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Alva Review-Courier Vol. 121 No. 97

Friday, December 6, 2013 - $1.00

Indulge in feast of Christmas music, decor Sunday Page 9 Martin files for school board Page 3

WILLOW TREE NATIVITY -- One of NWOSU President Cunningham’s nativity sets expanded this year thanks to gifts from her husband, Rick. See it on the Tour of Homes Sunday. Photo by Helen Barrett

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620 Choctaw, Alva, OK 73717

Ladybugs win season opener Page 10


December 6, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Obtaining easements is slow process

By Marione Martin A state highway department project to place a traffic signal at US 281 and 64 is still in the early stages of planning. City Business Manager Joe Don Dunham told the Alva City Council Monday that staff members are still trying to get easements for the project. Alva is responsible for obtaining the easements in their share of the project. In addition, the city is still working on easements for a sewer line to go to the new Atwoods store being built on US 64 to the east. Dunham said, “This has been a slow process. Staff is trying to meet the information requests from all the property owners and is having trouble getting the ball rolling.” Annexation For some time the council has hoped to “square up” the borders of the city and annex the areas of new growth. While some areas have been annexed, others have not. “I will be meeting with John Wynne, an attorney in Enid, on the annexation initiative the City of Alva is trying to accomplish,” said Dunham. He said other city managers have “highly recommended” the services of Wynne on annexation issues. “The purpose of this meeting A pickup truck and a Gibson crude-oil tanker truck collided around 4 p.m. Thursday afternoon 4 miles is to outline what the City would west and 4 miles south of Alva on County Road 490. At first, officials thought the truck was leaking crude like to accomplish and develop a oil, but no leaks were found. One driver complained of a possible back injury. No other details were plan to get it completed in a timely available at press time. Photos by Lynn L. Martin manner,” said Dunham. The city currently has two requests for annexation and needs to act on those, he added. Share Trust Grant The city was recently awarded a $100,000 grant from the Charles

Stock Exchange Bank, Benbrooks, endow scholarships, lectureship with $100,000 gift The continuing support of Northwestern Oklahoma State University by the Stock Exchange Bank of Woodward and board members Bruce and Sheryl Benbrook soared to a new level with the announcement on Tuesday of a $100,000 pledge to the institution. The gift will benefit Northwestern in numerous ways, including the establishment of the Stock Exchange Bank/Bruce and Sheryl Benbrook Endowed Lectureship in Business. The lectureship represents the first major academic endowment for the Woodward campus. In addition to the lectureship, the gift will create a new endowed scholarship in business, enhance an existing endowed scholarship in education and provide annual support of the President’s Association annual giving program and the

Woodward Campus Student Activity Fund. “The Stock Exchange Bank and Bruce and Sheryl Benbrook have been among the most ardent supporters of Northwestern and our efforts to deliver higher education opportunities to Woodward,” said Dr. Janet Cunningham, university president. “This gift represents a major commitment by the private sector to support our Woodward campus and our students.” “This gift was well-planned, as it supports both teaching and learning through support for academic programs and student scholarships,” Cunningham added. “We are honored and humbled by the generosity shown by the Stock Exchange Bank and the Benbrooks.” “On behalf of the Stock Exchange Bank we are excited to be making this investment today in

Morton Share Trust to be used on equipment purchases for the street department. Dunham said so far the funds have been used for a crack sealer for $52,000 and a steel wheel roller for $32,000. He said the city needs a trailer to haul the steel wheel roller so it can be moved around more efficiently and economically instead of driving it to locations. He estimates that would cost $5,000. The approximately $11,000 remaining is expected to be spent on a rubber wheel roller. The one the city now owns is so old that parts can’t be found to repair the brakes. Job Openings The city has job openings for workers in parks and building maintenance, sanitation, street and water-sewer. “We have advertised in the newspaper, on the radio and with Oklahoma Workforce to try and get some prospects,” said Dunham, “but to date have not had much luck on these positions.” Other Items Dunham provided the council with a copy of a letter from the Oklahoma Tax Commission about a one-time credit against the fees retained in FY14 (fiscal year 2014) for collection of local sales and use taxes. The commission has not told the city what its share will be, but Dunham thinks it will be in the $10,000 to $12,000 range. Dunham told the council members he has information on the Citizens Leadership Academy if they are interested. He said OG&E representative Mike Ruby recommended it as being informative and helpful for council members.

the future of the Woodward campus of Northwestern Oklahoma State University,” Bruce Benbrook said. “We know that this investment will provide great benefits to future students and enable this campus to continue to grow and prosper, serving the higher education needs of Woodward and Northwest Oklahoma.” Bruce Benbrook is chairman and president of the Stock Exchange Bank, a position he has held since 1981. His wife, Sheryl, an attorney, serves as secretary for the bank’s board of directors. The Benbrooks are both natives Alva Business Manager Joe Don Dunham tells the city council that of Woodward, graduating from obtaining easements is a slow process. Photo by Marione Maritn Woodward High School. Bruce received his bachelor’s degree in finance from Oklahoma State University (OSU), which is also where

See Gift Page 7

Final notice! County fair checks available at Woods County OSU Extension office

The Woods County Fair Board has county fair premium checks available to be picked up at the Woods County OSU Extension Office from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday thru Friday. The OSU Extension office is located on the east side of the bottom level of the Woods County Courthouse across from the sheriff’s office. Any 4-H and FFA groups or individuals who exhibited at the September Woods County Free Fair and won a ribbon should have Bruce and Sheryl Benbrook (holding check) present a $100,000 gift to Northwestern Oklahoma State a premium check. Superintendents University-Woodward on behalf of Stock Exchange Bank and themselves. Also pictured are Sen. Bryce and their assistants will also have Marlatt, Regent Mike Mitchel, Dr. Deena Fisher and university president Dr. Janet Cunningham. checks available. These checks will

be voided if not cashed by Jan. 3, 2014 (90 days from date written). Exhibitors or their representative must sign for their check. Checks still at the Extension Office: Alva 4-H, Connie Allen, Kellen Allison, Carol Anderson, Misty Beiswanger, TW Beiswanger, Betty Benson, Sherryce Benson, Michele Bishop, JoDe Bradt, Marilyn Brown, Tanner Burton, Mika Cahoj, Cheyene Callison, Christopher Carpenter, Aimee Chapman, Caleb Chapman, Jayden Coffman, B.J. Cole, Amber Cook, Natalie Cunningham, Isaiah Danner, Carolyn Demaree, Catie


December 6, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Martin files for school board Race develops for Waynoka seat

By Marione Martin Incumbent Lynda Martin was the only person filing this week for office No. 4 on the Alva Board of Education. The filing period was from 8 a.m. Monday through 5 p.m. Wednesday. Two people filed for the two seats open on the Freedom Board of Education. Cindy Reed filed for the full term of office No. 4, and Concha Herrera filed for the unexpired term of office No. 3. Filing for office No. 4 on the Waynoka school board were Clint Olson and Anna Milledge. Incumbent Butch Edingfield was the only one filing for the zone 4 position on the Northwest Technology Center Board of Education. Those without opponents will automatically take seats on the boards. Olson and Milledge will face each other in the Feb. 11 school election.

Alva Christmas Parade cancelled Saturday With the Saturday forecast calling for a high temperature of 26 and a 50 percent chance of snow, the Dec. 7 Christmas Parade has been called off. The parade was scheduled for 6 p.m. in downtown Alva.

BRYLEE JOELLE VANRANKIN

Earl and Calli (Matthews) VanRankin III of Zanoni, Mo., are pleased to announce the birth of their daughter, Brylee Joelle

VanRankin. She was born on Nov. 12 at Baxter Regional Medical Center in Mountain Home, Ark. Brylee weighed 7 pounds, 1 ounce. Grandparents are Scott and Becky Matthews of Kiowa, Kan.; Earl and Deb VanRankin of Medicine Lodge, Kan.; and David and Tessie Sanford of Isabel, Kan. Great grandparents are Paul and Clyda Roark of Kiowa; Kenneth and Rosalie Ward of Sun City, Kan.; Uschi and the late Jerry Angle of Medicine Lodge; and the late Harvey and Wilda Matthews of Sharon, Kan.

Woods County Forecast Friday Partly sunny, with a high near 23. Wind chill values as low as -1. North wind 10 to 14 mph, with gusts as high as 20 mph. Friday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 7. Wind chill values as low as -3. Northeast wind 6 to 9 mph. Saturday Mostly sunny, with a high near 24. Wind chill values as low as -3. East northeast wind 7 to 13 mph. Saturday Night A 40 percent chance of snow. Cloudy, with a low around 13. Southeast wind 8 to 13 mph. Sunday A 30 percent chance

of snow. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 26. Sunday Night Mostly cloudy, with a low around 12. Monday Mostly sunny, with a high near 23. Monday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 11. Tuesday Sunny, with a high near 35. Tuesday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 18. Wednesday Sunny, with a high near 38. Wednesday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 21. Thursday Sunny, with a high near 42.

First-grade students from Washington Early Childhood Development Center gathered at Graceful Arts Gallery and Studios Thursday afternoon to hear from Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU) students about musical instruments. The Washington kindergarten students made the trip to the arts center a day earlier. With his back to the camera is NWOSU student Isileli Orfu, Jr. To the left around the circle are college students Bryce Lewis; Jeremy Stubbs at the keyboard; Josh Faulkner, standing; Alexandra Skinner; Riley Weibener; first-grade teacher Kelsey Yarbrough; NWOSU student Kenneith McIntosh; and Charla Parker, who is teaching an NWOSU class on teaching elementary school music . Not pictured, but present, was student Rachel Lugendo. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

NWOSU students tell gradeschoolers about various musical instruments By Lynn L. Martin Longtime Alva educator Charla Parker is teaching a course at Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU) this semester entitled “Methods and Materials for Elementary Music Teachers.” An end-of-semester project for the eight students in her class is to spend an hour with each of the kindergarten and first-grade classes in the Alva school sSystem. Parker said her students are juniors and seniors who will hopefully someday teach elementary music. Each elementary class walked

the one block to the Graceful Arts Center where they were first introduced to the Smithsonian music exhibit in the front portion of the arts center. There are many buttons to push that play sample music from different eras in American history. After that experience, the students moved to the back room where the NWOSU music students paired off with them to tell about and demonstrate the four families of musical instruments used in an orchestra: strings, brass, woodwinds and percussion. A few notes were played on each type of instrument.

Next, the students were seated in a large circle where they sang “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.” Then the college students taught them a new song that included motion. Both sets of students had great reactions. Parker said her students were very excited and she noted they revealed aspects to their personalities she hadn’t seen in the classroom. Also, the elementary teachers reported back to Parker that the kids talked about the class very affirmatively and really enjoyed it.

Oklahoma Watch granted tax-exempt status by IRS

Oklahoma Watch, an independent, nonprofit news service, has been granted tax-exempt status as a charitable organization by the Internal Revenue Service. The designation means that Oklahoma Watch can receive direct tax-deductible contributions and bequests to help further its mission of producing investigative and indepth journalism on public-policy issues in the state. To date, Oklahoma Watch has received donations through a fund established at the

Tulsa Community Foundation. “This is great news, for us and for all organizations that practice journalism in a nonprofit model,” said David Fritze, executive editor of Oklahoma Watch. “As many traditional news outlets continue to cut back on resources, we want to provide a public service by filling some of those gaps. “We are seeking even more community support as we dig more deeply to inform Oklahomans about the most significant issues

facing the state.” Oklahoma Watch joins dozens of other nonprofit journalism centers that have received 501(c)(3) tax-exempt status from the IRS in recent years. Oklahoma Watch provides nonpartisan coverage through stories, multimedia and interactive data, and conducts public forums on a wide range of public-policy issues, often focusing on the poor and disadvantaged. Its content is dis-

See Tax-Exempt Page 12


December 6, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Oklahoma Now

This holiday season, celebrating an inspiring year in Oklahoma By Gov. Mary Fallin Thanksgiving has come and gone and Christmas is on its way. This is a great time of year to reflect on all of God’s blessings and to be thankful for what we have. Like many Oklahomans, I am thankful for my faith, my wonderful family and my friends. I am also thankful for the opportunity to be your governor. Oklahoma is a special state. We are a community of generous and caring individuals. I am thankful for that sense of community, and for the Oklahoma Standard that it repre-

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The Alva Review-Courier is combined with the Woods County News, The Alva Advocate and Newsgram, and is published every Sunday and Friday by Martin Broadcasting Corp., 620 Choctaw St., Alva, OK 73717-1626. Periodical postage paid at Alva, Oklahoma. Annual subscription rates in Woods County, Oklahoma $72. Elsewhere in Oklahoma $90, elsewhere in the United States $108. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Alva Review-Courier, 620 Choctaw St., Alva, OK 73717-1626. Contents Copyright 2013 Member of the Associated Press, Oklahoma Press Association, National Newspaper Association

sents. It was that sense of resilience and compassion that allowed us to recover and rebuild so quickly in the wake of the May tornadoes. The tragedy of those storms was devastating, but the volunteer spirit, the fearlessness of our first responders and the generosity of our people was inspiring. Today, organizations like the OKStrong Disaster Relief Fund run by the United Way have raised millions of dollars for families affected by the storms. I am thankful for anyone who participated in that relief and recovery effort. Storm recovery is just one example of Oklahomans taking care of their neighbors. I continue to be thankful – and amazed – by how successful each year’s Feeding Oklahoma Food Drive has been because of our generous individuals and businesses. It is a sad truth that one in four Oklahoma children suffers from food insecurity. To help feed those children, as well as their parents, Oklahomans contributed over 3.1 million meals, right on time for the holiday season. I am also thankful for the industriousness of our people, their hardworking nature and the tremendous results that their work has sown. In 2009, Oklahoma followed the rest of the nation into a deep and damaging recession. For the last three years, we have put that recession behind us, dramatically outpacing national growth. Consider this: • Since 2011, our unemployment rate has fallen from 7 percent to just 5.3 percent, one of the best rates in the nation. • Our Rainy Day Savings Account has risen from $2.03 million to over $530 million. • Oklahoma families have seen their incomes rise by eight percent since 2011, meaning they have thousands more dollars to save or invest. That growth is extraordinary, especially given challenging national economic circumstances. In fact, Governing Magazine recently identified Oklahoma as one of only three states to see average wages increase during the period of 2007 to 2012. I am thankful that Oklahoma and Oklahoma families are on the rise. At the state Capitol, we are working hard to support and

In My Corner

She’s no ‘spring chicken’ By Arden Chaffee I saw a bumper sticker stating, “I’m ready for Hillary,” and I understand that change will come, but when she fell in January, suffering a head trauma, I know her supporters were concerned with her recovery. She and I are the same age so she’s no “spring chicken.” Having fallen as a result of a stomach virus and dehydration, she was later treated for a clot behind her right ear in a vein connected to her brain. Clots, wherever they occur, are always serious and head trauma may result in one, leading to a stroke. With all the discussion about football-related head injuries, including concussion and concerns about the use of MRIs as a diagnostic tool lead-

ing to cell damage, it’s critical for anyone getting a head injury to seek medical attention. “Wait and see” is especially dangerous if the injury is to a child, who may drift off to sleep without complaint. Now about Hillary: She was treated for a clot in her leg in 1998. Some people may well ask what medical school I attended, but I think that condition may have been the result of a long airplane flight, bruise or medication she was taking. The worst-case scenario, according to Dr. Geoff Manley at the University of California, San Francisco, is that she has a predisposed clotting disorder that many people have, diagnosed and otherwise. Does it make her a poor candidate in 2016? Some would say there were overriding reasons, but health issues didn’t stop Dick Cheney or FDR.

