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Alva Review-Courier Vol. 122 No. 22

Sunday, March 23, 2014 - $1.00

www.alvareviewcourier.com

620 Choctaw, Alva, OK 73717

Council gives owner 30 days to clean property Airport building tabled

I'D GIVE UP CHOCOLATE (AND READING) BUT I'M NO QUITTER — The annual Chocolate Fantasy will be this Thursday, March 27. Tasting begins at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $1. A silent auction and live auction will also be held. Photo by Helen Barrett

Indulge your taste buds at Chocolate Fantasy By Helen Barrett What do books and chocolate have in common? The annual Chocolate Fantasy sponsored by the Alva Friends of the Library. Several years ago, the library friends were looking for a fun, unique way to raise funds for the Alva Public Library. The library needed many new items: books, computers and special readers, to name just a few. Through their combined brainstorming, the annual Chocolate

Fantasy emerged. Over the years, the funds helped purchase e-book programs, books, films, equipment, furniture and other special programs. This year’s Chocolate Fantasy will be held March 27 in the basement of the Alva Public Library. Tickets to the event are $1 and will be available at the door. Special live music will be performed by Margaret Goss during the tasting party. The tasting party occurs from

6:30 to 7:30 p.m. During the evening, door prizes will be given. Grab bags will be available for $5. Throughout the entire evening, items will be offered in a silent auction. The live auction begins at 7 p.m. Every year, the live auction not only provides great entertainment but also raises the most money for the library. Karen Koehn and Rhonda Cook co-chair this year’s event.

City finances, projects have good reports School resource officer resigns

By Marione Martin Although the amount of sales tax collections continues to decline from previous highs, the City of Alva is showing an increase in revenue for the current fiscal year. City Business Manager Joe Don Dunham told the Alva City Council the city had collected eight percent more by the end of February than in the same time period a year ago. From July 2013 through February 2014, Alva collected $9,067,000. He attributed the increase to intergovernmental revenues (grants), charges for services, licenses and penalties, investment income and transfers in. Revenue categories showing

decreases are taxes (sales, use and other) along with fines and forfeitures. Dunham said the city is monitoring the category of sales and use tax very closely. There is expectation that annexing the business area to the east of Alva will increase city sales and use tax collections, particularly when the new Atwoods store opens. While Alva has collected more revenue than this time last year, expenses compared to last year are lower by one percent. Through February, Alva spent or encumbered $8,301,000 for goods and services. Expense categories that have increased since last year include personnel services, other services and charges, capital outlay, and debt service and transfers. Materials and supplies is the only

category showing a decrease, but Dunham reminded the council these overages are skewed due to the reorganization of expenses with the new budget system. “Overall through February 2014, the City of Alva is estimating collections over expenditures in the amount of $76,000,” reported Dunham. Sewer Line Project Cattle caused a glitch in the construction of a sewer line east of Alva that will provide service to the new Atwoods store. When city staff met with Myers Engineering and Mies Construction on March 10, they learned cattle owned by Lee Mackey had torn down construction stakes on Mackey’s property. Mies

By Marione Martin A piece of property was declared a nuisance by the Alva City Council Monday, March 17. Under normal procedures, the council would not be involved. However, the nuisance ordinance does not specifically address the piles of soil and construction debris on the site. The only recourse was for the council to declare the property a public nuisance. Council members and city staff had received several complaints about the property along Apache Drive and 14th Street, but discussions with owner Billy Joe Melton, Jr., did not lead to a resolution. Business Manager Joe Don Dunham said he notified Melton that the matter would be on the council agenda for March 17. Since that notification, Melton had “cleaned it up substantially,” according to Dunham. He showed the council photographs taken the day of the meeting. “Is it cleaned up to your satisfaction?” asked Councilmember Bryce Benson. “I think there’s still a little bit of work that needs to be done,” he replied. He said some mounds of dirt needed to be smoothed off and there was still some construction

debris. Councilmember Bo Hannaford said a few large rocks or concrete remained on the site, but Benson said one of those was a rock that had been there a long time. After some discussion about the length of time to give the landowner for cleanup, Hannaford made a motion to declare the property a nuisance and give the owner 30 days to finish cleaning it up. Steve Valencia seconded, and the motion passed unanimously. Airport Building At their March 10 meeting, the Alva Regional Airport Commission voted to recommend accepting the bid of Erikson Steel to build an equipment story structure at the airport. The 48 foot by 40 foot by 12 foot structure is to provide shelter for fuel trucks and courtesy cars. Council members were given a bid tabulation form that showed Ladwig Insulation and Construction bid $17,800 for an open structure and $22,800 for one enclosed on three sides. 66 Construction bid $28,430 and $29,980 respectively. Erikson Steel bid $22,500 on the enclosed structure and did not bid on the open one. Ladwig showed a start date of

See Council Page 2

Keeping up appearances Trash talk at city council

By Marione Martin When citizens take the floor at the Alva City Council meeting, unexpected topics arise. That was the case during the March 17 meeting when Irvin Ritter raised

Complaining of trash from WalMart blowing onto his property along U.S.Highway 64, Irvin Ritter said, "It's a disgrace." Monday he asked the Alva City Council to help alleviate the problem now that the store is in the city See School Page 3 limits. Photo by Marione Martin

the issue of blowing trash. Blowing Trash from Wal-Mart The discussion actually began earlier during a city annexation hearing. Ritter, who lives south of U.S. Highway 64 on the east side of town, asked the council for help in cleaning up trash blowing from Wal-Mart, which is located just across the highway. He stayed for the council meeting, which followed at 6:30, and continued his plea for help. “It’s a disgrace,” he said of the trash blowing up against his fence and into his pasture where it ends up against his barn and outbuildings. “Just take a look at that fence line and that pasture and the house and sheds,” he said. Ritter suggested that a company looking at locating in Alva might be discouraged at the way the east approach to town looks. He said he has talked to people at Wal-Mart about the problem. “They come out there once in a while and pick that up on the highway right of way,” he said. “They say they’re not allowed to come on our private property. I told them I’d give them a written consent.”

See Trash Page 15


March 23, 2014

Alva Review-Courier

Page 2

OSU reports Share Medical Education and event Center’s economic impact center underway As part of Share Medical Center’s engagement with Oklahoma State University to complete the Community Health Needs Assessment, the two entities working together to provide data on a number of indicators of the healthcare sector’s impact on the local and regional economy, such as jobs and wages. Lara Brooks, extension associate for OSU, shared their findings with a group of nearly 30 Alva area citizens at Northwest Technology Center March 12. Brooks noted that this information is important in evaluating the community’s healthcare needs and, for SMC, when developing its plans for the future. The health sector is comprised of the following components: • Hospital • Physicians, dentists and other medical professionals • Nursing and protective care • Home health • Pharmacies • Other medical and diagnostic labs Healthcare Sector Impact On Local Economy Estimated At Nearly $20 Million The payroll from healthcare sector employment has a direct impact on the local and regional economy. As of 2014, the healthcare sector in the Alva medical service area employs 383 fulltime and part-time employees and has an estimated payroll of $17,152,102. • Share Medical Center provides 171 full and part-time jobs with an estimated annual payroll of $6,734,913 (including benefits). • Physicians, dentists and other medical professionals employ 51 total full and part-time employees with an estimated payroll of $3,830,466. • Home health agencies, nursing homes and other medical and health services employ 140 total full-time and part-time employees with an estimated annual payroll of $5,648,551. • Pharmacies have 21 employees with a total annual payroll of $938,172.

In addition to these direct impacts, the sector also has secondary impacts on the area economy; these indicate the extent to which healthcare employees reinvest their healthcare earnings in the local economy. For every healthcare employee, an additional 0.23 people are employed by local businesses to meet their needs – a calculation called an “employment multiplier.” The OSU research used county-specific employment multipliers based on the county’s historical spending patterns. Applying the employment multiplier to SMC’s 171 full- and part-time employees yields a total employment impact of 211 employees. The employment impact of the area’s entire healthcare sector is estimated to be 475 employees. Researchers also applied income multipliers; for the hospital component of the local healthcare sector, that multiplier was determined to be 1.16 – for each dollar in hospital salaries and benefits, $0.16 is created throughout the area due to business (indirect) and household (induced) spending. Since the hospital’s payroll is $6,734,913, the income impact for the area is $7,803,972. The total income impact of the healthcare sector on the local economy is projected to be $19,960,968. Overall population trends as well as employment and income trends for the entire service area are also included in the SMC impact report. The data demonstrates why it may be important to invest in advances in healthcare. Population trends influence the demand for services currently offered and potentially justify new services previously deemed to not be viable. To complement the data as SMC and OSU work together with the community to make future plans, area citizens are encouraged to take a brief online survey that will further help to identify the demand for health services in the area. The survey can be found from now through April 4 at https://okstatecasnr. qualtrics.com/

Alva Cherokee Strip Museum expanding

By Helen Barrett The fences have been removed. Antique farm equipment no long sits scattered amid the tall grass. Crews brought equipment to the site, leveling and packing the ground for the upcoming expansion of the Alva Cherokee Strip Museum. A new 130 foot by 65 foot steel education and events center building with pavilion coverings on three sides will soon stand on the newly cleared ground. The farm equipment will be cleaned and displayed under the pavilion coverings. A special place enclosed with windows will house the antique fire truck. The enclosed building, constructed by Erikson Steel of Alva, will have a complete serving area with sinks, a 16-foot rolling buffet/storage counter and cabinets. The floor will be stained concrete. Glass entry doors and transom lights and windows will increase the natural light in the interior. The building will be equipped with two handicap accessible bathrooms, a loft storage area, and high quality projection and sound equipment, as well as central heat and air. “We want to have local artists paint four foot by nine foot pictures of local emphasis to place on the walls,” Building Committee member Freddy Brown said.

“We’re going to have nice tables and chairs that will be available when the building is rented for events,” Museum Director Beth Smith said. The museum board anticipates the building be used for educational seminars, traveling exhibits, and facilities for local residents and visitors for meetings, receptions and large parties. All construction, electrical and plumbing services will be provided by local contractors, Brown said. “We will not be in competition with The Runnymede,” Brown said. “If people want to have a nice place to meet, we’ll be able to provide that.” Smith wanted to emphasize the fact that the Fireplace Room

will still be available for smaller venues. Several clubs and organizations use that room every month. Donations Needed for Matching Grant The museum board applied for a Share Trust grant and were notified the trust approved a $150,000 matching grant. The museum will be required to raise the matching funds from other donations. “We are a 501C organization, so all donations will be tax deductible,” Business Manager Edith Wiebener said. The projected cost for the building and needed equipment is $400,000. “If we would happen to raise

See Museum Page 3

EXPANDING — Alva's Cherokee Strip Musem will soon have a new education and event center on this property north of the annex and barn. Photo by Helen Barrett

Many of the state’s lowest-performing students are not improving By Clifton Adcock Oklahoma Watch Four in 10 of Oklahoma’s lowestperforming students showed little or no improvement in language arts and math last year, raising questions about whether the state and schools are focusing enough attention on students who struggle the most. In public schools where at least three-fourths of students were from low-income families, about half of test takers made no significant improvement over the previous year, according to an Oklahoma Watch analysis of state test results in spring 2013. The results point to one of the biggest challenges facing educators, parents and

policymakers in efforts to raise Oklahoma’s relatively low achievement in common education: boosting learning for tens of thousands of students who are in the bottom academic tier. That group is counted by the state as the bottom 25 percent of scorers in the math and reading parts of the Oklahoma Core Curriculum Test in grades three through eight and in Algebra I and English II end-of-instruction exams in high school. “I think it’s an economic issue,” Richard Caram, assistant state superintendent for school turnaround, said of the bottom 25 percent. Those students, whether in urban or rural schools, face many of the same barriers. “If we help students who struggle, their possibility of success later in life is greater. They’ve learned how

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to learn. Many more doors are open for them and the barriers are broken.” Like many other states, Oklahoma has put greater emphasis on using tests to measure not only students’ level of performance, but also their degree of improvement, or “growth.” The belief is that tracking growth will spotlight the ability of schools and teachers to raise achievement regardless of their students’ levels of income or performance. Oklahoma and other states also track growth specifically for the bottom 25 percent at each school, with Oklahoma basing a fourth of its controversial school letter grades on that measure. Schools with fewer than 10 students in the bottom tier are graded only on all students’ growth. Oklahoma Watch went beyond the letter grades to analyze Oklahoma State Department of Education data showing the percentage of students in each school’s bottom tier who made

See Students Page 9

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March 23, 2014

Alva Review-Courier

Obituaries DENNIS LEE NEWMAN CARMEN – Funeral service for Dennis Lee Newman, 56, will be Tuesday, March 25, 2014, at 2 p.m. at the Dacoma gym with Rev. John Bizzell officiating. Burial will be in Union Center Cemetery near Dacoma. Arrangements are by Lanman Funeral Home, Inc. of Cherokee. Viewing will be Monday 10 a.m.7 p.m. Memories may be shared at www.lanmanmemorials.com. Dennis was born in Blackwell on Oct. 4, 1957, the son of Harold Newsman and Evelyn Briggs Newman. He passed away March 20, 2014. Dennis leaves behind his stepfather and mother, Don and Evelyn Newman, a daughter, a granddaughter, two brothers, a sister, a step-brother and countless close friends. He is preceded in death by his father and his sister. Memorials may be made to Carmen Fire Department or Oklahoma Medical Research, Cancer Division, through the funeral home. SHELLY (PITCHER) THOMAS Shelly Gwen Pitcher was born on Feb. 17, 1960, in Carnegie to Clyde E. “Barney” and Roberta (Bowser) Pitcher. She passed away on Saturday, March 15, 2014, at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. Shelly grew up in Carnegie

and graduated from Carnegie High School in 1978. She attended college at Southwestern in Weatherford and Northwestern in Alva. She then moved to Cordell and married Tim Merrill. Together they had two children: Madison and Ryan. In 2002, Shelly moved to Elk City to open her own business, named Home on the Range. She sold her store in 2006 and began working for Cudd Energy Services in Elk City. Shelly loved decorating her home, gardening, playing golf and tennis, watching OU football and basketball, and taking care of her dogs, PJ and Boomer. She was deeply loved by her family and friends and will be dearly missed. Shelly was preceded in death by her parents, Clyde E. “Barney” and Roberta (Bowser) Pitcher, and brother-in-law, Ralph Horton. Survivors include her daughter, Madison Holland and husband Austin of Tucson, Ariz.; son Ryan Merrill of Cordell; sisters Jan Doster and husband Danny of Carnegie; Marsha Dean and husband Bill of Katy, Texas; and Rhonda Cook and husband Mike of Alva; many nieces and nephews and friends. Funeral services were held Thursday, March 20, 2014, at 2 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church in Carnegie. Burial followed in the Carnegie Cemetery under the direction of Ray and Martha’s Funeral Home.

