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Alva Review-Courier Vol. 121 No. 88

Sunday, November 3, 2013 - $1.00

www.alvareviewcourier.com

620 Choctaw, Alva, OK 73717

Front row, left to right: Bobby Sutton, Cody Little, Brodie Patton, Jason Guy, Joshua Hudson, Nickalous VanSlyke, Chad Collins, Hezekiah Privett, Fabian Ford, Austin Tiger and James Sanders. Second row: Gavin Bollschweiler, Robert Kerlin, Joseph Wheat, Gregory Myrick, Michael Garcia, Christopher Gordon, Jeffrey Whitmire, Michael Weaver, James Parcher, Raymundo Cases, Gregory Berry, Tyson Burling, Marco Orosco, and Devin Aughenbaugh. Third row: Tyrea Fulson, Willie Paden, Jacob Bertis, Shane Adams, Jarred Priest, Maurice Watkins, Antione Bogus, Zachary Harris, Walker Blackwell, Billy Weisner, Damon Reddin, Dalucas Gibson, Gavino Lopez and Steven Pigg. Fourth row: Cody Elkins, Henry Vance, Cody Stacy, Jeremy Fenton, Bradley Williams, Timothy Brown, Rodney Churchill, Joseph Smart, Bryce Casteel, Larry Carter, Larry Reilly, Jonathan Hartung, Dustin Duncan, Christopher Addison, Immanuel Mitchell, and Leonard Johnson. Fifth row: Colby Smith, Jimmy Cossey, Shawn Duncan, Dustan Swihart, Joshua Silva, Dylan Schwenk, Spencer Buesing, Jeremy Morris, Christian Vargas, Gary Adams, Raymond Dreadin, Darrell Black, Robert Lee, Olen Willbourn and Brandon Amyx. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

Largest GED class graduates at BJCC By Lynn L. Martin Oklahoma Department of Corrections (DOC) Superintendent of Education Pam Humphrey told the crowd at the Bill Johnson Correctional Center (BJCC) for the commencement of GED graduates Friday that the 76 graduates of the November 2013 class was the largest ever for BJCC, and also the largest of all sites in this DOC

system. She said this was particularly noteworthy because it is the second class this year and most of the other institutions only have an annual class. BJCC Chaplain Michael Culbreath opened the ceremonies with an invocation. Commencement began with Warden Janice Melton noting it was a beautiful day weather-wise for family and

friends to travel great distances to attend the commencement. She said that graduation is a special day for the men, and it just gets better when they get to share that with family. Melton also praised the positive news coverage the local paper gives events that at BJCC. “We’re the only facility that gets great coverage of the things

that happen in corrections,” said Melton. “The media is so often ready to report on the things that don’t go so well, yet there are far more good things than negative, so we appreciate that the local newspaper covers these events and the video of the entire event will be on the newspaper web site.” Melton introduced Rev. Dr. Judye Pistole of First Presbyterian

Church in Alva and said that the church presents a Bible to each graduate. Melton said, “We know we have different faith groups here, but it is a wonderful gesture to recognize the accomplishments of the men here today.” Besides introducing Humphrey from the central office, Melton

See BJCC Page 3

Oklahoma prison system crisis Rural traffic stop threatens lives, says Hickman leads to drug charges Water mangement “looming issue,” he tells Kiwanis Club By Kathleen Lourde The Oklahoma state legislature failed last session to address several issues that have reached critical or even crisis level across the state, State Rep. Jeff Hickman told Kiwanis Club members at an Oct. 30 lunch meeting. The state’s correctional system – which now exceeds 100 per— Rep. cent capacity even as state prisons struggle to operate safely with only 60 percent of needed staff – is in such crisis that Hickman fears it’s only a matter of time before a corrections officer or inmate is killed onsite. “If something doesn’t change, someone is going to get killed,”

Hickman said. “Literally, it is a life and death situation. And it sounds really strange to say, but if we only lose one correction officer at work, if we only have one inmate killed, we’ll be lucky.” The reason for the short staffing, Hickman said, is not that too few applicants are qualified, but that Jeff Hickman despite ads inviting job seekers, virtually no one is applying for the open positions at all. And the reason no one’s applying, he says, is that the state offering too low a wage. “When you’re paying $11.83 an hour for correctional officers and you can go make three times that in

“If we only lose one correction officer at work, if we only have one inmate killed, we’ll be lucky.”

the oil field and not have to deal with a bunch of knuckleheads, I’m, quite frankly, surprised we have any of our employees left at our prisons.” Gov. Mary Fallin is aware of the situation, but has called for a study to be conducted – a move Hickman appears to find less than adequate. “When you put an ad in the paper and you get no applicants, that tells me that I don’t need a study. We’re not paying enough to get people to even apply for these jobs.” The correction system crisis is so severe, Hickman said, that the state is on the verge of seeing the U. s. Justice Department take it over, as they did some years ago. The state is already under a court order to fix serious problems with the Oklahoma Department of Human Services (DHS), Hickman

See Hickman Page 2

By Marione Martin On Oct. 22 about 9:15 p.m. Woods County Deputy Sheriff Keith Dale became suspicious when he saw a passenger car turn onto a rural road where cars rarely travel. There are few residences and no businesses in that area. According to documents in the case, he knew from past experience that it is common for individuals who use illegal substances to drive in unpopulated areas in an attempt to avoid being detected. He followed the car, which had turned east from Highway 281 onto Harmon Road. He saw the vehicle travel into the oncoming lane of traffic on Harmon, an undivided dirt road. The car stopped at Harmon and County Road 450 before turning north on County Road 450. The vehicle again traveled into the oncoming lane of traffic on County Road 450, an undivided asphalt road. Dale turned on his lights and conducted a traffic stop.

Dale spoke to the driver, later identified as Shelby Ruth Hooper, 18, of Wichita, Kan., and asked for her driver’s license. She said she did not have it in her possession. Dale could smell an overwhelming odor of perfume in the vehicle. From experience and training, he knew individuals who use marijuana often spray perfume or other fragrances in a vehicle to mask the odor. Dale asked the front seat passenger for his identification and learned he was Jeremiah Drayaun Jones Carter, 23, of Alva. He asked Hooper to accompany him to his patrol vehicle. Dale ran Hooper’s driver’s license information and asked why they were driving in the area. She said they were driving around talking. He asked her passenger’s name, and she said “Jeremiah” but could not provide a last name. He asked if there was any mari-

See Charges Page 3


November 3, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Brief agenda for city council By Marione Martin The Alva City Council has a short agenda for their meeting on Monday. The council meets at 6:30 p.m. in the council chambers of City Hall. Other than the manager’s report and votes on approval of claims and minutes, the only agenda item is an executive session to discuss negotiations with IAFF Local 3782 Alva, the firemen’s union. On return to regular session, time will be allowed to hear remarks from council members and citizens. The Alva Utility Authority and Alva Economic Development Authority meetings will follow. For those meetings, the only items on the agenda are votes on approval of minutes and claims.

Alva school board to meet Monday

By Marione Martin The Alva Board of Education will meet at 5 p.m.at the district office, 418 Flynn. Following reports by the school principals, the superintendent will present a report on accreditation. Board members will discuss and act on a letter to the Oklahoma State Department of Education, accreditation section, regarding relocation of Pre-K to Longfellow Elementary School. There will be discussion and action on the annual election resolution, board meetings dates for the calendar year 2014, and the employment of Marque Bergner as non-certified personnel for 4.5 hours per day. The board will also hear a presentation of the drop out report for 2012-2013.

A large crowd attended the Northwest Technology Center’s Annual Advisory Committee Meeting held Friday on the campus in Alva. Assistant Superintendent Daren Slater addressed the group, asking for their input on how they could improve existing programs and/or to submit ideas for new needs. The group enjoyed a barbcue dinner and then received a tour of the facility before breaking off for discussion into specialty area groups. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

From Front Page

Hickman

said, and the corrections system is close behind. “We’re not far from being under a court order in corrections, and we’re not that far removed from being under federal control of our prison system. We’re one lawsuit away or one phone call to the Justice Department away from them taking over the prison system in Oklahoma again.” That is not a good thing, he said, because it means a federal judge will force the state to spend a fixed amount of his choosing on the corrections system, and to accomplish specific goals with that money, such as increasing staffing, making capital improvements, or whatever the judge deems necessary to fix the system. The state has no input on what that dollar amount is or what the goals will be, and arguments that not enough money is left over for schools or roads has no affect on the court’s requirements. “The people you have elected to represent you and to set the state budget and priorities will no longer have a say,” Hickman said. “And then whatever (money is) left, then we can sprinkle it around other places,” such as education or public safety. Critical shortages – though not crises, Hickman notes – must quickly be addressed in a number of other areas as well, he said. The most pressing areas are the shortages in DHS caseworkers, state troopers, and teachers. In the case of DHS, Hickman said progress toward meeting the mandated federal court-ordered goals, “but we still have a ways to

go,” he said. In fact, a report highly critical of DHS was issued by the independent monitors tasked by the federal judge with overseeing the agency’s progress. To primary problems pointed out in the report were the agency’s inaccurate reporting of data and its phenomenally high staff turnover rate that the monitors wrote is “fast forging a new crisis on the front lines of the organization.” The state legislature also received harsh criticism for actions that most likely impeded progress in reforming the agency. While the federal court ordered that the legislature appropriate $40 million to be spent on the DHS reform plan -- a “core element” of which is pay increases for staff to reduce turnover -- the legislature instead appropriated only $32 million. Hickman acknowledged that staff shortages at DHS are resulting in vulnerable Oklahomans “falling throught he cracks.” In October, DHS had a backlog of 1,833 cases. Water a Looming Issue Water – without which life on Earth cannot exist, after all – is becoming such a crucial commodity for more and more states and communities that Hickman predicts we may well see battles to possess water rights that will become so heated as to put the oil and gas wars of the past to shame. “It’s already happened in other states,” he said. “It’s getting here now.” In fact, the Fairview’s mayor, city engineer and city manager, along with people with the Major

County Rural Water District, were in Alva at the very time of Hickman’s talk. They were touring reverse osmosis plants, Hickman said, because in the wake of the Environmental Protection Agency’s new, stricter standards on nitrates in water, Fairview officials discovered that nitrates in the city’s water were high. Alvans are already very familiar with the fact that Oklahoma City has withdrawing a significant amount of water from Canton Lake, whose water level is now 13 feet lower than it should be, Hickman said, despite the spring rains. Oklahoma City has the legal right to take the water, as Hickman pointed out. “I don’t think anyone argued that,” he said. Where Hickman expresses concern is the way Oklahoma City withdrew more water from the lake last spring, despite advice that they wait untila fter the spring rains came, because if the rains were plentiful withdrawnig the water from Canton Lake wouldn’t ben necessary. “Sure enough, they take the water out of Canton Lake; it starts raining – in Oklahoma City, not in the river basin that feeds Canton Lake – and Oklahoma City ends up releasing more water downstream to Lake Eufala than they ever took from Canton Lake,” said Hickman. That kind of irresponsible water management worries him.He said his city-dwelling colleagues don’t understand why water must be managed responsibly, rather than just used willy nilly without forethought and planning. Hickman tried to make them understand that their actions mean that if Oklahoma City should be

in dire need of water months from now, theywon’t be able to find it in their Canton Lake reservoir – which, after all, they have legal claim to for the exact purpose of having water in the wings in the event of a bad drought. “Once you take it, it’s gone,” Hickman told his Oklahoma City colleagues. “There is no way for us to get you additional water from your reservoir at Canton Lake. You have used everything you have.” But Oklahoma City isn’t the only entity that could use some lessons in more responsible water mangement. The state of Oklahoma is also “dumping a lot of water into the Red River,” said Hickman. “Once it hits the Red River, it’s not usable by anyone.” Hickman thinks this water could be put to a much better, and very important, use. It appears that water management will likely become extremely expensive in the years to come, as more and more infrastructure (such as a network of pipelines) for moving water around the state becomes necessary – especially the moving of water to western Oklahoma where it’s needed so desperately. But the state simply doesn’t have the money to pay for this kind of infrastructure. Hickman suggests we find a way the state could use that water to raise money to fund it. He poses the question, “Is there a way that we can sell it to Texas and not be locked in so that when we need it in Oklahoma we can’t get it back? The water lawyers and experts I talk to say yes, you can do it on a renewable permit that every ten years they have to re-apply.”

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November 3, 2013

From Front Page

Alva Review-Courier

Page 3

BJCC

also introduced Jack Bowers, who is principal at the Crabtree Correctional Center. Since commencement speaker Jeff Hickman had warned them that he was running about 15 minutes late, Melton took the extra few minutes to tell the parents and relatives that for these men to accomplish something as significant as a GED is huge. “Many folks do not know that if a man comes in here and does not have a high school diploma, it is a required part of the program to try to get one,” Melton said. She noted that whatever caused these guys not to finish school, it has nothing to do with their intelligence. “They are all very bright guys and very capable. Finishing this is very important to have on your resume for your life. “This program is tough. It is meant to be tough in order to challenge them,” she said. Greg Lyon, site supervisor for BJCC’s educational facility, told

the crowd that the prison education staff is very proud of these graduates and they have worked very hard. Some graduates who achieved above and beyond, he said. “If you notice the guys with the colored collars on their robes,” said Lyon, “they have scored in the top 20 percent in the nation on their GED test.” Damon Reddin was introduced as the salutatorian and Robert Kerlin as the valedictorian. Both men gave short speeches. Reddy thanked the guests for attending and mentioned how important it is to have the support of their loved ones. “We may have made some bad choices in the past, but that does not mean we can’t take this time to better ourselves for the future,” Reddy said. He told his fellow graduates to look upon this as a stepping stone to greater things, and thanked the staff members at BJCC for this opportunity. Kerley said it means a great

deal to the men for those guests who came to help celebrate their accomplishments. “I’m sure my classmates will agree that achieving this goal was not easy, to say the least,” he said. “What this achievement means is we can reach goals that we once thought were impossible. We can overcome any obstacle in our past and achieve greatness. We will not stop. We won’t give up. We will try to continue to achieve excellence.” Commencement speaker Rep. Jeff Hickman thanked the graduates and said it was an honor to speak to them on this special day. “We really have something special here at Bill Johnson Correctional Center that other people don’t

Rep. Jeff Hickman was the featured commencement speaker

Greg Lyon, site supervisor of the Warden Janice Melton welcomes BJCC educational facility, thanks visitors the center’s education staff

State Department of Corrections Superintendent of Education Pam Humphrey praises the BJCC educational staff for exceeding their goal of 250 GED graduates this past year

Damon Reddin, salutatorian

Robert Kerlin, valedictorian

Woods County Forecast Sunday Mostly sunny, with a high near 66. Windy, with a south wind 15 to 20 mph increasing to 27 to 32 mph in the afternoon. Winds could gust as high as 45 mph. Sunday Night Mostly cloudy, with a low around 48. South wind 18 to 21 mph, with gusts as high as 29 mph. Monday Mostly sunny, with a high near 68. South wind around 18 mph, with gusts as high as 25 mph. Monday Night A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 55. South southeast wind 13 to 17 mph, with gusts as high as 24 mph. Tuesday Showers likely

and possibly a thunderstorm. Cloudy, with a high near 64. Chance of precipitation is 60%. Tuesday Night A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms before 1am. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 35. Wednesday Mostly sunny, with a high near 53. Wednesday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 33. Thursday Sunny, with a high near 61. Thursday Night Clear, with a low around 38. Friday Sunny, with a high near 65. Friday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 42. Saturday Mostly sunny, with a high near 65.