Random Thoughts

Another general, another word

By Roger Hardaway Last week, I told you about how “sideburns” came to mean hair grown on the side of a man’s face The word comes from the name of Civil War general Ambrose Burnside who sported this type of facial hair. Another word that is today common in the English language was popularized (if not invented) by another major general of that terrible conflict. This particular general, unlike Burnside, became a career officer and did not leave the army in order to enter private business or run for political office. The commanding general of the U.S. Army during the Civil War, U.S. Grant, did not like this officer. Grant complained that he was often insubordinate with his superiors. Moreover, the general had a reputation as a ladies’ man who drank too much and partied too much. While some of this activity may have been exaggerated by the press during the war, the popular perception prevailed. See Now Page 7 Presumably, our general allowed the men un-

der his command to also do some partying and womanizing. He was, apparently, not a strict disciplinarian. Still, he saw action in several major battles of the Civil War. But his reputation hurt his military career. He was passed over for some promotions because Grant and others saw him as unpredictable and not bold enough in battle. Our general was Joseph Hooker, and the women who hung around his headquarters and partied with his soldiers became commonly known as “Hooker’s girls” – a term eventually shortened to “hookers.” Some people have argued that Hooker has been unfairly treated by history. They point out that the word “hooker” was used to refer to a prostitute for several years before the Civil War. One of the boat docks in New York City was called “Corlear’s Hook” – more generally known as simply “the hook.” Prostitutes used to frequent the area looking for customers, and that is apparently where the term “hooker” came into being. But Joseph Hooker’s practice of allowing his men to consort with prostitutes made the word more commonly known and used.


December 6, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Click and Clack Talk Cars

Page 5

Dear Margo

When you feel like a There’s such a thing as overdoing heifer at an auction fuel conservation

By Tom and Ray Magliozzi Dear Tom and Ray: I am currently driving (and loving) my Chevy Volt. So far, I’ve gone about 2,800 miles with it and used only 19 gallons of gas. And I have not put gas in the car for four months. My question is about driving around town: Can I let the gas run down, and keep only a small amount in the tank to reduce weight and perhaps get better electric range? – Maurice RAY : Well, technically, if you reduce weight, you will improve your mileage. No question about it. Gasoline weighs a little over six pounds a gallon. So you certainly can do that, Maurice. TOM: SHOULD you do it? That’s another question. The fuel capacity of the Volt is about nine gallons. So, say you run it down to one gallon. That saves you 50 pounds in a car that weighs about 3,800 pounds. Round it up to 4,000 pounds with you in it. RAY: Will shedding that weight improve your electric-only range? Yes, but only by a very small amount – a fraction of a percent. And while getting a marginal benefit, you risk stranding yourself in some wooded area overnight and passing through the digestive systems of wolves. It hardly seems worth it to me. TOM: Yeah. I mean, we’re all for efficiency, but if you’re not

careful, you can go off the deep end with this stuff. A lot of people with high-mileage cars seem prone to this sort of obsession. RAY: For example, once you’ve shed that 50 pounds of unnecessary fuel, what are you going to do to get the next half-mile on a charge? Are YOU going to lose 50 pounds? TOM: Are you going to start driving naked to rid yourself of the excess weight of your shoes and trousers? RAY: It’s all theoretically justifiable, but not practically justifiable. After all, you’re already getting the equivalent of 93 miles per gallon without doing anything else! TOM: So if it were me, I’d just enjoy that, and not nit-pick to the point where you either drive your spouse and friends insane, or run out of electricity AND gasoline, and strand yourself. Without your clothes. Good luck, Maurice. *** Why do unmitigated cheapskates like Tom continue to buy nothing but old clunkers? Find out by ordering Tom and Ray’s guide “How to Buy a Great Used Car: Secrets Only Your Mechanic Knows.” Send $4.75 (check or money order) to Used Car, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. *** Get more Click and Clack in their new book, “Ask Click and Clack: Answers from Car Talk.” Got a question about cars? Write to Click and Clack in care of this newspaper, or email them by visiting the Car Talk website at www. cartalk.com.

Karen’s Kolumn

Is giving a pet as a gift a good idea? By Karen Armbruster Many children around the country are already poring over toy and gift catalogs and making their wish lists for the holidays. It is likely many of those children have a kitten, a puppy or some other type of furry friend, on their list and have high hopes of finding it under the Christmas tree. While giving a pet as a gift is well intentioned by a family member or friend, it may not always be a welcomed idea, said Dr. Elisabeth Giedt, director of continuing education, extension and community engagement at the Center for Veterinary Health Sciences at Oklahoma State University. “As much fun as a new kitten or puppy can be, it’s also stressful,” said Giedt. “The holiday season in itself can be hectic for some families, and the added stress of a new pet may not be as exciting as the gift-giver hopes. Trying to house train a new pet during all the excitement of the holiday season can be difficult,” Giedt said. “A better idea is to wrap up a book about the pet of choice and give that instead of the animal itself, along with a certificate indicating you will cover

the cost of a future adoption. Offer to go along to help select the new pet. Another idea is to wrap up a gift basket of animal necessities such as toys, collar, leash, treats, food or bedding. Be sure to clear this with the parents ahead of time, especially if the recipient is too young to fully take on the responsibility of pet ownership.” In addition, the person giving the pet needs to keep in mind the long-term commitment required, both time-wise and financially, for the new pet owners. Food, veterinary care, grooming expenses, toys and the time to exercise, train and play with the animal may not fit into the new pet owner’s schedule or budget. Those who are ready to take on all the responsibilities of pet ownership should pick out their new companion themselves. “If you decide to give a pet as a gift,” said Giedt, “go with the recipient to pick out the animal after the holidays when the family has more time to commit to the love and care of the new pet. This will help ensure the animal and new owner are a good fit for one another. A poor fit could result in the animal being sent to a shelter or another home. In addition, pets may suffer loneliness and neglect when their novelty has worn off because the new owner re-

See Kolumn Page 7

Dear Margo: I am 36 and attending college for the first time. It has been a wonderful experience, and because of my high GPA, I received many scholarships. One scholarship comes with an invitation to a fundraising dinner with all the local elite who contribute to the college. I was there last year to receive an award and hated it. The fundraising and the requests for money made me uncomfortable, and the people at my table were snobby and condescending. The foundation puts the winning students at tables with the donors so they can “see what their money buys.” There are games where the speaker searches the room with a spotlight asking for donations, and all the rich people at my table were waving their checkbooks and clamoring for one of the plaques being given away. I felt like a heifer at auction. I swore I would never go back. This year I was awarded the BIG scholarship given to the school by the estate of a man who passed away years ago. I decided I would not attend. My friends at work think I am being silly and that I should be grateful to be able to dine with such “nice” people. They say I “owe” it

to the foundation to go. Am I being unreasonable, or are these fundraising events always this awful to endure? Should I go? – Ungrateful or Just Uncomfortable? Dear Un: Yes, it’s true that fundraisers can sometimes be the castor oil of social events, and, yes, you should go. It is the only way you have of thanking the people who’ve made your education possible. These kinds of events can be uncomfortable because of the display of wealth, but the ends really do justify the means. I have been to affairs where the beneficiaries are present – and sometimes speak – and the effect is one of creating solidarity between the supporters and the organization. Such evenings aren’t so much about letting people “see what their money buys” as about letting them see where their money goes. – Margo, understandingly Dear Margo: I am the mother of a 28-year-old woman who is the mother of my only grandchild. The child is 6 years old. I am also bisexual and in a committed relationship with another woman. My daughter was exposed to my lifestyle at a young age, when I had another longtime partner. I remained single for about 17 years before my current relationship. The problem is that my daughter has become engaged to a young

man who is quite homophobic and who’s pushing for my only child to break ties with me and keep my grandchild away from me. He also doesn’t want me present at their wedding, even though I have volunteered to attend alone. Needless to say, my heart is broken, because my daughter, granddaughter and I have always had strong ties with one another. How do I get past this? I don’t want to lose my daughter and granddaughter, and it just kills me to imagine that they could be taken from me. – Brokenhearted Mom Dear Broke: What I can’t figure out is how a daughter, with whom you say you’ve been close, could allow her fiance to remove you from her life, as well as take a little girl’s grandmother away. Ditto for attending the wedding. That she would choose such an intolerant man, coming from where she’s coming from, is astounding. If her loyalty and love for you are so shallow that she would permit this, then there is nothing for you to do. And for whatever it’s worth, her priorities are as lamentable as his views. – Margo, regrettably Dear Margo is written by Margo Howard, Ann Landers’ daughter. All letters must be sent via the online form at www.creators.com/ dearmargo. Due to a high volume of e-mail, not all letters will be answered.

Annie’s Mailbox®

Action needed for improvement Dear Annie: My boyfriend and I have been together for two years, and he moved in six months ago. “John” is 25 years older than I am. He has always been supportive and helpful, but now he is displaying passive-aggressive behavior. John was forced into retirement last year, and I think he somehow blames me. I work full time, take care of two teenage boys, cook dinner every night, do dishes and laundry, clean the bathrooms, buy the groceries and pay the bills. John sweeps and vacuums and does the yard work, which is a godsend because I have had shoulder issues that make these things difficult for me. But lately, John has been pushing all of my buttons. He throws the towel over the shower door even though there is a nearby towel rack. I know it’s a small thing, but it’s a daily nuisance, and he knows it bugs me. He also does not squeegee the shower after he uses it, and I’m the one who cleans it. And he leaves the toilet seat up – but only when the toilet is dirty, which is his way of telling me it’s time to clean it. He leaves dishes in the sink instead of loading the dishwasher, even though I’ve asked him to at least leave them on the counter. When they are piled in the sink, I have no room to prepare dinner. I know these are tiny things, but they add up, especially when I’m working all day while he is watching TV. When he’s upset with me, he gives me the silent treatment, and often it takes me days to figure out why. I know John is depressed because of his retirement, but he is well situated, doesn’t have to pay any bills and gets home-cooked meals every day. I love him dearly, but I am going nuts walking on

eggshells. What am I doing wrong? – Massachusetts Dear Massachusetts: Nothing. You did not live with John before his retirement and don’t really know whether he was always like this. His age may also be a factor in that he might be less energetic and capable than he was a year ago. And depression could cause him to push you away in these subtle ways, feeling he doesn’t deserve you. Please talk to him. Tell him you love him, but that the current situation is making you worry your feelings aren’t reciprocated. Ask him to see his doctor about depression. Suggest he look into part-time jobs or activities that will keep him more active during the day. But if he makes no effort to address this, the situation is not likely to improve. Dear Annie: I recently missed my 10-year high school reunion. I found out it was held in August, and I was never invited because I am not on Facebook. When did social media get so big that people can’t pick up a phone or write a letter? – Curious Dear Curious: Social media sites began springing up as early as the mid-90s. Facebook was founded in 2004, and there are now more than a billion users. Like it or not,

people are more apt to use such a site for mass invitations rather than pick up a phone and make dozens of individual calls. Our readers have let us know that when you haven’t heard about an upcoming reunion, you should contact others and find out whether you are out of the loop. Dear Annie: I’d like to respond to “Too Good of a Cook,” whose grown children often visited for the weekend but never offered to help cook or contribute to the growing grocery bills. My mother had many siblings who visited from out of state. Her rule was, “You are guests for one day. After that you are living here.” So everyone helped out with the dishes, cooking, cutting grass, doing wash and whatever. – J.F. Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annie’s Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.


December 6, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 6

Freedom’s annual Christmas program

By Nathan Donnahoe For this year’s special Christmas program, Freedom Schools’ English and drama teacher, Katie Strehl, has put together some Christmas plays for the junior high school classes to perform. Some of the younger classes will put on plays as well. The Christmas plays will be performed for the public on Dec. 20 at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Rhett Mullins: senior in the spotlight

By Freedom High School Yearbook Staff Freedom senior Rhett Mullins took a few minutes out of his busy schedule to tell Freedom High School’s yearbook staff about himself. Mullins plans to attend college and major in architectural design. He sees himself with a family and job in 10 to 20 years, and hopes Freedom 4-Hers perform a dramatic glow-in-the-dark dance at the Share the Fun talent competition. to have a luxurious home and two Performers are Nicole Hughes, Iridian Herrera, Casey Luddington, Luke Bolar, Lance Bolar, Myles Porsches in the garage. Mullins’ favorite thing about atNixon and Austin Reed. tending school in Freedom is that the classes are small. He enjoys basketball and football. His favorite food is McDonald’s french fries. Additionally, Mullins enjoys reading and hanging out with friends.

Close competition at Freedom’s Share the Fun By Nicole Hughes Woods County 4-H held a talent show called Share the Fun at the Alva High School auditorium the weekend of Nov. 17. There were many great acts and everyone definitely brought their talents. Freedom performed two acts: “Human Lights” and “The Bean Skit.”

“Human Lights,” a glow-inthe-dark dance, was performed by Nicole Hughes, Iridian Herrera, Casey Luddington, Luke Bolar, Lance Bolar, Myles Nixon and Austin Reed. “Human Lights” competed against Alva’s “Monster Mash” and came in second place, reserve champion. The second act performed was

“The Bean Skit,” performed by McKenna Nixon, Emma Reed, Mariah Luddington and Ciara Vance. They drew great laughs from the crowd. “The Bean Skit” was the only act in that age group, so it won a blue ribbon. Despite doing a fantastic job, they came up short and did not advance to district competition.

Freedom seniors work hard to provide concession stands at home games

Freedom High School seniors prepare the concesstion stand.

By Kaitlyn Gay As many know, Freedom High School seniors run concession stands at home basketball games, but what some may not know is the process of doing that and how much time it takes to set up and clean up before and after every home game. Getting ready before the game takes the seniors a lot of time, because the tables have to be put away so the floors can be swept and mopped. Sometimes, if the floor is really dirty, the seniors must sweep again after they’ve mopped, which usually takes about 30 minutes. After that’s done, the seniors put three tables down so people can sit and eat if they want. The seniors usually offer a variety of good food at the concession stand, such as Frito chili pie, nachos, hotdogs and hamburgers, candy and drinks. The seniors usually start the chili and cheese in the morning in a crock pot, so the chili can cook slowly throughout the day. Onions and tomatoes must be chopped and the condiments put out. The seniors are usually very busy during halftimes and in between games; the pace can be very tiring. After the game is over, the seniors clean up. Everything must be put away and trash thrown out. The seniors wash any dishes or equipment they’ve used and, finally, mop and sweep the lunchroom and kitchen floors.

Rhett Mullins

Woods County 4-H’s Link performs ‘Blown Away’ at Share the Fun By Luke Bolar On Sunday, Nov. 17, Woods County 4-H held its annual Share the Fun competition in Alva. One of the many acts was “Blown Away,” by Carrie Underwood, sung by Freedom 4-H member Tamlynn Link. Link sang very well and received much applause, and she earned a blue ribbon for her performance. Link’s routine was one of the many new talents 4-H has seen this year. At left: Tammlynn Link performs ‘Blown Away’ at Share the Fun

Reed’s ‘Fear of Imperfection’ speech wins blue ribbon By Luke Bolar During the 4-H Share the Fun competition recently, Emma Reed performed an individual routine. She gave a dramatic speech on “The Fear of Imperfection.” She earned a blue ribbon for her performance. Congratulations, Emma!

At left: Emma Reed perferms dramitic speech about ‘The Fear of Imperfection’ a the recent 4-H Share the Fun


December 6, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Freedom Schools basketball news

The first game of the 2013-2014 basketball season could not have been better for Freedom’s junior high and high school girls. The game against Yarbrough, attended by a large supporting crowd, was on Tuesday, Nov. 5. The game ended with the Freedom Junior High girls’ team winning by 22 points. Right after a junior high boys’ game, the high school girls entered the court to play another brilliant game, which they won by 26 points. The good result showed that the school’s new coach, Charles Hough, is there to take these girls to the podium.

From Page 4

Now

sustain this forward momentum. We’ve pursued tax cuts and eliminated barriers to job creation by pursuing legal reform and reducing red tape. We are delivering smart, balanced budgets that eliminate government waste and inefficiencies. And we’re also making the investments we need in our schools, because nothing is more important to getting a good job with a living wage than education. All of this is part of what I call the Oklahoma Comeback. As we move towards the new year, I’m thankful and proud to have been part of one of the country’s greatest success stories. I hope you are too!

Freedom High School students From Page 2 Checks learn about computers By Freedom High School Yearbook Staff Recently, Freedom High School computer students got to experience working alongside Information Technology (IT) workers as they created keystone jacks. One of the elementary classes got

new computers, and new keystone jacks had to be made. These jacks are used to plug an ethernet (patch) cable from a computer into a wall or floor (keystone) jack in order to access a network connection.