Town hall meeting to address underage drinking By Helen Barrett A public town hall meeting will be held Wednesday, April 2, at 6:30 p.m. in the Alva Middle School cafeteria. The meeting will be sponsored by the Northwest Center for Behavioral Health and the Woods County Coalition. “The meeting’s priority will be addressing underage drinking and some preventative measures,” coordinator Tandy Keenan said. “We will have local students from SWAT (Students Working Against Tobacco) and representative from the Woods County Sheriff’s Office,” Keenan said. With the approach of the prom and graduation seasons, the opportunity for underage drinking seems to increase, Keenan said. “We will educate people about

the social host law that says people can be held responsible for providing a place for underage people to drink,” she said. “That person doesn’t have to be an adult. If a minor provides a place for them to drink, they can also be held responsible. Parents of the minor can also be held responsible if they are aware of the drinking.” Keenan hopes as many people as possible will attend. “The more feedback we receive, the better job we can do,” she said. “We’re trying to help the adverse health effects of underage drinking and the tragedies connected with it.” For more information contact Keenan at 580-571-3241 by phone, or by e-mail at Tandi.keenan@ obmhsas.org.

Woods County Forecast Sunday Partly sunny, with a high near 47. North northeast wind 6 to 11 mph becoming east in the afternoon. Sunday Night Partly cloudy, with a low around 31. Southeast wind 6 to 8 mph. Monday Mostly sunny, with a high near 61. South wind 7 to 12 mph becoming north 18 to 23 mph in the afternoon. Winds could gust as high as 32 mph. Monday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 28. North wind 12 to 17 mph becoming light north northeast. Winds could gust as high as 24 mph. Tuesday Mostly sunny, with a high near 54. Tuesday Night Partly cloudy, with a low around 37. Wednesday Mostly sunny, with a high near 69. Windy. Wednesday Night Mostly cloudy, with a low around 49. Thursday Partly sunny, with a high near 75. Thursday Night Partly cloudy, with a low around 37. Friday Mostly sunny, with a high near 60. Friday Night Partly cloudy, with a low around 35. Saturday Mostly sunny, with a high near 67.

Page 3

From Front Page

Council

four to six weeks after approval and 66 Construction said the start date would be 10 to 14 days. Erikson Steel did not list a start date. Councilmember Wes Miller asked about the lack of a start date for Erikson. Dunham said he thought they were going to start immediately but he wasn’t sure. He did not have bid documents at the meeting, only the tabulation sheet. Councilmember Chad Fisher asked, “Is there a completion date?” He said that was more important than the start date. Dunham was unable to recall any specifics on a start date for Erikson but was sure no completion date was mentioned. Councilmember Gary Lehl, who is a member of the airport board, made a motion to table the bids until they could obtain more information. The motion passed unanimously. Labor Negotiation Dunham said it is time to start negotiating the fiscal year (FY) 2014-2015 contract between the IAFF Local 3782 Fire Union and the city. In the recent past, the city has used a labor negotiator. However, the personnel committee

had discussed the idea of appointing two city representatives instead. The committee did not make a recommendation, leaving the decision to the full council. Dunham said in FY 2012-2013 the city paid a negotiator $8,497, and in FY 2013-2014 the cost was $8,736. He said the negotiations went to arbitration last year so there were additional expenses for an arbitrator and a labor lawyer. After some suggestions from council members, Bryce Benson and Wes Miller agreed to represent the city during negotiations with Dunham acting as staff support. A motion by Hannaford, seconded by Fisher and approved by a council vote, made it official. Other Business The council approved paying claims totaling $346,533.91. Finance Chairman Miller said the amount included $134,000 for a wheel loader and $35,000 in a workers comp payment. Scott Brown was the only council member absent. Alva Utility Authority After the council adjourned, the same people met as the Alva Utility Authority. They approved paying claims totaling $223,473.01,

From Page 2

including $69,000 for a backhoe and $8,000 for a roll-off dumpster. Dunham introduced the proposed purchase of a used truck for the sanitation department. He said, “One truck is going downhill fast.” For the budget year, the city identified the need to purchase another roll-off truck. They located a 1996 Western Star Truck from Southwest Truck Parts, Inc. It has a 3406 Cat 15 speed frame stretched and doubled to give it the ability to handle the city’s rolloff containers. It comes with all controls and hydraulics hooked up and installed. The truck has no warranty. Dunham said they hope the truck will last 8 to 10 years. The fully delivered price is $29,750, and the city had budgeted $30,000 for the purchase. The old truck will be declared surplus. Board members voted unanimously to purchase the truck. Alva Economic Development Authority The final meeting of the evening was very short. After approving minutes of the last meeting, the Alva Economic Development Authority voted to pay claims totaling $33,010.29.

Museum

more than is needed, the extra will go into a perpetual care fund for the building,” Wiebener said. Second Year Plan The museum board approved a five-year plan. To facilitate that plan, they are in the process of purchasing lots to the north of the current location. “We are purchasing one lot, and the owner is donating three more,” Brown said. The main project of the plan’s second year is moving the Cedar Grove Church to museum property. The church will either be placed on property near the school house or on the new property to the north, Wiebener said. “The congregation donated the church to the museum,” Brown said. “People from Cedar Grove will pay moving and set up costs.” Other Future Needs Plans they hope to complete during the third year are replacing the non-functioning elevator; improving handicap accessibility to facility exploration of exhibits, and aiding in the safe transport of artifacts during display changes. The estimated cost of that project

is $50,000. “The state closed the elevator because of its condition,” Smith said. “We need a new elevator installed in the old shaft.” Anyone visiting the museum can see many cracks in the cement steps leading to the front door. Part of the fourth year of the plan is to replace the stoop, retaining the original railing. The estimated cost of that project is another $40,000.

Donations Needed Donations of all sizes are welcomed. The board feels confident the community will rally around the project and help in its completion. Donations may be made to the Alva Cherokee Strip Museum, 904 14th Street, Alva, OK 73717. For more information, call 580-327-2030. Keep watching the area as you drive by. The landscape is changing … for the better.

This is the artist’s rendering of the new Alva Cherokee Strip Museum Education and Event Center.

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March 23, 2014

Alva Review-Courier

Page 4

In jam over Obamacare, Dems don’t know which way to turn

have adopted a new mantra that it needs to be “fixed.” But at least voters don’t want to scrap it altogether. The problem is, the truth may be a little more complicated than that. A new Wall Street Journal-NBC News poll asked voters whether various policy positions would make them more or less likely to vote for a candidate for Congress this November. For example, would respondents be more or less likely to vote for a candidate who “supports repealing the health care reform law?” Would they be more or less likely to vote for a candidate who “supports fixing and keeping the health care reform law?” The Journal found that 47 percent of those surveyed would be more likely to support a candidate who favors repeal, while 32 percent would be less likely, and 19 percent said it Alva Review-Courier made no difference either way. On the other question, 45 (USPS 016-180) percent said they would be more 620 Choctaw St. likely to support a candidate Alva, OK 73717-1626 who supports keeping and (580) 327-2200 fixing Obamacare, while 42 Fax: (580) 327-2454 percent said they would be less likely, and 11 percent said it Office Hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. made no difference either way. Monday - Friday What to make of the Website: numbers? On the most basic www.alvareviewcourier.com level, they show a few more people would be drawn HERE TO HELP YOU to a candidate who favors Publisher.............Lynn L. Martin repeal than a “keep and fix” Editor..................Marione Martin candidate. They also show a (marione@alvareviewcourier.net) few more would be turned off Ad Sales...........Angela Courson by a “keep and fix” candidate (angela@alvareviewcourier.net) Colette Baier than would be turned off by a (colette@alvareviewcourier.net) repeal candidate. On a larger level, the Reporters.............Yvonne Miller numbers suggest more intensity Sports...................Leslie Nation on the repeal side. If there is an (leslie@alvareviewcourier.net) invigorated, passionate “hands off my Obamacare” faction, Subscriptions it’s not very big. & Action Ads..........Linda Toone That could be one reason (manager@alvareviewcourier.net) why Democrats seem so vexed Ad Design.............Paula Oakes over how to handle Obamacare in midterm campaigning. Many Page Design........Patty Hankey have adopted the “keep and fix” Legal Notices.......Patty Hankey approach used unsuccessfully (legals@alvareviewcourier.net) by Democrat Alex Sink in the recent special election to fill The Alva Review-Courier is the House seat in Florida’s combined with the Woods 13th Congressional District. County News, The Alva Advocate and Newsgram, and is The problem is, they’re strong published every Sunday and on the “keep” part but confused Friday by Martin Broadcasting on the “fix” part. Corp., 620 Choctaw St., Alva, When asked how she would OK 73717-1626. Periodical fix Obamacare, Sink offered postage paid at Alva, Oklahoma. small suggestions that would Annual subscription rates in Woods County, Oklahoma $72. not have addressed the higher Elsewhere in Oklahoma $90, premiums, higher deductibles, elsewhere in the United States and narrower choices the law $108. POSTMASTER: Send has imposed on millions of a d d r e s s c h a n g e s t o A l v a Americans. Other Democrats Review-Courier, 620 Choctaw who have also pledged to fix St., Alva, OK 73717-1626. Obamacare have offered even Contents Copyright 2013 Member of the Associated Press, fewer ways to actually do it.

By Byron York When it comes to Obamacare, many Democrats take comfort in polls showing a small majority of voters, or at least a plurality, oppose repealing the Affordable Care Act. To them, that proves the Republicans’ do-away-with-it position is out of sync with voters as this November’s midterm elections approach. The argument shows how far Democrats have retreated from the heady days when they rammed Obamacare through Congress over unanimous GOP opposition. Democrats can’t argue that most people actually like the new law, and indeed many Democratic candidates

Oklahoma Press Association, National Newspaper Association

Junkman’s Gems

Such was the world of Max’s trades By Jim Scribner Last weekend we went to Jenks to a wedding at the aquarium. Cleo’s nephew Kyle and newest family member, Sara, got married in front of the shark tank. They had written the spoken words themselves, with some from the Bible. All in all it was a nice ceremony. I was a little disappointed that they didn’t put on scuba gear and do the vows in the tank. Did I mention they had free food? The aquarium is a great place to go on a family outing. I’d say it is a little bit pricey, but it is probably in line with other forms of entertainment. Sunday we met the Gruenwalds for dinner at the Hard Rock Casino before heading home. The casino was pretty cool. They had lots of music memorabilia scattered around. I got a ham steak for dinner that rivaled the one I got at the Virgin River cafe in Nevada. It hung off the plate all the way around.

We had to travel to Braman to pick up Jaylyn on the way home, and Iva sent the leftover pizza home with us. Between leftover ham and pizza I ate pretty good for a couple of days. On the way home, I received a call that Max Faulkner had passed away earlier in the day. He has had some health problems, but I was praying he would beat them. Max was one of the few men who has died without an enemy in the world. Even if you did have a problem with him, his gentle ways would soon win you over as a friend. A man told Max once if Max, Warren Little and I went on a trip, unless we went north it would take us a week to get out of the state because we three never missed a chance to visit with someone. I told Max I was honored to be included with two great bull shooters like them and he just gave me the Max grin. I don’t know when Max and I met, but my first memory with him was from working in the county together for Bud Strawn in the 60s. We were working south of town. The dirt See Gems Page 5

Karen’s Kolumn

Physical activity important for older adults with diabetes

By Karen Armbruster Do you have diabetes or maybe one of your family members does? Here in Woods County, as in the rest of Oklahoma, many individuals are coping with being diabetic. Anyone living with diabetes or at risk for it knows watching the waistline and staying active play a big role in proactively dealing with the disease. But finding just the right balance between weight loss and exercise is especially crucial to the rising number of older adults managing the condition. When it comes to older adults with diabetes, weight loss and weight control is a factor, but they also must focus on getting plenty of physical activity. The link between obesity and diabetes is solid, but it’s a fine line for older adults with the disease. Losing too much weight could lead to a loss of muscle, which could affect their ability to complete even daily See Obamacare Page 5 activities.

Adults age 60 and older should concentrate on losing just five percent to seven percent of body fat – or roughly the equivalent of 10 pounds to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person – and clocking 30 minutes of physical activity five days a week. Following those two key recommendations is enough to cut the risk of developing diabetes by as much as 58 percent, according to findings from National Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DPPOS). A healthy diet combined with physical activity is the foundation of long-term weightloss success, and is more likely to result in loss of body fat while maintaining muscle. Generally, watching portion sizes and cutting back on foods high in solid fats and added sugars helps encourage weight loss. Also, try adding more fruits, vegetables and whole grains to your diet. Physical activity plays an important role in both weight loss and protecting and building that all-important lean muscle. See Karen Page 7


March 23, 2014

Alva Review-Courier

Annie’s Mailbox®

Page 5

Click and Clack Talk Cars

Will executor cheats siblings Car won’t start in damp weather By Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar Dear Annie: Four years ago, my wife, “Joann,” was the executor of her mother’s will. Per instructions, she divided the estate equally with her three siblings. However, a few months later, the estate received an award of $200,000 for a lawsuit her mother had filed 30 years ago. Joann and one of her siblings split the award and did not tell the other two. Since that time, Joann and I have separated. (She was unfaithful.) What she and her sibling did was dishonest and cheated the other two, both of whom struggle financially. I am still in contact with Joann’s siblings and am fond of them. But my conscience is bothering me. If I reveal this secret, the entire family will be rocked and Joann may be charged with fraud. While we are not on good terms, I don’t want to send her to prison. What do I do? – Anonymous Husband Dear Anonymous: Joann is not likely to go to prison, but she could be sued by her siblings and held liable for this money, and such secrets have a way of coming out eventually. You would not be the one rocking the family. That responsibility falls squarely on Joann’s shoulders (and the sibling who shared in the windfall) for defrauding her siblings. Tell Joann that you are planning to inform the other siblings of this money and you are giving her the opportunity

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interact closely and regularly. It doesn’t mean these relatives aren’t loved and appreciated. You could sweetly say, “We shouldn’t take our families for granted. They won’t always be here.” But unless you are prepared to debate the issue and disclose details about your own situation, it is unlikely you will change how they respond. Dear Annie: I read the letter from “Disappointed Dad,” who was hurt that his son called him “cheap.” My son is 16 and recently called me a “cheapskate.” I laughed and wore it as a badge of pride. Being a cheapskate has allowed us to live in a nice home, own a vacation property and pay for our children’s private education. I hope I’ve set a good example of being a cheapskate, just like my dad did. God bless his cheapskate soul. He was able to pass on to me a nice amount of money so that I could continue being a cheapskate. – Temperance, Mich. Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annie’s Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.