Obituary JACK ALLEN LANCASTER Jack Allen Lancaster, 63, died on Oct. 22 in Stillwater. His memorial service will be held on Monday, Nov. 11, at 2 p.m. at the First Christian Church in Stillwater. The graveside service will be held at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 12, at Alva Municipal Cemetery. Strode Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

have,” he said. “In other places, they may also have made choices they wish they hadn’t, but they are incarcerated in places that do not have the same opportunities you have here at BJCC. I want to congratulate you for being willing to set yourself apart and take advantage of a good program.” Humphrey concluded the public speakers by saying, “Days like today are my favorite part of this

From Front Page

job.” She praised Lyon and the BJCC teaching staff for exceeding their goal of graduating 250 individuals by going beyond that and graduating 252. The graduates each then received their GED certificate by coming to the front and shaking hands with Humphrey, Melton, Hickman and Pistole. Humphrey dismissed the group with a prayer.

Charges

juana inside the vehicle and she said “no.” He asked for consent to search the vehicle and she refused. Dale then contacted Woods County Dispatch and requested a K-9 unit be sent to his location. Dale then spoke to Carter, the passenger. As they talked he noticed marijuana in his right leg hair. He asked if there was any marijuana in the vehicle, and Carter said “no.” He told Carter he had marijuana in his leg hair, and Carter immediately brushed his right leg, causing the marijuana to fall onto the floorboard. Dale asked Carter to exit the vehicle, and he then asked him to empty his pockets on the vehicle hood. Carter removed a package of Swisher Sweets 3 Minis brand cigars. Dale opened the package and saw two cigars. He asked Carter to stand between the two vehicles. Dale spoke again with Hooper and told her he knew there was marijuana in her vehicle and asked her to be honest with him. She said there was a “bong” in her purse in the front of the vehicle. He again asked for consent to search, and she agreed. Before searching, Dale escorted Carter to the back passenger seat of his patrol vehicle. A search of the vehicle revealed one baggie containing marijuana, one purse containing a glass bong with burnt residue and a large amount of U.S. currency, and several loose pieces of marijuana and marijuana seeds. Dale handcuffed Carter and later placed him in Alva Police K-9 Officer Patrick Hawley’s vehicle. He placed Hooper under arrest and read her Miranda Rights, which she voluntarily waived. She said Carter contacted her earlier that evening stating he needed to “smoke.” She said she and Carter were driving around to smoke marijuana. She said he provided the marijuana they intended to smoke. Hooper said when she turned north on County Road 450 Carter threw an opened cellophane baggie of marijuana out of the passenger side window. She admitted ownership of the marijuana found in the front driver’s side door and the bong. Asked about the currency, she said while Carter was sitting in the backseat of Dale’s patrol vehicle, he told her he put the money in her purse. She said he told her to say it was hers and she got it from her mother.

Dale read Carter his Miranda Rights, which he voluntarily waived. He denied throwing anything from the vehicle or possessing any marijuana. He said the money belonged to him and he believed he had $1,000, which he put in Hooper’s purse. Dale asked Alva police officers Jade Cardenas and Hawley to attempt to locate the baggie of marijuana that was thrown from the vehicle. They later reported finding a small cellophane baggie that was empty near the location described by Hooper. Hawley said his canine partner, JONY, alerted to a trained odor emitting from the baggie. Dale and Hawley transported Hooper and Carter to the Woods County Jail where Dale counted the currency in Hooper’s purse, which totaled $1,385. In a post-Miranda interview at the jail, Carter said he broke the screen on his cellphone so he texted Hooper saying he needed to “smoke.” He said he provided the marijuana. When he saw a police vehicle behind them, he threw the cellophane baggie containing marijuana out of the window. He said there were only “crumbs” in the baggie. Dale told Carter his cellphone and $1,385 were being seized as evidence. In a post-Miranda interview, Hooper told Dale she believes Carter is a drug dealer. She said she had smoked marijuana with him approximately five times, and he provided it every time. She said he always provides it in the same packaging and in the same quantity. She said he received frequent phone calls and text messages to which he replies “I will get back with you” and “I can help you out.” A criminal history check on Carter revealed arrests in 2010 and 2011 in California for possession of narcotics, battery, driving without a license and possession of a controlled substance. Carter currently has an active warrant out of Ashland, Ore., for first degree burglary, first degree theft and four counts of second degree theft. Carter has been charged with a felony of distribution of controlled substance and a misdemeanor of possession of paraphernalia. Hooper has been charged with two misdemeanors: possession of controlled dangerous substance and possession of paraphernalia.


November 3, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 4

I.R.S. tax-credit scandal a bad omen for Obamacare By Byron York Under Obamacare, the Internal Revenue Service will determine who is eligible for health insurance subsidies, and it will deliver those subsidies, in the form of tax credits, to millions of individual Americans. It’s a huge job, and a critical one, involving hundreds of billions of taxpayer dollars. So it should go without saying that the subsidies go only to people who actually qualify for them. But a new scandal within the IRS casts serious doubt on whether that will happen. The scandal involves a pro-

gram known as the Earned Income Tax Credit. It is an antipoverty program in which the government gives low-income workers a tax refund larger than their tax liability. For example, a family with a $1,000 income tax liability might qualify for a credit four times that large, and receive an Earned Income Tax Credit payment of $4,000. Another family with no income tax liability at all might qualify for the same lump-sum payment. Call it a subsidy, a refund, a transfer payment -- in any case, the family receives a check from the feds. The government sends out between $60 billion and $70 billion a year in Earned Income Tax Credit payments. Now, a new IRS inspector general’s report shows that a huge amount of that -- anywhere Alva Review-Courier between 21 and 30 percent, depending on the year -- has (USPS 016-180) been given out improperly to 620 Choctaw St. recipients who do not qualify Alva, OK 73717-1626 for the payment. The inspector (580) 327-2200 general estimates that someFax: (580) 327-2454 where between $110 billion and $132 billion -- billion, not Office Hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. million -- has been given away Monday - Friday in improper Earned Income Website: Tax Credit payments in the last www.alvareviewcourier.com decade. It’s long been known that HERE TO HELP YOU the IRS throws taxpayer dolPublisher.............Lynn L. Martin lars away through tax credits. Editor..................Marione Martin President Obama, who has (marione@alvareviewcourier.net) sought to expand the Earned Ad Sales...........Angela Courson Income Tax Credit program, in (angela@alvareviewcourier.net) 2009 signed an executive order Colette Baier (colette@alvareviewcourier.net) entitled “Reducing Improper Payments and Eliminating Reporters.............Yvonne Miller Waste in Federal Programs” Sports...................Leslie Nation that required the IRS to come (leslie@alvareviewcourier.net) up with annual “improper payment reduction targets.” That Subscriptions was four years ago. It still & Action Ads..........Linda Toone hasn’t been done. (manager@alvareviewcourier.net) Don’t look for it to be done Ad Design.............Paula Oakes anytime soon. IRS officials told the inspector general that Page Design........Patty Hankey the program was too compliLegal Notices.......Patty Hankey cated to administer correctly, (legals@alvareviewcourier.net) and even if it were less complicated, they would not want rigThe Alva Review-Courier is orous enforcement measures combined with the Woods to discourage legitimately County News, The Alva Advocate and Newsgram, and is qualified people from applying published every Sunday and for the credit. In the words of Friday by Martin Broadcasting the inspector general’s report: Corp., 620 Choctaw St., Alva, “The IRS cited the complexOK 73717-1626. Periodical ity of the Earned Income Tax postage paid at Alva, Oklahoma. Credit program as well as the Annual subscription rates in Woods County, Oklahoma $72. need to balance the reduction Elsewhere in Oklahoma $90, in improper payments while elsewhere in the United States still encouraging individuals to $108. POSTMASTER: Send use the credit as the two main a d d r e s s c h a n g e s t o A l v a reasons why reduction targets Review-Courier, 620 Choctaw have not been established.” St., Alva, OK 73717-1626. Given that, inspector genContents Copyright 2013 eral Russell George concluded, Member of the Associated Press, Oklahoma Press Association, National Newspaper Association

Rewarding excellence Ever give your child money for a job well done – maybe $5 for keeping his or her room clean or for helping with chores around the house, maybe a reward for good grades? It works in business on a larger scale, and it should work the same in state government. You reward exceptional performance, and in so doing, you incentivize others to strive for similar success. That’s the idea behind reserving about $16 million of the State Department of Education’s $2.5 billion fiscal year 2015 budget request recently approved by the State Board of Education. The proposal will go to the state Legislature when it convenes in February. The request represents a $174.9 million increase over last year, with an $81.4 million increase in financial support for public schools, part of the $1.9 billion overall in the State Aid

Funding Formula. Of that amount, I’m requesting that 20 percent, or $16 million, be used to reward schools that have higher-than-average populations of students that qualify for free and reducedpriced meals but are also posting reading and math scores that are higher than the state average. People often point to high poverty as a barrier for student success. Poverty undoubtedly has a significant impact in the classroom. But we cannot throw our hands up and resign these children to a preordained fate. Successful educators have found that when they have high poverty rates, they must redouble their efforts, innovate and try strategies that are different from their suburban counterparts. They make sure they have all hands on deck. We’ve seen some incredible results from schools with high poverty rates, and we want to make sure we recognize their hard work and success and encourage others to duplicate their best practices. See Reward Page 7 At the same time,

Junkman’s Gems

Halloween and veterans

By Jim Scribner Dad had a procedure done at St. Mary’s Hospital in Enid Wednesday and we stayed overnight. Thursday at the hospital started kinda strange when the first nurse we see is a witch. They got to dress up for Halloween and some of them were pretty imaginative. I hope everyone had a good time trick or treating this year. The grandkids hit the jackpot in the loot business. The weather for the parade and Halloween were just perfect. It was a great parade and thanks to all that participated. We lost two lifelong Alva residents this last week: Owen Davison and Harry Kline. Both were veterans of World War II and were VFW supporters. I hope I thanked them both for keeping us free. I met Owen in my misspent youth in the pool halls and bars. He was always the best natured and most friendly guy you would ever See York Page 5 meet. The last time I saw him, probably at the

Moose Restaurant, he greeted me with “Hello Goldwater,” just like he always has since the sixties. It would be hard to count the number of veterans Owen helped get their benefits over the years. Not many people had the knowledge he had to work through the government maze to get results. I’m not saying he was known everywhere, but I bet if you would have dropped Owen off in the Gobi Desert, the first town he came to someone would have recognized him. Harry Kline and Howard Kurth started K&K in the ‘50s and it is still family run today. I’m not sure when I first met Harry, but I suspect it was somewhere in the ‘60s when I got wheels. Harry was the kind of a guy that would stop and listen to a young person even if there was no potential profit in it. Over the years I got to be friends with Harry. We shared many meals when our wives were members of a sewing group together. He enjoyed life as a traveler, fisherman and auto re-builder. It was always interesting to see what his current projects were. Anyone that has ever See Gems Page 8 seen the cars he has


November 3, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Annie’s Mailbox®

Page 5

Click and Clack Talk Cars

A prenup is a sensible move How to fish for Dear Annie: My wife died five years ago. Two years ago, I met “Lorna,” and I recently asked her to marry me. I feel strongly that personal assets that are brought into a marriage should be protected. I made this clear to Lorna early in our relationship and got the impression that she would agree to a prenup. I’ve been very successful financially. Lorna has few assets and a lot of debt. She says a prenuptial agreement makes her feel that our marriage is of a lesser quality than my first. I have tried to explain to her as gently as I can that this isn’t the case. It took my first wife and me 20 years to acquire what we had. It would kill me to risk that and have to start over when I’m 60. Is it right for Lorna to expect to be considered a financial equal immediately after marriage? Am I wrong to think it should take a reasonable amount of time for her to enjoy equal ownership? After my wife passed away, I set up trusts for my kids in case something happened to me. Lorna fears the financial agreement will make my kids think less of her because her daughter isn’t entitled to the same share. I truly believe this isn’t about the money. I think Lorna is concerned about how others, especially my children, will view our marriage. If I live long enough, Lorna’s teenage daughter will be given the same inheritance as my kids, but Lorna says that isn’t fair because she’ll be treating my children the same

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as hers from the start. I’ve told her that her daughter will have as much of my heart as my children, but the money is something else. Am I treating this too much like a business transaction? -- Frazzled in Phoenix Dear Frazzled: Absolutely not. Lorna’s fears are unfounded. A prenup is a sensible move when you are bringing considerable assets into a marriage, and there is no reason anyone other than your lawyer would know about it. Please take Lorna to see your attorney and set up an arrangement that she will agree to. Otherwise, we worry that it is indeed only about the money. Dear Annie: Is there a polite way to refuse a friend’s request to share in the cost of a mutual friend’s gift? Every time someone has a celebration where a gift is appropriate, “Ginny” always asks whether she can go in with me. Basically, she just wants to give me half of the cost so she doesn’t have to be inconvenienced by coming up with an idea, shopping for it, wrapping it, getting a card and then delivering it. I enjoy selecting special gifts with personal meaning for my friends. How do I tell Ginny that I am not her personal shopper? -Getting Annoyed Dear Annoyed: You could shop early and tell Ginny, “So sorry, but I already purchased my gift.” Or you could simply say, “I prefer to shop for something that

has meaning for me, sorry.” If you can offer a suggestion of what she might purchase as a gift, that would be nice of you, but don’t allow her to talk you into shopping for it. Dear Annie: I read the letter from “I Have Feelings, Too,” the grandmother who complained about how poorly she is treated when she visits her grandchildren. I, too, live far from my beautiful son, daughter-in-law and five amazing grandchildren, yet we do everything we can to be good guests, helpful grandparents and understanding of the huge amount of effort that goes into raising a family. Yes, the sinks are clogged, there are no towels, my daughterin-law often takes a night off, and sometimes the kids eat the pizza before we can get a bite. We don’t consider this abuse. We consider ourselves the luckiest people on Earth to be invited, and the sticky hugs we get are priceless. -- Lucky Grandma Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@ comcast.net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annie’s Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www. creators.com.