Devine, Taylor Devine, Karlee Dietz, Kory Dietz, Sharon Doctor, Paige Donnahoe, Eleanor Ring, Barbara Faulkner, Donna Fearing, Ethan Flynt, Jadlyn Ford, Ashton Ghaemi, Ethan Girard, Seth Green, Ruth Greenland, Leta Grimm, Riley Hess, Janelle Hoover, Samuel Houston, Hannah Kornele, Trey Kowing, Delaney Lambert, Kaden Lambert, Ryan Lee, Charlotte Locke, Trent Lohmann, Colby Mackey, Cade Madsen, Lane Madsen, Kayla Maier, Leah Maier, Jeana Maier, Merritt Mantz, Morgan Martin, Sue Martin, Linda McDonald, Betty McMurphy, Blake Mieser, Gagan Moorthy, Shadi Nettles, Curan Olson, Ryleigh Orcutt, Mattie Pettus, Kenny Pfledier, Linda Pfleider, Joanne Price, Garrett Radford, Wyatt Radford, Betty Rhodes, Katherine Ryerson, Madeline Ryerson, Brooke Sampson, Amanda Schroeder, Brayden Schroeder, Jesse Schroeder, Mia Schroeder, Sandra Schubert, Remington Seaman, Bonnie Selfidge, Jocie Shelton, Jaidyn Shepperd, Tina Shepperd, Jansen Shirley, Jarin Shirley, Bonnie Sidders, Liz Smith, Lone Star OHCE Group, Brenda Starks, Bonita Stewart, Charla Tuner, Janet Wanger, Addison Weaver, Addisan Weber, Brocklinn Weber, Elizabeth West, Mason West and Gail Wilks. The fair board would like to express its appreciation to everyone who entered exhibits and attended the 2013 Woods County Free Fair, and helped to make it a very successful fair.

From Page 5

ally didn’t want an animal to begin with.” When it comes to giving gifts, some families include pets they already have in the fun. Safety is the first thing to consider when selecting gifts for pets. Make sure the gift is nontoxic and does not contain small parts. Chew toys also are a good option since they can help prevent periodontal disease in pets. Toys that encourage exercise for the pet, as well as pet interaction, also make great gifts. “Pets can be a wonderful addition to a family and add a whole new level of love and affection,” Giedt said. For more information concerning parenting topics, call or come by the Woods County OSU Extension Office located on the ground floor of the Woods County Courthouse, or visit www.oces.okstate.edu/woods on the Internet.

Freedom High School student Rhett Mullins works on a keystone jack At right: Freedom High School student Rosanna Hoffmann creates a keystone jack

From Page 2

Gift

Sheryl received her bachelor’s degree in education . Sheryl received her juris doctorate from the University of Oklahoma’s School of Law. Bruce was a founding director of the Woodward Education Foundation and served as its president. In addition, he has served as president of the Oklahoma Foundation for Excellence and the Oklahoma Bankers Association, and as chair-

man of the OSU-A&M Board of Regents. Bruce has also served as a state highway commissioner, and currently is a member of the board of governors of the OSU Foundation. He also is serving as chair-elect of Leadership Oklahoma. Bruce received the OSU Distinguished Alumni Award in 1995. Sheryl has served as president of the Woodward Education Foun-

Kolumn

dation and the Woodward County Bar Association. She currently serves on the board of directors of Women for OSU. Sheryl and Bruce have received the Woodward Education Association’s “Friend of Education” award and both were named the “Woodward Boomer Booster of the Year.” They have two children: Rachel, a 2013 OSU graduate, and Julia, a freshman at OSU.


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Alva Review-Courier

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Common Core emails Despite opposition, state education officials say repeal of Common Core ‘unlikely’ By Michael King Oklahoma Watch Despite continued opposition to new publicschool standards, Oklahoma education officials say they are more confident than they were earlier this year that the standards will be fully implemented. In a national survey conducted by the Center on Education Policy at George Washington University, Oklahoma State Department of Education officials indicated in May that it was “somewhat likely” that the state’s decision to adopt Common Core State Standards would be reversed, limited or changed, according to a copy of the survey obtained by Oklahoma Watch through an Open Records Act request. The department cited public opposition and opposition from state legislators as reasons for a possible change in the state’s 2010 decision to adopt the standards. However, Tricia Pemberton, assistant director of communications at the education department, said the agency would answer that question differently now. “We would change that response to ‘not likely,’” she said. “In the education community, teachers say, by and large, that they like the new, more rigorous standards,” Pemberton added. “They don’t necessarily want to see it changed.” The department has been helping train educators to put Common Core standards in math and English language arts into practice in the classroom. Agency officials said on the survey that at the time between about half and three-fourths of teachers had received some professional training on using Common Core. The new standards, which take effect in the 2014-2015 school year, are designed to be more challenging and to improve students’ critical thinking. All but five states have adopted the standards. Oklahoma students lag their peers in most other states in academic performance. On the math and reading assessments on the 2013 National Assessment of Ed-

ucational Progress, Oklahoma’s fourth and eighth graders scored lower than their peers in 40 other states. Opposition to Common Core persists among some legislators, parents, educators and groups. Detractors say the standards represent a federal intrusion into state and local education policy and will not lead to better student achievement. Some teachers are concerned that the benchmarks will increase the amount of classroom time devoted to testing. The 2014 legislative session will see bills aiming to derail Common Core. Sen. Eddie Fields, R-Wynona, has drafted a bill that would require the Oklahoma Board of Education to halt implementation of “any curriculum standards or related assessments aligned with the K-12 Common Core State Standards” by July 1, 2014. The bill would also require changing any agreement that makes using Common Core a condition for receiving federal funds. In the House, Rep. Gus Blackwell, R-Laverne, a vocal opponent, said he plans to introduce a bill that would eliminate the requirement that school districts use Common Core and allow districts to keep the current standards or use standards tested elsewhere. Oklahoma is also developing its own social studies and science standards and, along with Common Core standards for math and English, will designate all of them Oklahoma Academic Standards. Blackwell said his main concern is that the Common Core standards were adopted without testing or research to prove they will be effective. “I’m not asking anyone to be against Common Core, just to put the standards to the test,” Blackwell said. Blackwell said he believes if his bill goes to a vote in the House, it will pass. He is less confident it would pass in the Senate. State Superintendent Janet Barresi and Gov. Mary Fallin have endorsed the Common Core standards. “We will be working to educate

legislators about the importance of keeping the Oklahoma Academic Standards, and we don’t believe a bill will make it to the governor’s desk,” Pemberton said. On Wednesday, Fallin issued an executive order intended to address some of the major objections to the standards. The order says that the state is solely responsible for developing and implementing the standards, and that “the federal government shall not have any input in the formulation of the Oklahoma Academic Standards or the assessments used to determine student performance.” The order also is designed to protect students’ privacy rights by prohibiting the collection or reporting of any information that would violate state or federal privacy laws. In addition, the order stipulates that the new standards affect only public K-12 schools; private schools and home schools “are not under the jurisdiction of the state Department of Education and are not affected by the implementation of any standards adopted by the State.” “It’s in the best interest of Oklahoma’s children for our state to join the rest of this country in increasing classroom rigor,” Fallin said in a written statement, adding, “It is not, however, in our best interest to allow the federal government, or any organization outside of Oklahoma, to dictate how we teach our children or how we run our public schools.” Oklahoma Watch is a nonprofit, nonpartisan media organization that produces in-depth and investigative journalism on public-policy issues facing the state. For more Oklahoma Watch content, go to www.oklahomawatch.org.

By Oklahoma Watch Concerns over Common Core are reflected in the emails sent to and from State Superintendent Janet Barresi, and to and from Marsha Thompson, assistant state superintendent of instruction, from May 1 through June 30. Educators, parents and citizens weighed in with their views. State officials shared emails and articles from other groups and political leaders. Oklahoma Watch obtained the emails in an Open Records Act request in an effort to gauge feedback over the standards and the Oklahoma State Department of Education’s responses. Here is a summary of some of the messages: Weleetka Superintendent In an email sent to Barresi on May 13, Dan Parrish, then superintendent of Weleetka Public Schools, asked whether the state would keep Common Core and raised concerns about the testing associated with the new standards. Parrish compared the implementation of Common Core to his experience with Outcome-Based Education methods in the early 1990s. In his email, he pointed out that “we put a lot of effort into OBE” only to see it go away. Barresi provided a detailed response, saying, “As you know, the standards are simply statements about what children should know and be able to do per subject and per grade. The curriculum to teach the standards should be developed by the teachers at the site and confirmed by their board of education.” She said that only Common Core standards in math and English were being implemented, and she had led the effort to develop the state’s own standards in social studies and science. “We will continue on in subsequent subjects like world languages and art in future years. Collectively ALL of the standards our children will be exposed to are called the Oklahoma Academic standards,”

Fallin supports divisive education standards OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – Gov. Mary Fallin signed an executive order on Wednesday in support of education standards in math and English known as Common Core, and said she hopes the order eases growing fears the standards represent a federal takeover of public education. The standards are part of an initiative of the National Governors Association, which is currently chaired by Fallin. They have been adopted in 45 states, including Oklahoma, but there has been growing opposition to them, especially among some conservative House legislators. Fallin said the executive order should help assure Oklahomans that local teachers and school boards are running local schools, and not President Barack Obama or federal bureaucrats. “So today I want to announce that I am signing an executive order to put these fears to rest, and to make sure that Oklahoma continues to shape its own education policy, including the new standards, not standards from the federal government,” Fallin said. The four-page order states that the federal government will have no input in the formulation of the standards and that the state will be responsible for deciding how to test students. “All agencies of the state of Oklahoma will aggressively oppose any attempt by the federal government to force the state to adopt standards that do not reflect Oklahoma values,” the order states. Rep. Gus Blackwell, one of the fiercest critics of the Common Core standards, said he agrees with the direction the governor is taking but said he still supports an effort to repeal the standards. “I’m for high standards, but I don’t think Common Core gets us where we need to be,” said Blackwell, R-Lavern.

Barresi wrote. “So in answer to question #1, no, they are not going away.” Parrish, who retired after the 2012-2013 school year, said in an interview with Oklahoma Watch that he does not feel teachers have been given enough time or training to properly implement the new standards. “In my 37 years of experience, we are moving way too fast,” he said. He also cited difficulties with testing last year, saying that computer servers got overloaded when students tried to take the required tests. Weleetka Public Schools has five high-speed “T1” lines that should have provided enough bandwidth to handle the testing. The current Weleetka Public Schools superintendent, Chris Carter, said in an interview he is also apprehensive about the new standards, but worries that so much time and money has been invested in the new standards that repealing them could cause additional problems. Tricia Pemberton, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Education, echoed that view, saying it would take just as much time and money to abandon Common Core as it has taken so far to implement it. Teachers • An email dated May 9 from a Vian teacher was addressed to those who approved Common Core. The teacher cited how she had helped a student with a moderate disability move from writing a simple paragraph to writing a four-paragraph essay with a thesis. This “phenomenal” accomplishment required intensive one-on-one instruction. But new demands on teachers, with no additional pay, were taking a toll. “I can tell you that I am reaching the level of burnout,” the teacher wrote. “The legislators and the State Department of Education need to realize what they are so close to losing.” • Twenty-three residents, at least some of them teachers, sent copies of a letter to Barresi over weeks in May and June expressing support for Common Core but noting reservations about associated highstakes testing and saying teachers had not been given adequate training. “I am very concerned that the CCSS are being imposed on teachers without the resources, time and training students and teachers need to succeed,” the letter said. “And I am also troubled that, once again, the focus will be on testing instead of teaching.” The letter called for a moratorium on the high-stakes testing to focus on implementation first. Others Other emails sent to Barresi cited concerns about the federal government overstepping its authority, privacy concerns relating to data collection, complaints that parents are not fully informed about the new standards, and claims that the standards are Marxist in origin, or a plot by the New World Order. An example is a letter from a couple who described themselves as conservative. “By researching Common Core Education, you will discover that Common Core Education is a Marxist trap to take control of our precious children and their future within the Agenda 21, New World Order … We must stop this now! Please keep our children’s education local within Oklahoma.”


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Alva Review-Courier

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Indulge in a feast of Christmas music, décor Sunday Annual Christmas concert, Tour of Homes begins at 2 p.m. By Helen Barrett Alva Public Schools’ vocal department invites everyone to attend a calorie-free feast of Christmas music and décor Sunday afternoon at 2 p.m. in the high school auditorium. Students in grades 6-12 will present their annual Christmas concert followed by the Electric Gold Tour of Homes. All the choirs will join in singing the traditional “Carol of the Bells” and a fun medley titled “Jolly Jingle Christmas.” The middle school choir will present arrangements of “Rise Up Shepherd and Follow,” “Carol of the Kings” and a soothing rendition of “A Winter Night.” Featured soloists will be Kristen Perks, Callie Duncan and Max Cline. Both traditional carols and

popular Christmas songs fill the menu for the high school vocalists. The beautiful voices of Cheney Bird and Gage Bouziden will be featured in “All Ye Good People.” “All Through the Night” will showcase the talents of flautist Alyssa Brewer. “Noel Fantasy” will soothe any tension listeners may feel with its medley of “The First Noel” and “Infant Holy, Infant Lowly.” Aaron Pierce will be the featured bass soloist on the familiar “Please Come Home for Christmas.” The concert will conclude with the traditional singing of “The Hallelujah Chorus” from Handel’s “Messiah.” Audience members who sang this selection in the past as part of the Alva High School

(AHS_ choir or in other venues are invited to join the AHS choir onstage for this celebratory selection. Ramona Cummings directs the choirs, accompanied by Helen Barrett. The concert is free to the public. Greg Baker Home The annual Electric Gold Booster Tour of Homes will begin immediately following the concert. The cost of the tour is $5 with tickets available at the concert or at the featured homes. Greg Baker graciously offered his country home for this year’s tour. As one enters the expansive home, eyes immediately focus on a towering Christmas tree trimmed with fur and feather garlands and zebra-striped balls, in addition to

other traditional ornaments. A colossal crystal vase filled with white-glittered snowballs and matching reindeer adorns the formal dining table. Giant stockings drape from the mantle of the massive stone fireplace. Nearby, a large velvety Santa Claus sits atop the bookcases, keeping an eye on activities. Of special interest to visitors will be the picturesque swimming pool with a babbling stone fountain centered in the serenely landscaped back yard. To reach the Baker home, drive 3 miles north of Alva to Jefferson Road, turn left onto County Road 440. The entrance to the home sits immediately to the left of the intersection. The President’s House Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU) President Dr. Janet Cunningham has graciously opened the President’s House on the NWOSU campus for the annual tour. The magnificent 1918 brick house features many holiday collections – both privately owned by the president, and some donated to the university. Every room of the spacious house is decorated for the Christmas season. Many of the rooms contain different styles of nativity scenes, one of Cunningham’s

trademark decorations. Her newest nativity scene is modern shaped with shiny silver modern sculptures made of a special material developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Since becoming NWOSU president, Cunningham has gifted her senior administrative staff members with pieces of the Willow Tree nativity collection. This year her husband, Rick, surprised her with gifts of wise men and stars for her personal collection. The bookshelves in the office are filled to the ceiling with snow village pieces. In the master bedroom, a Dickens village donated to the university by former instructor Dr. Earlene Smith tops an ornate dresser. Other collections of Santas fill bookshelves and surround the old fashioned pump organ. In the private quarters on the second floor, the family has its own personal trees. The family tree fills one room, while a penguin tree belonging to their son sits in another. The President’s House sits just to the west of the circle drive on the NWOSU campus at 709 W. Oklahoma Blvd. A stop at the President’s House will definitely lift your holiday spirits.