Gems

mover Max was driving slid down the ditch and turned over on its side. I ran down to see how Max was and he just crawled out of the overturned machine as calm as could be. That was the Max I have known for a lifetime – always calm. Many years ago my father in law, Ivan Haney, and I went out to Max’s house to try to sell him an old Ford Maverick car for one of his kids to drive. He looked it over, asked me a few questions about it, then tried to strike a deal. We bartered around on price and got pretty close together. We visited a bit and neither wanted to budge, so Max told me he would throw in an old mower on the trade. After looking the mower over and a bit more bartering, a deal was struck. As we drove away, Mr. Haney

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to make it right before she is hauled into court. Let her know she can put whatever spin on it she wishes in order to make herself look better. We hope she has sense enough to fix this before it’s too late. Dear Annie: I am a 40-something professional. Due to illness, accidents and natural causes, I unfortunately have lost all of my family members. Sometimes, it is difficult to cope, but with the help of a wonderful fiance and a few close friends, I have found a way not to dwell on it. My problem is, I find it difficult to listen to co-workers who do nothing but talk poorly about their relatives and constantly fight with family members over insignificant and unsubstantial things. They bicker about who hosted the last get-together or who said what on Facebook. I wish I could make them see how lucky they are to have family and to make every moment count. I want to scream that I would do anything to have one more phone call with any family member, and I’d gladly host every single celebration just to have them attend. Is there a polite way to explain to my stubborn co-workers that you can’t count on forever? – Just One More Day Dear Just: Our deepest condolences on what must be a heartbreaking situation. It’s natural for your co-workers to complain about those with whom they must

mentioned we had been there a couple of hours on a 15-minute car sale, and he thought the mower might not be such a good part of the trade. I told him without the mower both of us would have thought the other had gotten the best hand, and this way it looked like a draw. Such was the world of Max’s trades. Max and I have solved the majority of the world’s problems sitting in his pickup. I would come up with a hairball/crazy idea on how to fix the government or life in general, then Max would tweak it until it was sane and workable. The problem was we didn’t know anyone up the food chain that understood common sense to tell our solutions to. Max and Barbara would drive by the salvage slowly and when I asked what they were doing, he would

tell me they were inventorying. Every once in a while Max would find something he thought he could save and take it home. Sometimes I would see it back on the pile and knew if he couldn’t fix it no one could. Max could have been a great used car salesman. He had an uncanny ability to buy cars that had a gazillion miles on them and get another gazillion miles out of them. He bought an 1981 Malibu with low miles one time and had trouble with it, so he hunted up a car with more miles and got along great. To all of Max’s family and friends – and myself – we were blessed to have this gentle giant in our lives and now God is listening to Max’s stories. Every time a pickup drives by the salvage slow, I will wish my friend Max is coming to see me once more.

Obamacare

And they’re not getting any help from the administration. When Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius appeared before the House Ways and Means Committee recently, she was asked by Republican Rep. Tom Reed for “any suggestions ... in areas that you want to fix the Affordable Care Act.” “Has there been any legislation from the administration sent up to Congress in regards to those fixes?” Reed asked. “I have not sent legislation to Congress, no sir,” Sebelius answered. Sebelius noted that the administration has made unilateral changes in implementation. Republicans are well aware of that. But in terms of proposing

legislation to fix or improve the president’s landmark achievement, Democrats have offered next to nothing. What changes could they advocate? Most likely they can’t suggest anything really big, like repealing the individual mandate; most Democrats would see that as gutting the law, and any candidate who advocated it could risk party support. But perhaps Democrats could, as the blogger Mickey Kaus suggested, propose cutting back on mandated benefits like mental health treatment and pediatric dentistry, in the hope of bringing down premiums. “Would (that) require Democrats to in effect admit error -- that they ‘went too far’ in building out Obamacare?”

Kaus wrote. “Well, duh! Voters tend to like admissions of error, especially if they seem likely to lead to better policies in the future.” It’s an open question whether voters would really welcome Democratic confessions of error in creating Obamacare. Most Democratic candidates probably don’t want to learn the answer. But they have to do something. It’s conventional wisdom that Republicans who advocate getting rid of Obamacare have to offer an alternative. Now, it’s just as true that Democrats who advocate fixing Obamacare have to offer a fix. Soon. (Byron York is chief political correspondent for The Washington Examiner.)

By Tom and Ray Magliozzi Dear Tom and Ray: In January, the water pump went out on my 2001 Dakota (V-6 engine). Everything under the hood got soaked with coolant. I had the water pump and all the hoses replaced, as well as the drive belt. Now when there is very foggy or damp weather and the truck has been sitting for a day or more, it won’t start. After a few hours, when the temperature rises a bit and the air moisture is reduced, it will start and run fine. On one occasion, I hit a small puddle in the road, and the engine quit. After about 10 minutes, it started again. Is there a sensor that will cut the engine off if it gets damp? Does the “catalyst system efficiency” have anything to do with this problem? What do I need to replace to fix the problem? -- Bob RAY: You need to move to where there’s a drought, Bob. Have you considered Death Valley? TOM: I don’t think your problem has anything to do with your water pump failure or the eruption of Old Faithful under the hood that came with it. I think it is a faulty sensor problem. RAY: My guess would be the crank angle sensor. On your truck, that’s located on or around the transmission belt housing, which makes it vulnerable to moisture and splashing water. TOM: As the name implies, the crank angle sensor measures the position and speed of the crankshaft, and sends that information to the car’s computer so that all the elements of combustion in each piston can be timed to happen at the right moment. RAY: Knowing where the crankshaft is in its revolution allows the fuel to be injected and the spark to be delivered at just the right millisecond. It allows the valves to open and close precisely when they should. And without that information (when the crank angle sensor does not send a signal) the

car definitely won’t start. Or run. TOM: You also ask about the catalyst system efficiency, Bob. That tells me that your checkengine light came on, you looked up the trouble code, found out it meant “catalyst system efficiency” and you had no idea what that meant, but the truck was still running so you ignored it. That about right? RAY: It means your catalytic converter is failing, Bob. That won’t produce the symptoms you describe, but when the converter eventually plugs up completely, it will prevent the car from running at all. TOM: And it’ll certainly prevent you from passing your state emissions inspection soon, if it hasn’t already. RAY: So you probably need a crank angle sensor and a catalytic converter, Bob. I’d do the sensor first. That way, you know you’ll be able to start the truck on the day you have an appointment to get the converter replaced. *** Bumps and potholes do more than merely annoy drivers. Find out what, and how you can ease the pain, by ordering Tom and Ray’s pamphlet “Ten Ways You May Be Ruining Your Car Without Even Knowing It!” Send $4.75 (check or money order) to Ruin, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. *** Get more Click and Clack in their new book, “Ask Click and Clack: Answers from Car Talk.” Got a question about cars? Write to Click and Clack in care of this newspaper, or email them by visiting the Car Talk website at www.cartalk.com.

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Responsible individual that can handle day to day operation of the club house, Handle employees, finances, small kitchen, members and guest of the golf course. Some computer skills needed. Send Resume to AGCC Attn: Elizabeth, PO Box 68, Alva, OK 73717


March 23, 2014

Alva Review-Courier

Page 6

Bear, Lehl Senior citizen report announce engagement

Ashley Bear and Travis Lehl,

Terri Fowler of Pawnee has announced the engagement of her daughter, Ashley Bear, to Travis Lehl, son of Mr. and Mrs. Gary Lehl of Alva. Ashley graduated from Pawnee High School in 2010 and is currently attending Northwestern Oklahoma State Univerisity, pursuing a bachelor’s degree in accounting. Travis is a 2010 graduate of Alva High School and 2011 graduate of Northwest Technology Center. He is currently employed by Lehl and Son Water Well Drilling. The wedding will take place at 5 p.m. on Saturday, June 21, at Alva’s First United Methodist Church. An open invitation is extended to family and friends. After honeymooning in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, the couple will reside in Alva.

Northwest Oklahoma Genealogy Society learns about heirloom preservation The Northwest Oklahoma Genealogy Society met on the cold Saturday of March 8 with 21 people present. The speaker, Bill Wedge, did not come because of the weather, but librarian Sandra Ott Hamilton showed an interesting video on preserving family heirlooms. A related exhibit is on display in the basement of the library for public viewing. The clever introduction of the video led into dealing with preventng the deterioration of heirlooms, their display and storage,

specific preservation techniques for such items as jewelry, books, quilts, paintings, photos, slides and tribal artifacts. Individuals were encouraged to start writing down what they have in the way of heirlooms and what the heirlooms mean to their children and grandchildren. Objects represent family history. You may delay but time will not. The next program, “Cemetery Symbols,” by Luann Waters, will be April 12 at the Alva library. The program will start at 2 p.m. Guests are welcome. ,

Red Hat Scarlet ladies

By Betty Riggins The Alva Red Hat Scarlet ladies went across the tracks to enjoy a great meal for their monthly outing. We invited Teresa Rameriz to entertain for us. She did a couple of Spanish songs. Our attendance has dropped, as we only had 13 show up and we usually have around 20, so ladies if you wish to go on an outing with us just give Frieda Graves a call at 580-327-2346 and get your name on our list.

Next month on April 17 we will meet at Champs Restaurant around 11:15 a.m., so come join us with a purple shirt and red hat or flowers and you will have a great time. Those attending this outing were Twila Lancaster, Donna Clark, Betty Cushenbery, Marcile Lancaster, Arlene Boham, Frieda Graves, Teresa Ramirez, Betty Riggins, Jewel LeDou, Sherry Harzman, Lois Brown, Leigh Kelly and Charlene Graham.

March 24 to March 28 Breakfast Menu for Alva Public Schools Monday – Pancake on a stick, maple syrup, peaches, milk Tuesday – Whole Grain Captain Crunch, buttered toast, mandarin oranges, grape juice, milk Wednesday – Breakfast pizza, biscuit, rosy applesauce, grape juice, milk Thursday – Whole Grain Apple Jacks, cinnamon toast, fruit cocktail, orange muice, skim milk Friday – Breakfast burrito, salsa, pears, milk Lunch Menu for Alva Public Schools Monday – Chicken pot pie, seasoned beans, fresh pears, butterscotch pudding, milk Tuesday – Rib sub, happy coins, pickle spear, strawberries, chocolate chip cookies, milk

Wednesday – Chicken and noodles, mashed potatoes, spinach, raisins, garlic bread, milk Thursday – Indian tacos, salsa, bread sticks, banana, milk Friday – Pizza with cheese topping, corn, bread sticks, mandarin oranges, milk Menu for Woods County Senior Citizens Monday – Hamburger, sliced onion, lettuce, french fries, brownie Tuesday – Biscuits and gravy, eggs, bacon, hashbrowns, fruit Wednesday – Ham and beans, tomato spoon relish, cornbread, white cake with icing Thursday – Beef stroganoff, carrots, peaches Friday – Krispy fish, oven fried potatoes, broccoli, bread, chocolate pudding

By Betty Riggins On Friday, March 14, we had a good attendance, as most like the fish. It was good to have Barbara Rockenbach work the desk so I could be gone. We were open Saturday, as we used this as a snow day that we had to make up. We had breakfast for lunch, so we had a great attendance. Bettie Lou Lane was back with us. Ronnie Walker dropped in to eat; he said he would be back as he enjoyed the company and good food. The boys from the correctional center like coming to the center to work. They do a great job cleaning and cooking and we really appreciate their help. On Monday we lost another of our long-time Alva citizens, center member Max Faulkner. He will be greatly missed by family and friends as will many others who

passed on this last week. Dorothy Logsdon (accidently printed as Dorothy Lansdown last week) has been ill and unable to come to the center for some time now. Tuesday was a beautiful spring morning. We had a great meal. We had a big attendance and even ran out of some of our food. Art Britcher brought his daughter Pam Silver from Enid to visit and eat with us. Cleta Ann McMurphy brought her friend Joyce Hickman. We hope we can keep these ladies coming. So glad to see Roma Scott coming to the center. The little wind storm sure messed up the electricity when it went off and all the clocks in the building were messed up.. On Wednesday we had a good attendance with a great spaghetti dinner and salad bar. Ronnie Walker was back again. Alan and Pam Smith have been in Woodward

all week to a meeting and then they are going to Colorado to play grandma and grandpa with their little gradndaughter – such a fun job. On Thursday, we had a great, cool morning. We had a good attendance with roast beef and all the trimmings for lunch. The Red Hat Scarlet ladies were away from the center, as it was their monthly outing day. Next week on Monday, March 24, we will be making noodles, so helpers we need you. On Tuesday, March 25, we will have bingo. On Wednesday, March 26, we will have Gary Booze here to entertain for us. Friday, March 28, is our fun night, which begins at 6:30 p.m. at the center with a covered dish supper, games, visiting and fun. Come join us for this event.