York

“The IRS is unlikely to achieve any significant reduction in Earned Income Tax Credit improper payments.” So, look for billions more to be wasted in improper payments this year. And next year. And so on. This is the very same IRS that will administer Obamacare’s subsidies and penalties. Does anyone doubt that in coming years the IRS will use the same excuses -- complexity, a desire not to discourage qualified recipients -- to explain its lack of enforcement, or perhaps refusal to enforce, Obamacare’s requirements? The process has already begun. Back in July, the Obama administration announced it will not require state-run Obamacare exchanges to verify whether individuals who receive subsidies for health coverage are actually qualified for those subsidies. The administration will rely instead on an honor system in which it accepts an applicant’s word that he or she is eligible -- a decision many analysts call an invitation to fraud. In September, the Republican-

controlled House passed a bill to require verification for all subsidies. This month, a much weakened version of that proposal became part of the settlement of the government shutdown. But the bottom line is, don’t expect the federal government to do much checking on who is receiving subsidies. And even a stringent verification requirement will not work if the IRS decides not to enforce it for fear of discouraging people who legitimately qualify for Obamacare subsidies. Since that has been the case with IRS non-enforcement of the president’s executive order covering improper Earned Income Tax

Credit payments, is there any reason to believe the IRS would not use the same rationale for Obamacare? Right now the public debate over Obamacare is consumed by news of the exchange website’s failures. It’s a serious situation that could have a long-lasting effect on the system. But at some point the administration will fix its technical problems. And then the news can move on to the next stage of Obamacare dysfunction -- like a new scandal with the IRS and subsidy payments. (Byron York is chief political correspondent for The Washington Examiner.)

a spark plug

By Tom and Ray Magliozzi Dear Tom and Ray: I had a spark plug blow out. The tip of the spark plug fell into the engine. Will that hurt it if I can’t fish it out? I drained my oil, but it didn’t come out, and I am trying to avoid taking the head apart. Thanks for any advice. – Stephanie TOM: Well, like the goldfish my brother once swallowed, these things all come out eventually. RAY: Actually, are you sure it went into the engine? If the spark plug blew out because it was improperly tightened, the tip also could have blown out. It could have hit the underside of the hood and dropped to the ground. TOM: That may be why you can’t find it – it isn’t in there! RAY: If you’re pretty sure it fell in there, then I’d look for a shop with a borescope. A borescope is just like the thing they used for your last colonoscopy, Stephanie, except it’s for cars. It allows the mechanic to snake an optical tube through a small opening – in this case, the spark-plug hole – and look inside an otherwise mysterious, dark space. TOM: If he sees the piece in there, he can try any creative way he can think of to remove it. A magnet won’t help you, in this case, because of the particular metals involved. RAY: But at times, we’ve been able to remove foreign objects from cylinders using a coat hanger with a blob of silicone adhesive on the end. TOM: Or sometimes, by blowing compressed air into the cylinder, you can force the piece out. RAY: But if he can’t get it out using whatever tools are at his disposal, then you’ve got some decisions to make. TOM: If the piece is clearly metallic, like the electrode, it’s likely to do some damage to a

valve if you run the car. In that case, it makes sense to remove the head and get the thing out. RAY: Right. Otherwise, you’ll end up paying to have the head removed AND paying for a valve job. TOM: If it’s something that’s small and appears destructible, like a piece of porcelain, then you can start up the car, and let the piston crush it and send the remnants out the tailpipe (see goldfish, above). RAY: And if you can’t find it – so you aren’t even certain what, if anything, is in there – then you probably need to take a chance and try starting up the car. TOM: I’d let your mechanic do this. His ear is better-tuned to expensive-sounding engine noises than yours is. RAY: Right. He’s bred to home right in on people who need rebuilds. TOM: What he’ll do, with an assistant, is start the engine. If it sounds normal, then he’ll know that either the piece was never in there, or it was something that got quickly chewed up and spit out by the cylinder. RAY: If it makes loud, frightening noises, he’ll shut it off immediately to limit any damage, then he’ll run a credit check on you and, if you pass, give you an estimate for some serious engine work. TOM: Good luck, Stephanie. *** Which is cheaper, buying or leasing? Should you keep a car forever or dump it after three years, before trouble starts? Find out in Tom and Ray’s pamphlet “Should I Buy, Lease, or Steal My Next Car?” Send $4.75 (check or money order) to Next Car, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 328536475. *** Get more Click and Clack in their new book, “Ask Click and Clack: Answers from Car Talk.” Got a question about cars? Write to Click and Clack in care of this newspaper, or email them by visiting the Car Talk website at www.cartalk.com.


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Chapter AL, P.E.O. learns Senior citizen report about graphoanalysis Chapter AL, P.E.O met Friday, Oct. 18, in the home of Joy Sherman, with Cheryl Ellis acting as co-hostess. President Jeannie Wade opened the meeting in due form and conducted the business meeting. An invitation was presented to the Founder’s Day luncheon to be held in Waynoka on Nov. 2. Sally Wiersig presented an informative program on graphoanalysis. She explained how different strokes in one’s handwriting demonstrate the character and personality of the writer. The primary aim of handwriting analysis is a better understanding of oneself and others. It was interesting to note that only 10 percent of our handwriting is physical, while 90 percent is mental. Following the program, delicious refreshments were served by the hostess and co-hostess. The next regular meeting will be held in the Methodist Church Parlor, with Marilyn Brown as hostess.

By Betty Riggins Friday, Oct. 25, was a great day at the center, as we had a good attendance plus a very good meal. Thank goodness we have great help from the three Bill Johnson Correctional Center boys. They worked n the kitchen plus helped set up the tables for the chicken and noodle feed for Homecoming. Saturday morning was busy, as we had to cut and tray cobblers. It was a beautiful day for the parade and we had a fairly good attendance for the dinner at the center. Monday was chilly but we had a good attendance. We had a room

full of Mrs. Tyree’s kindergarden class. They were amazing as they sang Halloween songs dressed in their pajamas, as it was pajama day at school. We are saddened by the loss of several prominent citizens. Our heartfelt sympathy goes out to these families. Tuesday we had a cool, damp and foggy morning. The attendance was low again but we had a very good meal. Marvin and Lois Smith from Waynoka entertained for us. If you or you know someone who would like to entertain for us or needs a ride to the center please call 580-327-1822.

Wednesday was another damp day with a few sprinkles and a fairly good attendance with a good meal. Thursday we had a few showers around but it turned out to be a beautiful day for the Halloween parade. We had a lot of kids and parents dressed in full costume, some pretty scary. We had a low attendance at the center. Next week we will have a board meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 6. We have noodles for sale at $4 a bag, so come and get yours. Holiday time is coming fast.

Patchwork Friends OHCE group learns of ways to stretch their dollars The Patchwork Friends OHCE (Oklahoma and Community Education) group met at the home of Barbara Cue on Oct. 24. JoAnn Prewett led the group in the flag salute. Barbara Cue gave the devotion on “Strangers Becoming Friends.” Seven members answered roll call to “What is one way you stretch your dollars?” Those answering were Sarah Green, Doris White, Maureen Thomas, Dottie Gatz, Aleta Nolan, JoAnne Prewett and Barbara Cue. Tamara Bohn was welcomed as a guest. Pennies for Friendship and Nickels for Leadership were collected. The minutes of the September meeting were read. The treasurer’s report will be presented next month, in the absence of DeeAnn Mason, the group treasurer. Thomas reported from the Woods County OHCE Fall Association Meeting held Oct. 14, telling the group that Barbara Cue, a Patchwork Friends member, was elected as the new Woods County OHCE treasurer for 2014/2015. See Patchwork Page 8

Photo restoration is topic at Oct. 12 genealogy society meeting

Nine members and guests of the Northwest Oklahoma Genealogy Society met Oct. 12 at Lynn Martin’s studio for an informative presentation on photo restoration. Lynn discussed putting movies and slides on DVDs because of the fading and the fact that projectors are no longer available for their viewing. Lynn also discussed software and its cost for photo manipulation of old photos. Photoshop, the gold standard, is no longer sold in a boxed package and must now be rented at $50 a month. Corel Photo Paint is around $79 in a boxed set. Free software for PhotoScape’s photo-manipulation is paid for by junk tag-along software that could overwhelm a person’s computer if he or she is not careful. Lynn’s studio offers many services in restoration at reasonable prices. Society members appreciated Lynn’s presentation. The next Northwest Oklahoma Genealogy Society meeting is Nov. 9 at 2 p.m. at the Alva Public Library with member Dorothy Erikson presenting on “Researching Cajun Ancestors.” Visitors are welcome.

Nov. 4, 2013 to Nov 8, 2013 Breakfast Menu for Alva Public Schools Monday – Chicken biscuit, pears, milk Tuesday – Pancakes, maple syrup, peaches, milk Wednesday – Whole Grain Apple Jacks, buttered toast, mandarin oranges, apple juice, skim milk Thursday – Sausage gravy, biscuit, fruit cocktail, milk Friday – Whole Grain Frosted Flakes, cinnamon toast, banana, grape juice, skim milk Lunch Menu for Alva Public Schools Monday – Little Smokies, green beans, whole grain biscuit, pickle spear, applesauce, milk Tuesday – Hamburger, dill pickles, roasted veggie medley, pears, milk

Wednesday – Turkey and noodles, mashed potatoes, carrots, wheat rolls, strawberry cup, milk Thursday – Chili, crackers, cinnamon roll, banana, milk Friday – Chicken sandwich, dill pickles, broccoli and cheese, happy sticks, mandarin oranges, milk Menu for Woods County Senior Citizens Monday – Pulled pork, mashed potatoes, gravy, carrots, bread Tuesday – Chicken patty, mashed potatoes, gravy, mixed vegetables, bread, gingersnap cookies Wednesday – Biscuits and gravy; bacon, eggs and hash browns; strawberries and bananas Thursday – Polish sausage with sauerkraut, pickled beets, bread, fruit cocktail Friday – Taco salad, corn, tortilla chips, cinnamon roll

Various brightly colored mums and pumpkins in tan, grayish green and orange stacked on an urn adorn the front entrance to the Fall Porch of the Month, located at 526 Noble St.

‘Porch of the Season’ recipients are Randy and Carla Mitchel Randy and Carla Mitchel moved to their home on 526 Noble St. 20 years ago. What with Carla’s love of the creative arts and gardening, and Randy’s muscle and creative ideas, the couple truly enjoys decorating for the seasons. Carla said that they have enjoyed this home so much, saying there was lots to do to it and it was very homey. She has always liked to garden and decorate and this was the perfect place for it. “It takes both of us to get it done,” she said. “Randy does the hard work; I do the fun part – what a deal! We shop here in Alva for most everything concerning our yard – in the fall, that’s pumpkins, mums, kale, etc. It’s reasonable and satisfying to shop here. I’ve always loved Halloween, and it’s easy to be creative then. I just dig through all my junk and go for it. Randy is always, always helpful with the tools. It makes me smile to ‘play’ in the yard.” The porch has many interesting items, including bright yellow mums in coconut-filler baskets adorned with colorful fall ribbons and hoisted up for view on metal stands from the enclosed railings. A scarecrow usually sits with his “bumpy” pumpkins in a wicker rocker as a ghost haunts nearby. Carla created a large fall grapevine

wreath that adorns the porch wall. Pumpkins rest on the floor of the porch as well as the railings. Halloween pumpkin planters hold colorful purple mums on the steps. Below the front porch are urns displaying colorful pumpkins stacked upon each other in tan, grayish green and orange. The entrance of the home has numerous large butterscotch, yellow, rust and purple mum planters in interesting arrangements, some with kale, and a wagon filled with more colorful

pumpkins. The council’s next “Porch of the Season” will depict a winter theme. Suggestions are welcome and may be submitted by calling members of the committee: Evelyn at 580327-5706, April at 580-917-0331 or Barbara at 580-327-.0753. To be nominated, a decorated porch must be within the city limits. The Alva Council of Garden Clubs will have not only the winter theme, but one for the spring and also for the summer.

Carla Mitchel is shown with her scarecrow and lovely porch decorated for Halloween.


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Alva Girl Scouts help Homestead residents carve pumpkins Alva Girl Scouts with troops #969 and #799 helped carve pumpkins with the residents at The Homestead getting in the spirit of Halloween. The residents helped pick out the design they wanted carved in their pumpkin, and the scouts cut off the tops, scooped out the insides and carved the designs in the pumpkins. Some of the pumpkin seeds were sorted out to roast and eat later. The scouts helping were Calissa Fouts and Leah Maier with Troop #969 and Daylin Smart, Hailey Weber and Chesney Fouts with Troop #799, along with their leader, Judy Neilson.