Water cascades over the natural rock fountain into the expansive Feathers and fur garlands combine with zebra striped, gold and red balls fill the massive Christ- Colorful patchwork stockings drape beneath the pool behind the Baker house. Photo by Helen Barrett mas tree in the entry of the Greg Baker home. Pho- lighted garland covered mantle at the Greg Baker home. Photo by Helen Barrett to by Helen Barrett

SNOW VILLAGE -- Dozens of pieces of the Snow Village fill the shelves in the Cunningham’s office. Photo by Helen Barrett

AEROSPACE NATIVITY -- One of Dr. Cunning- Whimsical Santas surround the old fashioned ham’s newest nativity sets is made from a new met- pump organ in the Cunningham home. Photo by al designed by NASA. Photo by Helen Barrett Helen Barrett

Look for more pictures on page 19

A large collection of Snow Babies fill this curio cabinet in the Cunningham family room. Photo by Helen Barrett


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Alva Review-Courier

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Goldbugs stumble Ladybugs win against Woodward season opener By Leslie Nation WOODWARD – The Goldbugs trailed early against the Boomers and were unable to rally and overcome a marginal lead, giving them their first defeat of the season. Roles were reversed in the second game for Alva, as Woodward came out swinging to get a 14-point lead in the first quarter. Alva didn’t get their first score until almost four minutes had ticked off the play clock. The Goldbugs would score once more with 2:41 left in the first before Woodward went on a 10-0 run to end the quarter 18-4. The Boomers’ Ty Richey (#24) hit three treys that gave Woodward that momentum to take a huge lead. In the second quarter, Alva started to hit their shots from the field to outscore Woodward by only two points but still had a long way to go entering halftime. Coming out of halftime, the Boomers extended their lead to a 19-point margin, but the Goldbugs continued to fight back. Alva would come back in the fourth quarter to outscore the Boomers again, but it was not enough, as the Goldbugs fell 44-61. The leading scorer for the Goldbugs was Lane Madsen (#20), who was six for seven from the field and hit two of four from the foul line. Riley Hess (#13) was the only other to hit double digits, with 11 points to go along with his 14 rebounds. The Goldbugs had a tough time hitting from the field, but they shot a higher percentage than the Boomers, hitting 40.4 percent against the Boomers’ 37 percent. Alva was 36.4 percent from the free throw line, hitting only four of 11, while Woodward hit just over half their foul shots, with 11 of 21. Goldbugs head coach Paul Duncan was disappointed in the shooting from the foul line, but believed the team will get better as the season goes. With the football season end-

By Leslie Nation WOODWARD – The Alva High School Ladybugs basketball team made quick work of the Lady Boomers on Tuesday night to win their first game on the road 65-36. The Ladybugs scored four points within the first three minutes before Woodward came back to within one off a layup and a foul shot. The Lady Boomers had made it one-point game with 4:15 left in the first quarter, but that was the closest they got to Alva’s lead, as the Ladybugs took off on a 15-0 run to end the first quarter 19-3. The situation was looking dire at best for Woodward, but they finally hit a rhythm to score 14 points to the Ladybugs’ 21 in the second quarter to go into halftime trailing Alva 40-17. Jaden Hobbs (#23) of the Ladybugs had an impressive second quarter, shooting five of six from the field to score 13 of Alva’s 21

points. Alva continued to outscore the Lady Boomers through each quarter, but only by one or two points. The huge rally in the first quarter had left a gap too big for Woodward to overcome. That lead gave the Ladybugs the needed to push to get a 29-point win over the Lady Boomers and a 1-0 record to start the season. Lora Riley (#15) was the leading scorer for the Ladybugs with 17 points, hitting six of nine from the field. She drained four of her six from the beyond the arc. Hobbs and Morgan Shiever (#10) were the only other Ladybugs to make it to double digits, with 16 and 13 points respectively. Hobbs led Alva with five assists for the night. The Ladybugs freshmen played Ponca City on Thursday at 6 p.m. in the Alva High School gym. The team will host Blackwell (Class 4A) on Friday at 6:30 p.m.

Ty Hooper (#3) goes up to hit a a wide open three-pointer against the Woodward Boomers. Photo by Leslie Nation ing recently, three of Alva’s starters – Trevor Johnson, Ty Hooper and Hess – are just now getting to practice more with the team. “Right now they’re better than us,” said Duncan. “They had two players that didn’t play football (Iliff Taylan and Richey), so they

were in the gym a lot. That’s no excuse, but we’ll get better as the season goes. We still have a lot of growing up to do.” The Goldbugs will host Blackwell on Friday, Dec. 6, after the girls’ basketball game, both in the Alva High School gym.

CB Colvin playing hurt for Sooners  By Murray Evans NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — The pain comes and goes for Aaron Colvin. The Oklahoma cornerback’s injured shoulder might flare up while sitting in class, walking to a team meeting or hanging out with the guys. It hurts worse when it’s cold and it’s going to be frigid Saturday when No. 18 Oklahoma (9-2, 6-2 Big 12 Conference) plays at No. 6 Oklahoma State (10-1, 7-1). But Colvin doesn’t regret — not for a second — his decision to bypass the NFL draft and return for his senior season with the Sooners. Games like the Bedlam showdown are what he came back to Oklahoma for and he plans on toughing it out until the football season ends. “I came back to win games,” Colvin said. “I came back to try to help this team win as many games as I could. I’m a competitor at the end of the day. I can’t sit on the sideline and just watch something. If I don’t give it my all, then I’m going to have regrets and that’s one of my biggest things. I don’t want to have any regrets when I leave this university. “It’s a tough situation that I’m in. But at the end of the day, I’ve just got to leave it in God’s hands and try to grind through it.”

Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops calls Colvin “truly one of the best defensive backs we’ve ever had here.” Colvin was projected as a potential early round NFL draft choice after his junior season, in which he had four interceptions and 11 pass breakups and was a first-team AllBig 12 selection. Instead, Colvin opted to complete what he called “unfinished business” at Oklahoma. He has played nine games this year, starting eight, and has 47 tackles (five for loss), an interception, a fumble recovery and three pass breakups. His toughness might be his most valuable contribution to the Sooners. He injured his shoulder in a loss at Baylor on Nov. 7 and missed Oklahoma’s win over Iowa State the following Saturday. On Nov. 23, on a cold day at Kansas State, the plan was for Colvin to see limited action but, after K-State receiver Tyler Lockett burned the Sooners for three long touchdown catches in the first half, that plan was chucked. Instead, despite being “in a ton of pain,” Colvin matched up on Lockett for most of the second half and held him off the scoreboard, a key factor in allowing the Sooners to win 41-31. “It’s been an uncomfortable

season with his shoulder and he’s really toughed it out and it shows you a lot about his character and his toughness,” Oklahoma defensive coordinator Mike Stoops said. “It’ll be the same deal (against Oklahoma State). He’s a fighter and I’m sure he’ll want to play a great game.” The respect Colvin’s teammates had for him — which already was considerable — increased after his performance against Kansas State. “That’s Slick’s character,” fellow defensive back Zack Sanchez said, referring to Colvin by his nickname. “That’s just the type of player he is. He wants to be in the game, regardless. If he has a broken leg, he’s going to try to be out there. It just speaks volumes to people that don’t know that part of Slick. He’s going to fight to the very end with whatever he’s got.” Colvin said he does his best to block out the pain — “I’ve just got to go out there and play.” — but he also understands the reality of the situation. When he’s getting ready to make a tackle, he thinks about how he can protect his shoulder. “As much as I would try to deny it and say that it doesn’t (bother me), it does,” he said.

Nicole Ritter (#24) hits a layup in the paint against the Woodward Lady Boomers on Tuesday, Dec. 3. Photo by Leslie Nation

Weather forces changes in Okla. football playoffs 

STILLWATER (AP) – Winter weather on the way to Oklahoma has led the Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association to delay this week’s scheduled high school football playoffs across the state. Thursday’s Jenks-Union Class 6A championship game in Stillwater has been moved to Dec. 12 at the University of Tulsa. All 3A, 2A and Class A semifinal games have been rescheduled for Dec. 13. The Class 5A, 4A, B and C title games have been rescheduled for Dec. 14. Cherokee will play Tipton at 7 p.m. Dec. 14 at Southwestern Oklahoma State University in Weatherford. The National Weather Service says rain that is expected to start falling on Thursday will switch to freezing rain in parts of the state, and that freezing rain and sleet will continue into Thursday night. Much of the precipitation is expected to become entirely snow before ending Friday, See Colvin Page 11 and travel is expected to be dangerous.


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Rangers suffer close loss at Cameron Alva High School football NWOSU Sports Information LAWTON – The Northwestern Oklahoma State women’s basketball team suffered another close loss Tuesday night, falling 66-61 at Cameron. Northwestern (0-8) has now dropped four games by five points or less. Two of those defeats have come against the Aggies, who improved to 6-1 on the year. A pair of Rangers reached double digits in the scoring column, led by Kamera Bozeman, who scored 16 points in only 14 minutes of action. A dozen of those came in the second half. Fellow freshman Sarah Parker had 11 and also pulled down a team-high of seven rebounds. Lacy Reinke grabbed nine rebounds and hit eight of 10 shots for

Cameron on her way to 16 points. The Aggies were a sizzling 20 of 23 from the foul line. After trailing by as many as eight, Northwestern had the final surge in a back-and-forth first half. Bozeman scored with 35 seconds to go, and Emily Eaton’s jumper beat the buzzer to send the Rangers into the break down just 31-28. Parker battled foul trouble early but made big contributions down the stretch. Nine of her 11 points came in the second half, including a big putback on the Rangers’ opening possession that helped pull them rise to within a point. Dierra Gilmore drained a three at the 14:38 mark to put Northwestern in front 38-37, but the momentum wouldn’t last. Cameron scored the next 10 points to rocket away.

The Aggies’ lead ballooned to 13 points near the midway point for the second half before a resilient Rangers squad went to work. A 16-6 push cut it back down to three with 2:35 left to play. Bozeman had a pair of three-point plays and Parker drained a couple of treys to get things going. Northwestern was down by three with the ball and a chance to tie, but turned the ball over with 29 seconds left. Cameron went four for five from the foul line down the stretch to keep the game out of reach. Northwestern now plays its final 18 games of the year against Great American Conference foes, beginning Saturday at home against Southern Nazarene. Tipoff is set for 2 p.m. with the men to follow.

Oklahoma pounds Texas A&M CC 78-56 By Scott Wright NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — Until two weeks ago, Isaiah Cousins had never scored more than nine points in a game during his two seasons at Oklahoma. Now, he has scored at least 10 in five straight games. Buddy Hield scored 18 points, Cousins added 12 and the Sooners (7-1) pulled away for a 78-56 victory over Texas A&M-Corpus Christi on Thursday in a matinee that was rescheduled to start five hours earlier because of concerns over bad weather. Hield made eight of his 14 shots from the field and Cousins hit half of his 10, including two 3-pointers. “It was under unusual circumstances moving the game

time up and adjusting the routine,” Oklahoma coach Lon Kruger said. “I thought our guys handled that pretty well. They got off to a good start, got a margin early. It’s good to be challenged by something other than routine from time to time.” Texas A&M-Corpus Christi (37) was led by 12 points and a gamehigh 10 rebounds from freshman Rashawn Thomas, a 6-foot-7 Oklahoma City native making his college debut. Guard John Jordan added 11 points for the Islanders. Ryan Spangler and D.J. Bennett helped Oklahoma’s cause on defense. Spangler led Oklahoma with nine rebounds, while Bennett added nine points and five blocked shots. “For me, it was mainly just

being a presence defensively,” Bennett said. “Coach and the rest of the staff emphasize that every day in practice. I just try to help as much as I can on defense.” Bennett, a 6-foot-8 reserve junior forward, was slowed by injuries early in the season. As his health has returned, he has become integral to the Sooner defense, and provides comfort for the perimeter defenders. “Just having a presence and knowing you have help back there (makes a difference),” Hield said. “We are going to get blocked shots. We are going to run out and make plays for our teammates. It’s good for a defensive team.”

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District 2A-1 Riley Hess Most Valuable Player – Cade All District Pfleider Offensive Line – Kory Dietz Quarterback of the Year – Ty Defensive End – Brandon Ellis Hooper Linebacker – Joby Allen Running Back of the Year – Honorable Mention Cody Jones Offensive Line – Colin Fouts, Wide Receiver of the Year – Dakota Nusser

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Colvin

He has had some people close to him suggest that he shouldn’t play with the injury. “I’ve got a lot of voices in my ears and whatnot, but it’s ultimately my decision,” he said. “Any time somebody tries to give their opinion on something, I kind of ignore it. I know what’s best for me and I know what’s best for this team. At the end of the day, I’ve just got to do us right.” Colvin said his injury will just need time to heal and that he doesn’t know yet if he might be at 100 percent for the Sooners’ bowl game. There’s also the prospect of next year’s NFL draft, during which he figures to be chosen at some point. It was suggested to him that his willingness to play through pain might be considered an asset by pro scouts. “That’d be cool,” he said. “To be honest, though, I’m just trying to get these wins. I’m trying to finish out strong. I don’t want to finish out how we finished out last year (with a bowl loss to Texas A&M). Whatever it takes, that’s what I’m going to do.”


December 6, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 12

Alva Public Library celebrates Oil crews endure even when 50 years at its present location wind chill drops to -40  The Alva Public Library is hosting a day-long reception on Monday, Dec. 9, to celebrate 50 years at its present location and over 100 years of public library access for the citizens of Alva. The reception starts at 10 a.m. with welcoming comments from speaker Karen Koehn. A special display will feature pictures and interesting information about the four locations that have housed the library. A lot of fun facts have been discovered by researching old newspaper articles. Everyone is invited to attend the reception or stop in anytime that day for coffee, hot apple cider and cookies. The library had its beginning in the winter of 1905-1906 when a reception and book shower hosted by the Congregational church brought in the first 75 volumes. In 1911, Alva built a new City Hall, and when a room on the third floor was offered to the City Federation of Women’s Club, the decision was made to use the room for a library, and the Congregationalists donated about 400 books for it. An old newspaper article states, “Forty-seven steps up and forty-seven steps down … with the monthly draw of books averaging 3,000 books, two to a borrower, how many steps have been taken since the Alva City Library has been located on the top floor of the City Hall? Thirty-one years is a long time to tote books up and down all those stairs.” Former Alva Public Library librarian Shelley Martin remembers climbing those 47 steps as a child and contemplating sliding down

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the banister. The decision was made to move the library to the first floor of the new civic center (the old hospital) and more than 14,000 books were sorted, arranged and moved to the new location. The paper speculated that borrowers and librarians would break into smiles at the first-floor location. Twenty-one years later, everyone who occupied the civic center building moved out except the library, which could not locate a place to go. Wonderful news arrived for the citizens of Alva and Woods County when it was announced that the Charles Morton Share Trust was going to erect, as its first building, a new library. The library, at a cost of $320,000, would be located on the corner of Barnes and Seventh streets. On Dec. 9, 1963, a dedication ceremony was held and the deed to the library was presented to the City of Alva by the trust. One hundred Alva citizens donated $10,000, which the Share Trust matched, and this money bought the new furniture for the main floor. The majority of this furniture is still in use. Board member Marilyn Clyne has memories of helping move the books into the wonderful new library building. Under the leadership of former director Larry Thorne, the library collection and services offered continued to expand and provide the patrons in the area with services that were usually only available in large metropolitan and system libraries. The library appreciates the continuing support it has received from the Charles Morton Share

Trust through the years, including the funding when the library went through the automation process. The Wisdom Family Foundation, working in conjunction with the Alva Public Library Foundation, generously funded Alva’s newest park, the Library Pocket Park, which includes a shaded table seating area, stage, electrical outlets and lighting. The area can be used for small receptions, and plans are to utilize it as a venue for music groups to hold small concerts for the public. The land for the pocket park was donated a number of years ago by the late Gertrude Myers, who requested that it be used for the library and the citizens of Alva. Numerous other individuals and groups have provided valuable support, including the Friends of the Alva Public Library. The City of Alva funds the library and the additional support of area citizens has allowed the library to grow and offer new services, including Internet computers, wireless Internet and ebooks. The latest technology to be added is a Web conferencing unit that should be available for use in January. Washington School students will be visiting the library during the afternoons of Dec. 9 and 10. Activities for the month of December include special “Craft and Movie Days” held from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 10 and 17, and Wednesday, Dec. 11 and 18. Regular story time will be held on Mondays at 3:30 p.m. Happy holidays from the staff of the Alva Public Library.