Tulip Garden Club learns about Monet’s famous garden in France

The Tulip Garden Club met for brunch at the home of Linda McCoy on Thursday, March 13. Attending the meeting were April Ridgway, Donna Rhodes, Helen Janzen, Genevieve Farris, Mary Ann Crow and one guest, Becky Smith. April Ridgway, president, opened the meeting with members reciting the conservation pledge. Roll was called with the question of whether members plant flowers for

the four seasons. Linda McCoy read the minutes of the last meeting, and Helen Janzen gave the treasurer’s report. She reminded members of the April 1 deadline for 2014 dues. The library book “Gardening in Miniature” is now available at the Alva Public Library. Members were encouraged to reserve it. April Ridgway gave a report on the Alva Garden Council meeting. The northwest district spring meeting will be held on Saturday,

April 5, at “Pub on the Bricks,” 122 E. 5th St, Guymon. The cost is $12 per person. The RSVP deadline is March 28. The Petunia Club’s annual plant sale is scheduled for May 10. Members discussed the upcoming national convention in Norman. April Ridgway and Linda McCoy will attend from the Tulip Club. Club members suggested

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Twentieth Century Club learns about the history of porches at March meeting

The Twentieth Century Club met for its monthly meeting on Thursday, March 6, in the parlor at the Methodist Church. Fifteen members were led in the flag salute and the Clubwoman’s Collect by Celia Roots. Joyce Dixon gave the treasurers report. Roll call and the minutes were read by Marian Roberts. Donations were made to Act I and the Cherokee Strip Museum. New officers for next year were selected. Paula Bloyd will be president, Helen Theising will be vice president, Marian Roberts

will be secretary, Joyce Dixon will be treasurer and Thamazin Harrison will be the corresponding secretary. They will be installed at the May meeting. There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. Billie Buckles presented an interesting program on porches. Porches were originally used in rural settings. They were a transition from the uncontrolled to the cherished home. Many remember sitting in rockers and porch swings and watching the fireflies, sitting in a cool breeze on a warm night,

listening and telling stories, visiting with neighbors, and recalling memories of yesteryear. Porches were also used to transact business. Today the porch is considered a lost room. Billie Buckles showed different porches and books about porches. Rose Elmore was the hostess and Evelyn Kramp was co-hostess. Delicious dessert was served centered around the St. Patrick’s Day theme. The April 3 meeting will be at Barbara Bouziden’s home. Carol Anderson will be the co-hostess.

Petunia Garden Club discusses garden table décor for National Garden Club Convention in Norman

Carol Anderson hosted 17 members of the Petunia Garden Club in her home for its March 12 meeting. Brunch refreshments from a table decorated in a St. Patrick’s Day theme welcomed members Connie Allen, Joanne Price, Wanda Cox Emma Lou Lightfoot, Eleanor Ring, JoAnn Cole, Carol Grover, Shirley Cummings, Donna Schwerdtfeger, Leah Kelly, Betty McMurphy, Janet Wanger, Susie Koontz, Barbara Faulkner, Barbara Case and Mrs. Anderson. President Wanda Cox presided over the meeting with Connie Allen reading the Gardener’s Creed. Secretary Barbara Case called roll to the question, “Do you compost?” Some ideas about composting were using a large black plastic garbage or leaf bag in the area

one would use the composting. These bags become very heavy as composting continues with the addition of vegetable and fruit scraps (excluding meat and bones), grass clippings, leaves, coffee grounds and fresh kitty litter (for nitrogen). Then simply roll the bag over periodically to mix. The heat generated from the black bag helps in decomposing its contents. After a time, slit the bag and roll it over onto the intended area. Another idea was to use a barrel with a door, turning it periodically and then emptying the compost as needed. Betty McMurphy gave the treasurer’s report. Cox presented a brochure for the Northwest District Garden Club meeting in Guymon on April 5. She noted that those attending will be voting on newly proposed bylaws and

that reservations would be due to Wanda by March 27. Betty McMurphy read a thank you from the Cherokee Strip Museum for the group’s participation in the annual Festival of Trees. Several members expressed thanks for wellness cards, calls, visits or food when they or family members were ill. Also, the group received a request for thoughts and prayers for Maddy Beiswanger, who has surgery scheduled for March 17. She is the granddaughter of Janet Wanger and the daughter of Ryan and Misty Beiswanger. Cox, Cole, Anderson and McMurphy attended the garden club city council meeting and reported on discussions held about

See Petunia Page 7


March 23, 2014

Alva Review-Courier

Page 7

Award-winning Oklahoma author to speak Online posting leads at The Homestead, Alva library March 25-26 to drug arrest The Alva Public Library is pleased to announce a visit by award-winning Oklahoma author Anna Myers. Myers writes historical and contemporary fiction for young adult readers. Her writing shows the human side of history by using fictional characters to tell a story of everyday people caught up in monumental events. Her novels include “Tulsa Burning,” “RedDirt Jessie, Spy!” and the popular “Confessions From the Principal’s Chair,” and are enjoyed by students

and adults. Seventeen of her books have been award winners or finalists. Members of the Alva Public Library Staff have attended her presentations, as she is a nationally recognized author who gives presentations at library conferences; her sessions are always well attended. Myers’ books are available for check out at the Alva Public Library. Myers will present a program for the public the evening of March 25. The presentation will be at 6:30 p.m. at The Homestead Retirement

From Front Page

School

was approaching that property and was worried that the cattle could cause a problem. The city contacted Mackey who agreed to remove the cattle by the morning of March 14, so the issue was resolved. While the contract with Mies Construction allows 130 days to finish the sewer line, they have made a lot of progress. Only 17 days into the project they had installed 1,800 linear feet of pipe and eight manholes. They had used about 40 cubic yards of rock or gravel. As of March 10, Dunham estimated the project was about 50 percent done. Transfer Station Paperwork for moving the transfer station to just north of Alva has been at the offices of the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). Dunham said the administrative completeness review is finished. Now DEQ will start on the technical review. He expects the project to be ready for bidding very soon. Skyline Sewer Several meetings ago, Scott Cook spoke to the city council about getting a sewer line installed for his home and some neighbors on Skyline Drive. Dunham said he talked with engineers recently, and they are trying to figure out ways that project can be accomplished. The goal is to put in the line and tie it in with another line while eliminating a lift station that has been giving the city problems. “We are moving forward with that project,”

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Karen

Part of the increase in older adults with the diabetes can be credited to people living longer. Simply, the longer we live, the greater our chances of developing diabetes. Some of the more commonly known complications of diabetes are heart disease, stroke, hypertension, blindness and amputations. However, according to the 2011 National Diabetes Fact Sheet, people with diabetes age 60 and older are up to three times more likely to report being unable to walk one quarter mile, climb stairs or do housework compared to people the same age without the disease. The fact sheet also indicated that of the 25.8 million people with diabetes in the United States, 10.9 million, or 26.9 percent, are 65 or older. In Oklahoma, about one in five older adults age 65 and over has been diagnosed with diabetes, according to a 2010 Oklahoma State Department of Health diabetes fact sheet.

said Dunham. SRO Officer Resigns Dunham said School Resource Officer (SRO) Kris Jones has resigned to take another job, so the city is looking for someone to fill that position. The city is also looking for seasonal swimming pool and Alva Recreation Complex employees, as well as sanitation, street and water-sewer workers. The city will participate in the Northwestern Oklahoma State University job fair as part of the recruitment effort. Swimming Pool Repairs Councilmember Steve Valencia asked for an update on work being done at the Alva Municipal Swimming Pool. “Over the past couple of years, we have had issues with keeping water in the pool because of leaks,” said Dunham. He said through some other work, they learned that the leaks were actually in the filter pipes. One had broken, so the city is currently replacing the water lines around the pool and making sure all the couplings are secure. Mayor Arden Chaffee said, “So a lot of the decking had to be removed around the pool.” He asked if this would delay the opening of the pool for the summer, and Dunham said so far they plan to open as

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Center, and readers of all ages are encouraged to attend. The following day Myers will discuss her books and writing methods, and give Alva Middle School’s seventhand eighth-grade students hints for their own writing. She also does at least one book talk dressed as a character from one of her books. The three sessions for the students will be held at the Alva Public Library. This visit is made possible with funds the library received from the Bank It program.

usual.

Gun Range Councilmember Wes Miller said the Gun Range Committee met recently and plans are moving forward. He said the gun range is open and the city dumpster placed there seems to be working out. Currently the committee is working on getting a concrete pad and an awning. They are raising money for that work. A surveillance system has been donated, and the committee is trying to get power to the range to use that system. Saving on Fire Truck At the March 3 meeting, the council approved the purchase of a fire truck but asked the Finance Committee to look at which payment option would cost least. The contract included an option to pay the entire amount in advance and save about $4,000. It was undetermined how the early payment might affect the amount and number of payments on the lease-purchase agreement. Finance Chairman Miller said they decided that paying up front was the best deal. It would save the city $4391.05 so that’s the deal they made. The savings include the $4,000 discount and a little more on interest and payments.

Tulip

alternatives, such as touring the OU gardens or the Enid master gardener tour as a group later this year. The club decided to assemble the dish gardens at the April meeting. The Garden Council deadline for dish gardens is April 26. Members will bring suitable plant materials, potting soil and miscellaneous supplies. An assortment of garden accessories have been collected for use in making the gardens. Linda McCoy gave a brief bio of the impressonist artist Claude Monet, including his passion for

gardening, prior to showing a slideshow of his beautiful gardens in Giverny, France. She visited the gardens last May when the spring flowers were at their peak. Monet’s gardens provide an unbroken succession of flowers from April right through November. She also shared additional photos and a copy of the book “Giverny, The Garden of Claude Monet.” Helen Janzen won the gardener gift – a decorative floral frame and easel. The next meeting will be held at Allyson Yoder’s home at 1330 Flynn on April 10.

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By Marione Martin Various online sites have made it easy to post and share pictures taken with your cellphone. Instagram allows users to take pictures, apply filters and post quickly. Some photos posted to Instagram led to problems for a young man living in a dorm on the Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU) campus in Alva. According to documents on file, on March 11 about 9:30 a.m. NWOSU Campus Police Officer LeRoy Burks was contacted by Director of Housing Shane Hansen. When Burks arrived at his office, Hansen showed him pictures from Instagram of red plastic cups with what appeared to be growing marijuana plants; a hand holding what appeared to be a burning marijuana joint; a hand holding nine $100 bills, one $50 bill and three $20 bills with a caption reading #payday#banking#bread#dough. One of the photos showed a man, later identified as James Keith Phillips, smoking what looked like a marijuana joint. Phillips was

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found to be a resident of Coronado Hall on the NWOSU campus. The counter top shown in some of the photos matched the counter tops in Coronado dorm rooms. Burks contacted Alva Assistant Police Chief Ben Orcutt and Officer Patrick Hawley, who met him at Coronado Hall. The officers went to Phillips’ room and knocked on the door. When Phillips came to the door, they gave him a copy of the search warrant and started searching the room. Phillips told Orcutt that all the marijuana he had left was in a cloth bag under his bed. A quart jar containing what field tested as marijuana was found. Several sandwich baggies, new and used, were seized along with two packages of rolling papers. Phillips was arrested and booked into the Woods County Jail. On March 12, James Keith Phillips, 19, of Alva was charged with felony possession of a controlled dangerous substance within 1,000 feet of a school. He was also charged with a misdemeanor of possession of paraphernalia.

Petunia

the Northwest District Meeting and the dish garden table decorations for the National Garden Club Convention to be held in Norman this May. The convention’s theme is “Black Gold and Red Dirt.” Each club will prepare 10 dish gardens for the event. Members were asked to assist with the materials, plants, ideas and transportation, as well as assembling the live creations. Cherokee Strip Museum is in need of volunteers during the week to answer phones and to meet and greet museum visitors. A project discussed last fall for removing large rocks at the Share Convalescent Home entry so that beds can be prepared was noted as well as a reminder to members that dues are in order and would be collected at the April meeting. The Petunia Garden Club’s annual plant sale is set for May 10 and arrangements will be

made to meet with the county commissioners for permission to use the east parking lot. The program was given by Shirley Cummings, whose February presentation was delayed due to the weather. She played a CD with various bird sounds – namely Northern Cardinals, Northern Mockingbirds, House Wrens and Cedar Waxwings – giving a description of each and displaying photos of the birds. The Gardener’s Gifts were won by Connie Allen and Barbara Faulkner. A thank you was expressed to Carol Anderson, who had prepared a club tradition of presenting Valentine favors in February for the food trays of patients hospitalized at Share Medical Center. The meeting was adjourned to meet in the home of Donna Schwerdtfeger on April 9.

PART-TIME WORK The National Association of State Departments of Agriculture (A Fair Opportunity Employer) needs survey interviewers in Woods County. Applicants must have a valid driver’s license and access to a pick-up truck or automobile. Starting pay is $10.59 per hour including training time plus 56¢ per mile for travel. A farm background is desirable, but not essential. If you are interested, please contact: NASDA Supervisor at 580-689-2390 or fax resume to 580-689-2215


March 23, 2014

Alva Review-Courier

Page 8

Dominant pitching leads to softball doubleheader sweep NWOSU Sports Information Two solid pitching performances from the Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU) softball team led to a doubleheader sweep of Henderson State University (HSU) in day one of the series, 5-0 and 4-1.