Daylin Smart and Jim Noble decided to carve a bat into their pumpkin

Calissa and Chesney Fouts and Don Know show off their pumpkin creation

Leah Maier poses with her pumpkin creation

Hailey Weber and Gene Leslie display their jack-olantern pumpkin face

Citizen assists in nabbing suspect By Marione Martin Oklahoma Highway Patrol Trooper Brock Morgan received some assistance from a citizen in catching a suspect Wednesday, Oct. 23. Morgan was on routine patrol about 6:15 p.m. in the Capron area of Woods County when he was contacted by Woods County dispatch. He was told that a black Ford pickup was northbound on U.S. 281 and had run another vehicle off the road into the ditch. The reporting party was still following the pickup and giving live updates to dispatch via cellphone. The reporting party then stated the pickup had stopped in the road on McClain Road just east of U.S. 281. A male exited the passenger seat and a female exited the driver’s seat. The two of them argued; then the female got into the pickup and continued to drive. The pickup crossed into Kansas and was contacted by the Barber County Sheriff’s Office in Hardtner. Trooper Morgan contacted the reporting party and verified the location where the driver had left

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the male passenger. He drove south on U.S. 281 and began to travel east on McClain Road. About a half mile east of U.S. 281 Morgan met a pickup and talked with the driver, Marty Koppitz, who asked if he was looking for a man. Koppitz said he saw a man walking in a wheat field just east of their location. Morgan drove down the road and saw a man walking west in the wheat field on the north side of the road. He stopped and stood up high in the door frame of his patrol unit and advised the man he was a state trooper and instructed him to stop. The man stopped and looked at Morgan. Then he began to move faster to a fence line. Morgan identified himself as a law enforcement officer and told him to stop. The man continued to run. Koppitz had pulled in behind Morgan. The trooper asked Koppitz if he would drive him to the man. He agreed, and Morgan jumped on the flatbed of his pickup. They caught up with the man, and Morgan ordered him to stop. He looked at the trooper defiantly and continued. As

the pickup pulled up beside him, Morgan again ordered him to stop. The man slowed to a walk, and Morgan told him to put his hands above his head. The man complied, and Morgan ordered him to his knees as he jumped from the bed of the pickup. Morgan took the man into custody, and he was transported back to the road on the bed of Koppitz’s pickup. Morgan retrieved a Mississippi driver’s license from the man’s jeans pocket, which identified him as Jason Loyel Gray, 35, of Corinth, Miss. Morgan noticed that Gray had a strong odor of intoxicating beverage about his breath and person and that he was unsteady on his feet. Morgan then transported Gray to the Woods County Sheriff’s Office. There he performed standardized field sobriety testing on Gray. He did not perform well and had a very high preliminary breath test reading. Gray has been charged in Woods County with public intoxication and obstructing an officer, both misdemeanors.

Reward

we are accounting for increased enrollment at many public schools and asking for about $65 million in additional funds to accommodate such growth. Our budget also asks for $69 million to adequately implement various education reforms. We recognize that districts need proper funding for such state-mandated reforms as Achieving Classroom Excellence graduation requirements or third-grade reading standards. This is an answer to that request from

districts. I also am urging district superintendents to use part of the new funds to increase teacher pay. There is no question that inadequate teacher salaries are a big reason we lose many of our best and brightest educators to other states. A pay raise would help make clear the value we place on their hard work and dedication. Of course, we will see fewer dollars go to the classroom this year in the wake of the Affordable Care Act. The consequences of Obam-

acare are severe and painful. Millions of dollars that could have gone to the classroom instead must be eaten up in insurance costs, a $59 million jump over last year’s figures. Still, we believe our budget request is responsible, realistic and an important step forward in connecting new funds to proven performance. Oklahomans must know their tax dollars are being invested wisely in schools, and we believe this budget ensures just that.

Motel reports nude man running in the halls By Marione Martin Two Alva police officers were sent to a local motel after management reported an intoxicated nude man running in the halls. According to information on file, on Oct. 23 about 10:25 p.m. Alva police officers William Shahan and Wade Suffron went to America’s Best Value Inn. They were told at the front desk that the man was in room 101, and they were asked to remove the man from the premises. The night manager also said he would get the police a copy of the surveillance video of the incident. Shahan and Suffron made contact with the suspect who was lying in his bed under the blankets.

Shahan asked the man, identified later as Gary Ray Armstrong, 42, to come out from under the blankets slowly and to come to his feet. They observed that he was nude. They asked the assistance of his male roommate to get Armstrong clothed. While speaking to Armstrong, Shahan noticed the strong odor of intoxicating beverage emitting from his breath and person. He observed that Armstrong was unsteady on his feet and his speech was thick and slurred. Armstrong was placed under arrest and taken to the Woods County Jail. Armstrong has been charged with public intoxication and outraging public decency, both misdemeanors.


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Kidnapping charge filed in custody case

By Marione Martin A woman who recently moved to Alva has been charged with felony kidnapping. According to documents on file, the charge filed against Geraldine Mary Powell, 22, involves the custody of her biological son. The boy’s father, who lives in California, has legal custody of the child. California officials contacted district attorney’s investigator Steve Tanio about the case, saying they believe Powell was living in Alva with her boyfriend and the child. On Oct. 23 Tanio spoke with a child welfare supervisor with the Oklahoma Department of Human Services (DHS) who said on Oct. 5 Powell filled out paperwork at the Woods County DHS to begin receiving food stamps. She listed her residence in Alva and her place of employment. A warrant was issued on Oct. 23. Bennett family members pictured are (left to right) Gene Bennett, Barry Sharp, Callie Sharp, Carla Sharp, Clairece Bennett, Terry Bennett, Pam Thacker, Peggy Bennett, Brent Thacker, Kristina Bennett, Nettie Bennett, Dennis Bennett, Barry Bennett, Jackie Richardson, Carol-Bennett Sisson, Donna Fagan, Sherri Bennett, Tristen Bennett, Charles Fagan, Jessie Jeffers, Cydney Bennett, Don Bennett, Sabrina Bennett, Teri Zamora, Auston Ames, Marion Bennett, Gary Bennett, Keith Bennett, Eric Harger

Woods County commissioners have Fallen Ranger remembered short meeting Thursday

By Lynn L. Martin The video camera time counter showed 10 minutes and eight seconds as the total length of Thursday morning’s county commissioner’s meeting. District 1 Commissioner Clint Strawn was absent. As a result, the remaining commissioners tabled the road crossing permits requested in District 1, but approved the following: D3 5-25-14 SemGas Gas $500 D3 6-25-14 Alfalfa Electric Cooperative Electric $0 D3 2-25-14 SemGas Gas $500 D3 3-25-14 SemGas Gas $500 D3 31-26-13 SemGas Gas $500 D3 31-26-13 SemGas Gas $500 D2 14-27-16 Howard Drilling Water $375 D2 12-27-17 Howard Drilling Water $1,125 The commissioners approved a request from Jody Bradford, representing the Chamber of Commerce, for use of the courthouse stage at 4 p.m. on Dec. 7. The event is the Chamber’s Candy Cane Cash Sweet Stakes, a promotion to urge consumers to buy in Alva. Karen Armbruster also was on the agenda. The commissioners approved the annual contract between the commissioners, the USDA and the OSU Extension service. The commissioners budget $54,400 annually to help retain the service in Woods County.

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Gems

restored knows he was one of the finest craftsman around. I will always remember the last two places I saw him. One was at this year’s car show showing off his beautiful cars. The other was at the Kansas Star Casino. I was sitting in the car in the parking lot taking a nap when who should stop to see if I was okay but Harry. I will miss his smile and

easy going ways. I know Halloween is over, but these are too good to not pass on. What do you call a haunted chicken? Poultry-giest. What do you call an overweight jack-o-lantern? Plumpkin. What do you get if you cross Bambi with a ghost? Bamboo. Have a good week and remember Nov. 12.

Family, friends and Northwestern hosted a remembrance for fallen Ranger Jerry Bennett on Oct. 5 during a memorial held in the Ranger Room. Bennett graduated from Northwestern in 1965 and was killed in action in 1967 in the Republic of South Vietnam. He was a first lieutenant at the time. Bennett is recognized as Northwestern’s only casualty who was killed in action. Bob Ferguson, a fellow Marine, and Carl Lemon, Northwestern alumnus and fellow Marine, wanted to honor Bennett and his family in a special way. They established a permanent exhibit that features war memorabilia in shadow boxes now in a display case in the Ranger Room in the Student Center. During the remembrance, many family members and friends shared memories of Bennett, describing him as spunky and full of life. A commemorative flag was presented to the Bennett family at halftime of the Ranger game during the Military Appreciation Day ceremonies. Each of the 12 surviving Bennett family members was given a Marine Corps medallion in tribute to their fallen relative. “Military Appreciation Day was the perfect opportunity for the Northwestern family to share the occasion with Bennett and guests,” said Lizabeth Richey, director of alumni relations. “Jerry was a very

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special individual, exhibited by the Rangers present at the ceremony and those who spoke so eloquently of his service for our great nation. It was an honor and a privilege to participate in such a meaningful tribute.” Another Northwestern fallen Ranger, William Michael (Mike) Warehime, has also been honored with a shadow box. Warehime was in the ROTC program at Northwestern and graduated in 1975. Upon graduation and after

completion of the ROTC program, he was commissioned. Warehime was killed in a helicopter crash in 1976 when the craft, which was on training maneuvers, crashed during a storm on a north Georgia mountain. He was stationed out of Fort Benning, Ga. At the time he was married to fellow Northwestern alumnus Mary Catherine Goss, who graduated from Northwestern in 1975. Warehime’s shadow box is also displayed in the Ranger Room in the Student Center.

Marion Bennett is shown receiving the commemorative Marine memorabilia from Carl Lemon, friend, alumni and fellow Marine of Jerry Bennett, who was killed in action in the Vietnam War

Patchwork

“Holiday Happenings,” a combined county event, will be held this year in Fairview on Friday, Nov. 15. Those planning to attend are asked to register by Nov. 8 at the Woods County OSU Extension Office. Discussion was held concerning a holiday donation to the Alva Food Bank, which will be done in the

near future. The November meeting will be held early, because of the Thanksgiving holiday, on Nov. 21 at the home of Dottie Gatz. Members planning to attend who would like to car pool will meet at the Alva City Pool parking lot. The date for the December meet-

ing was discussed with no decision made for the exact date at this time. It was decided for the group to play “Dirty Santa” with the gift limit of $15. Thomas presented the educational lesson on “Food Storage for Safety and Quality.” She reminded the members to pay attention to the date on the packaging of all food products. Use a system of “first in, first out” when it comes to rotating stored food. You should also pick up cold items last at the store and get them home quickly. Members received guidelines on the subject. There being no other business, the meeting adjourned. The hostess provided refreshments. Sarah Green won the hostess gift. The Wood County OHCE organization invites potential new members to contact the Woods County OSU Extension Service, located on the ground floor of the Woods County Courthouse, for a membership form, or go to www. oces.okstate.edu/woods to obtain a copy.


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Alva Girl Scouts visit wildlife park Alva’s older girl scouts enjoyed a beautiful fall day at the Tanganyika Wildlife Park in Goddard, Kan. It is a smaller zoo, but visitors get to be up close with the animals and feed most of them. The money visitors spend to buy food to feed the animals helps pay for feed during the winter months when the wildlife park is closed. The scouts were able to feed the giraffes, lorikeets, turtles, bunnies, llamas, lemurs and rhino. They took a camel ride and patted the kangaroos with their joeys. They were able to see the penguins, different cats and an albino alligator. The park is also known for having weddings at their facility and including some of the animals in the festivities. The scouts believe that right beside the waterfall would be an ideal location for a small wedding. Something to remember for Autumn Stout feeds the giraffes at the wildlife park. future reference.

The lorikeets make a friend of Kendra Neilson at the wildlife park in Goddard, Kan.

Isabella Stout and Daylin Smart enjoy a camel ride at the Tanganyika Wildlife Park.

Girl scouts attending the trip to Tanganyika Wildlife Park in Goddard, Kan., are Kendra Neilson, Autumn Stout, Isabella Stout and Daylin Smart along with their leader, Judy Neilson.


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Alva ruins senior night for the Dibble Demons By Leslie Nation It was senior night in Dibble as the Goldbugs took to the field to kick off for their last road showdown before heading back home to round out their regular season against Hennessey. The Demons were suffering from a drought, losing all their last three games, and they were desperate to end that here. It looked like Dibble could make that happen after a 17-yard run from tailback Nick Hearon and a 14-yard connection between starting quarterback Braeden James and Wyatt Hayes. After two back-to-back first downs, the Demons were making a statement against Alva’s defense, but the Goldbugs quickly pulled together. James threw twice into coverage, almost being picked off, and lost yardage when he opted to run to force Dibble into a fourth-and-16 situation to punt the ball away. With two minutes off the play clock, Alva was in possession at their 36. Nearly three minutes later, Alva had scored off a one-yard rushing touchdown from Joby Allen after driving the ball 63 yards in 10 plays. Quarterback Ty Hooper was off to a great start, completing five of six passes for 50 yards. Two of those completions were for some long gain to Riley Hess to bring Alva into Dibble territory on a 14yard pass, and a 12-yard pass that brought them just shy of the red

zone. The extra point attempt was ruled no good and Alva had a 6-0 early lead against the Demons to give them some ground to make up. Dibble was making a case for themselves so that the Goldbugs wouldn’t rule them out just yet. Starting from their 35-yard line, James handed off to the Demons’ star running back, Tazden Jevons, who broke straight up the middle for a 24-yard run to put them in Goldbug territory. Two more plays and Dibble was seven yards away from the red zone, but after another handoff to Jevons, the Goldbugs forced a fumble and the ball was recovered by Alva’s Brandon Ellis at their own 28. With a fresh set of downs, Alva attempted to extend their lead against the Demons. But the Dibble defense held strong to make the Goldbugs go three-in and threeout. Punting the ball away, Dibble had to start their new drive on their 12 with 3:16 left to go in the first quarter. A 17-yard run and an 11-yard pass completion to Hearon gave the Demons huge forward progression and breathing room. After a critical personal foul penalty called on Alva, Dibble was in Goldbug territory at the 43. But another turnover by Dibble gave the Goldbugs the ball after Cade Pfleider intercepted the ball, running it all the way back to the Dibble 27-yard line for 23