Sooners

Spangler, a 6-foot-7 forward, has 13 blocked shots in the Sooners’ last six games to help Oklahoma’s interior defense. “With the rules the way they are, it’s harder to guard the ball,” Kruger said. “The ball is getting keyed into the paint more. Having a shot blocker behind you takes on a greater significance more and more. That’s going to become even more obvious. If you have a guy back there that can block shots and change shots, it’s really important.” Oklahoma made nine of 22 3-pointers, five coming in the first half as the Sooners built a 42-24 lead. Guard Jordan Woodard hit two 3s as he and Hield led the

Sooners with eight points each in the first half. With an undersized lineup, Oklahoma attacked early with a fast-paced offense. Woodard finished with eight points and four assists. His 3-pointer with 7:38 left in the first half sparked a 16-2 run that put Oklahoma up 38-20. Six different players made a 3-pointer in Oklahoma’s guardheavy rotation that generated a steady offense in the first half. And the Sooners committed just nine turnovers. Woodard has 14 assists and two turnovers during the Sooners’ three-game winning streak.

Oklahoma’s shooting went cold to start the second half, but the Islanders were still unable to gain much ground. The Sooners maintained at least a 15-point lead throughout the second half, slowly putting the Islanders away. Overall, the Sooners shot 45 percent as they wrapped up a threegame home stand, but the Islanders were even colder at 38 percent. Oklahoma forced 20 turnovers. “We are just trying to be active on defense,” Hield said. “We want to get stops and run out and score the basketball. That’s what we’re trying to do every day. We can get as many turnovers as we need and that gives us opportunities to score the basketball.”

By James MacPherson BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — With the wind chill falling to almost minus 40, Steve Hendershot’s mind was elsewhere Thursday as he and his crew of roustabouts worked an oil rig in North Dakota’s booming oil patch. On palm trees and beaches, in fact. “Sometimes you just got to close your eyes and dream of a warm, happy place,” said Hendershot, working near Souris. “I’m doing that today.” The cold weather sweeping the Plains wasn’t cooling off work in the oil patch, which moves forward in all kinds of weather. But even hardened oilmen were taking note of the dangerous conditions that were expected to keep daily highs below zero until Sunday. A powerful winter storm that slammed much of the nation kept intensifying Thursday, draping many communities in skin-stinging cold. The system dumped 1 to 2 feet of snow in parts of Minnesota and Wisconsin, forcing school closures and temporary power outages and delighting skiers who hit the slopes despite temperatures in the single digits. The south-central U.S. braced for the next blow, expected to come Friday in the form of sleet and ice that could imperil millions unaccustomed to the treacherous combination of moisture and bitter cold. In Montana, temperatures fell as low as minus 26 in Great Falls and minus 27 in Havre, both records. In parts of the Rockies and Northern Plains, wind made those conditions feel even colder. The deep freeze, blamed on the jet stream’s move southward, was expected to linger at least through the weekend. With the mercury falls this low, the cold inflicts pain on exposed skin almost instantly, and water poured from a cup can freeze before hitting the ground. Contact lenses begin sticking to eyeballs. Cars fail to start, and people begin longing for heavy foods. Pets refuse to go outside. The Red Cross urged people to stay inside or layer up to guard against frostbite if they must go out. The agency also asked residents to check on neighbors, especially those who need special assistance or live alone. Holiday events were called off. In Rapid City, S.D., officials concluded it was too cold for ice skating. Oil patch workers endure by layering up beneath fire-retardant

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clothing and taking breaks in small heated shacks called “doghouses,” which are often near rigs. Many companies also try to hire locals with at least five years of experience. “If they’ve made it that long, they’re probably going to stick around,” said Larry Dokken, a veteran oilman whose consulting firm recruits workers for oil companies. Hendershot has shared the advice of dreaming of warmer climes to fellow workers in years past. He said a few have taken it literally. “Some have actually left and gone to that warm, happy place,” he said. Some workers gripe about the bone-numbing temperatures, he added. Many others take pride in withstanding it. “This is what I love to do,” said Craig Hovet, during a break from maintenance work on a well Wednesday near Mandaree. “The joke around here is: This kind of weather keeps out the riffraff.” North Dakota historically has conjured up images of a bleak, wind-swept and treeless wasteland. The perception was so great that one group a decade ago proposed changing the state’s name by dropping “North” and leaving just “Dakota,” to dispel the state’s image of inhospitable winter weather. That was before North Dakota’s recent oil bonanza, which has brought swarms of people to the state in search of jobs and a fresh start. Now thousands of new oil wells have been punched though the prairie, generating billions of dollars and abundant work. It’s a boom that doesn’t pause for the weather. “The pace probably slows during extreme blizzard conditions,” said Ron Ness, president of the North Dakota Petroleum Council, an industry group that represents hundreds of oil-related companies. “And there are extra precautions on safety. But it’s work that is not going to stop.” Hendershot was keeping close tabs on his crew Thursday, making sure they got plenty of breaks in vehicles and the heated work shacks. One worker told him Thursday that it had gotten so cold that “it froze his soul.” “There is only a certain amount of time these guys can work in this, and some people get cold quicker than others,” Hendershot said. “Everybody talks about how much money an oil worker is paid.

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December 6, 2013 LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Friday, December 6, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: SANDRIDGE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION, LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: POOLING LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Section 22, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma Cause CD No. 201307672 AMENDED NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, including the following: Eleanor Cooper Van Petten Trust dtd 2/1/85, and the Trustee of such trust; Countryside United Methodist Church; Virginia Military Institute Foundation; Carol J. Drake; Myra B. Ward; Moyer O G & I LP; Carl E. Gungoll; Chesapeake Exploration, LLC; Chesapeake Operating, Inc.; Tiptop Oil and Gas US, LLC; Marjorie Frick, deceased; Harlan Birch, deceased; Carole J. Drake, LLC; Beatty Silvius, deceased; George G. Vaught, Jr.; David Curry; Steve G. Shaddock; Wayne A. Bliss; Alfred E. Van Patten, Jr., deceased; if any of the above-named individuals be deceased, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such deceased individual; if any of the above-named parties is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity; and if the above-named party designated as a trustee is not presently acting in such capacity as trustee, then the unknown successor or successors to such trustee. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicant, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, has filed an amended application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma to enter an order pooling the interests, and adjudicating the rights and equities in connection therewith, of the oil and gas owners in the 640-acre drilling and spacing unit formed in Section 22, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, for the Mississippi Chester common source of supply, in respect to the development of such common source of supply in such unit. The interests of the oil and gas owners involved herein and the rights and equities in respect thereto are sought herein to be pooled and adjudicated pursuant to 52 O.S. §87.1 within and on the basis of the unit covered hereby, and not limited to a single wellbore. The amended application in this cause states that Applicant has proposed the development of the common source of supply in the unit involved herein under a plan of development and has proposed to commence such plan of development of such unit by an initial well in the lands covered hereby. Such amended application further states that Applicant has been unable to reach an agreement with the owners of drilling rights named as respondents herein with respect to such proposed plan of development of the common source of supply in the unit covered hereby. Such amended application further requests up to 365 days within which to commence operations on or in connection with such initial well under such plan of development. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the amended application in this cause requests that SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, or some other party recommended by Applicant be designated as operator under the order to be entered herein of the common source of supply in the unit covered hereby, including the initial well and any subsequent well or wells to be drilled under or otherwise covered by Applicant’s proposed plan of development of such unit. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause is set before an administrative law judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma. Notice is further given that the amended application in this cause may be further amended at such hearing in accordance with the rules of the Commission and the laws of the State of Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an administrative law judge on the Conservation Docket at the Western Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, 2101 North Lincoln Boulevard, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 A.M. on the 23rd day of December, 2013, and that this amended notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that

LPXLP Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their names and telephone numbers. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact John R. Reeves, attorney, OBA #7479, Seventeenth Floor, One Leadership Square, 211 North Robinson Avenue, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, Telephone: (405) 272-5742; or Luke Roberts, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73102-6406, Telephone: (405) 429-6344. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA. L. MURPHY, Commissioner DONE AND PERFORMED this 2nd day of December, 2013. BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary 14831-0737anoh

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Friday, December 6, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANTS: CHESAPEAKE OPERATING, INC. AND CHESAPEAKE EXPLORATION, L.L.C. RELIEF SOUGHT: WELL LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 30, TOWNSHIP 28 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST OF THE IM, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA Cause CD No. 201307746 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, more particularly the parties set out on the Exhibit “A” attached to the application on file in this cause, and, if any of the named individuals be deceased, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such deceased individual; if any of the named entities is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity; if any of the named parties designated as a trustee is not presently acting in such capacity as trustee, then the unknown successor or successors to such trustee; if any of the named parties designated as an attorney-in-fact is not presently acting in such capacity as attorney-in-fact, then the unknown successor or successors to such attorney-in-fact; and if any of the named entities are corporations which do not continue to have legal existence, the unknown trustees or assigns of such parties. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicants, Chesapeake Operating, Inc. and Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C., have filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission to enter an order, as follows: (i) authorizing and permitting an exception to the permitted well location tolerances in the 640-acre drilling and spacing unit comprised of Section 30, Township 28 North, Range 13 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, for the Mississippi Lime common source of supply, so as to allow a well to be drilled as follows: Location of Wellbore at Completion Interval: The proposed location of the completion interval will be no closer than 165 feet from the south line and no closer than 560 feet from the west line and no closer than 165 feet from the north line and no closer than 560 feet from the west line of the unit comprising said Section 30, Township 28 North, Range 13 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, and to be completed in and produce hydrocarbons from the above-named common source of supply; (ii) providing for the re-opening of the cause at such time as the bottom hole location of the well proposed hereunder has been determined; and (iii) establishing a proper allowable with no downward adjustment made thereto. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that the order be entered in this matter be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and that the authorization and

Alva Review-Courier permission requested herein run in favor of one or both of the Applicants, including Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C. acting by and through its agent Chesapeake Operating, Inc., or some other party recommended by Applicants. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the legal descriptions for the land sections adjacent to said Section 30 are Sections 19, 20, 29, 31 and 32, Township 28 North, Range 13 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma and Sections 24, 25 and 36, Township 28 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Merits Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 23rd day of December 2013, and that this notice will be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicants and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. An interested party who wishes to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicants or Applicants’ attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide his or her name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Matt Fleischer, landman, (405) 935-1407, or Emily P. Smith, attorney, OBA No. 20805, (405) 9358203, Chesapeake Operating, Inc., P.O. Box 18496, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73154-0496. Please refer to Cause CD Number. DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 3rd day of December 2013. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Friday, December 6, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA Case No. PB-2013-1 In the Matter of the Estate of Catherine Allene Clarke, Deceased. NOTICE OF HEARING RETURN OF SALE OF MINERAL INTERESTS NOTICE is hereby given that Charles Alvin McDonald, Personal Representative of the Estate of Catherine Allene Clarke, Deceased, has made Return to this Court of, and presented for confirmation, sale made by him as such personal Representative to ROCKY D. HODGSON, for the sum of ONE HUNDRED TWENTY FIVE THOUSAND NINE HUNDRED FIFTY THREE DOLLARS ($125,953.00) cash, under power of sale granted in the Last Will and Testament of Catherine Allene Clarke, Deceased, of the following described mineral interests situate in Woods County, State of Oklahoma, to-wit: ALL MY MINERAL INTEREST IN: TRACT 1: Northeast Quarter (NE/4) of Section One (1), Township Twenty-two (22) N, Range Fourteen (14) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. TRACT 2: North Half of the Southwest Quarter (N/2 SW/4) and the Southwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SW/4 SW/4) of Section Thirty-five (35), Township Twenty-three (23) N, Range Thirteen (13) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. TRACT 3: Northwest Quarter (NW/4) of Section Seven (7), Township Twenty-four (24) N, Range Thirteen (13) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. TRACT 4: East Half of the Northwest Quarter (E/2 NW/4), of Section Eighteen (18), Township Twenty-four (24)N, Range Thirteen (13) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. TRACT 5: Southwest Quarter (SW/4) of Section Twenty (20), Township Twenty-four (24) N, Range Thirteen (13) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. TRACT 6: Northwest Quarter (NW/4) of Section Ten (10), Township Twenty-six (26) N, Range Sixteen (16) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma.

Page 13 TRACT 7: South Half of the Southwest Quarter (S/2 SW/4) of Section Twenty-two (22), Township Twenty-six (26)N, Range Sixteen (16) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. TRACT 8: Southeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SE/4 NE/4) of Section Three (3), Township Twenty-seven (27)N, Range Fourteen (14) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. TRACT 9: East Half of the Northeast Quarter (E/2 NE/4) of Section Twenty-one (21), Township Twenty-seven (27)N, Range Fourteen (14) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. TRACT 10: West Half of the Northwest Quarter (W/2 NW/4) of Section Twenty-two (22), Township Twenty-seven (27)N, Range Fourteen (14) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. TRACT 11: South Half of the Southeast Quarter (S/2 SE/4) of Section Six (6), Township Twenty-seven (27)N, Range Seventeen (17) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. TRACT 12: West Half of the Northeast Quarter (W/2 NE/4) of Section Seven (7), Township Twenty-seven (27)N, Range Seventeen (17) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. TRACT 13: LOT 2 (a/d/a) Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (NW/4 (NE/4) of Section Two (2), Township Twenty-eight (28)N, Range Seventeen (17) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. TRACT 14: Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE/4 SW/4) of Section Six (6), Township Twenty-eight (28)N, Range Seventeen (17) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma, and a strip of land off E. Side of Lot 3 as follows: 5 chains wide & 21.52 chains long containing 10 acres. TRACT 15: East Half of the Northwest Quarter (E/2 NW/4) and the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SW/4 NE/4) of Section Seven (7), Township Twenty-eight (28)N, Range Seventeen (17) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. TRACT 16: Northwest Quarter (NW/4) and the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NW/4 SW/4) of Section Twentyeight (28), Township Twenty-eight (28) N, Range Eighteen (18) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. TRACT 17: Southwest Quarter (SW/4) of Section Twenty-nine (29), Township Twentyeight (28)N, Range Eighteen (18) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. TRACT 18: Lots One (1) and Two (2) and the East Half of the Northwest Quarter (E/2 NW/4) (a/d/a NW/4) of Section Thirty-one (31), Township Twenty-eight (28)N, Range Eighteen (18) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. TRACT 19: Northeast Quarter (NE/4) of Section Twenty-six (26), Township Twenty-nine (29)N, Range Seventeen (17) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. TRACT 20: Northwest Quarter (NW/4) of Section Twenty-three (23), Township Twentynine (29)N, Range Eighteen (18) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. TRACT 21: Southwest Quarter (SW/4) of Section Thirty-five (35), Township Twenty-nine (29)N, Range Eighteen (18) W.I.M., Woods County, Oklahoma. AND, the following described mineral interests situate in Alfalfa County, State of Oklahoma, to-wit: TRACT 22: Northeast Quarter (NE/4) of Section Fourteen (14), Township Twenty-four (24)N, Range Eleven (11) W.I.M., Alfalfa County, Oklahoma. TRACT 23: North Half of the Northwest Quarter (N/2 NW/4) of Section Twenty-three (23), Township Twenty-four (24)N, Range Eleven (11) W.I.M., Alfalfa County, Oklahoma. AND, the following described mineral interests situate in Major County, State of Oklahoma, to-wit: TRACT 24: Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (NW/4 NE/4) of Section Fourteen (14), Township Twenty-two (22)N, Range Twelve (12) W.I.M., Major County, Oklahoma. Less and Except 3 acres of CRI&P Railroad ROW and 2 acres to Concho Washed Sand & Gravel Co. Off the NW corner thereof. AND, the following described mineral interests situate in Texas County, State of Oklahoma, to-wit: TRACT 25: Lots One (1) and Two (2), Block Eight (8) and Lots One (1) and Two (2),