Shelby Anderson earned her 11th win of the season in a masterful one-hit shutout in game one of the series with the Reddies, while teammate Kellie Mason also threw great for the Rangers in a three-run victory. Three Rangers dominated from

the plate on the afternoon with Anderson, Shyanne Nichols and Megan Sanders all hitting .500 in the two games combined. Game One Due to heavy north wind, neither team was able to produce any runs in the first three and a half innings, but the home team found a way to plate three runs in the bottom of the fourth. Singles by Nichols and Tiffany Santistevan and a double by Sanders broke the game open, giving Anderson a three-run cushion. Two more runs came across in the fifth on two hits and an error by Henderson State. Anderson continued to dominate the Reddies at the plate, giving up no hits in five innings, but a single squeezed down the third base line to end the hitless game for the visitors. Three runners were left on base for HSU, and a three-up three-down seventh inning closed the game out for Northwestern. Four Rangers collected hits in the first contest with Nichols, Santistevan and Sanders all going two for three while Anderson went one for three in the game. Anderson only needed 74 pitches to shut out the Reddies and col- Shelby Anderson winds up for the pitch against Henderson State in game one on Friday. Anderson allowed only one hit. Photo by Leslie lected a strikeout in the process. Nation

Score By Inning brought the first run across and Team R H E doubles by Shyanne Nichols and Tyler Casada brought home the HSU 000 000 0 - 0 1 2 other two. NWOSU 000 320 x - 5 8 0 Mason managed to pin the Reddies down for six scoreless innings, Game Two but HSU was able to put a run on Northwestern drew first blood the board in the final inning on a in game two off a homerun to groundout. straightaway center by Lindsay The run in the seventh snapped Thorstenson, giving the Rangers a a string of 25 straight scoreless in1-0 lead after the first. nings for the Rangers, with the last The Rangers struck again in coming in the bottom of the second the bottom of the third where they inning of game on against NorthThird baseman Shyanne Nichols fields a grounder and throws a Hen- plated the rest of their four runs in wood earlier in the week. the game. A single by Anderson Mason’s ninth win of the season derson State runner out at first. Photo by Leslie Nation

came with six strikeouts and only one earned run. Northwestern pitchers have allowed one run or less in six consecutive games, which is a school record. The previous record was four straight. The Rangers have also won seven straight games. The two rivals took to the field in two more games to complete the series at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Score By Inning Team R H E HSU 000 000 1 - 1 5 1 NWOSU 103 000 x - 4 6 1

Freemyer blasts GAC-leading eighth home run but Rangers come up short at HSU

NWOSU Sports Information ARKADELPHIA, Ark. – The Rangers found themselves running low on runs Friday. Despite strong pitching performances from starters Zach Postoak and Joe Coto, Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU) dropped both games of a doubleheader at Henderson State University (HSU) by scores of 3-1 and 2-1. Those razor thin margins amount to business as usual for Northwestern (15-12, 5-9 Great American Conference). Through the first three weeks of March, the Rangers have had 10 games decided by two runs or less. They’re 5-5 in those contests. Postoak matched HSU starter

Colton Lorance goose egg for goose egg through six innings in game one. Coto’s double in the top of the seventh gave the Rangers a 1-0 lead, but Andrew Reynold’s three-run double in the bottom half of the inning turned the tide for the Reddies. Tadarious Hakwins’ RBI triple sparked a two-run fifth inning for HSU (11-19, 6-11 GAC) in game two. Jonathan Freemyer homered in the top of the sixth for Northwestern to cut the margin to 2-1, but Dylan Howell retired five of the last six batters in the game to finish out a complete game victory. The Rangers will look to salvage the series finale and stop a four-game slide in conference play

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when the teams meet again on Saturday for a single nine-inning contest. First pitch is scheduled for noon at HSU’s Clyde Berry Field. Game One Postoak (2-3) took a tough luck loss in the opener, where he worked seven innings and struck out six. He allowed three runs – all in the seventh – on eight hits. The Ranger defense helped keep HSU in check with help from three double plays. Lorance (3-2) pitched seven innings for the Reddies, surrendering just three hits and a walk. He recorded his final out with HSU trailing 1-0 but became the pitcher of record when his teammates rallied in the bottom of the seventh for three runs. Luke Tebbetts pitched the eighth and ninth innings for his first save of the year. Northwestern had four base runners in the first three innings, but all of them came with two outs. Lorance retired the side in order in

the fourth, fifth and sixth frames. He had turned aside 10 straight Rangers heading into the seventh before hitting his first real bump in the road. Calvin Ellis was hit by a pitch to start off the seventh for Northwestern. Danny O’Connell put down a sacrifice bunt to move Ellis up to second base and wound up reaching safety himself, thanks to an HSU error. Joshua Caruos flew out to center, but he hit the ball deep enough for Ellis to tag and move to third with still just one out. Coto followed with a double to center, bringing home Ellis with the game’s first run. The Rangers still had two runners in scoring position but were unable to bring either of them in. Colten Dickerman flew out to shallow right, and Alex Marquez struck out looking to end the innings. Postoak danced in and out of trouble for most of the afternoon, but the Reddies struggled to take

advantage of their opportunities. Hawkins doubled to lead off the bottom of the first but was thrown out trying to stretch his hit into a triple. Postoak used double-play groundouts to escape the third and fourth innings, then picked off a runner in the fifth. Oddly, it was in an inning where Postoak appeared to be cruising along that HSU finally got to him. The junior retired the first two batters he faced in the bottom of the seventh with Northwestern clinging to a 1-0 lead. A ground ball single up the middle, a walk and an infield hit loaded the bases for the Reddies, and Reynolds just as quickly cleared them with a threerun double. Postoak got the next batter, but the damage was done. Northwestern put the tying run aboard in each of its last two at bats. O’Connell singled to open the ninth, but a double play ended the game. Score By Inning Team

R H E

NWOSU 000 000 100 - 1

5

1

HSU

9

3

000 000 30x - 3

Game Two Both teams had opportunities in game two but clutch hits were tough to come by one either side. Northwestern ran itself out of a potential threat in the second in-

See Rangers Page 9


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Students

what the state defines as sufficient improvement on tests from 2012 to 2013. “Growth” is defined as moving up by at least one performance level, remaining at one of the highest two levels, or outpacing the state average in improvement of scores. The state uses four levels: unsatisfactory, limited knowledge, proficient and advanced. The results were compared to a list of the percentage of students on free and reduced-price lunch at each school, as reported by the state Office of Educational Quality and Accountability. The data shows that large percentages of “bottom-25” students at a majority of schools failed to improve, meaning the students risked starting the next school year far behind. Even at schools where less than a fourth of students are low-income, more than a quarter of test takers in the bottom tier made no significant improvement. In general, the higher the percentage of students on free and reduced-price lunch at a school, the greater the chance that school’s lowest-performing students showed no improvement. That reflects statements by education experts that poverty not only goes along with low education levels, but also with low improvement. Student absentee and dropout rates, lack of preparedness for school among young children, less parental involvement, and student health and wellness problems are more severe among the poor, said Tracee Frazier, instructional leadership director for Tulsa Public Schools. Overcoming those barriers in schools can be a herculean task, she said. “It makes the task (of educating) harder,” Frazier said. “It’s harder for the teachers, it’s harder for the school leaders. You’re playing catch-up.” Among the more than 115,000

From Page 8

Rangers ning. With one out, Ellis singled and Caruso walked. O’Connell followed with a single to right but was thrown out on the base path. Coto went the distance for the Rangers, pitching six innings, while allowing just two runs on three hits. He struck out four and walked none. Both of the Reddie runs came in the fifth. HSU kicked it all off with a leadoff single. With two outs and a runner at second. Hawkins ripped a triple to center. Moments later, he scored on a Coto wild pitch to make it a 2-0 game. That second score would loom large the rest of the way. With one out in the top of the sixth, Freemyer drove a pitch over the wall in left for his Great American Conference leading the eighth home run of the season. The senior has hit five homers in his last six contests. Freemyer’s solo homerun was the first only blemish on Howell’s record. The HSU pitcher surrendered five walks and three hits over 7.0 innings. Score By Inning Team R H E NWOSU 000 001 0 - 1 5 1 HSU 000 020 x - 2 3 0

reading and math tests taken by the bottom 25 percent of students in Oklahoma, almost three-fourths were in schools where most of the student population is from lowincome families. Still, Frazier and other education officials say the barriers aren’t insurmountable and should not be an excuse for failure. In a December opinion piece in the Oklahoman, State Superintendent Janet Barresi wrote, “It would be folly to deny the effects of poverty, but that should not, and cannot, allow for its acceptance … We do no favors to children in low-income families when we hold them and their schools to a lesser standard of education.” But a debate rages on over whether the state is doing its part to help the lowest achievers, beyond grading schools. Teachers and school leaders say more funding is critical. Some legislators and advocacy groups say competition, more than money, will make a difference. Caram, the assistant state superintendent, said the reading mandate, which requires third graders to read at grade level or risk being held back a year, will help the lowest tier of students improve faster in all subjects. Critics say retention will harm students’ learning and social adjustment. Meanwhile, many schools find themselves doing remedial teaching, playing parent and social worker, and being tempted to focus on helping children on the “bubble” – just below passing a state test – in order to boost the school’s letter grade, some experts say. According to a 2013 study by University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University researchers who were critical of the letter-grade system, scoring growth using proficiency bands “encourages gaming practices that target students near the ‘bubble’ at the expense of lower or higher performing students.” Caram said he doesn’t think gaming practices are widespread. Playing Catch-Up For Mollie Miller, principal at Kerr Elementary School in Tulsa, the progress rate for her bottom 25 percent last year was sobering. According to state data, eight out of 10 students in the lowest tier failed to make gains in math and six out of 10 did not improve in reading. “Obviously, what we’ve been doing in the last couple of years

1

has not really worked,” Miller said. Kerr Elementary covers kindergarten through sixth grade; all students are eligible for free or reduced-price lunch. That extent of poverty brings complications that make learning growth very difficult, Miller said. One is mobility. Students counted in a school’s growth rating exclude those who arrived after the school year has started. But Miller said many children have changed schools or districts in previous years before arriving at Kerr, and that has added to their being behind academically. “If we have a child in first grade that comes to us and they’ve already been to six different schools from kindergarten to first grade, all that transitioning back and forth, they’re not able to have any kind of consistency,” Miller said. More than half of Kerr’s students are Hispanic, with many in English language learning classes. Miller said that program could use more funding. Teachers at Kerr are mostly trying to help students catch up. For a principal and teachers, achieving growth is a daunting task, but Miller said dramatic changes are possible. It requires knowing which teachers are effective in which roles, using limited resources wisely and efficiently, knowing what interventions to apply to what children, and trying to get students and their parents invested in education. “It is possible to do it,” Miller said, “if all the pieces fall into place and you have all the supports for that.” Miller and education leaders said the state and schools have taken steps to expand early childhood education, make subjects more relevant, create guidance and advocacy programs, push better reading, and give additional instruction to the lowest performers. The state also offers professional development to “teach teachers how to teach” in ways that students can comprehend the information, said Caram, assistant state superintendent. The School as Parent On a cold day last year, a young boy showed up in Shelly Deas’ office. The boy had refused to take a test in class, said Deas, principal

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at Lee Elementary in Oklahoma City, where nearly all students are low-income. “I said, ‘Why can’t you take your test?’ He said, ‘My toes are cold,’” Deas said. “I looked down and all ten of his toes were coming out of the front of his shoes.” Deas left the school and bought him a pair of shoes. As schools look for ways to address the learning problems of children in poverty, teachers and administrators also find themselves filling non-education roles more often: social worker, parent, provider. “We’re having to do society’s stuff. Our original purpose is to teach a child to read and write and do arithmetic,” said Caram. “In many instances, we assist in raising children,” he added. “That’s not a bad thing. But for many children in poverty, this is where they get their breakfast, and this is where they get their lunch, and in many schools they have backpacks that the schools will give students on Friday, and it has food in it.” At Lee Elementary School, improving learning is hard enough. Despite academic gains in lower grade levels, the school saw less than a third of its lowest 25 percent of test takers make improvement in 2013. Deas has been principal at Lee for three years, and during that time the school has expanded its pre-kindergarten classes from a half-day to four full days, created a partnerships with community businesses and other groups, hosted free dental clinics and provided eyeglasses to children. The school does not offer a full range of wraparound services, which are individualized programs for students and parents to help meet basic needs, and Deas said that model would likely bring about a drastic turnaround. “The job of teacher and Schools by Percent Free/Reduced Lunch 75 percent and up 50-74 percent 25-49 percent 0-24 percent All

principal has changed,” Deas said. “The reason we’re having to do these things is because, if we don’t, our kids aren’t going to make it.” Schools with many indigent children also end up playing the role of parent concerned about education. Generally, a parent’s education level determines their income, Caram said, and in households with low income and education levels, children often don’t get exposed to reading, a building block to all learning. “If that parent doesn’t have that history (of educational achievement), they’re not going to be able to share that,” Caram said. “They may have what they believe they need, but it’s way different if you’ve done it, if you’ve experienced it.” Deas said most parents of Lee students are supportive. For example, more than 90 percent of students’ parents attended the last parent’s-night event, she said. But many parents don’t know how to help their child academically. “I think our families do support us here and they want their kids to do well, but they don’t know really how to help them,” Deas said. Often, parents in poverty may be hostile to the school because of their bad experiences, said Frazier, the leadership director for Tulsa Public Schools. “I believe our education system in general in America has often failed a lot of our households in poverty,” Frazier said. “The schools have left a bad taste in their (parents) mouths, so there’s this distrust.” Oklahoma Watch is nonprofit, nonpartisan journalism organization that produces indepth and investigative content on important public-policy issues in the state. For more Oklahoma Watch content, go to www. oklahomawatch.org.

% Reading % Math % Combined Improvement Improvement Improvement 49.1% 50.7% 50.1% 57.1% 56.9% 57.4% 66.3% 63.3% 65.1% 76.0% 71.7% 73.9% 58.2% 57.4% 58.1%


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TIGTA warns of ‘largest ever’ phone fraud scam targeting taxpayers WASHINGTON – The Treasury Inspector General for Taxpayer Administration (TIGTA) today issued a warning to taxpayers to beware of phone calls from individuals claiming to represent the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) in an effort to defraud them. “This is the largest scam of its kind that we have ever seen,” said J. Russell George, the Treasury’s inspector general for tax administration. George noted that TIGTA has received reports of over 20,000 contacts and has become aware of thousands of victims who have collectively paid over $1 million as a result of the scam, in which individuals make unsolicited calls to taxpayers fraudulently claiming to be IRS officials. “The increasing number of people receiving these unsolicited

calls from individuals who fraudulently claim to represent the IRS is alarming,” George said.  “At all times, and particularly during the tax filing season, we want to make sure that innocent taxpayers are alert to this scam so they are not harmed by these criminals.” He added, “Do not become a victim.” Inspector General George urged taxpayers to heed warnings about the sophisticated phone scam, noting that the scam has hit taxpayers in nearly every state in the country. Callers claiming to be from the IRS tell intended victims they owe taxes and must pay using a pre-paid debit card or wire transfer. The scammers threaten those who refuse to pay with arrest, deportation or loss of a business or driver’s license. The truth is the IRS usually first contacts people by mail – not by

phone – about unpaid taxes. And the IRS won’t ask for payment using a pre-paid debit card or wire transfer. The IRS also won’t ask for a credit card number over the phone. “If someone unexpectedly calls claiming to be from the IRS and uses threatening language if you don’t pay immediately, that is a sign that it really isn’t the IRS calling,” George said. The callers who commit this fraud often: • Use common names and fake IRS badge numbers. • Know the last four digits of the victim’s Social Security Number. • Make caller ID information appear as if the IRS is calling.