Starting tailback Cody Jones (#3) breaks a loose tackle by a Dibble defender to the right side for a gain of 11 yards and a Goldbug first-down in Demon territory. Jones had 127 rushing yards and two touchdowns against the Demons on Friday. Photo by Leslie Nation yards. After just two plays and 12 yards, Hooper threw the ball deep in the end zone from 15 yards out into the capable hand of Hess for another Goldbug touchdown with 1:13 left before the second quarter. Alva scored a successful two-point conversion to put them ahead of the Demons 14-0. Four plays and 80 yards later, however, the Demons scored their first touchdown to bring themselves within 12 of Alva’s lead. James was the scorer for Dibble on a design quarterback keeper to the end zone. Weaving in and out of traffic, James found a hole to the left sideline all the way for a 34yard touchdown. Two possession changes later, Alva was able to respond with an eight-yard touchdown run by Allen, and then a 32-yard pass to Hess for his second touchdown with over four minutes left to go in the half. These two touchdowns gave the Goldbugs plenty of cushion to lead 28-6 before the end of the first half. Alva’s Lead Proves Too Much for the Demons At the start of the second half, it was Dibble who would be kick-

ing off to the Goldbugs, but the Demons ended up being the ones to recover the ball on Alva’s 38. Dibble’s possession didn’t last very long, as James threw his third interception of the night to give the ball back to Alva on their 44. Eight plays and 56 yards later, the Goldbugs scored another touchdown as Allen recorded his second rushing touchdown of the night. Alva had a sizable 34-6 lead against the Demons, and it was starting to look like Dibble’s fourth straight loss was in the making. After 11 plays and nearly five minutes running off the clock, Alva was back in possession, as the Demons were unable to get anything past the Goldbugs’ defense. Starting the drive from their own 20, Hooper dropped back to pass as the Demons blitzed to hurry the quarterback. Hooper ran to his right side to avoid the sack and threw down the field into Dibble coverage, who ran it back for a defensive touchdown. With three minutes left in the third quarter, Alva was quick to respond. After five plays and 60 yards, the Goldbugs scored off of a 44-yard touchdown pass to Pfleider,

giving Hooper his third touchdown pass of the night. Alva scored again before the Demons were able to respond. The score 46-19 with Alva in the lead, the two teams traded blows throughout the rest of the game. In the end it was the Goldbugs on top, winning 61-25 as Dibble wound the rest of the play-clock down. Stats For the Goldbugs Hooper threw 24 passes with 15 completions, 218 yards and four touchdowns and two picks connecting with four different receivers through the night. Hooper’s go-to receivers were Hess and Pfleider. Hess, who had six grabs for 87 yards, had three touchdowns while Pfleider snatched five passes for a total of 105 yards and a touchdown. Manning also received three passes for 26 yards to add to the passing game. The go-to tailback for the evening was Jones, who eclipsed 100 yards running for 127 off of 17 handoffs, getting two touchdowns. Allen added 38 yards off of 10 attempts, getting three touchdowns for the Goldbugs, while Pfleider and Hooper added a total of 36 yards off of eight carries.

Wide receiver Riley Hess (#27) catches a 15-yard touchdown pass deep in the endzone against the Dibble Demons on Friday, Nov. 1. Hess caught three touchdowns in that game. Photo by Leslie Nation

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Running back for the Demons Nick Hearon (#20) is pursued by the Goldbug defense – Cade Pfleider (#35), Riley Hess (#27) and Dalton Manning (#26) – after finding a hole in the defensive line for a huge gain and a first down. Photo by Leslie Nation


November 3, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Rangers’ football showdown with Pitt State ends in 70-0 loss By Leslie Nation The Northwestern Oklahoma State Rangers football team clashed helmets with the Pitt State University (PSU) Gorillas on the road Saturday. This ended in a shutout on Pitt State turf, as Northwestern gets ready to round out their season with one more away game and a trip back home for their final game against longtime rivals Southwestern Oklahoma State. The downside for Northwestern is that after having huge success against Southeastern in last week’s homecoming matchup, starting quarterback Reid Miller was out for the entire game. Miller was 13 for 26, throwing for 164 yards and three touchdowns as well as adding 121 yards rushing. On the plus side, redshirt freshman L.T. Pfaff, who has seen a lot of success already as a Ranger, replaced him for the game.

Northwestern was the first to receive the ball after winning the coin toss, but after two-anda-half minutes, three plays and a gain of only four yards, the Gorillas had possession at the Rangers’ 40. It took Pitt State less than 10 seconds to make a statement, when starting quarterback for the Gorillas Anthony Abenoja connected with his go-to receiver John Brown on a 40-yard touchdown pass. Two minutes later, Abenoja got another chance with Brown, this time on a 76-yard pass and catch to lead Northwestern 14-0 with 9:56 left in the first quarter. On the Gorillas’ next possession, the Rangers’ defense had finally found a rhythm to slow up Pitt State’s progression down the field, but the results were still the same. After a 72-yard march on seven plays, running back Jeff Seybold was able to run for a short two-yard touchdown. Abenoja had

two long passes to help the Gorillas down the field – the first on a connection to Marquise Cushon for 24 yards to get them on Northwestern’s 25. The second was to Brown for 11 yards on a play just prior to Seybold’s touchdown. Northwestern covered some ground in their next possession starting from their 19-yard line. Liggins started the drive on a handoff for a nine-yard rushing play to give the Rangers their first shot at a first-down. After an offside penalty was called on PSU, Northwestern advanced to their 33 and a Ranger first-down. Things quickly went wrong for the Rangers after Pfaff completed a pass to Davontaa Bryant, as PSU safety Scott Roderique upended Bryant through the air to force a fumble. Defensive lineman Taye Irvin of the Gorillas recovered the fumble at Northwestern’s 38 to start a fresh drive for Pitt State. It didn’t take long for the Goril-

Ladybug named to softball Region I All-Region team By Leslie Nation With Class 6A and 5A softball championships coming to a close, an official end to another generation of talented softball players is approaching, as they hang up their uniforms for a final time. In October, the Alva High School Ladybugs softball team said good-bye to three such seniors who have been a huge part of their success throughout the season, each in their own right. Two of those seniors have started every game this past season, and while Emily Harris may not have had a huge role on the field, head coach Paul Duncan pointed out advantages of having a player like Harris. “I’ve got one, Emily, who doesn’t get to play very much but she’s here and does what she’s supposed to do,” Duncan said. “She’s been a vocal supporter, and sometimes it’s tougher to be that girl than the one that’s playing every day.” Duncan also had a lot to say about his other leaders who have seen playing time: Kaitlin Ramy

Senior Darian Carothers receives recognition and is named to the softball Region 1 All-Region team as utility player for her ability to play in multiple positions on the field. Carothers played the majority of this season as shortstop, but she also saw playing time at third base, and she was catcher for three years prior to this season. Photo by Leslie Nation

las to get another seven after a 29yard pass to Gavin Lutman gave Seybold a chance for a nine-yard rushing touchdown to extend the lead to 28-0 before the end of the first quarter. The Rangers were able to force PSU’s punting team on the field once in the first half, but the Gorillas had four more unanswered touchdowns before ending the half. Rangers Slow Pitt State’s Onslaught Northwestern turned up the heat on defense enough to slow Pitt State’s offense, and that determination resulted in only one touchdown apiece in the next two quarters. Granted, the Gorillas let up on the beating they were giving, the Rangers didn’t go down without a fight. As the game came to a close, Northwestern suffered their worst loss since 1953 (80-0 against Texas A&M Commerce), losing 70-0 on Saturday, Nov. 2. Abenoja threw an impressive 10 of 12 passes for 256 yards and four touchdowns. Two of those touchdown passes connected with Brown, who accumulated 132 yards receiving off of four grabs. Seybold carried the ball 10 times for the afternoon for 125 yards and three runs into the end

zone for the Gorillas, who are now 8-1 (7-1 MIAA). For Northwestern, Pfaff completed 10 of his 18 throws for 63 yards and two picks. Bryant was the leading receiver for the Rangers, catching four, and Tavion Parnell followed him with three for 25 yards. Liggins was the leading rusher with 65 yards off of 18 attempts. On defense, it was Joby Saint Fleur and Caden Gacek who finished with a team-high of seven tackles for the game at seven tackles each. Though this was a disappointing loss for the Rangers, head coach Alan Hall could see a positive side to this game: “We’ll put this one behind us,” Hall said. “This one doesn’t mean much in terms of our conference. We still have a couple of big games in terms of Oklahoma bragging rights.” Those bragging rights are definitely still possible for the Rangers, as they travel back across the state border to face Southern Nazarene in Bethany for a 1:30 p.m. kickoff next Saturday, Nov. 9. Northwestern will then finish off their season against the Southwestern Oklahoma State Bulldogs at Ranger Stadium for senior night on Nov. 16.

OBU staves off Ranger comeback

ALVA HIGH SCHOOL LADYBUG SOFTBALL TEAM SENIORS — Pictured from left to right are Kaitlin Ramy, Emily Harris and Darian Carothers. means so much to me that I was and Darian Carothers: “Kaitlin is our quiet leader. picked as a utility player because She does all the little things that I know my strengths and abilities nobody notices for us coaches to play different positions, and as and we’ll miss that,” Duncan said. long as I’m playing I don’t care “She just does all the little things where it is,” Carothers said. Carothers went on to state that and doesn’t have to be asked.” she believed it took “hard work, The senior who has received a lot of recognition as the softball determination, positive attitudes season has officially come to a and your heart to take you where close is Carothers, who was named you want to go.” The Ladybugs utility player to the softball Region softball team will be losing three I All-Region team. This honor ac- seniors that have had impactful knowledges Carothers’ ability leadership roles, and Carothers unto play in multiple positions on derstood the significance of stepthe field, which is something that ping up in that role her senior year. “I knew it was time to step up Duncan has emphasized with his and try to be positive about everyteam. “From the beginning I have thing we had to overcome because said, ‘I just want softball play- I know losing a couple of girls ers,’” Duncan said. “Our softball could’ve brought the team down, IQ is rising, and we can always but we stayed strong and pulled make adjustments depending on through in a positive manner,” Carothers said. who is pitching.” While hard work and dedicaDuncan expressed his pride when Carothers was announced tion are certainly core ingredients in any leader, Carothers believes utility player for All-Region: “Of course, Darian is multi- that showing respect to her teamfaceted on the field,” Duncan said. mates as well as her coach is part “She’s been a catcher for three of that role as well. “I’m so happy to see that our years, and now she’s out there at team has grown so much over the shortstop and third base some. She just rolls and does it, and we’ll years, and I hope to see the girls continue to grow and strive for exmiss that.” When Carothers was asked cellence,” Carothers said. “I also what her feelings were on being greatly appreciate Coach Duncan given recognition, she had this to and all of his dedication he put say: “I am very honored and ex- into the team and how he always cited that I made All-Region. It believed in us.”

NWOSU Sports Information Asia Pipkin delivered 17 kills and17 digs, but Northwestern Oklahoma State’s volleyball team couldn’t muster enough additional firepower to get by Ouachita Baptist University (OBU). Northwestern hit .096 for the match on its way to a four-set defeat Friday at Percefull Fieldhouse: 21-25, 14-25, 25-17, 18-25. Korina Lillard added nine kills and 15 digs to go with nine more kills from Elisa Bentsen, who hit a team-high .350 for the match. Tiana Barnett finished with 28 assists, while Kaydee Yukawa chipped in 14. OBU (9-7, 3-4 Great American Conference) hit .221 for the night and put a stop to a six-match losing streak. Northwestern (3-17, 0-7 GAC) will grapple with Henderson State (9-7 GAC) at 2 p.m. on Saturday. The Rangers led early in the

opening set, but a 6-0 OBU run turned things around. The Tiger lead ping-ponged between three and seven points for much of the set. Down 23-17, the Rangers ran off four straight points on a couple of Bentsen stuffs, followed by two Pipkin kills, but 23-21 is the closest they could get it. OBU won 11 of the first 14 points in the second set to coast to an easy win. Northwestern finally came to life in the third. Down 15-12, they outscored the Tigers 13-2 the rest of the way. Pipkin and Lillard each had two kills, and Megan Hentschke helped close it out with a pair of service aces. The Rangers had a chance to force a fifth set, trading blows with OBU in the fourth until the score reached 16-all. Four attack errors and a service error, however, quickly shifted things in the Tigers’ favor.

Tigers top Rangers 4-1 at home NWOSU Sports Information Scoring soccer goals starts with generating opportunities – something visiting East Central University (ECU) did often Friday. The Tigers outshot Northwestern Oklahoma State 29-5 on their way to a 4-1 Great American Conference victory. ECU struck first in the game at the 19:06 mark, when Kourtney Holleman took a pass from Ashley Bradford and scored from 10 yards out. Bradford added a goal of her own just over 16 minutes later, sending a rocket off the inside of the cross bar that came down just across the goal line. Down 2-0 with just two minutes and change left in the first half, Northwestern’s Sarah Witty scored

her first goal of the season. Sabrina Pena dribbled into the left corner and sent a hard cross curling in front of the left post. Witty found position between herself and the keeper and bodied the ball into the net to make it a 2-1 game going into the half. Milan Galloway and Katie Glutz scored second-half goals for ECU. Northwestern head coach Kasey Mahaffey began her coaching career as an assistant at ECU, recruiting many of the current players. She’s 0-3-1 against them over the past two seasons. The Rangers will take the field again at 1 p.m. on Sunday afternoon for senior day against Southern Nazarene.


November 3, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Add Red Ribbon Week dress up days to Halloween and this is what you’ll find at Alva High School. From left, front row: Mary Tyler, Cody Jones, Cade Pflieder, Shayla Terrell, Rachel Carter, Rylan Castleberry and Kristina Duppenthaler. Back row: Mr.Eckhardt, Emily Harris, Jordan Coffman, Siera AHS students dress up this week for Red Ribbon Week. From left, Earnest, Darian Carothers. front row: Brianna Duppenthaler, Jaida Williams and Autumn Stout. Back row: Megan Web, Megan Brown, Rozlynn Murrow, Joseph Ortiz.

Students and teachers celebrate Red Ribbon Week with dress up days. Monday was pajama day, Tuesday was wacky day, Wednesday was western day and Thursday was wear bright colors day. From left, front row: Ms. Almgren, Cade Pfleider, Jordan Flynt, Jeremiah Bozeman, Mrs. Pfleider. Back row: Jordan Shiever, Mrs.Beiswanger, Mrs. Simon and Joseph Ortiz.

These AHS students are dressed up for Red Ribbon Week or perhaps for Halloween. From left, front row: Cheyenne Hooten, Riley Beeler, Brooklynn Faison, Kimberly Stuck, Linda McDonald. Back row: Savannah Guffy, Christian Burton, Shanea Herren and Crissa Edstrom.