Block Five (5), and Lots One (1) and Two (2), Block Nine (9) and Lot One (1), Block Twenty-four (24) in Park Addition to Town of Guymon, Oklahoma, being a part of Section Thirty-one (31), Township Three (3)N, Range Fifteen (15) E.C.M., Texas County, Oklahoma. AND, the following described surface and mineral interest situate in LeFlore County, Oklahoma, to-wit: SURFACE AND MINERAL INTEREST IN TRACT 26: South Half of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (S/2 SE/4 NW/4) of Section Three (3), Township Four (4)N, Range Twenty-two (22) E.I.M., LeFlore County, Oklahoma. AND, the following described mineral interest situate in Barber County, Kansas, to-wit: TRACT 27: Lot Four (4) and the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE/4 SW/4) (a/d/a S/2 SW/4) of Section Six (6), Township Thirty-four (34)S, Range Thirteen (13) W.I.M., Barber County, Kansas. TRACT 28: South Half of the Southeast Quarter (S/2 SE/4) of Section Seven (7), Township Thirty-four (34)S, Range Thirteen (13) W.I.M., Barber County, Kansas. TRACT 29: Lots One (1) and Two (2) and the East Half of the Northwest Quarter (E/2 NW/4) (a/d/a NW/4) of Section Seven (7), Township Thirty-four (34)S, Range Thirteen (13) W.I.M., Barber County, Kansas. TRACT 30: Lots Three (3) and Four (4) and the East Half of the Southwest Quarter (E/2 SW/4) (a/d/a SW/4) of Section Seven (7), Township Thirty-four (34)S, Range Thirteen (13) W.I.M., Barber County, Kansas. TRACT 31: Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NW/4 SE/4) of Section Seven (7), Township Thirty-four (34)S, Range Thirteen (13) W.I.M., Barber County, Kansas. TRACT 32: Southeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SE/4 SE/4) of Section One (1), Township Thirty-four (34)S, Range Fourteen (14) W.I.M., Barber County, Kansas. TRACT 33: East Half of the Southeast Quarter (E/2 SE/4) of Section Eleven (11), Township Thirty-four (34)S, Range Fourteen (14) W.I.M., Barber County, Kansas. TRACT 34: Northeast Quarter (NE/4) of Section Twelve (12), Township Thirty-four (34) S, Range Fourteen (14) W.I.M., Barber County, Kansas. TRACT 35: Southwest Quarter (SW/4) of Section Twelve (12), Township Thirty-four (34) S, Range Fourteen (14) W.I.M., Barber County, Kansas. TRACT 36: Southeast Quarter (SE/4) of Section Twelve (12), Township Thirty-four (34) S, Range Fourteen (14) W.I.M., Barber County, Kansas. TRACT 37: Northeast Quarter (NE/4) of Section Thirteen (13), Township Thirty-four (34) S, Range Fourteen (14) W.I.M., Barber County, Kansas. TRACT 38: Northwest Quarter (NW/4) of Section Thirteen (13), Township Thirty-four (34) S, Range Fourteen (14) W.I.M., Barber County, Kansas. TRACT 39: East Half of the Northeast Quarter (E/2 NE/4) of Section Fourteen (14), Township Thirty-four (34)S, Range Fourteen (14) W.I.M., Barber County, Kansas. TRACT 40: Northeast Quarter (NE/4) of Section Eighteen (18), Township Thirty-four (34) S, Range Fourteen (14) W.I.M., Barber County, Kansas. TRACT 41: Lots One (1) and Two (2) and the East Half of the Northwest Quarter (E/2 NW/4) (a/d/a NW/4) of Section Eighteen (18), Township Thirty-four (34)S, Range Fourteen (14) W.I.M., Barber County, Kansas. to ROCKY D. HODGSON, for the sum of ONE HUNDRED TWENTY FIVE THOUSAND NINE HUNDRED FIFTY THREE DOLLARS ($125,953.00), which return is on file herein, and that the 31st day of January, 2014, at 11:30 o’clock A.M., in the district court room in the court house in the city of Alva, in said county of Woods, State of Oklahoma, has been appointed for hearing such return, at which time any person interested in said Estate, may appear and contest the same. Reference is hereby made to said return for further particulars. Dated the 4th day of December, 2013. s/ Mickey J. Hadwiger JUDGE OF THE DISTRICT COURT


December 6, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 14

My place in the marching order By Dr. W. Jay Tyree, College Hill Church of Christ “Every soldier must know, before he goes into battle, how the battle he is to fight fits into the larger picture, and how the success of his fighting will influence the battle as a whole.” – Bernard Law Montgomery One of the reasons Christians fail to stand firm and accomplish things for the Kingdom stems from a lack of understanding concerning their special place in both the physical and spiritual history of mankind. As we study the “superheroes” of the faith, men and women who grace the pages of the Old and New Testaments, it is easy to see ourselves as underproductive and of little or no value to the cause of Christ. Of course, just to say it out loud is to realize the folly of such thinking. Each of us has a role to play in God’s ultimate task of redeeming mankind. Two of my favorite biblical examples among the faithful are the Good Samaritan (a man deval-

ued and avoided by the religious elite of his era) and Tabitha, a.k.a. Dorcas, whose claim to fame was simply sewing and caring for others. In both cases, we are treated to a quick glance at the lifestyle of those who seem to know their own place in the battle. The Samaritan is the subject of a parable, told by Jesus, to define the commandment, “Love your neighbor.” He went out of his way to care for one who was in dire circumstances – going well above and beyond what others were willing to do. Tabitha had invested so much of herself in the lives of others that, upon her death, the Apostle Peter was moved to reclaim her from the dead – if only for a while – as a gift to those who loved her so much. You can find the story of the Good Samaritan in Luke 10:2534 and the account of Tabitha’s return from the dead in Acts 9:3642. At the conclusion of both passages, there is a brief “punchline.” In the case of Tabitha, it is noted

Alva Friends Church

that many new disciples came to faith because of her return from the dead. No doubt each of those converted were treated to stories of her love and generosity prior to her death. The ending of the Parable of the Good Samaritan is a bit more “in your face.” After making His point about caring for others, He ends the discussion with a short but challenging command: “Go and do the same.” It’s been quite a while since I’ve seen anyone walk on the water (though I’ve met a few preachers who seem convinced they could pull it off), but every day I see fellow workers in the Kingdom of Christ winning amazing victories by caring for those around them. In just the past few weeks, I have been the recipient of many such gestures and, believe me, I have found some new heroes of the faith. It is great to be back in Alva, America, among so many compassionate and caring folks. Keep up the good work and remember: the battle belongs to the Lord!

Area Church Directory

College & Center, Alva 327-2524

Alva Wesleyan Church Third & Church, Alva 327-2636

Barnes Street Church of Christ 1024 Barnes Street, Alva

Bible Baptist Church 402 Choctaw, Alva 327-1582 www.BBCalva.com

Capron United Methodist Church 580-829-4416

Cedar Grove Wesleyan Church

Our Mother of Mercy Catholic Church

First Baptist Church

Sacred Heart Catholic Church

Fifth & Maple, Alva 327-0894

210 S. Main, Waynoka

Twelfth & Church, Alva 327-0339

College & Church, Alva 327-2623 alvafbc@yahoo.com

St. Cornelius Catholic Church 404 S. Massachusetts, Cherokee

First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

Seventh Day Adventist Tenth & Church, Alva 327-4752

College & Maple, Alva 327-0194

Town & Country Christian Church

First Presbyterian Church

Ninth & Church, Alva 327-0811

Seventh & Church 327-3895

Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church

First United Methodist Church

Ninth & Center, Alva 327-2846

Freedom United Methodist Church

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

1407 Thunderbird Rd., Alva 327-2993

Church of the Nazarene College & Locust, Alva 327-2566 www.alvanaz.org

College Hill Church of Christ 1102 College Blvd., Alva 327-0130 www.alvaok.net/collegehill

Community of Christ First & Church, Alva 327-0719

Dacoma Church of God 505 Broadway, Dacoma

Alva Church of God Sunday, December 8: Sunday begins at 9:30 a.m. Worship will begin at 10:30 a.m. Pastor Robert Brown will bring a sermon entitled “Jesus Came, but They Missed Him.” Our evening study at 6 p.m. will be “Wisdom to Live By – Proverbs.” Wednesday, December 11: This evening’s topic is “The Trouble with Sin.” Please visit our website at www. AlvaChurchOfGod.org. Alva Friends Church Sunday, December 8: We would love for you and your family to join us here on the corner of College Avenue and Center Street as together we worship and serve the Lord. Sunday school for all ages will begin at 9:30 a.m. The worship hour begins at 10:30 a.m. Pastor Mark will share with the Little Friends and preach the message, “Missing from Nativity Scenes,” from Mark 1:1-8. Sherry Williams will serve as worship and song leader. Accompanists are Sally Byrd on the organ and Cindy Goss on

First Assembly of God

7 mi W on Hwy 64, 10 mi N, 2 mi W 430-9026

Church of God

Church Calendar

College & Church, Alva 327-2571

Third & Maple, Alva 327-0510 zlcalva@cneconnect.com

800 Eagle Pass, Freedom 580-621-3580

Campus Ministries

Park & Church, Alva 327-4210 (327-0817) www.freewebs.com/graceandfaith

1020 College, Alva - 580-371-5957 bsu1933nw@yahoo.com

Grace & Faith Fellowship

Baptist Student Union

Green Valley Free Methodist Church South of Alva on Hwy 45 580-871-2456

Hopeton Wesleyan Church

Chi Alpha Student Fellowship

(Upstairs at First Assembly of God) 904 Fifth, Alva - 327-0894

Church of Christ Bible Chair 1108 College, Alva - 327-4511

8 miles S of Alva on Hwy 281 580-435-2400 hwc@hopetonchurch.org

College & Barnes, Alva - 327-5433 extreme@hopetonchurch.org

1.6 miles E on Hwy 64, Alva

1027 Eighth, Alva - 327-2046 wesleyhousenwosu@yahoo.com

Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witness

The eXtreme

Wesley House

Marshall Funeral Home www.marshallfuneralhomes.com

PO Box 804 230 Flynn • Alva, OK 327-2311

1-800-656-2311

PO Box 178 1872 Cecil • Waynoka, OK 824-2311

the piano. Wednesday, December 11: Our adult Bible study group is doing Adent season study, “When God Comes Down.” It meets at 6 p.m. at the church. All are welcome. Alva Wesleyan Church Sunday, December 8: Sunday worship is at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., with Sunday school at 9:30 a.m. Evening Bible study is held at 6 p.m. Alva Wesleyan Church is on the corner of Third and Church streets, Alva, 580-327-2636. Wednesday, December 11: Awana for kids three years through eighth grade meets at 6 p.m. Youth – grades nine through 12 – also meet at 6 p.m. If you have any questions, call 580-327-2636. Avard Christian Church Sunday, December 8: Sunday school is at 10 a.m, Worship begins at 11 a.m. Avard Christian Church is 7 miles west of Alva on Highway 64 and 7 miles south on County Road 370, or 6 miles south on Highway 281 and 7 miles west on Garvin Rd. Avard Christian Church, Rt. 2 Box 92, Alva, OK 73717. Pastor Neal Gordon, 580431- 2646; cell 580-430-8464. Barnes Street Church of Christ Sunday, December 8: Sunday worship services will be at 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. (7 p.m. during daylight savings time). Wednesday, December 11: Evening services will be at 6 p.m. (7 p.m. during daylight savings time). Visitors are most welcome to attend the worship services. For more information, contact Landis Trekell (327-0865), Andrew Rhodes (3273368), Brian Gaddy (327-5130) or Gray Fields (327-6676). Bible Baptist Church All services will be held at Fourth and Choctow in the fellowship hall of our church building Saturday, December 7: Women’s Bible study continues today at 9:30 a.m. in the back of the fellowship hall. Sunday, December 8: Sunday school starts at 10 a.m. There are graded classes for children, a teen class, a college and career class and an adult class. Morning worship service will start at 11 a.m. “A Simple Christmas” starts today! Evening service will begin at 6 p.m. in the church fellowship hall. Teen Impact will also meet at this time and is open to all teens from sixth to 12th grade. Wise Guys, our youth program for pre-school to fifth-grade children, will also meet at 6 p.m. Tuesday, December 10: Celebrate Recovery will meet in the church fellowship hall at 7 p.m. This is a Christ-based recovery program to help provide a safe place to discover a Savior who can give freedom from hang ups, hurts and habits. Everyone is invited to attend. Wednesday, December 11: Tonight we will be going Christmas caroling. We will meet at the church at 6:30 p.m. As always, transportation and nurseries are available for all services. We look forward to having you and your family visit us this Sunday! Capron United Methodist Church Sunday, December 8: If you don’t have a church home, we would love for you to worship with us. Services start at 9:15 a.m. with singing and preaching of the Word. Pastor Clark’s message is entitled “Be Ready,” based on Matthew 24:36-44. At 10:30, adult Sunday school will begin. We are studying the book by James W. Moore,

See Calendar Page 15


LPXLP

December 6, 2013

From Page 14

Alva Review-Courier

Calendar

“Finding Bethlehem in the Midst of Bedlam.” For more information about our church, activities or if you have a need, please call 580-216-4787. Cedar Grove Wesleyan Church Sunday, December 8: Pastor Harold Henson and the entire Cedar Grove family desire to get to know you and your family when you join our loving and caring congregation of all ages, as we discover the truths of Jesus Christ are love, grace, forgiveness, joy and fellowship through Sunday school at 10 a.m. and at 11 a.m. the morning worship. Church of the Nazarene Sunday, December 1: Experience AlvaNaz! Are you looking for a church to call home? We want to welcome you to our services and experience God’s love with our church family! Be our guest @ AlvaNaz! Come and join our family. Need a ride? Please call 327-2566 or327-7751 to reserve your ride today! We can pick you up for breakfast, Bible study and morning worship. God wants you to spend eternity with him. We have a great time at AlvaNaz! Free continental breakfast @ 9 a.m. Bible study @ 9:30 a.m. and worship @ 10:45 a.m. (Continental breakfast begins in June.) The sermon topic will be “The Joy of our Christmas Witness.” Prayer for the week: Dear God: Help me to be a witness to your glory and honor in all that I do each day! You are an awesome God! In Jesus name, Amen. If you have a prayer request, please email it to WorshipGod@ AlvaNaz.org. We want to pray for you! AlvaNaz – A Church For All People – 728 College – 580-3272566 – www.AlvaNaz.org Email address: worshipgod@alvanaz. org. Find us on Facebook at www. facebook.com/www.alvanaz.org. College Hill Church of Christ Sunday, December 8: Sunday Bible class for all ages begins at 9:30 a.m. and worship begins at 10:30 a.m. Following the weekly fellowship lunch, the afternoon service will begin at 12:45 p.m. Don’t miss a Sunday with our great Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ! Wednesday, December 11: Bible classes for adults, college age and children will be held at 7 p.m. From our family to yours, we sincerely invite you to worship God with us this coming Sunday. Be encouraged and lifted up as we sing songs of praise, lift up our prayers to God, observe the Lord’s Supper, and hear a portion of His eternal word. You will be sure to enjoy our “no visitor left behind” policy which means that, as a visitor, you will be greeted and we would love the opportunity to get to know you more. Dacoma United Methodist Church Sunday, December 8: We will gather at 8:30 a.m. for felowship coffee and donuts. Worship will begin at 9 a.m. Wednesday, December 11: Wednesday evening Bible study is on hold until after the new year. Dacoma United Methodist Church is located at 900 Main St., Dacoma, Okla. Eagle Pass Baptist Church Sunday, December 8: At 9:40 a.m., join us for a friendly visit and have some coffee. 10 a.m. – Bible Explorers: getting you into the Bible and the Bible into you. Groups: Young Explorers ages 5-11, Young Teen Explorers ages 12-16 and Adult Explorers ages 17 and older. 11 a.m. – Praise and worship. 3 p.m. – Discipleship. When you walk in, you will