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Sunday, March 23, 2014.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANTS: CHESAPEAKE OPERATING, INC. AND CHESAPEAKE EXPLORATION, L.L.C. RELIEF SOUGHT: WELL LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 26 NORTH, RANGE 12 WEST OF THE IM, ALFALFA COUNTY, OKLAHOMA Cause CD No. 201402028 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Alfalfa County, Oklahoma, more particularly the parties set out on the Exhibit “A” attached to the application on file in this cause, and, if any of the named individuals be deceased, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such deceased individual; if any of the named entities is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity; if any of the named parties designated as a trustee is not presently acting in such capacity as trustee, then the unknown successor or successors to such trustee; if any of the named parties designated as an attorney-in-fact is not presently acting in such capacity as attorney-in-fact, then the unknown successor or successors to such attorneyin-fact; and if any of the named entities are corporations which do not continue to have legal existence, the unknown trustees or assigns of such parties. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicants, Chesapeake Operating, Inc. and Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C., have filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission to enter an order, as follows: (i) authorizing and permitting an exception to the permitted well location tolerances in the 640-acre drilling and spacing unit comprised of Section 7, Township 26 North, Range 12 West of the IM, Alfalfa County, Oklahoma, for the Des Moines Lime (Big Lime), Oswego Lime, Douglas, Lansing-Kansas City, Cherokee and Mississippian separate common sources of supply, so as to allow a well to be drilled as follows: Location of Wellbore at Completion Interval: The proposed location of the completion interval for the Mississippian common source of supply will be no closer than 165 feet from the north line and no closer than 560 feet from the east line and no closer than 165 feet from the south line and no closer than 560 feet from the east line of the unit comprising said Section 7, Township 26 North, Range 12 West of the IM, Alfalfa County, Oklahoma, and the location of the completion interval for the Des Moines Lime (Big Lime), Oswego Lime, Douglas, Lansing-Kansas City and Cherokee separate common sources of supply will be no closer than 330 feet from the north line and no closer than 560 feet from the east line and no closer than 330 feet from the south line and no closer than 560 feet from the east line of the unit

• Send bogus IRS emails to support their scam. • Call a second time claiming to be the police or department of motor vehicles, and the caller ID again supports their claim. If you get a call from someone claiming to be with the IRS asking for a payment, here’s what to do: • If you owe federal taxes or think you may owe taxes, hang up and call the IRS at 800-829-1040.  IRS workers can help you with your payment questions. • If you don’t owe taxes, call and report the incident to TIGTA at 800-366-4484. • You can also file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission at www.FTC.gov. Add “IRS Telephone Scam” to the

comments in your complaint. TIGTA and the IRS encourage taxpayers to be alert for phone and email scams that use the IRS name. The IRS will never request personal or financial information by email, text or any social media.  You should forward scam emails to phishing@irs.gov. Don’t open any attachments or click on any links in those emails. Taxpayers should be aware that there are other unrelated scams (such as a bogus notification of being a lottery sweepstakes winner) and solicitations (such as debt relief) that fraudulently claim to be from the IRS. Read more about tax scams on the genuine IRS website at www. irs.gov.

L.L.C. RELIEF SOUGHT: WELL LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 26 NORTH, RANGE 12 WEST OF THE IM, ALFALFA COUNTY, OKLAHOMA Cause CD No. 201402029 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Alfalfa County, Oklahoma, more particularly the parties set out on the Exhibit “A” attached to the application on file in this cause, and, if any of the named individuals be deceased, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such deceased individual; if any of the named entities is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity; if any of the named parties designated as a trustee is not presently acting in such capacity as trustee, then the unknown successor or successors to such trustee; if any of the named parties designated as an attorney-in-fact is not presently acting in such capacity as attorney-in-fact, then the unknown successor or successors to such attorneyin-fact; and if any of the named entities are corporations which do not continue to have legal existence, the unknown trustees or assigns of such parties. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicants, Chesapeake Operating, Inc. and Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C., have filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission to enter an order, as follows: (i) authorizing and permitting an exception to the permitted well location tolerances in the 640-acre drilling and spacing unit comprised of Section 7, Township 26 North, Range 12 West of the IM, Alfalfa County, Oklahoma, for the Des Moines Lime (Big Lime), Oswego Lime, Douglas, Lansing-Kansas City, Cherokee and Mississippian separate common sources of supply, so as to allow a well to be drilled as follows: Location of Wellbore at Completion Interval: The proposed location of the completion interval for the Mississippian common source of supply will be no closer than 165 feet from the north line and no closer than 1320 feet from the west line and no closer than 165 feet from the south line and no closer than 1320 feet from the west line of the unit comprising said Section 7, Township 26 North, Range 12 West of the IM, Alfalfa County, Oklahoma, and the location of the completion interval for the Des Moines Lime (Big Lime), Oswego Lime, Douglas, Lansing-Kansas City and Cherokee separate common sources of supply will be no closer than 330 feet from the north line and no closer than 1320 feet from the west line and no closer than 330 feet from the south line and no closer than 1320 feet from the west line of the unit comprising said Section 7, LEGAL NOTICE (Published by the Alva Review- Township 26 North, Range 12 West of the IM, Alfalfa County, Oklahoma, Courier on Sunday, March 23, 2014.) and to be completed in and produce BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF hydrocarbons from the above-named separate common sources of supply; (ii) OKLAHOMA providing for the re-opening of the cause APPLICANTS: CHESAPEAKE OPERATING, INC. AND CHESAPEAKE EXPLORATION, See Legal Page 11

comprising said Section 7, Township 26 North, Range 12 West of the IM, Alfalfa County, Oklahoma, and to be completed in and produce hydrocarbons from the above-named separate common sources of supply; (ii) providing for the re-opening of the cause at such time as the bottom hole location of the well proposed hereunder has been determined; and (iii) establishing a proper allowable with no downward adjustment made thereto. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that the order be entered in this matter be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and that the authorization and permission requested herein run in favor of one or both of the Applicants, including Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C. acting by and through its agent Chesapeake Operating, Inc., or some other party recommended by Applicants. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the legal descriptions for the land sections adjacent to said Section 7 are Sections 5, 6, 8, 17 and 18, Township 26 North, Range 12 West of the IM, Alfalfa County, Oklahoma and Sections 1, 12 and 13, Township 26 North, Range 13 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Merits Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 15th day of April 2014, and that this notice will be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicants and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. An interested party who wishes to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicants or Applicants’ attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide his or her name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Brett Gwartney, landman, (405) 935-2338, or Emily P. Smith, attorney, OBA No. 20805, (405) 9358203, Chesapeake Operating, Inc., P.O. Box 18496, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73154-0496. Please refer to Cause CD Number. DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 20th day of March 2014. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA BOB ANTHONY, Chairman PATRICE DOUGLAS, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary


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Woods County Real Woods County Estate Transactions Court Filings Beginning book 1172 page 781 Real Estate Transfers Doris Marcus to Tonja R. Lewis: Lot 14 in Block 4 of the T.M. Hess Addition to the City of Alva: Warranty Deed. Doris J. Marcus to Tonja R. Lewis: Lot 11 in Block 6 of the East Vale Addition to the City of Alva: Warranty Deed. Charlotte L. McAnally aka Charlotte Lawanda McNally & Thomas S. McAnally and Carolyn McDaniel Westcote aka Carolyn Rose Westcote & John VanHorn Westcote and Catherine K. McDaniel Johnson & Albert Wesley Johnson to Elvin R. Bates Jr., Trustee of the Elvin R. Bates Jr. Family Trust dated July 29, 2008: Lots 3 & 4 and the East Half of the Southwest Quarter and the Southeast Quarter of Section 7, Township 27 North, Range 16, WIM; RESERVING unto the Grantors, all of the oil, gas and other minerals and mineral rights lying in, under and that may be produced from the above described property, together with the right of ingress and egress for the purpose of exploring for and producing the same: Warranty Deed. Vernon R. & Mabel Selvey to

Margo Castillo: Lot 3 in Block 3 of the Keith and Kennedy Addition to the Town, now City of Waynoka: Joint Tenancy Quit Claim Deed. Vernon R. & Mabel Selvey to Margo Castillo: Lot 4 in Block 3 of the Keith and Kennedy Addition to the Town, now City of Waynoka: Joint Tenancy Quit Claim Deed. Jeffrey Lee Lancaster & Kelli M. Lancaster to Chesapeake Midstream Development LLC: the East Half of the Southeast Quarter of Section 1, Township 25 North, Range 15, WIM: RESERVING unto the Grantors, all of the oil, gas and other minerals and mineral rights lying in, under and that may be produced from the above described property, together with the right of ingress and egress for the purpose of exploring for and producing the same: Warranty Deed. William R. Stewart & Bonita Stewart to the State of Oklahoma acting by and through the Department of Transportation of the State of Oklahoma: a strip, piece or parcel of land lying in the West Half of the Southeast Quarter of Section 15, Township 27 North, Range 18, WIM: Warranty Deed. William R. Stewart aka Russel

Stewart & Bonita Stewart to the State of Oklahoma acting by and through the Department of Transportation of the State of Oklahoma: a strip, piece or parcel of land lying in the Northwest Quarter of Section 22, Township 27 North, Range 18, WIM: Warranty Deed. Mortgages Mark Alan Lehl & Carla Sue Lehl to BancCentral NA: (1) the South 50 feet of Lots 31 & 32 in Block 51 of the Original Town, now City of Alva; AND (2) the South 25 feet of the North 100 feet of Lots 31 & 32 and the South 75 feet of Lot 30 and the East 10 feet of the South 75 feet of Lot 29, all in Block 51 of the Original Town, now City of Alva: maximum obligation limit $60.800. Elvin R. Bates Jr. Family Trust dated July 29, 2008 to Farm Credit of Western Oklahoma: Lots 3 & 4 and the East Half of the Southwest Quarter and the Southeast Quarter of Section 7, Township 27 North, Range 16, WIM: $400,000. Tandy R. Keenan & Clayton H. Keenan to USAA Federal Savings Bank: a tract of land in the Northeast Quarter of Section 12, Township 25 North, Range 16, WIM: $108,907.

Woods County Court Dispositions Five Guilty Two Felonies Martin Leon Moore, 47, Alva: Defendant pleaded no contest on Feb. 13, 2014, in case CF-201300096 for Child abuse by injury. Sentence is a term of 25 years with all except the first 15 years suspended under the custody and control of Oklahoma Department of Corrections, pursuant to the rules and conditions of probation entered by the court. Defendant to receive credit for time served in Woods County Jail since Aug. 23, 2013. It is further ordered that the first two years of sentence to be supervised by the Oklahoma Department of Corrections. Defendant shall pay costs, fees, assessments, restitution, transport fees and court-appointed attorney fees. Jake Shelton Esley, 23, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Feb. 25, 2014, in case CF-2013-00112 for (1) Possession of controlled dangerous substance (CDS) (methamphetamine) Subsequent offense and (2) Possession of firearm after former felony conviction. For count 1, sentence is a term of 10 years with time suspended except the time necessary to successfully complete the Bill Johnson Correctional Center (BJCC) Drug Offender Work Camp or equiva-

From Page 10

lent program therein, under the custody and control of Oklahoma Department of Corrections, pursuant to rules and conditions of probation entered by the court. For count 2, sentence is a term of 10 years with time suspended except the time necessary to successfully complete the BJCC Drug Offender Work Camp or equivalent program therein, under the custody and control of Oklahoma Department of Corrections, pursuant to rules and conditions of probation entered by the court. These terms to run concurrent to each other. Defendant shall receive credit for time served in Woods County Jail from Sept. 20, 2013. It is further ordered that the first two years of suspended sentence to be supervised by the Oklahoma Department of Corrections. Defendant shall pay a fine of $500 per count, pay costs, fees, assessments, transport fees and court-appointed attorney fees. This offender is subject to the Methamphetamine Registry. Three Misdemeanors Jake Shelton Esley, 23, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Feb. 26, 2014, in case CM-2013-00323 for (1) Obstructing officer and (2) Unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia. For count 1, sentence is a term of 160 days under the custo-

dy and control of the Woods County Sheriff. For count 2, sentence is a term of 160 days under the custody and control of the Woods County Sheriff. These terms to be served concurrent to each other and concurrent to Woods County cases CF-2013-00112 and CM2014-00051. Defendant shall pay costs, fees, assessments and restitution. Jake Shelton Esley, 23, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Feb. 26, 2014, in case CM-2014-00051 for Assault and battery. Sentence is a term of 90 days under the custody and control of the Woods County Sheriff. These terms to be served concurrent to Woods County cases CF-2013-00112 and CM-201300323. Defendant shall pay costs, fees, assessments and restitution. Robert Eugene Nichols, 39, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Feb. 7, 2014, in case CM-201400010 for Assault and battery. Sentence is a term of 10 days under the custody and control of the Woods County Sheriff. Defendant to receive credit for time served in Woods County Jail. Defendant ordered to obey all jail rules and instructions of the sheriff while incarcerated. Defendant shall pay a fine of $150, pay costs, fees, assessments and restitution.