Zehr, West named Ranger Queen, King During halftime of the Rangers football game on Oct. 26, Baylei Zehr, a senior from Copeland, Kan., and Jake West, Tonkawa senior, were crowned as 2013 homecoming queen and king during the coronation ceremony at Northwestern Oklahoma State University. Zehr is an English education major. She was sponsored by the Alpha Sigma Alpha sorority, and has been a part of the sorority for four years. Zehr also is a part of the Student Oklahoma Education Association, Conserving Our Ranger Environment club and Northwestern Scholar Ambassador. She enjoys going to sporting events

and watching movies. Zehr is the daughter of Jay and Angie Zehr. West is majoring in history education and health and sports science. He enjoys fishing, playing intramural sports, working at the Wellness Center and growing out his mustache. West was sponsored by the Chemistry Club. His parents are Tige and Kristi West. In a separate election, Sydnie Lowe, a freshman from Neosho, Mo., was chosen as the Freshman Queen. The flower girl was Zoe Parker, daughter of Alan and Diane Hall. Tucker Hannaford served as the crown bearer. He is the son of Dr. Bo and Tara Hannaford.

Check out our unpublished photos online Go to “Photo Gallery” at www.AlvaReviewCourier.com

A great way to fill a grandma’s scrapbook.

Baylei Zehr and Jake West were named the 2013 Ranger King and Queen during halftime of the Ranger Homecoming football game Saturday. They are pictured with flower girl Zoe Parker and crown bearer Tucker Hannaford.


November 3, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Timberwolves roll Thunder, 100-81 By Jon Krawczynski MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Two games into the season, and it is clear that Russell Westbrook’s knee injury has taken the swagger and ferocity right out of the Oklahoma City Thunder. The last team in the NBA that will have any sympathy for the Thunder is the Minnesota Timberwolves, who are showing signs of putting everything together after two years of devastating injuries. Kevin Love had 24 points and 12 rebounds and Ricky Rubio added 14 points, 10 assists and five steals to lead the Timberwolves to a 100-81 victory over the Thunder on Friday night. Nikola Pekovic had 15 points and 10 rebounds for Minnesota and Corey Brewer led a spirited defensive effort against Kevin Durant. Derrick Williams had 10 points and seven rebounds for Minnesota after not playing in the opener. Durant scored 13 points on 4-for-11 shooting and had trouble finding clean looks against a Timberwolves team that was supposed to be porous on defense. But the Thunder shot 35 percent and turned the ball over 21 times to get run out of the building. “We can be very good,” Love said when asked how good the team can be if it plays that kind of defense. “We can be very good. But

I’ve learned not to look too far into the future. I just want to take it day by day.” After scoring 42 in the season opener against Utah, Durant scored his fewest points since Dec. 31, 2011 when he had 12 against Phoenix. Jeremy Lamb was the only other Thunder player in double figures with 16, and it has become abundantly clear very early in the season how much they miss Westbrook. “If they play one-on-one, I felt like I had the better matchup. But every time I caught it there was two guys guarding me, so I’ve got to kick to my teammates,” said Durant, who had four turnovers. “I’ve got to make better decisions in that area.” The Thunder offense has lacked its usual punch with the fiery Westbrook sidelined indefinitely. “Them not having Westbrook, that’s taking away 25 (points), seven (rebounds) and six (assists) or some crazy number like that,” Love said. “It’s a whole different dynamic when they have Westbrook on the team. “ Westbrook or no Westbrook, it was a bit of a statement for the Wolves, who enter this season with hopes of getting to the playoffs for the first time since 2004. They led by 34 points, allowing coach Rick Adelman to rest his starting five for the entire fourth quarter. The Timberwolves shot poorly

in the first half as well, but they used some opportunistic defense and made good at the free throw line to build a 20-point lead. They made 18 of 19 shots at the foul line while Durant, Kendrick Perkins and Steven Adams piled up the fouls early. The Wolves, who figured to struggle on the defensive end this season without a true shot-blocker in the paint, forced 13 turnovers in the first half, which led to 19 points. “We know we can score,” Rubio said. “But when we (play) defense, we’re a different team.” Williams blocked two shots and the Wolves made Durant work for his touches while limiting his shot attempts. The Thunder star was just 2 for 5 from the field in the first 26 minutes, and it looked at times like he was deferring to his younger role players to try to get them involved. All it did was dig the Thunder a bigger hole. The Wolves offense got clicking midway through the second quarter with a 21-9 run that ended on a beauty of a no-look, wraparound bounce pass from Rubio to Pekovic in transition for a 59-37 lead. “I’m worried about guys playing hard, competing hard and playing for your team every time down the court, and tonight that wasn’t the case,” Thunder coach Scott Brooks said. “But it’s early. We’ve got a game right around the corner and we’ve got to play much better.”

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Oklahoma St women eager for next step By John Tranchina STILLWATER, Okla. (AP) — After advancing to the second round of the NCAA tournament, Oklahoma State is looking to take the next step up to national power. The Cowgirls finished 22-11 (9-9 Big 12) and with four of five starters from last year returning, combined with an influx of talented freshmen, they believe they are destined for a big season. Oklahoma State was ranked No. 21 in the AP preseason poll released Friday. “We feel good about our chances,” said third-year coach Jim Littell. “We finished very strong last year. We’re ranked in the top 20 in most polls and we return a wealth of experience. We feel like we’ve had a good recruiting class, the number 15-ranked recruiting class in the country. It’s just a matter of putting it all together.” Losing to second-seeded Duke in the tournament in a game they led by 13 at halftime fuels the squad’s motivation to go deeper next time. “I really think we should have won that game, so I think it just shows us what we really need to work on,” said guard Brittney Martin, one of the Big 12’s top freshmen last season. “That game really pushed us, made us want to really finish games, and when we get under stress, try to work together and not try to do as much on our own. I’m a lot more hungry.” As that loss to Duke demonstrated in painful fashion, the Cowgirls’ biggest shortcoming was their inability to hold onto late leads, and contributing to that was a lack of depth. In most games,

Littell used just eight players, and being able to utilize a deeper bench likely would have prevented his starters from wearing down. With eight freshmen in the mix, including highly-touted guard Roshunda Johnson, the issue will hopefully be resolved. “In seven of our 11 losses last year, we led by double digits, and whether we lost those games because of no bench, that’ll remain to be seen,” Littell said. “But I think (a deeper lineup) will enable us to finish some games off that last year, we got tired and had to overplay some people.” As for Johnson, Littell expects the freshman from Little Rock, Ark., to play a significant role. “She’s a talent and understands the game and plays extremely hard,” Littell said. “In most of the rankings around the country, she was a top-50 player in the nation, so she’s going to step in and make a big impact immediately.” And while the process of developing team chemistry with such an overhaul of personnel took a bit longer than usual during the pre-season, that minor drawback is overshadowed by the benefits of adding youthful exuberance while also fostering more competition for playing time. “It’s cool this year because we have 15 now and we’re all really close and I think we play really well together,” Martin said. “We have a lot of depth off the bench, so if we get in foul trouble, we can still play hard and not worry about (fouling out). And people have to work a lot harder than we did last year. I’m really excited.”

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — Wichita State newcomer Kadeem Coleby had 12 points on 6-of9 shooting to help the No. 16 Shockers rout Oklahoma Baptist 73-29 in an exhibition game Saturday night. Coleby averaged 9.6 points and 4.9 rebounds two years ago for Louisiana-Lafayette. Cleanthony Early added 10 points and seven rebounds for the Shockers. Cale Jackson led the Bison with eight points. Wichita State, playing at Koch Arena for the first time since advancing to the Final Four,

dominated with defense. Oklahoma Baptist, ranked second in the NAIA coaches’ poll, was 1 of 18 in the first half and trailed 31-8 at halftime. The Shockers ended the half on an 18-4 run ignited by Ron Baker’s 3-pointer and highlighted by Coleby’s consecutive dunks.

Rangers volleyball team sweeps Wichita State routs Reddies for first GAC win Oklahoma Baptist 73-29 NSOSU Sports Information Twenty-two defeats is a testament to how long and how hard Northwestern Oklahoma State had labored for its first Great American Conference (GAC) volleyball victory. But when that win finally came, the Rangers made it look rather easy. Northwestern – which revived its program prior to the 2012 season – crushed visiting Henderson State University (HSU) in straight sets Saturday afternoon (25-16, 2519, 25-15). “With new programs, there are a lot of landmark situations, and this was one of them,” said Northwestern head coach Gene Krieger, who took over the program last spring. “Earlier this week we got our first road win of the year, and today’s is our first conference win.

We think the younguns are figuring it out.” Northwestern (4-16, 1-7 GAC) won for the third time in five matches. Asia Pipkin led the Rangers with 13 kills and 10 digs while hitting .500. Pipkin totaled 48 kills in just 10 sets for the week. Korina Lillard emerged for the second-straight day. The sophomore came into the weekend with only 24 kills over the first 18 matches this year. She tallied 22 on Friday and Saturday, including a career-high 13 against HSU. “We’ve had two dimensions. Now we have a third one today with Korina,” Krieger said. “Hopefully down the line that becomes five or six dimensions.” Tiana Barnett had another solid match, breaking her own school re-

cord with 38 assists. After starting in a 4-0 hole, the Rangers came roaring back for a 6-5 lead on their way to a ninepoint victory in the first set. In the second, Northwestern hit .286 with 13 kills to quickly erase a 3-0 deficit. The third and final set of the day was all Northwestern. The Rangers hit .517 and led wire-to-wire in trashing HSU (3-16, 0-8 GAC) by 10 points. The Rangers now have six days off before hosting conference foe Arkansas Tech at 6 p.m next Friday. “Confidence is a funny thing,” Krieger concluded. “If we have it, it’ll be good for Tuesday, because we’re playing a team with a great reputation in Arkansas Tech. I’m excited to see if the confidence carries over.”


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Alva Review-Courier

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Rangers drop finale NWOSU Sports Information WEATHERFORD – Northwestern Oklahoma State’s soccer team fell 2-0 at Southwestern Oklahoma State Friday in its final match of the year. Northwestern struggled on the offensive end, but freshman goalkeeper Briana Legaspi stepped up with 11 saves to keep the Rangers in the game. Legaspi kept the Bulldogs in check for the first 40 minutes before Eva Rule broke through with the first goal of the game off an assist from Miranda Balezentis.

The Rangers remained within striking distance until deep in the second half, with help from five more Legaspi saves. Balezentis, however, would add a second assist in the 81st minute, to put the game on ice. Cori Kelly finished for her first goal of the year to make it a 2-0 lead. Southwestern (11-3-2, 7-1-1 Great American Conference) outshot the Rangers 30-2 for the game (11-1 in shots on goal). Northwestern finishes out the season 1-17, 0-10 in conference play.

Ellenberg leads experienced No. 11 Oklahoma  NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — Hayley Brattain (#7) of the Northwestern Oklahoma State Rangers makes an attack and kill over Kiley Without Brittney Griner in the Big Brennfoerder in the game against the Southwestern Oklahoma State Bulldogs on Oct. 31. Brattain had 12, things have opened up again 10 kills in the match, although the Ranger fell in four sets against the Bulldogs. Photo by Leslie Nation for Oklahoma. Griner, who starred at Baylor for the past four seasons and helped the Bears to back-to-back undefeated records in the conferNWOSU Sports Information Korina Lillard and 10 from Hayley ing a 6-0 run to pull away and even ence, has moved on, leaving the Halloween night ended in defeat Brattain. Brattain hit a team-high the match at a set apiece. The Rang- Sooners as the league favorite. “I think this senior class, they for Northwestern Oklahoma State’s .350. ers hit .433 with 15 kills and just had the disadvantage of playing volleyball team in their game against Tiana Barnett and Megan two errors for the set. their entire careers in the league rival Southwestern Oklahoma State: Hentschke each had 15 digs. Barnett Southwestern, however, rewith Brittney Griner, truthfully,” 18-25, 25-15, 15-25, 23-25. also handed out 35 assists. grouped during the 10-minute interBoth sides attacked relatively Southwestern (10-18, 6-5 Great mission to post a lopsided third-set Sooners coach Sherri Coale said. well. Southwestern out-hit the American Conference) erased a 2-0 win, then rallied from a 20-17 defi- “They understand they have a bit of a window, maybe. It does make Rangers .209 to .195, with four dif- Ranger lead with five straight points cit in the fourth to take the match. ferent Bulldogs registering double- and rolled to an easy first-set vicNorthwestern will hit the road (the league) a little bit different.” With four starters returning, digit kills. tory. for its next two matches. The RangNo. 11 Oklahoma seems to be in Asia Pipkin led Northwestern Northwestern (5-19, 2-9 GAC) ers are at Southeastern Oklahoma good position to take advantage. with 14 kills to go with 11 from flipped the script in the second, us- State at 2 p.m. on Saturday. The anchor of those returners is Aaryn Ellenberg, the senior guard from Las Vegas who averaged The Northwestern rodeo team 18.7 points per game last season. hosted a variety of rodeo events Ellenberg has been a starter for her on Wednesday morning at entire career with the Sooners but the downtown square for stuwas thrust into an even bigger role dents from all three elementary last season when Whitney Hand schools. Morgan Cook from went down with a season-ending Lincoln Elementary rides one injury early in the season. of the horses around the square. “Vegas is a unique talent, obPhoto by Leslie Nation viously,” Coale said. “Watching her grow over the past six to nine months has been really special. I felt like last year, when Whitney went down, Vegas sort of surrendered to the whole deal. It allowed her to go to another level.” Coale coached Ellenberg this summer at the World University Games in Russia, where the U.S. won gold. Ellenberg has never been a very vocal leader but was forced to in that situation. “I was the only guy there that knew coach Coale and how she

Rangers fall in four on Halloween

liked to play so with everything that we did I was kind of a step ahead of everybody else,” Ellenberg said. “She needed my help in bringing them along with everything that we were doing. I had to step outside of my comfort zone in that situation so it definitely gave me a little bit of an upper hand in bringing it back here.” When she returned, she told her teammates she had a goal to be an All-American. “That’s the first time all of us thought, ‘She’s for real and she’s going to do it,’” senior guard Morgan Hook said. “Ever since she said that and got that out in the open, she just changed. She’s not out there being the biggest talker or anything like that but she’s doing the little things.” Last season, Oklahoma lost two key players to injury in the preseason before Hand was hurt early in the season. The Sooners eventually pulled a pair of players from the volleyball team onto the roster just so they could have full practice. Still, OU made it to the NCAA Tournament’s regional semifinals. This season, Oklahoma has bigger aspirations. Since 2000, the Sooners have won six Big 12 regular-season and four conference tournament titles. The last, though, came in 2009. “There’s history here and you want to be a part of it and we don’t want to be the only class not to cut down a net,” Ellenberg said. “There’s a little bit of an urgency thing too. This is our last goround.” The Sooners open the season Nov. 8 against Stetson in the Women’s Preseason NIT.