be our guest, but you will walk out family! Meeting at the Senior Citizens Building, 941 Eagle Pass, Freedom. Contact Pastor Dale at 580-430-9079. Jeans and children are welcome! First Assembly of God Sunday, December 8: Morning worship will be at 10:45 a.m. Evening worship will begin at 6 p.m. Wednesday, December 11: Adult Bible study, youth ministry for grades 6-12, and children’s activities at 7 p.m. At 9 p.m. will be Fuel (College and Young Adult Ministry). Nursery is available for all services except for Fuel. For more information please contact us at 580-327-0894. First Baptist Church Sunday, December 8: Prayer time starts at 9 a.m. Sunday school will begin at 9:30 a.m. and at 10:35 a.m. the worship service will begin. Wednesday, December 11: Wednesday night study groups will be at 6 p.m. First Christian Church Sunday, December 8: The choir will present a Christmas musical, “One Small Child,” during our morning worship at 10:30 a.m. Immediately following worship we will join together for our Holiday Dinner and Bake Auction. Proceeds from the bake auction will fund our Christmas baskets. Monday, December 9: Youth will meet at 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. The quilting group will meet at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, December 11: Today’s activities include the children’s Christmas program practice at 6 p.m.and the young adult study at 6 p.m. We invite you to come join us at First Christian Church. First Presbyterian Church Sunday, December 8: Sunday school will be at 9:50 a.m. Worship is at 11 a.m. The worship leader will be Dr. Martha Evans. The ushers will be Carol Bramlett, Jane Gaskill, and Dr. James and Kerri Bell. The sermon title is “Roasting Fork,” based on Matthew 3:1-12. The elders for 2016 will be installed. Wednesday, December 11: Choir practice will begin at 5:30 p.m. The fellowship dinner will be at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, December 12: A session meeting/Christmas party will start at 6 p.m. Friday, December 13: The Tiny Tots Christmas program will begin at 6:30 p.m. First United Methodist Church Saturday, December 7: The Methodist Men breakfast meeting will start at 8 a.m. Sunday, December 8: Sunday school for infants through adults will begin at 9:30 a.m. The worship service will be at 10:30 a.m. The Chancel Choir, directed by Dr. Irene Messaloras, will present a Christmas program. The liturgist will be John Ryerson. Children’s Time will be presented by Paul Duncan. Ushers will be Della Dunnigan, John Plummer, Rob Melton, and Randy and Paula McMurphy. Methodist Men will host a fellowship dinner after worship; donations will support UMM projects. Monday, December 9: Sherrill Bell Choir rehearsal will be at 5:30 p.m. N.A. Meets each Monday at 7 p.m. Wednesday, December 11: The children’s Christmas program will begin at 7 p.m., followed by cookies and punch fellowship, hosted by United Methodist Women, in the basement. Hopeton Church Hopeton: a non-typical church! You don’t have to dress in a suit to be accepted; you can wear your jeans, get a cup of coffee, and enjoy

contemporary music, great videos, and a relevant message. Hopeton Church meets at 10 a.m. at the main campus in Hopeton, just a few short miles south of Alva on 281. Coffee bar begins at 9:30 a.m. in the new children’s wing. A second service is held at the northern campus, The eXtreme, at the corner of College and Barnes Street in Downtown Alva, beginning at 1 p.m. The coffee bar opens at 12:30 p.m. We have something for every age: nursery, children, teens, adults, women’s support groups, and adult small H.O.M.E. groups for fellowship. 19390 County Road 440, PO Box 7, Hopeton, OK 73746. Phone: 580435-2400, fax: 580-435-2401, email: hwc@hopetonchurch.org, Web site: www.hopetonchurch.org. eXtreme Youth Center All middle and high school students are invited to come to this fun place to hang out after school. Winter hours are Monday through Thursday from 3 p.m. To 5:30 p.m. The eXtreme is under the direction of Hopeton Church youth pastors Jeremy and Melissa Little. For more information, call 327-5433. Town and Country Christian Church Sunday, December 8: Sunday school for all ages will start at 9:30 a.m. The Adult Sunday school lesson is “Mary Sings Her Praise,” from Luke 1:46-56. The greeter will be Verna Graybill. At 10:30 a.m. worship service will start. Cherie Lau will play the piano. Song leader will be Kim Foster. Serving communion will be Paul Cole and Justin Lau. Children’s Church will be held. Pastor Paul Cole will bring the message, entitled “A Heartwarming Christmas Brings a Concern,” based on Luke 1:26-38. Tuesday, December 10: Town and Country Saints will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, December 11: The youth group will meet from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The men’s group will meet at 7:45 p.m. Sunday, December 15: The fellowship meal will follow morning worship. Sunday, December 22: The children’s Christmas program and candlelight communion service will begin at 7 p.m. Zion Lutheran Church Rev. Aaron Wagner is the pastor of Zion Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod) at Third and Maple. Sunday School and Adult Bible Class meet at 9:15 a.m. Fellowship begins at 10 a.m. and Divine Worship starts at 10:30 a.m. with Holy Communion twice monthly. Youth Group meets monthly. Ladies circles include Ruth Circle at noon the first Monday, Mary Martha Guild is 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of the month, Lutheran Women’s Missionary League meets the first Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. Hand bells practice at 5 p.m. on Mondays Seasoned Saints meet at 1 p.m. on the third Tuesday. On Wednesdays, Confirmation Class (for grades 7 and 8) begins at 5 p.m. Weekday School (grades 3-6) meets at 3:30 p.m. Zion holds Wednesday Services during Advent and Lent at 7 p.m. There is a Fellowship Meal at 6 p.m. The Lutheran Early Care and Education Center (327-1318) offers care for children as young as six weeks old, as well as an after school program. For more information concerning Zion Lutheran Church call 327-0510 or e-mail zlcalva@cneconnect.com.

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Womens’ religious retreat to focus on happiness Kiowa retreat will be held Jan. 11, 2014 Have you spent your life seeking happiness? Believing that other people often see happiness as what happens to us from the outside, Rev. Billie Blair has sought a deeper level of happiness or joy from the inside. Joy is an internal state, a connection to God that can help every day be more enjoyable and can take us through the hard times in life as well. The Kiowa United Methodist Church is bringing this half-day women’s retreat to Kiowa on Sat-

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, December 6 and December 13, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF JO ANN COSTELLA, DECEASED. Case No. PB-2013-24 NOTICE OF HEARING FINAL ACCOUNT, PETITION FOR DETERMINATION OF HEIRS, DISTRIBUTION AND DISCHARGE Notice is hereby given that Norman Richard Costella, Jr., Christopher James Costella, and Jon Alan Costella, CoPersonal Representatives of the Estate of Jo Ann Costella, deceased, having filed in this Court their final account of the administration of said Estate and Petition for Order allowing same, determination of heirs, distribution, and for final discharge of said Co-Personal Representatives, the hearing of the same has been fixed by the Judge of said Court for Friday, the 3rd day of January, 2014, at 1:30 o’clock P.M. at the Courtroom of said District Court in the Courthouse at Alva, in the County and State aforesaid, and all persons interested in said Estate are notified then and there to appear and show cause, if any they have, why the said account should not be settled and allowed, the heirs of Jo Ann Costella, deceased, determined, and said Estate distributed and the Co-Personal Representatives discharged. Dated this 2nd day of December, 2013. s/Mickey J. Hadwiger JUDGE OF THE DISTRICT COURT Edward E. Sutter, OBA #8778 Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives 401 College Avenue Alva, OK 73717 (580) 327-1511

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Friday, November 29 and December 6, 2013.) Solicitation for Bids (Bid Notice) Sealed bid proposals will be received by Northwestern Oklahoma State University at the Board of Regents Conference Room, located at 709 Oklahoma Blvd.; Alva, Oklahoma until 10:00 a.m. on the 19th day of December, 2013 for furnishing all necessary labor, materials and equipment for the Elevator Cylinder Replacement in Vincent Hall at Northwestern Oklahoma State University, Alva, Oklahoma. Bids received more than ninety-six (96) hours, excluding Saturdays, Sundays and holidays before the final time set for receipt of bids, as well as bids received after the final time set for receipt of bids, will not be considered and will be returned unopened. AGENCY CONTACT: Jim Detgen (580) 327-8645. Said bids will be publicly opened, read aloud, and tabulated in the Jack Annis Regents’ Conference Room, 2nd Floor Herod Hall, Northwestern Oklahoma State University, Alva, Oklahoma, beginning at 10:00 a.m. on the 19th day of December, 2013. Proposals must be sealed to be considered. Bid proposals received will be presented to the Northwestern Oklahoma State University Board of Regents. It is the intent of Northwestern Oklahoma State University to immediately award and execute the contract.

urday Jan. 11, 2014, from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. During this retreat women will discuss what happiness is; how the mind, body and spirit is affected by happiness; and what “Holy Habits,” or tools, can create a deeper sense of joy. The retreat is open to all women from all areas, with any or no faith. Participants can register until Dec. 20. Registration forms are available at the Kiowa United Methodist Church. For more information call Miranda at 620-825-4090. A deposit of $20.00 per set will be required from each contractor obtaining plans and specifications. This deposit will be returned if all sets secured by bidder are returned in good order within seven (7) days after bid date, and if contractor submits a bonafide bid. Failure to do either as specified will forfeit the deposit. Copies of plans and specifications may be obtained by application to the Architect, Easley Associates Architects, 223 North Independence; Enid, Oklahoma 73701. Contractor’s standard AIA Qualification Statement is required prior to receipt of plans and specifications. Contractors must submit Qualification Statement no less than 10 days prior to date of bid opening to be included on bid list. Plans and specifications are also on file for review at plan rooms in Oklahoma City, OK at construction news agencies. Business Relationships Affidavit, Non-Collusion Affidavit and cashiers check, certified check, Surety Bid Bond, or an irrevocable letter of credit in the amount of five percent (5%) of the gross amount of the base bid as a guaranty shall accompany the sealed proposal of each bidder. The Owner reserves the right to reject any or all bids. No bidder may withdraw his bid within thirty (30) days after the actual date of the opening thereof. The successful bidder will be required to submit statutory Payment, Performance, Defect and Maintenance Bonds prior to commencing work on the project. For purposes of your bid, do not include any local or state sales tax. The Owner will appoint the successful bidder its agent for the purpose of receiving tax exempt status on purchase of materials for this Contract only. Authority Oklahoma Statute Article 68 Paragraph 1356, 1983. Dated this 27th day of November, 2013. Dr. Janet Cunningham, President Northwestern Oklahoma State University

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, December 6 and December 13, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT IN AND FOR WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA In the Matter of the Estate of Maude Swann Durkee, Deceased. Case No. PB-2013-46 NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO THE CREDITORS OF MAUDE SWANN DURKEE, DECEASED: All creditors having claims against the above named Decedent are required to present the same, with the description of all security interest and other collateral (if any) held by each creditor with the respect to such claim, to the named Personal Representative, Ann F. Graham, at the office of Dal Houston, 615 Barnes, Alva, Oklahoma, 73717, attorney for said Personal Representative, Ann F. Graham, on or before the following presentment date, to-wit: February 3, 2014, or the same will be forever barred. Dated this 2nd day of December, 2013. Dal L. Houston, Attorney for Personal Representative Dal L. Houston, OBA #17065 BENSON & HOUSTON, P.L.L.C. 615 Barnes/P.O. Box 488 Alva, Oklahoma 73717 (580) 327-1197 Attorney for Estate


December 6, 2013 LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Friday, December 6, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANTS: CHESAPEAKE OPERATING, INC. AND CHESAPEAKE EXPLORATION, L.L.C. RELIEF SOUGHT: POOLING LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 27 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST OF THE IM, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA Cause CD No. 201307627 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, including the following: Desert Partners IV, L.P.; Family Tree Corporation; The J. Christopher Dykes Revocable Trust, dated October 10, 2012; The Michael L. Dykes Revocable Trust, dated October 10, 2012; The Robert P. Dykes Revocable Trust, dated October 14, 2011; Marion S. Clinkscales; and, if any of the named individuals be deceased, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such deceased individual; if any of the named entities is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity; if any of the named parties designated as a trustee is not presently acting in such capacity as trustee, then the unknown successor or successors to such trustee; if any of the named parties designated as an attorney-in-fact is not presently acting in such capacity as attorney-in-fact, then the unknown successor or successors to such attorney-in-fact; and if any of the named entities are corporations which do not continue to have legal existence, the unknown trustees or assigns of such parties. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicants, Chesapeake Operating, Inc. and Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C., have filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission to enter an order pooling the interests of the oil and gas owners, and adjudicating the rights and equities with respect thereto, in the 640-acre drilling and spacing unit comprised of Section 9, Township 27 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, for the Tonkawa, Red Fork (Cherokee) Sand, Cottage Grove, Big LimeOswego, Mississippi Lime, Hunton Lime and Lansing Kansas City separate common sources of supply with respect to the development of such separate common sources of supply in such unit. The interests of the oil and gas owners involved herein and the rights and equities in respect thereto are sought here to be pooled and adjudicated pursuant to Tit. 52, Okla. Stat., Section 87.1 within and on the basis of the drilling and spacing unit covered hereby, and not limited to a single wellbore. The Applicants in this cause state that Applicants have developed the separate common sources of supply in the drilling and spacing unit involved herein under a plan of development and have commenced such plan of development of such unit by an initial well and proposed subsequent well in the lands covered hereby, and that Applicants have been unable to reach an agreement with the owners of drilling rights named as respondents herein with respect to such plan of development of the separate common sources of supply

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Alva Review-Courier

Order No. 315441, to authorize and permit an additional well for the production of hydrocarbons from the Mississippi Lime common source of supply underlying the 640-acre drilling and spacing unit comprised of Section 30, Township 28 North, Range 13 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, and to establish proper allowables for such well and such unit. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that the order entered in this matter (amending applicable orders of the Commission, including Order No. 315441) be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or a date prior thereto, and that the authorization and permission requested herein run in favor of one or both of the Applicants, including Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C. acting by and through its agent, Chesapeake Operating, Inc., or some other party recommended by Applicants. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Conservation Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, 2101 North Lincoln Boulevard, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 23rd day of December 2013, and that this notice will be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicants and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. An interested party who wishes to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicants or Applicants’ attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide his or her name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Matt Fleischer, landman, (405) 935-1407, or Emily P. Smith, attorney, OBA No. 20805, (405) 9358203, Chesapeake Operating, Inc., P.O. Box 18496, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73154-0496. Please refer to Cause CD Number. DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 3rd day of December 2013. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman LEGAL NOTICE DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner (Published by the Alva Review- BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: Courier on Friday, December 6, 2013.) PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission BEFORE THE CORPORATION Secretary COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA LEGAL NOTICE APPLICANTS: CHESAPEAKE (Published by the Alva ReviewOPERATING, INC. AND Courier on Friday, December 6, 2013.) CHESAPEAKE EXPLORATION, BEFORE THE CORPORATION L.L.C. COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF RELIEF SOUGHT: INCREASED OKLAHOMA WELL DENSITY APPLICANTS: CHESAPEAKE LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION OPERATING, INC. AND 30, TOWNSHIP 28 NORTH, RANGE CHESAPEAKE EXPLORATION, 13 WEST OF THE IM, WOODS L.L.C. COUNTY, OKLAHOMA RELIEF SOUGHT: EXCEPTION TO Cause CD No. 201307660 OAC 165:10-3-28 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION persons, owners, producers, operators, 30, TOWNSHIP 28 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST OF THE IM, WOODS purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and COUNTY, OKLAHOMA all other interested persons, particularly Cause CD No. 201307771 in Woods County, Oklahoma, more NOTICE OF HEARING particularly the parties set out on the STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All Exhibit “A” attached to the application on file in this cause, and, if any of persons, owners, producers, operators, the named individuals be deceased, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and then the unknown heirs, executors, all other interested persons, particularly administrators, devisees, trustees and in Woods County, Oklahoma, more assigns, both immediate and remote, of particularly the parties set out on the such deceased individual; if any of the Exhibit “A” attached to the application named entities is a dissolved partnership, on file in this cause, and, if any of corporation or other association, then the named individuals be deceased, the unknown successors, trustees and then the unknown heirs, executors, assigns, both immediate and remote, administrators, devisees, trustees and of such dissolved entity; if any of the assigns, both immediate and remote, of named parties designated as a trustee such deceased individual; if any of the is not presently acting in such capacity named entities is a dissolved partnership, as trustee, then the unknown successor corporation or other association, then or successors to such trustee; if any the unknown successors, trustees and of the named parties designated as an assigns, both immediate and remote, attorney-in-fact is not presently acting of such dissolved entity; if any of the in such capacity as attorney-in-fact, then named parties designated as a trustee the unknown successor or successors to is not presently acting in such capacity such attorney-in-fact; and if any of the as trustee, then the unknown successor named entities are corporations which or successors to such trustee; if any do not continue to have legal existence, of the named parties designated as an the unknown trustees or assigns of such attorney-in-fact is not presently acting in such capacity as attorney-in-fact, then parties. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the unknown successor or successors to Applicants, Chesapeake Operating, Inc. such attorney-in-fact; and if any of the and Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C., named entities are corporations which have filed an application in this cause do not continue to have legal existence, requesting the Corporation Commission the unknown trustees or assigns of such to enter an order amending applicable parties. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that orders of the Commission, including

in the drilling and spacing unit covered hereby. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that one or both of the Applicants, including Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C. acting by and through its agent, Chesapeake Operating, Inc., or some other party recommended by Applicants be designated as operator under the order to be entered in this cause of the separate common sources of supply in the drilling and spacing unit involved herein, including the initial well and any subsequent wells under Applicants’ plan of development of such unit. Applicants may request up to one year from the date of the order to enter in this cause, within which to commence the subsequent well. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Merits Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 30th day of December 2013, and that this notice will be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicants and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. An interested party who wishes to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicants or Applicants’ attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide his or her name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Eric Denneny, landman, (405) 935-3726, or Emily P. Smith, attorney, OBA No. 20805, (405) 9358203, Chesapeake Operating, Inc., P.O. Box 18496, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73154-0496. Please refer to Cause CD Number. DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 2nd day of December 2013. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary

Page 16 Applicants, Chesapeake Operating, Inc. and Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C., have filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission to enter an order, as follows: (i) authorizing and permitting an exception to the permitted well location tolerances provided in OAC 165:10-3-28 for the Mississippi Lime common source of supply underlying the unit comprised of Section 30, Township 28 North, Range 13 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, so as to allow a well to be drilled at the location as follows: no closer than 200 feet from the wellbore of the Leatherman 1-30 Well, located in the center of the E/2 SW/4 SW/4 of Section 30, Township 28 North, Range 13 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, and to be completed in and produce hydrocarbons from the above-named common source of supply. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that the order be entered in this matter be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and that the authorization and permission requested herein run in favor of one or both of the Applicants, including Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C. acting by and through its agent Chesapeake Operating, Inc., or some other party recommended by Applicants. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Conservation Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, 2101 North Lincoln Boulevard, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 23rd day of December 2013, and that this notice will be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicants and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. An interested party who wishes to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicants or Applicants’ attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide his or her name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Matt Fleischer, landman, (405) 935-1407, or Emily P. Smith, attorney, OBA No. 20805, (405) 9358203, Chesapeake Operating, Inc., P.O. Box 18496, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73154-0496. Please refer to Cause CD Number. DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 3rd day of December 2013. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Friday, December 6, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: SANDRIDGE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION, LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: POOLING LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Section 23, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma Cause CD No. 201308085 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, including the following: Chesapeake Exploration, LLC; Chesapeake Operating, Inc.; Tiptop Oil and Gas US, LLC; Paige Ramsey; Pene Virdell; Charles R. Brawner; Edward Brawner; Anne Cozart; Carol J. Drake, LLC; Myra B. Ward; David Curry; Steven G. Shaddock; George G. Vaught, Jr.; Mary Sue Brawner; if any of the above-named individuals be deceased, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such deceased individual; and if any of the above-named parties is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that

Applicant, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, has filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma to enter an order pooling the interests of oil and gas owners, and adjudicating the rights and equities in connection therewith, in the 640-acre non-horizontal drilling and spacing units to be formed in Section 23, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, for the Tonkawa and Oswego separate common sources of supply and in the 640-acre horizontal well unit to be formed in such section for the Mississippian common source of supply, in respect to the development of such separate common sources of supply in such units. The interests of the oil and gas owners involved herein and the rights and equities in respect thereto are sought herein to be pooled and adjudicated pursuant to 52 O.S. ‘87.1 within and on the basis of the units covered hereby as a group or unit or in the aggregate, and not limited to a single wellbore. The application in this cause states that Applicant has proposed the development of the separate common sources of supply in the units involved herein under a plan of development and has proposed to commence such plan of development of such units by an initial well in the lands covered hereby. Such application further states that Applicant has been unable to reach an agreement with the owners of drilling rights named as respondents herein with respect to such proposed plan of development of the separate common sources of supply in the units covered hereby. Such application further requests up to 365 days within which to commence operations on or in connection with such initial well under such plan of development. Such application further states that there is currently pending before the Commission in Cause CD No. 201307323 an application of Applicant to form 640-acre non-horizontal drilling and spacing units in said Section 23 for the Tonkawa and Oswego separate common sources of supply and a 640acre horizontal well unit in such section for the Mississippian common source of supply. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, or some other party recommended by Applicant be designated as operator under the order to be entered herein of the separate common sources of supply in the units covered hereby, including the initial well and any subsequent well or wells to be drilled under or otherwise covered by Applicant’s proposed plan of development of such units. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause is set before an administrative law judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma. Notice is further given that the application in this cause may be amended at such hearing in accordance with the rules of the Commission and the laws of the State of Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an administrative law judge on the Conservation Docket at the Western Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, 2101 North Lincoln Boulevard, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 A.M. on the 23rd day of December, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their names and telephone numbers. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact John R. Reeves, Attorney, OBA #7479, Seventeenth Floor, One Leadership Square, 211 North Robinson Avenue, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, Telephone: (405) 272-5742; or Ashlei Jordan, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Ave., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 731026406, Telephone: (405) 429-5754. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA. L. MURPHY, Commissioner DONE AND PERFORMED this 2nd day of December, 2013. BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary 14831-0742noh


December 6, 2013

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Alva Review-Courier

Boyd L. Hill, deceased, determined, and said Estate distributed and the Personal (Published by the Alva Review- Representative discharged. Courier on Friday, December 6, 2013.) Dated this 4th day of December, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF 2013. WOODS COUNTY STATE OF s/Mickey J. Hadwiger OKLAHOMA JUDGE OF THE DISTRICT COURT In the Matter of the Estate of MARK Edward E. Sutter, OBA #8778 CLINTON WILLIAMS, Deceased. Attorney for Personal Representative Friday Case No. PB-2013-51 College Avenue 9 a.m. The Woods County NOTICE OF HEARING PETITION 401 P.O. Box 213 Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, FOR PROBATE OF WILL, Alva, OK 73717 Alva, is open for games and other APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL (580) 327-1511 REPRESENTATIVE AND activities. Exercise is scheduled DETERMINATION OF HEIRS, each day at 11 a.m. Transportation LEGAL NOTICE DEVISEES AND LEGATEES provided upon request. (Published by the Alva ReviewNotice is hereby given to all persons 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip interested in the estate of Mark Clinton Courier on Friday, November 29 and Museum in Alva is open every day Williams, deceased, that on the 4th day of December 6, 2013.) except Monday. For information or December, 2013, Donna Louise Williams IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. produced in the District Court of Woods WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA 7 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous County, Oklahoma, an instrument in meets every Friday at the Senior writing purporting to be the Last Will IN THE MATTER OF THE CONJOINT Citizen Center, 122 1/2 E. Second, and Testament of Mark Clinton Williams, ESTATES OF FLORA R. HOWARD deceased, and also filed in said Court her and DOMER LAWTON HOWARD, Cherokee. Petition praying for the probate of the mother and son, both deceased. Saturday Case No. PB-2013-41 Will and asking that Letters Testamentary 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip issue to Donna Louise Williams as NOTICE TO CREDITORS All creditors having claims against Museum in Alva is open every day Personal Representative named in the except Monday. For information or Will and for judicial determination of the Estates of Flora R. Howard, deceased, arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. the heirs, devisees and legatees of said who died on January 17, 1968, or the Estate of Domer Lawton Howard, deceased, decedent. Sunday Pursuant to an order of this Court who died on May 5, 1986, are required 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip made on the 4th day of December, 2013, to present the same, with a description of Museum in Alva is open every day notice is hereby given that Tuesday, the all security interest and other collateral except Monday. For information or 17th day of December, 2013, at 1:30 (if any) held by each creditor with arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. o’clock P.M., the Petition will be heard respect to such claim, to Marian Howard 2-4 p.m. Northwest Oklahoma at the District Courtroom, Woods County and Linda Beth Howard, Co-Personal Alva, Oklahoma, when and Representatives of the aforesaid estates, Genealogy Society will meet at the Courthouse, where all persons interested may appear c/o Gayle Freeman Cook, Esq., Monnet, Alva Public Library for a Christmas and contest the same. Hayes, Bullis, Thompson & Edwards, Social. Visitors are welcome. In Testimony Whereof, I have 120 N. Robinson, Suite 1719 West, hereunto set my hand this 4th day of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102-7405, December, 2013. on or before the following presentment s/Mickey J. Hadwiger date: January 31, 2014, or the same will JUDGE OF THE DISTRICT COURT be forever barred. Rick Cunningham, OBA #12629 /s/ Marion J. Howard Attorney at Law Marian J. Howard 409 College Ave., P.O. Box 433 Co-Personal Representative Alva, Oklahoma 73717 /s/ Linda Beth Howard (580) 327-0080 Linda Beth Howard Attorney for Petitioner Co-Personal Representative GAYLE FREEMAN COOK, OBA #3122 MICHAEL S. PETERS, OBA #15328 LEGAL NOTICE MONNET, HAYES, BULLIS, (Published by the Alva ReviewTHOMPSON & EDWARDS Courier on Friday, December 6 and 120 N. Robinson December 13, 2013.) 1719 First National Center West IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102-7405 WOODS COUNTY STATE OF Telephone: (405) 232-5481 OKLAHOMA Toll Free: (877) 232-5481 In the Matter of the Estate of Boyd Hill, Facsimile: (405) 235-9159 a/k/a Boyd L. Hill, Deceased. ATTORNEYS FOR CO-PERSONAL Case No. PB-2013-37 REPRESENTATIVES NOTICE OF HEARING FINAL ACCOUNT, PETITION FOR LEGAL NOTICE DETERMINATION OF HEIRS, (Published by the Alva ReviewDISTRIBUTION AND DISCHARGE Notice is hereby given that Larry Courier on Friday, November 8 and D. Hill, Personal Representative of the November 15, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF Estate of Boyd Hill, a/k/a Boyd L. Hill, WOODS COUNTY STATE OF deceased, having filed in this Court his OKLAHOMA Final Account of the administration of said Estate and Petition for Order In the Matter of the Estate allowing same, determination of heirs, of DOROTHY BERDINE distribution, and for final discharge of MEISENHEIMER, Deceased. Case No. PB-2013-26 said Personal Representative, the hearing NOTICE OF HEARING FINAL of the same has been fixed by the Judge ACCOUNT AND PETITION FOR of said Court for Thursday, the 2nd day of January, 2014, at 11:00 o’clock A.M. DETERMINATION OF HEIRSHIP AND DISTRIBUTION at the Courtroom of said District Court in Notice is hereby given that Stewart the Courthouse at Alva, in the County and State aforesaid, and all persons interested Knoop and Leroy Meisenheimer, Coin said Estate are notified then and there to Personal Representatives of the estate appear and show cause, if any they have, of Dorothy Berdine Meisenheimer, why the said account should not be settled deceased, have filed in the above Court and allowed, the heirs of Boyd Hill, a/k/a and cause their Final Account, Petition for Final Settlement, Determination of Heirship and Distribution, and that Friday, the 20th day of December, 2013, at 1:30

Community Calendar

LEGAL NOTICE

EdwardJones

The Dow Jones Industrial Average was dn 68.26 to close at 15,821.51. The NASDAQ Composite Index was dn 4.84 to close at 4033.17. The Transportation Average was dn 1.42 to close at 7156.51 and Utilities CLOSED dn 4.48 at 484.41. Volume was approx. 654.55 million shares. Gold fell $17.72 to $1,226.06 and Silver CLOSED at $19.39, dn 29¢. Crude oil prices rose 15¢ to $97.35 per barrel. Wheat Price was $6.71, dn 9¢. Prime Rate is 3.25%

Stocks of Local Interest — Courtesy Pat Harkin

Name OGE Energy ONEOK Inc Duke Energy WilliamsCo Chesapeake Energy Wal-Mart ConocoPhillips SandRidge Energy

Close 33.99 59.32 69.58 36.29 27.05 79.45 70.84 5.53

Change -0.22 -0.80 -0.34 -0.49 -0.05 -0.77 -0.57 -0.09

30 Yr. U.S. Treasury Bond Insured AAA Tax Free Muni. Bond Yield to Maturity 5 Year C/D, Annual Pct Yield Money Market - 7 Day Avg Rate

Volume 851,113 1,756,667 1,709,701 6,359,406 8,212,886 5,881,763 4,624,212 7,411,729

3.91% 0.77-4.00% 2.00% 0.01%

Stock Market Report — for December 5, 2013

Page 17 o’clock P.M. in the District Courtroom, Alva, Woods County, Oklahoma has been fixed as the time and place for hearing thereof, when any person interested in said estate may appear and contest the same as provided by law. Dated this 22nd day of November, 2013. s/Mickey J. Hadwiger JUDGE OF THE DISTRICT COURT Rick Cunningham, OBA #12629 Attorney at Law 409 College Avenue, P.O. Box 433 Alva, Oklahoma 73717 (580) 327-0080 Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Friday, December 6 and December 13, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT IN AND FOR WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA In the Matter of the Estate of Carl Henry Hort, Deceased. Case No. PB-2013-47 NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO THE CREDITORS OF CARL HENRY HORT, DECEASED: All creditors having claims against the above named Decedent are required to present the same, with the description of all security interest and other collateral (if any) held by each creditor with the respect to such claim, to the named Personal Representative, Marie Hort, at the office of Dal L. Houston, P.O. Box 488, 615 Barnes, Alva, Oklahoma, 73717, attorney for said Personal Representative, Marie Hort, on or before the following presentment date, to-wit: February 3, 2014, or the same will be forever barred. Dated this 2nd day of December, 2013. Dal L. Houston, Attorney for Personal Representative Dal L. Houston, OBA #17065 BENSON & HOUSTON, P.L.L.C. P.O. Box 488, 615 Barnes Alva, Oklahoma 73717 Attorney for Personal Representative

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Friday, December 6 and December 13, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT IN AND FOR WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA In the Matter of the Estate of Betty Jo Pangburn, Deceased. Case No. PB-2013-48 NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO THE CREDITORS OF BETTY JO PANGBURN, DECEASED: All creditors having claims against the above named Decedent are required to present the same, with the description of all security interest and other collateral (if any) held by each creditor with the respect to such claim, to the named Personal Representative, Samuel Pangburn, at the office of Dal Houston, 615 Barnes, Alva, Oklahoma, 73717, attorney for said Personal Representative, Samuel Pangburn, on or before the following presentment date, to-wit: February 3, 2014, or the same will be forever barred. Dated this 2nd day of December, 2013. Dal L. Houston, Attorney for Personal Representative Dal L. Houston, OBA #17065 BENSON & HOUSTON, P.L.L.C. 615 Barnes/P.O. Box 488 Alva, Oklahoma 73717 (580) 327-1197 Attorney for Estate


December 6, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 18


December 6, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 19

From Page 12

Endure

They earn it.” Daryl Andersen, a North Dakota native and 30-year oilman who now runs a well-services company, recalled his grade-school history books that described how George Washington and his army suffered at Valley Forge. “But we’re colder here than they ever were,” he said. North Dakota’s notorious cold isn’t a deterrent for Dylan Grossman, a 23-year-old Alaska native who posted a Craigslist ad seeking a laborer’s job in the oil fields. Grossman is currently in Florida, where he’s struggled to find work. He said he intends to move to

All sorts of Santas are displayed on these shelves RANGER TREE -- Dr. Cunningham calls this at the NWOSU president’s house. Photo by Helen tree her Ranger Tree. The tree features red ladies Barrett pumps and purses with contrasting black tulle and red and black ornaments. Photo by Helen Barrett

DICKENS VILLAGE -- A Dickens Village donated by Dr. Earlene Smith tops an ornate dresser in the master bedroom. President Cunningham’s reflection is cap- THE CUNNINGHAM TREE -- One favorite tured in the mirror. Photo by Helen Barrett item belonging to the Cunningham family is their personal tree from their home.

SANTA DELIVERS THE TREE -- (left) Dr. Janet Cunningham recently finished this wall picture of Santa delivering a Christmas Tree. Photo by Helen Barrett

North Dakota soon and has asked his mother to mail him his warmest clothes. “I’ve heard it’s cold and flat in North Dakota,” Grossman said. “I think I can layer for it.” Hovet, who grew up in North Dakota, has heard that before. He recalls four Texans walking off a job site after being in North Dakota for just one day last winter. “It was about 5 above and sunny and really kind of a pretty day,” Hovet said. “They got their truck stuck in a ditch, and their equipment got frozen up. They said, ‘The heck with this. We’re going back to Texas.’”


December 6, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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