Legal

at such time as the bottom hole location of the well proposed hereunder has been determined; and (iii) establishing a proper allowable with no downward adjustment made thereto. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that the order be entered in this matter be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and that the authorization and permission requested herein run in favor of one or both of the Applicants, including Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C. acting by and through its agent Chesapeake Operating, Inc., or some other party recommended by Applicants. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the legal descriptions for the land sections adjacent to said Section 7 are Sections 5, 6, 8, 17 and 18, Township 26 North, Range 12 West of the IM, Alfalfa County, Oklahoma and Sections 1, 12 and 13,

Township 26 North, Range 13 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Merits Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 15th day of April 2014, and that this notice will be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicants and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. An interested party who wishes to participate by telephone shall contact the

Applicants or Applicants’ attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide his or her name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Brett Gwartney, landman, (405) 935-2338, or Emily P. Smith, attorney, OBA No. 20805, (405) 9358203, Chesapeake Operating, Inc., P.O. Box 18496, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73154-0496. Please refer to Cause CD Number. DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 20th day of March 2014. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA BOB ANTHONY, Chairman PATRICE DOUGLAS, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary

According to the affidavits and petitions on file, the following individuals have been charged. An individual is innocent of any charges listed below until proven guilty in a court of law. All information is a matter of public record and may be obtained by anyone during regular hours at the Woods County Courthouse. The Alva Review-Courier will not intentionally alter or delete any of this information. If it appears in the courthouse public records, it will appear in this newspaper. Felony Filings James Keith Phillips, 19, Alva: Possession of controlled dangerous substance (CDS) within 1,000 feet of a school ($459.20). Misdemeanor Filings James Keith Phillips, 19, Alva: Possession of paraphernalia ($382). Jose Antonio Lopez-De La Rosa, 49, Ponca City: Driving while license is revoked ($405.10). Lacy Diane Lee, 30, Waynoka: Seven counts of Obtaining cash and merchandise by bogus check ($1603). Ashley Sayad, 28, Lucedale, Miss.: Obtaining cash and merchandise by bogus check ($229). Ronald Clements, 56, Alva: Three counts of Obtaining cash and merchandise by bogus check ($687). Civil Filings Eagle Wind O & G LLC vs. Carl T. Moon and A. S. Leibert: Quiet title ($135.70). Lauren Mobley Harrell Et Al vs. Bruce E. Moyer Et Al: Quiet

title ($145.70). Springleaf Financial Ser Inc. vs. Elias N. Cantu Jr.: Money judgment for an amount $10,000 or less ($205.70). Woodward Health System LLC vs. Charles B. Tune: Money judgment for an amount $10,000 or less ($205.70). Small Claims Filings Larry Clinton vs. Betty Hagen: Forcible entry and detainer ($185.70). Protective Order Filings Betty L. Hagen vs. Larry L. Clinton: Protective order ($125.70). Sharon E. Maras vs. Nicholas K. Bias: Protective order ($175.70). April Digman vs. Chantry Lee Hair: Protective order ($125.70). Marriage Licenses Issued Jeremiah John Bennett, age 28, of Billings, Mont., and Alesha Irene Livesay, age 19, of Livingston, Mont. Benjamin Franklin Kreiman, age 25, of Cherokee, and Amanda Ruth Goodman, age 23, of Mooreland. Traffic Filings Manuel A. Marquez Porras, 37, Woodward: Operating motor vehicle on which all taxes due state have not been paid ($211.50). The following individuals were cited for speeding: William E. Secrest, 62, Seiling: 75 in 65 ($188.50). The following individuals were cited for failure to wear seatbelt ($20): Samuel John Curtis Reed, no age listed, Mooreland.

Woods County Sheriff’s Report March 12, 2014 2:15 a.m. Individual called to ask about a hold on subject. 10:30 p.m. Caller about speeders by her house in Freedom. March 13, 2014 10:02 p.m. Caller wanting to pass information to inmate. March 14, 2014 1:42 p.m. Call from individual wanting to know the number for animal control. 6:20 p.m. Call about bringing inmate medicine; when items could be delivered. March 15, 2014 1:35 p.m. Call from individual, says people are speeding on her street, was very hostile and hung up before I could get information. 3:00 p.m. Call from bondman asking information on inmate. March 16, 2014 10:50 a.m. Call asking about inmate’s bond.

5:50 p.m. Grant County called asking for the front cover of individual’s protective order. 10:58 p.m. Houston, Texas, called asking about an NCIC hit on individual. March 17, 2014 7:50 p.m. Person calling about status of individual. March 18, 2014 6:22 p.m. Caller asking for information on search and seizure. 6:27 p.m. Person wanting to know individual’s charges and bond amount. 6:38 p.m. Call about individual’s bond and charges. 9:38 p.m. Person called for information on individual.

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Woods County Communication Call Center March 12, 2014 3:20 p.m. 911 call, red Mustang high rate of speed on Highway 81 toward Medford, notified Grant County Sheriff’s Office. 4:28 p.m. Dead cats at house west of 800 block of Santa Fe. 8:21 p.m. Two cars drag racing on Ridgway Road headed north, yellow Challenger. March 13, 2014 12:02 p.m. Take subject to Share Medical Center (SMC) to have him medically cleared and she will go to SMC to evaluate him. 12:51 p.m. Controlled burn at 1010 and Leflore. 1:19 p.m. 911 call, flat tire on right side on 281 10 miles south to 412. 3:36 p.m. Need officer at Jiffy Trip for fender bender. 3:57 p.m. Pit bull/terrier at 700 block of Third. 6:48 p.m. 911 call, two little dogs at end of Skyline. 9:27 p.m. Ran off road on CR 500, headed to Alva. 11:59 p.m. Fighting on Noble and Church, yelling and hollering. March 14, 2014 6:02 a.m. Hit deer on Greer Road, deer ran off. 8:01 a.m. Fire alarm on 500 block of Nickerson. 8:04 a.m. Contact treatment center, everyone okay, they see no smoke, everyone return to building. 8:35 a.m. Hit deer south of Hutchison. 12:07 p.m. Lost dog yesterday around 1100 block of Barnes, small white chihuahua mix, black jacket. 12:37 p.m. 911 call, 2 ½ miles east on Highway 11 west of Sand

Creek, maroon GMC car, seizure caused accident. 3:38 p.m. 911 call, overturned oil truck on CR 480 and Garvin in south bar ditch, antifreeze solvent loaded, confused. 5:08 p.m. Possible intoxicated driver pulled into Ampride in semi pulling a rock trailer, white with red stripe, NAPA mud flaps. 6:30 p.m. Controlled burn 2 miles west of Trenton Road on 132 and a half mile east. 9:39 p.m. Grant County about fire 1 mile east of Deer Creek 2 ½ miles north on 1090. 11:44 p.m. 911 call, heard woman screaming. March 15, 2014 12:09 a.m. Individual wearing black hoodie, holding pistol toward house at Second and Flynn. 8:32 a.m. Controlled burn on CR 1030 and Custer, advised Lamont Fire Department. 10:43 a.m. Controlled burn 5 miles north of Camp Houston on east side. 11:01 a.m. Vandalism at 700 block of Firstt. 11:49 a.m. Controlled burn on Johnston Road. 11:49 a.m. Three teens playing on roof of two-story playhouse on 700 block of First. 11:58 a.m. Controlled burn on CR 452. 12:58 p.m. Jeep Cherokee caught fire on dunes. 1:08 p.m. Controlled burn across from rodeo grounds in Freedom. 1:32 p.m. 911 call, cows out on Highway 11 east to CR 1010. 2:28 p.m. 911 call, one-foot

hole in bridge eastbound from Nash, bridge in construction, notified Grant County Sheriff’s Office. 3:30 p.m. Question on controlled burn three-quarters of a mile south of Waynoka airport. 8:33 p.m. Following a car east into Alva, reckless driver, by water tower hospital sign, car possibly SUV. 9:53 p.m. 911 call, supervisor pointed gun on him in Wakita. March 16, 2014 9:57 a.m. 911 call, Four-wheeler accident on dunes, back/face injury. 10:01 a.m. 911 call, stolen bicycle from 1000 block of Ninth Street. 10:12 a.m. Air evac declined due to winds. 6:38 p.m. Individual walking with gun. 7:58 p.m. 911 call, bicycle stolen from 1000 block of Ninth. 10:25 p.m. Individual about dog barking. March 17, 2014 11:17 a.m. Animal control needs info on who complained on Third Street. 1:14 p.m. Dog loose on Ninth and Center.

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Sunday, March 9, March 16 and March 23, 2014.) Anyone having interest in a 1968 Chev Malibu VIN# 136378K176834 contact Corey Crawford 580-748-1496. Sale date Monday, March 24, 2014.

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Sunday, March 23, 2014.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANTS: CHESAPEAKE OPERATING, INC. AND CHESAPEAKE EXPLORATION, L.L.C. RELIEF SOUGHT: WELL LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 28 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST OF THE IM, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA Cause CD No. 201402024 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, more particularly the parties set out on the Exhibit “A” attached to the application on file in this cause, and, if any of the named individuals be deceased, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such deceased individual; if any of the named entities is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity; if any of the named parties designated as a trustee is not presently acting in such capacity as trustee, then the unknown successor or successors

2:26 p.m. Man camp across from sale barn, requesting drug dog to search camp. 2:45 p.m. Missing dog, found small female, no collar or tag, at 200 block of Center. 3:00 p.m. 911 call, theft in Freedom on Cimmarron Pass, transferred to sheriff’s office. 5:50 p.m. Dog running loose at 200 block of Center. 7:34 p.m. 911 call, shed on fire on CR 980. 8:33 p.m. Square hay bale on roadway on 281 south of Alva on Greer. 10:34 p.m. Gunfire at 100 block of Elm in Medford, transferred to Grant County Sheriff’s Office. March 18, 2014 12:36 a.m. Possible intoxicated driver in silver possible Dodge pickup turned west on Monroe. 12:52 a.m. Fight in parking lot of bar. 1:22 a.m. Called a cab for person in vehicle, vehicle locked and secured in Loves parking lot. 1:45 a.m. Someone hit no parking sign at Little Sahara State Park. 1:27 p.m. Jiffy Trip in Waynoka needs officer for counterfiet bill.

2:27 p.m. Controlled burn at CR 1010 and McClain. 5:15 p.m. No power at 600 block of Meno. 5:16 p.m. 700 block of Sherman and 600 block of Meno without power. 6:11 p.m. 911 call, accident at 600 block of Choctaw. March 19, 2014 7:32 a.m. Controlled burn south on Comanche between CR 420 and 430. 8:22 a.m. 911 call, wreck at 13th and Choctaw. 12:13 p.m. Minor accident south of Jiffy Trip, minor fender bender. 1:04 p.m. Two-vehicle accident on Oklahoma Boulevard and Fifth, blocking traffic. 2:00 p.m. Wife had baby on Birch Street, extreme bleeding. 2:28 p.m. Controlled burn on Highway 11 and CR 900. The call center also handled the following calls: abandoned calls – 36, accidental calls – 23, pocket dial – 21, wrong number – 4, hang ups – 7, animal control – 9, sheriff – 34, police – 54, general info – 98, fire dept. – 27, ambulance – 9, road conditions – 2.

to such trustee; if any of the named parties designated as an attorney-in-fact is not presently acting in such capacity as attorney-in-fact, then the unknown successor or successors to such attorneyin-fact; and if any of the named entities are corporations which do not continue to have legal existence, the unknown trustees or assigns of such parties. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicants, Chesapeake Operating, Inc. and Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C., have filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission to enter an order, as follows: (i) authorizing and permitting an exception to the permitted well location tolerances in the 640-acre drilling and spacing units comprised of Section 32, Township 28 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, for the Tonkawa Sand, Lansing-Kansas City Lime, Oswego Lime, Cherokee Sand, Mississippi Lime and Endicott separate common sources of supply, so as to allow a well to be drilled as follows: Location of Wellbore at Completion Interval: The proposed location of the completion interval for the Mississippi Lime common source of supply will be no closer than 165 feet from the south line and no closer than 560 feet from the east line and no closer than 165 feet from the north line and no closer than 560 feet from the east line of the unit comprising said Section 32, Township 28 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, and the location of the completion interval for the Tonkawa Sand, Lansing-Kansas City Lime, Oswego Lime, Cherokee Sand and Endicott separate common sources of supply will be no closer than 330 feet from the south line and no closer than 560 feet from the east line and no closer than 330 feet from the north line and no closer than 560 feet from the east line of the unit comprising said Section 32, Township 28 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods

County, Oklahoma, and to be completed in and produce hydrocarbons from the above-named separate common sources of supply; (ii) providing for the re-opening of the cause at such time as the bottom hole location of the well proposed hereunder has been determined; and (iii) establishing a proper allowable with no downward adjustment made thereto. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that the order be entered in this matter be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and that the authorization and permission requested herein run in favor of one or both of the Applicants, including Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C. acting by and through its agent Chesapeake Operating, Inc., or some other party recommended by Applicants. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the legal descriptions for the land sections adjacent to said Section 32 are Sections 28, 29, 30, 31 and 33, Township 28 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma and Sections 4, 5 and 6, Township 27 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Merits Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 8th day of April 2014, and that this notice will be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicants and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. An interested party who wishes to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicants or Applicants’ attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide his or her name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Michael Lovelace, landman, (405) 935-4375, or Emily P. Smith, attorney, OBA No. 20805, (405) 935-8203, Chesapeake Operating, Inc., P.O. Box 18496, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73154-0496. Please refer to Cause CD Number. DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 20th day of March 2014. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA BOB ANTHONY, Chairman PATRICE DOUGLAS, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary

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Polled Hereford Bulls for Sale. 1yr- Alva. Wanted:CDL Drivers. Tanker 18mo. Call 580-334-6068 Endorsement. Competitive Pay, Insurance, Paid Vacation. 580-430Pasture Clearing 1800 or 580-327-6760 I can cut and stack unwanted trees and brush in your pasture. Contact Help Wanted Byron Jones at 580-761-3635 Gambino’s Pizza now hiring full time and part time. 580-327-0444. Need New Sidewalks 720 Okla Blvd Driveway perhaps, give us a call for estimate 580-732-1028 Help Wanted Triple F Oilfield Service seeking Double B Carpentry experienced Diesel Mechanic For all your carpentry needs from for Okla. Valid Driver’s License remodeling, painting, drywall, required. Job Duties include but not texturing, siding, windows, farm & limited to: inspect brake systems, ranch, etc. 580-748-1489 steering mechanisms, wheel bearings and other important parts, test drive Free Replacement Window & Siding estimates. Call to diagnose malfunctions. Apply in Window Headquarters toll free at person 46904 Jefferson Road, Alva, 800-719-3199. Save Money Today! OK 73717 or call 580-327-2327