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(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, November 3, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC., Plaintiff; vs BRYAN S. MILLER; BRANDI L. MILLER; AND JOHN DOE, OCCUPANT, Defendant(s). Case No, CJ-2012-24 NOTICE OF HEARING MOTION TO CONFIRM SHERIFF’S SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN TO: Bryan S. Miller, Brandi L. Miller, John Doe, Occupant, and their unknown successors and assigns, that the hearing on the above Motion to Confirm Sale is set on the 3rd day of December, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., before Judge Ray Linder, at the Woods County Courthouse, Alva, Oklahoma. SHAPIRO & CEJDA, LLC 770 NE 63rd St Oklahoma City, OK 73105-6431 (405) 848-1819 Attorneys for Plaintiff File No. 12-113082


November 3, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 15

Woods County Communication Call Center October 23, 2013 12:08 p.m. 911 call, dark blue 16-foot vehicle hauling equipment east on 64. 12:09 p.m. Street sweeper and pickup accident on Fifth Street. 1:15 p.m. 25+ cats and a couple of dogs at 200 block of Seventh. 1:36 p.m. 800 block of College blocked off. 2:41 p.m. 911 call, seizure at Alva Middle School. 3:23 p.m. 700 block of College 8 and 900 blocked off. 6:12 p.m. 911 call, Onstar advised vehicle ran into fence on Kiowa and 281 and Capron Road, headed to Kiowa, Ford F250 turbo black with grill guard, temporary tags. 6:20 p.m. Intoxicated driver reported 3 miles west on McClain. 7:01 p.m. 911 call, cow in road 6 miles west of Freedom on Highway 64, headed east in westbound lane. 7:49 p.m. 6+ black cows east of Moccasin Creek on north side of 64. October 24, 2013 1:22 a.m. Dog out at 700 block of Maple, cocoa, bridle, red collar, nice. 8:01 a.m. Squatters are at the Chamber, notified officer. 8:08 a.m. Wrecker 5 miles east of 34 north on 64 on south side, flat tire, hit deer. 8:36 a.m. Brown pit bull pup at 400 block of E. Barnes, left message with animal control. 1:19 p.m. Individual with PETA, message for animal control. 1:39 p.m. Individual with CSI, transfer to sheriff’s office. 2:29 p.m. Controlled burn at Latimer and CR 970. 3:20 p.m. Question on street blocked off. 3:30 p.m. Woodward Police Department transfer to sheriff’s of-

fice regarding sex offender. 6:13 p.m. Controlled burn at Cedar and Fifth. 8:15 p.m. 16 year-old in Alva at 1200 block of Fifth. 8:41 p.m. Fire at football field. 9:39 p.m. Bar ditch fire on CR 500 outside Burlington. 10:03 p.m. Party at Third and Church. October 25, 2013 7:27 a.m. 911 call, tires slashed at residence on 300 block of E. Lincoln in Lamont, transfer to Grant County Sheriff’s Office. 8:18 a.m. Small fire, tires, ¾ mile west of 910 on 11. 8:52 a.m. White pickup with long horse trailer parked the wrong way on Seventh and High, close to intersection. 9:06 a.m. Regarding “pug” at pound, wanting to adopt. 10:11 a.m. 911 call, suspicious vehicle south of Avard, transferred to Woods County Sheriff’s Office. 10:29 a.m. Pit bull out at 400 block of E. Barnes, message left with animal control. 12:53 p.m. Controlled burn north of Medford on M&M 1 ½ miles west on Kiowa. 2:46 p.m. Two cardboard barrels in bar ditch on shoulder on west side ¼ mile apart before you get to double bridges. 4:44 p.m. Controlled burn 1 ½ miles south on 490. 8:34 p.m. Party starting up at 700 block of First, would like police presence. 10:24 p.m. Fire alarm at 400 block of Church, advised owner already called. 10:25 p.m. Hit deer on Greer Road 1 mile east of Freedom. 11:59 p.m. Buick SUV east of town at storage units. October 26, 2013 6:14 a.m. Blocking streets, only for parade.

9:00 a.m. 911 call, big dog killing cat at 700 block of Choctaw, greyhound, in yard with collar. 11:10 a.m. Sewer problem at 600 block of Sherman, manhole in alley, contacted water department. 12:24 p.m. Officer to 1200 block of Oklahoma Boulevard for window broken out. 12:37 p.m. 911 call, cow out south of Salt Fork , transferred to Grant County Sheriff’s Office. 3:09 p.m. Blue pickup at northwest corner of Barnes/12th, officer notified. 5:53 p.m. 911 call, non emergency, keys locked in vehicle at Hatfield. 7:07 p.m. 911 call, fight in progress at 500 block of Center. 10:37 p.m. Possible intoxicated driver at Pizza Hut, now at bar. 10:38 p.m. Reporting assault at 700 block of Second Street, suspect left scene on foot. 10:50 p.m. 911 call, needed officer to 1300 block of Main. 11:45 p.m. 911 call, turned around on Highway 60, got stuck. 11:55 p.m. 911 call, cattle out on Logan and Leflore and 930. October 27, 2013 1:57 a.m. Fight in alley of 1000 block of Center/Church. 2:28 a.m. Father of son at 400 block of 10th, not married, should not be there. 4:34 a.m. 911 call, hit head, not acting right, at 200 block of E. Main. 7:37 a.m. Keys locked in vehicle at Jiffy Trip, gave locksmith number. 9:28 a.m. 911 call, house on fire east of 81 on Jackson, guy out of house. 10:03 a.m. Large St. Bernard walking east of Waynoka on Highway 45. 10:17 a.m. 911 call, fire department to Homestead for smoke in

Woods County Real Estate Transactions Beginning book 1166 page 231 Real Estate Transfers Woods County to Avard Regional Rail Park Authority: Lots 4 & 5 in a portion of Block 54; Lots 6, 13, 22 & 23 in a portion of Block 58; Lots 18 & 19 and the unvacated roads in the area in a portion of Block 53, all in the Original Town of Avard: Quit Claim Deed. Sharon Harris to Eagle Pass of Freedom: Beginning at a point 708 feet East and 973 ½ feet North of the Southwest Corner of the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 35, Township 27 North, Range 18, WIM, thence West 81 feet, thence North 346 ½ feet, thence East 81 feet, thence South 346 ½ feet to the point of beginning: General Warranty Deed. Gary D. Bevis & Betty J. Bevis and Brian D. Bevis to Semmel Investments LLC: Lots 3 & 4 and the East 1 foot of Lot 5 in Block 41 of the Original Town, now City of Alva: Warranty Deed. Bobby L. Warfield & Gladys L. Warfield to Bobby L. Warfield & Gladys L. Warfield: all of our interest in and to Lot 4 and the East 40 feet of Lot 5 in Block 1 of the East Vale Addition to the City of Alva: Joint Tenancy Quit Claim Deed. Vernon R. Selvey & Mabel Selvey to Margo E. Castillo & Christopher Castillo: Lot 10 in Block 2 of Nickerson’s 3rd Addition to the City of Waynoka: Quit Claim Deed. Billy F. Warfield & Ruth Warf-

ield to Billy F. Warfield & Ruth Warfield: all of our interest in and to Lot 4 and the East 40 feet of Lot 5 in Block 1 of the East Vale Addition to the City of Alva: Joint Tenancy Quit Claim Deed. Harry Thomas Reid & Dorothy Angela Reid to HBB LLC: Surface only in and to a tract of land in the Northeast Quarter of Section 25, Township 27 North, Range 14, WIM: Warranty Deed. Harry Thomas Reid & Dorothy Angela Reid and Patricia Ann Dennis & Roy L. Dennis to HBB LLC: Surface only in and to a tract of land in the Northeast Quarter of Section 25, Township 27 North, Range 14, WIM: Warranty Deed. Wanda F. Walz to Linda M. Toone: East 95 feet of the North 88.5 feet of Lot 5 in Block 17 of Bower’s 4th Addition to the City of Alva: Quit Claim Deed. Mary Herren to Randall Herren: the East 64 feet of Lot 6 in Block 2 of the Nob Hill Addition to the City of Alva: Quit Claim Deed. Matt L. Murry & Linda K. Murry to Phillip A. Murry & Sandra K. Murry: a tract of land in the Southeast Quarter of Section 14, Township 26 North, Range 14, WIM: Quit Claim Deed. Phillip A. Murry & Sandra K. Murry, as Trustees of the Phillip A. Murry & Sandra K. Murry Revocable Trust dated Nov. 13, 2012 to Matt L. Murry & Linda K. Murry: a tract of land in the Southeast Quarter of Section 14, Township 26

apartment. 3:38 p.m. Water coming out of meter in alley of 200 block of E. Maple, contacted water department. 4:48 p.m. Trunk or treat from Locust to Center. 5:43 p.m. 911 call, car blocked driveway for half an hour at 900 block of College, small blue Ford car. 7:17 p.m. Two people of interest are at Country Club Apartments. October 28, 2013 12:33 a.m. Loud music at the northwest corner of 10th and Maple. 12:53 a.m. Fell and cut head at 1600 block of Spruce, no sirens. 1:25 p.m. Take no further action at 700 block of E. Flynn, live traps no longer needed. 1:52 p.m. Controlled burn on Kiowa Road and CR 940-950 2:07 p.m. Two-vehicle accident on Oklahoma Boulevard and Seventh. 2:43 p.m. 911 call, controlled burn on Harmon/940. 4:19 p.m. Requesting Grant County deputy to 860 and Kiowa Road. 7:43 p.m. ADT residence alarm on US 281. October 29, 2013 5:29 a.m. 911 call, at Medford

and Trenton Road/Clyde Road, washers and dryers on highway, pickup in ditch, one on roadway. 8:50 a.m. 911 call, Waynoka Police Department to 2200 block of Waynoka Street, safety threatened. 11:40 a.m. Controlled burn at Major and CR 720 (Highway 38). 12:46 p.m. Dog on playground at Washington School. 3:24 p.m. Semis driving fast in Avard. 6:19 p.m. Found a male weiner dog at 700 block of Apache. 6:45 p.m. File a report, kid at house last night banging on windows at 2200 block of Waynoka Street. October 30, 2013 4:03 a.m. Dog attack on Waynoka Street. 7:01 a.m. Theft northwest of Camp Houston, will call back after 8a.m. 7:48 a.m. Regarding theft at 700 block of Ninth, company pickup broken into. The call center also handled the following calls: abandoned calls – 42, accidental calls – 12, pocket dial – 21, wrong number – 13, hang ups – 12, animal control – 13, sheriff – 59, police – 69, general info – 100, fire department – 7, ambulance – 17, road conditions – 8.

Woods County Court Filings According to the affidavits and petitions on file, the following individuals have been charged. An individual is innocent of any charges listed below until proven guilty in a court of law. All information is a matter of public record and may be obtained by anyone during regular hours at the Woods County Courthouse. The Alva Review-Courier will not intentionally alter or delete any of this information. If it appears in the courthouse public records, it will appear in this newspaper. Criminal Filings Geraldine Mary Powell, 22, no address listed: Kidnapping ($340.50). Jeremiah Drayaun Jones Carter, 23, Alva: Distribution of controlled substance ($505.40). Misdemeanor Filings Jeremiah Drayaun Jones Carter, 23, Alva: Possession of paraphernalia ($382). Shelby Ruth Hooper, 18, Wichita, Kan.: (1) Possession of controlled dangerous substance; (2) Possession of paraphernalia ($818.90). Jason Loyel Gray, 35, Corinth, Miss.: (1) Public intoxication; (2) Obstructing an officer ($587.90). Gary Ray Armstrong, 42, no address listed: (1) Public intoxication; (2) Outraging public decency ($587.90).

Ernest Eugene Rader, 69, Alva: (1) DUI; (2) Transporting an open container of alcoholic beverage ($1,069.90). Blake Walker Lehl, 19, Alva: DUI ($786). Civil Filings Brian Keith Tarter vs. Share Medical Center et al: Damages – negligence ($213.70). Midland Funding LLC vs. Sandra Ramirez: Money judgment for an amount $10,000 or less ($205.70). Portfolio Recovery Assoc. vs. Derek Nusser: Money judgment for an amount $10,000 or less ($205.70). Divorce Filings Brian Anthony Wallis vs. Kellie Lynn Wallis: Dissolution of marriage ($198.70). Annie Ruth Towns vs. Norman Douglas Towns: Dissolution of marriage ($193.70). October 24 – Marvin Lee Woodall vs. Kari Lea Woodall: Divorce granted. Traffic Filings The following individuals were cited for speeding: Taylor Samuel Davis, 21, Katy, Texas: 75 in 65 ($188.50); Gregory Bryan Fisher, 30, Mansfield, La.: 78 in 65 ($226.50); Misty Dawn Gregory, 36, Vici: 78 in 65 ($227); David A. Vaughan Jr., 32, Ashland, Kan.: 74 in 65 ($188.50).

North, Range 14, WIM: Quit Claim Deed. Dian L. Noyes to Marvin L. Noyes: a tract of land in the Northeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 11, Township 25 North, Range 13, WIM: Quit Claim Deed. Scott F. Wood & Lynn D. Wood to Efrain A. Barraza: Lot 11 in Block 11 of the Hess 2nd Addition to the City of Alva: Warranty Deed. Mortgages Jason R. Wickham & Lisa M. Wickham to Woodbridge Home Exteriors of Kansas: Beginning at the Northeast Corner of Block 10 of Hess 2nd Addition to the City of Alva, thence West 100 feet, thence South 95 feet, thence West 20 feet, thence South 34 feet, thence East 120 feet, thence North 129 feet to the point of beginning: $15,953. Briann Joel Schafer to High Plains Bank: Lots 14 & 15 of the Ranger Estates Subdivision being a portion of the East Half of the Southwest Quarter of Section 5, Township 27 North, Range 13, WIM, Subsequent to the date of June 11, 2009 at 8:00 a.m. and Lot 16 of the Ranger Estates SubdiviOctober 24, 2013 sion being a portion of the East Half 11:02 a.m. Call to report fence charge had been stolen, respondent of the Southwest Quarter of Section didn’t want a report made just a log made by us about it being stolen. 5, Township 27 North, Range 13, October 27, 2013 WIM: maximum obligation limit 5:30 p.m. Caller checking status on individual. $55, 161.39. 7:57 p.m. Mother calling on individual. Efrain A. Barraza to United October 28, 2013 Fidelity Funding Corp: Lot 11 in 8:10 a.m. Individual from US Department of Justice calling. Block 11 of the Hess 2nd Addition 6:45 p.m. Female called asking about inmate, also asked to pass a to the City of Alva: $80,612. message, informed her that I could not pass messages to inmate.