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Cherokee Manor is accepting applications for LPN’s and CNA’s, all shifts. New flexible scheduling, increased pay scale, shift differential, paid holidays, vacation accrual. Computer Plus Contact Renee or Twila at 580-596For all your computer repair needs 2141 call Adam Swallow at 580-327-4449 Help Wanted or 580-748-2349 or come by 1329 Experienced equipment operators Fair. Will do local housecalls and truck drivers needed! Prefer CDL Come On Back to Red’s licensed drivers. Apply in person to In Making Our Transition To A Full Rick Caruthers Construction, Inc., Service Restaurant, We’ve Had a Cherokee, OK or call 580-596-2341 Few Hiccups. We Believe Those Help Wanted Issues Are Resolved. Come See Our New Look, New Menu, New Buffet Ebert Construction Co., Inc., (11am-2pm Sunday-Friday), and Wamego, KS has an immediate New Manager. Enjoy The Best Food opening for a CDL Hazmat Driver. In NW Oklahoma. We Guarantee You Job site locations are Hwy 270 S of Will Be Pleased. Jim and Barbara Seiling, OK and on Hwy 64 W of Alva. Request application at 785-456-2455 Case, Owners. or email@ebertconstruction.com. Help Wanted Pre-Employment Drug Screening. Lutheran Daycare Director. Apply in Equal Opportunity Employer person at 902 2nd St. Applications Help Wanted accepted until March 28 at 5pm. Drivers, local, 100 mile radius, Rock Childcare experience preferred Hauling or Grain Hauling. Home Help Wanted weekly or nightly. Shop Hand, Licensed electricians and apprentices light mechanic work and welding. needed, full benefit package, 620-327-7360. Excellent wage experience in oilfield and gas percentage compression preferred but not necessary. Call 580-883-4667 or send resume to barbd@pldi.net. Save moisture & grass. Let me clear trees in your pasture. Skid Steer & Marshall Tree Saw. Ed Grover 580474-2465 or 580-542-0298

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Monday Help Wanted 8:50-11 a.m. Okla. Dept. of Triple F Oilfield Service is needing a Veterans Affairs Officer will be at housekeeper. 40 hours/week. $8-$10/ the courthouse in Alva to meet with Hour. Please call 580-327-2327 war veterans needing assistance the second and fourth Mondays of Continuous Moving Sale Selling everything! Must go before the month. (580) 327-2126 9 a.m. The Woods County May 13th. Hardtner, KS., state line. 1 mile from Hardtner, go to state line, 2 Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, miles E. Only house on N side of dirt Alva, is open for games and other road. 9am-8pm. Call for info. 620- activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation 213-8884 or 620-296-4668 provided upon request. Crooked Oak 1 p.m. Alva Duplicate Bridge The B&B For You! 580-327-3621 will meet at the Runnymede Hotel. 3:30 p.m. Storytime will be For Rent held at the Alva Public Library for Large updated 3bdrm, 2bth with 2 Car attached garage, includes children ages 3-5 and their parents. 7 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous appliances, No Pets, No Smoking. Available 3/21/14. $1000/month. meets at the First United Methodist Church. Call 917-855-9086 for $800/Deposit. 580-884-2993 information. Normandy Apartments 7 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous 2 bdrm for rent. 405-659-4199 will meet at 1027 8th (Wesley House) in Alva every Monday and For Rent 2bdrm, 1bth home. Furnished. All Thursday. Tuesday bills paid including high speed 9 a.m. The Woods County internet and Dish. Wkly cleaning can be negotiated. $1850/month with 6/ Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, month agreement. Call or text 580- Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled 748-1915 each day at 11 a.m. Transportation Unbelievable Price provided upon request. $160,000. 4bdrms, 3bth, 2,617 sqft, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Attention CH/A, fireplace, in-ground pool, Veterans - every Tuesday an garage, home on large lot! 580-327- Oklahoma Department of 4007. Kohlrus Real Estate. www. Veterans Affairs Veteran Service kohlrus.com Representative will meet with you Executive Town House PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: Available April 1. 2000 sqft m/l w/ garage. 580-327-2554 $OOUHDOHVWDWHDGYHUWLVHGKHUHLQ

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at the Woods County Courthouse,

Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 7 p.m. Widows and widowers support group will meet at College Hill Church of Christ. Call 580430-6083 with questions. 7 p.m. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday at the Bible Baptist Church, 4th & Choctaw, Alva. The purpose is to help people dealing with alcoholism, divorce, sexual abuse, domestic violence, drug addiction, sexual addiction, food addiction, co-dependency, gambling addiction, anger, grief and more. 7:30 p.m. Alva VFW will meet at their building. Wednesday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. Noon Alva Kiwanis Club meets at Champs Restaurant. 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 7 p.m. Alva Moose Lodge men’s meeting is held every Wednesday.

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CDL Truck Driver. Local Oilfield 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip 407 Government St., Alva. The Service Co. Hauling fluids. Sign-On Museum in Alva is open every day representative will advise and aid bonus. Top pay. Insurance. Contact except Monday. For information or you in obtaining veterans benefits. Rex at 580-727-5038 arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip

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Page 13

PORTABLE OUTDOOR BUILDINGS. Sheds, Storage Barns & more. No Credit Check. Low monthly payments. FREE Delivery. No Deposit. As low as $59 per month. www.qbi-ok.com 877-595-1875. STEEL BUILDINGS BLOWOUT!! Perfect for Homes or Garages with Low Prices and Monthly Payment. Various sizes available. CALL 1-800-991-9251 ask Ashlee about our DISPLAY BUILDINGS.

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If you’re over 50, get screened. 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) www.cdc.gov/screenforlife


March 23, 2014

RUBES

Alva Review-Courier

By Leigh Rubin

Page 14


March 23, 2014

Alva Review-Courier

Page 15

Oklahoma student killed in spring break car crash Woman charged with seven bogus checks GULF SHORES, Ala. (AP) — A hit-and-run crash has claimed the life of an Oklahoma State University sophomore visiting Alabama’s Gulf Coast on a spring break trip, police said. Kasey Waychoff, 19, died early Friday morning after being struck by a vehicle while walking in a bicycle lane, Gulf Shores police said. They said the crash happened around 1:45 a.m. Friday, as Waychoff walked with some of her sorority sisters along West Beach Boulevard in the community about 45 miles southeast of Mobile, Ala. A Baldwin County sheriff’s deputy later stopped a motorist based on a description of the vehicle involved in the hit and run,

From Front Page

Al.com reported. Gulf Shores police said no charges were immediately filed in connection with Waychoff’s death, and they were continuing to investigate the crash. Waychoff was from Flower Mound, Texas, Oklahoma State University said in a statement. Waychoff, a native of Edmond, Okla., was studying international finance at OSU, and planned to study abroad in China next year, said her grandfather, Handy Waychoff of Tulsa. As she was entering high school, the family had moved to Singapore for a few years where her father worked. Later they returned to Flower Mound, where Kasey

graduated from Flower Mound High School, Handy Waychoff told The Star-Telegram of Fort Worth, Texas. “It’s a wonderful family, a good Christian family,” he said. “And she just had such a big heart, and she loved all of them. We have six grandchildren and the first five were grandsons. . I used to like to say my grandsons gave me a basketball team and she was my cheerleader.” Waychoff and her sorority sisters had decided to visit Gulf Shores because they thought it wouldn’t be as crowded as other spring break destinations, her grandfather told Al.com. He said the family was struggling to understand why she was in the path of the vehicle.

By Marione Martin A Waynoka woman is facing seven bogus check charges. According to documents in the case, Lacy Diane Lee, 30, has been charged with seven counts of obtaining cash and merchandise by bogus checks in Woods County District Court. The bogus checks were all

written to the Waynoka Jiffy Trip and were drawn on an account at First State Bank. All the checks were written in January on the 14th, 17th, 18th, 19th, 20th (two checks) and 21st. The checks totaled $240.87. The bank stated that the defendant did not have sufficient funds on deposit for payment.

Trash

Mayor Arden Chaffee said, “That whole corridor (east along Highway 64) will become a trade district with this annexation, we anticipate, so that could be even more of an issue.” “Trash doesn’t go away, it just goes somewhere else,” added Chaffee. Ritter laughed and said, “We don’t get enough south wind.” That discussion occurred before the passage of the annexation ordinance when Ritter was asked if he had anything more to say. It came up again during the council remarks at the end of the meeting. Councilmember Bryce Benson asked, “What would be our procedure or direction we need to go to alleviate Mr. Ritter’s problem with Wal-Mart’s trash?” Alva Business Manager Joe Don Dunham said his first step would be to set up a meeting with Wal-Mart management to ask for their ideas on how to handle the issue. More Issues Councilmember Bo Hannaford commented, “I think it’s more than that, too. We’ve had conversations about this before. We’ve got to start enforcing that, not only with just the highway but our property owners in town and on the Boulevard.” “We’ve got several property owners around town now that are just throwing a couch or what have you out on the porch or front yard and it just stays there and looks like you know what,” said Benson. “And as our inspector can get around to address those, we have him do that,” said Dunham. Benson inquired, “Don’t we have enough teeth in our ordinances

to handle that?’ A Matter of Workload “I think we do,” answered Dunham. “It’s a matter of workload for one person.” Dunham said the city inspector handles keeping construction of business and residential buildings up to code as well as the nuisance problems being discussed. “Maybe we need to figure out a way to hire somebody part-time to go around and address the trash issue,” suggested Dunham. Councilmember Steve Valencia said, “I wouldn’t have any problem with that. I wouldn’t have any problem with hiring a full-time employee.” He said the council should consider that for the next fiscal year’s budget. City Attorney Rick Cunningham told the council the city has more – clout now with the annexation bringing businesses to the east into the city limits. “You’ve made it possible for more enforcement on that property that Mr. Ritter is complaining about,” he said. “Before, it was hard to enforce it, but now with it being in the city limits we have some nuisance issues.” He continued, “It actually gives more teeth to enforcement than we had – Irvin Ritter before.” Dunham said the street and alley committee of the council, along with the street commissioner, plan to address the problem of dirt accumulating along Oklahoma Boulevard. He described it as a priority for the coming year

“It’s a disgrace.”

and indicated street sweeper hours may need to be changed to operate at night when traffic lessens. Benson suggested the city look into hiring more part-time employees for the summer, especially in the street department. Dunham said the city was participating in a job fair at Northwestern Oklahoma State University in the hope of hiring more part-time student help. He said they especially need part-time help at the swimming pool and the rec park. Rusty Cars During the citizen remarks time, Jewel LeDou spoke to the council. “Since you’re talking about the ordinances and the streets and yards, what about these homes that have these ugly, rusty cars parked up against the house that the Bryce Benson wheels are off of them and they’re just an eyesore?” “Now if that happened next door to me, I’d be down here raising all kinds of heck about the ordinances,” she said. “There’s a lot of ordinances in that book that nobody ever pays a bit of attention to. I think it’s time that something is done.” Expressing her appreciation of Mr. Ritter for his comments, LeDou continued,”Maybe more people need to complain about things.” She said she hears a lot of griping about the council, “and then I ask, ‘Do you know your councilman? Do you know your mayor?’” She said most of them do not. “They don’t put in an effort to know you, but they do a lot of hollering.”

“Don’t we have enough teeth in our ordinances?”

Members of the Nescatunga Arts and Humanities Council smile after their request for funds was approved by the City of Alva Tourism Tax Committee Wednesday. They were granted up to $11,250 for the Nescatunga Arts Festival to be held in June. From left are Grace Lansdown, Charla Parker and Bettielou Lane. Photo by Marione Martin

14 earthquakes recorded in Oklahoma since Friday LANGSTON, Okla. (AP) — The U.S. Geological Survey has recorded 14 earthquakes in Oklahoma since about 9:30 p.m. Friday, the largest being a magnitude 4.0. The 4.0 magnitude quake was recorded at 10:05 p.m. Friday about seven miles south of Langston. Three other quakes of magnitude 2.9, 3.0 and 3.3 were recorded Saturday afternoon in the Medford area. The other quakes ranged from magnitude 2.4 to 2.9.

NOW IS THE TIME TO APPLY ULTIMATE WEED & FEED FERTILIZER

Baby Chicks Are Here! Customer Appreciation Day is March 28th 9-2pm Free Lunch & Plant Specials

Ad For Watch Our Specials. Upcoming Jewel LeDou complained to the Alva City Council Monday about "these ugly, rusty cars parked up against the house." She said there are ordinances that are not being enforced. Photo by Marione Martin

No injuries or damage are reported. Geologists say earthquakes of magnitude 2.5 to 3.0 are generally the smallest felt by humans. Scientists are studying why earthquake activity has increased in Oklahoma and whether it is connected to wastewater disposal related to oil and gas production — but have found no answers. The energy industry denies that the method is to blame for the increased seismic activity.

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4th & Barnes - Alva, OK - (580) 327-2101 M-F 7:30-5:30 • Sat 7:30-12:00


March 23, 2014

Alva Review-Courier

Page 16

SUBMIT YOUR PHOTOS TO ALVA REVIEW-COURIER AT FACEBOOK, EMAIL TO manager@alvareviewcourier.net OR SIMPLY BRING THEM IN. Daniella Smart-Waiting for our check-up!

SHOW OFF YOUR PRIDE AND JOY HERE... Tiara Leslie Darling-Pretty bumpy flight coming back!

Jonie Merle Martin-Love my girls! Toby Servis-Congratulations Ladybugs! Whan an awesome season! Go Bugs!

Provided by Louree N Jacob Gordon

Judy Ann Lockwood-I came to my Grandma Juju's I need to be spioiled with love!

Leah Kay-Hold on. Let me take a Selfie. Happy Friday y'all!

KEEP SENDING IN THOSE PHOTOS, YOU CAN USE YOUR CELL PHONE TOO!

Provided by Jim Jacobs Provided by Rennetta Lambert

Giana Evans-Brought back some good times, much needed catching up!

ATTENTION! A low cost, high quality spay/neuter mobile unit is coming to Alva on April 13th. To schedule and ask questions, please email spaywayalva@gmail.com. Cats are $30. Dogs are $40 and up. Appointments are required and are going fast.

Bill Ingraham-One of my little fans. She wanted me to sign her guitar!

Provided by LaTasha Thrash


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