Woods County Sheriff’s Report


November 3, 2013 LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Sunday, November 3, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: SANDRIDGE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION, LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: SPACING LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Section 23, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma Cause CD No. 201307323 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, including the following: Atinum MidCon I, LLC; Repsol E&P USA, Inc.; Chesapeake Exploration, LLC; Chesapeake Operating, Inc.; Tiptop Oil and Gas US LLC; Commissioners of the Land Office of the State of Oklahoma; Helen W. Carmine, deceased; Janette Whelchel; Harry J. Carmine; Ronald P. Roerig; Moyer O-G & I, Ltd. Partnership; David Crews; Carole J. Drake LLC; Myra B. Ward; Mary Sue Brawner a/k/a Sue Brawner a/k/a Susan Brawner; Paige Ramsey; Pene Virdell; Charles R. Brawner; Edward Brawner; Anne Cozart; George G. Vaught, Jr.; David Curry; Steve G. Shaddock; Wolgamott Family Trust, and the Trustee of such trust; Carol Wolgamott; William Babcock; Thelma Jean Gungoll; if any of the abovenamed individuals be deceased, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such deceased individual; if any of the above-named parties is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity; and if the abovenamed party designated as a trustee is not presently acting in such capacity as trustee, then the unknown successor or successors to such trustee. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicant, SandRidge Exploration and

LPXLP Production, LLC, has filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma to enter an order, to be effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto, as follows: (i) amending Order No. 609490 to enlarge and extend the boundaries of the Tonkawa and Oswego separate common sources of supply of gas so as to cover and include Section 23, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, and forming proper drilling and spacing units in such section for such separate common sources of supply, which units Applicant requests be formed as nonhorizontal 640-acre drilling and spacing units; (ii) amending Order No. 609490 to enlarge and extend the boundaries of the Mississippian common source of supply of oil so as to cover and include said Section 23 and forming a proper horizontal well unit in such section for such common source of supply, which unit Applicant requests be formed as a 640-acre horizontal well unit; (iii) determining that the 640-acre horizontal well unit to be formed in this cause for the Mississippian common source of supply in said Section 23 will supersede the existing non-developed 80-acre non-horizontal drilling and spacing units previously formed for the Chester common source of supply in said Section 23;  (iv) establishing the initial boundaries of the Woodford common source of supply of oil so as to cover and include said Section 23, and forming a proper horizontal well unit for such common source of supply in such section, which unit Applicant requests be formed as a 640-acre horizontal well unit;  and (v) granting such other and further relief as may be proper based upon the evidence presented at the hearing herein. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that the order  to  be entered in  this matter  be  made  effective as of  the date of  the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and seeks to amend Order No. 609490 in the manner described above and Order No. 62045, as corrected by Order No. 63219, with respect to the Chester common source of supply. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that

Alva Review-Courier this cause is set before an administrative law judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. Notice is further given that the application in this cause may be amended at such hearing in accordance with the rules of the Commission and the laws of the State of Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an administrative law judge on the Conservation Docket at the Western Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, 2101 North Lincoln Boulevard, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 A.M. on the 19th day of November, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their names and telephone numbers. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact John R. Reeves, attorney, OBA #7479, Seventeenth Floor, One Leadership Square, 211 North Robinson Avenue, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, Telephone: (405) 272-5742; or Ashlei Jordan, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73102-6406, Telephone: (405) 429-5754. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner DONE AND PERFORMED this 30th day of October, 2013. BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary 14831-0726noh

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Sunday, November 3, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: SANDRIDGE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION, LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Section 23, Township 28 North Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma Cause CD No. 201307325 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, including the following: Meadowbrook Oil Corporation; Chesapeake Operating, Inc.; Chesapeake Exploration, LLC; Atinum MidCon I, LLC; Repsol E&P USA, Inc.; PAR Oil Company, Inc.; Harry H. Diamond, Inc.; Tiptop Oil and Gas US LLC; and if any of the abovenamed parties is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicant, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, has filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma to enter an order, to be effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto, as follows: (i) authorizing and permitting an exception to the permitted well location tolerances in the 640-acre horizontal well unit to be formed in Section 23, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, for the Mississippian common source of supply, so as to allow a horizontal well to be drilled into, to be completed in and to produce hydrocarbons from such common source of supply, with the completion interval of such well in such common source of supply to be located within the subsurface location tolerance area as set forth below: not closer than 200 feet from the north line and not closer than 560 feet from the west line and not closer than 200 feet from the south line of said Section 23, and with such authorization and permission running in favor of Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant; and (ii) establishing a proper allowable for the proposed well involved herein as to the common source of supply covered hereby, which allowable

Page 16 Applicant requests be established as a full allowable with no downward adjustment made thereto. Such application further states that there is currently pending before the Commission an application of Applicant to form a 640-acre horizontal well unit in said Section 23 for the Mississippian common source of supply. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that the order to be entered in this matter be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and that the authorization and permission requested herein run in favor of Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the “land sections adjacent to the area within the location exception” requested herein in said Section 23 in regard to the subsurface location tolerance area for the completion interval of the proposed well covered hereby, as described above, are Sections 14, 15, 22, 26 and 27, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma. The other “land sections” surrounding said Section 23 are Sections 13, 24 and 25, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause is set before an administrative law judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma.  Notice is further given that the application in this cause may be amended at such hearing in accordance with the rules of the Commission and the laws of the State of Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause is set for hearing before an administrative law judge on the Conservation Docket at the Western Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, 2101 North Lincoln Boulevard, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 A.M. on the 19th day of November, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their names and telephone numbers. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact John R. Reeves, attorney, OBA #7479, Seventeenth Floor, One Leadership Square, 211 North Robinson Avenue, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, Telephone: (405) 272-5742; or Ashlei Jordan, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Ave., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 731026406, Telephone: (405) 429-5754. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner DONE AND PERFORMED this 30th day of October, 2013. BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary 14831-0727noh

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Sunday, November 3, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: MIDSTATES PETROLEUM COMPANY, L.L.C. RELIEF SOUGHT: WELL LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 25 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA CAUSE CD NO. 201307361-T NOTICE OF HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicant in this cause is requesting that the Commission enter an order amending Order No. 584718, dated April 25, 2011, for the Mississippian common source of supply, to permit a well for such common source of supply at the following location: SURFACE LOCATION: Will be specified in the order to issue in this cause. LOCATION OF WELLBORE AT COMPLETION INTERVAL: The proposed location of the end points of the completion interval will be no closer than 165 feet from the North and South lines and no closer than 600 feet from the West line of the unit comprising said Section 28, Township 25 North, Range

13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. Same to be a well for the unit consisting of said Section 28, a 640acre horizontal unit by said order which requires the well to be located not less than 660 feet from the unit boundary. The legal descriptions of the land sections adjacent to the area within which the location exception lies are Sections 20, 21, 22, 27, 29, 32, 33 and 34, Township 25 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. Applicant further requests that Applicant or some other party be authorized the right to drill said well. Applicant further requests that it be permitted to produce said well at said location from all common sources of supply covered hereby with no downward allowable adjustment. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Initial Hearing Docket at the Corporation Commission Tulsa facility, Kerr State Office Building, 440 S. Houston, Suite 114, Tulsa, OK 74127, at 8:30 a.m., on November 19, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their names and telephone numbers. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Stephany Nichols, Landman, Midstates Petroleum Company, L.L.C., 321 S. Boston, Suite 600, Tulsa, OK 74103, Telephone: 918/947-8566 and/or Gregory L. Mahaffey, Attorney, 300 N.E. 1st Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73104-4004, Telephone: 405/236-0478. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice-Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner DONE AND PERFORMED ON OCTOBER 31, 2013. BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, November 3, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA HSBS MORTGAGE SERVICES INC., Plaintiff; vs CORY L. SMITH; AMANDA K. SMITH; JOHN DOE, OCCUPANT; CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), N.A.; DONNIE DAVID GOOCH, TRUSTEE OF THE DONNIE DAVID GOOCH REVOCABLE TRUST DATED FEBRUARY 2, 1999, AND AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE OF THE GARY FRANCIS GOOCH REVOCABLE TRUST DATED FEBRUARY 18, 1999; GARY FRANCIS GOOCH TRUSTEE OF THE GARY FRANCIS GOOCH REVOCABLE TRUST DATED MAY 30, 1997; AND UNKNOWN HEIRS, SUCCESSOR, ASSIGNS, TRUSTEE AND BENEFICIARIES OF THE DONNIE DAVID GOOCH REVOCABLE TRUST DATED FEBRUARY 2, 1999, Defendant(s). Case No, CJ-2012-26 NOTICE OF HEARING MOTION TO CONFIRM SHERIFF’S SALE Notice is given to: Cory L. Smith; Amanda K. Smith; John Doe, Occupant; Capital One Bank (USA), N.A.; Donnie David Gooch, Trustee of the Donnie David Gooch Revocable Trust dated February 2, 1999, and as successor Trustee of the Gary Francis Gooch Revocable Trust dated February 18, 1999; Gary Francis Gooch Trustee of the Gary Francis Gooch Revocable Trust dated May 30, 1997; Unknown Heirs, Successor, Assigns, Trustee and Beneficiaries of the Donnie David Gooch Revocable Trust dated February 2, 1999, and their unknown successors and assigns, that the hearing on the above Motion to Confirm Sale is set on the 3rd day of December, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., before Judge Ray Linder, at the Woods County Courthouse, Alva, Oklahoma. SHAPIRO & CEJDA, LLC 770 NE 63rd St Oklahoma City, OK 73105-6431 (405) 848-1819 Attorneys for Plaintiff File No. 12-113525


November 3, 2013

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Alva Review-Courier

Action Ads Yorkies For Sale 5 Yorkie Puppies From Full Blooded White Mother. $400 Firm. 2nd Litter Full Blooded Mahogany Yorkie. 1 Puppies. $400 Firm. Make Good House Pets. Puppies Will Be a Week Old 10/06/2013. Call 580-603-3172. Computer Plus

Help Wanted Enid area counseling agency seeking licensed or equivalent Outpatient Substance Use and/or Outpatient Family Specialist. Full-Time or PartTime. Benefits offered for Full-Time only. Send resume to cindyopi@ gmail.com

For all computer repair needs call Help Wanted Adam Swallow at 580-327-4449 or High Pressure Truck Operator/ 580-748-2349 or come by 1329 Fair. Driver. Hawley Hot Oil. Competitive Will do local housecalls wages and benefits. Will train. 580542-1200

Help Wanted

Looking for Part Time Office Help For Sale and CDL Driver in Alva area. 501- JD 4440, 6100 hrs, power shift with 499-3338 loader. Call 580-548-6496

Job Opening

EG Pumpkin Rolls

McClure Agency. Administrative $12.50. Call Alva Vocal Program at Assistant. Must have computer skills, 580-327-2509 accounting knowledge and ability to Donate Clean Clothing multitask. PO BOX 917, Alva, OK, Annual Warmth for Winter clothing 73717. mcclureagency@yahoo.com and blanket collection in progress at Help Wanted College Hill Church of Christ, Alva. Driver for Port-A-Pot Trash Trailer. Help those who don’t have enough NO CDL required. Must have valid funds by donating your gently used, driver’s license. 580-497-6950 clean (no repairs needed) clothes for all ages. Men’s slacks and blankets Help Wanted especially needed. Leave at church Depot Bar & Grill. Bartender. Pick- building in storage trailer behind. Up application at 3 N college. 580- Thanks! Call 580-327-0130 with 327-7011 questions.

Help Wanted

for a FT Clerical Position at a busy medical office. Looking to hire another energetic person willing to learn and be able to work well with public and co-workers. Computer skills, organizational skills/ prioritizing skills and telephone etiquette required. Benefits will be discussed at time of interview. Please mail your current resume to Resume, PO Box 3, Alva, OK 73717

Clothing Give-Away

Church of the Nazarene from 8am1pm Nov 9

Housing for Rent

Community Calendar Sunday 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. Monday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. 1 p.m. Alva Duplicate Bridge will meet at the Runnymede Hotel. 3:30 p.m. Storytime will be held at the Alva Public Library for children ages 3-5 and their parents. 6:30 p.m. Alva City Council meets the first and third Mondays of the month in the council chambers of City Hall. 7 p.m. Book discussion at the Alva Public Library on “Whose Names Are Unknown� by Sanora Babb, presented by Dr. Joyce J. Bender. Refreshments provided. 7 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets at the First United Methodist Church. Call 917-855-9086 for information. 7:30 p.m. Alva Masonic Lodge #105 will meet. 8 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous will meet at 1027 8th (Wesley House) in Alva every Monday and Thursday. Tuesday 9 a.m. The Woods County

Clean, quiet, comfortable. All bills paid including propane & WiFi Internet. Weekly & Monthly rates. 830-220-3858

For Rent

Cottage by night, week or month. 540 sqft. Micro, dorm fridge, patio w/grill, Direct TV, conveniently located between Alva & Cherokee. 580-748-1385

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EVENTS VIETNAM VETERANS MEMORIAL - 80% replica of The Wall in Washington D.C. to be retired at Woodring Regional Airport, Enid, Oklahoma. Dedication Ceremony 11 a.m. on Veterans Day, Nov. 11.

CAREER TRAINING/EDUCATION

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AIRLINE CAREERS BEGIN HERE – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA Approved Training. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-802-6655.

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FOR SALE

HELP WANTED EXP. FLATBED DRIVERS: Regional opportunities now open with plenty of freight & great pay! 800277-0212 or driveforprime.com ATTENTION REGIONAL & DEDICATED CDL-A Drivers! Averitt is GROWING and we need you! Full-benefits and weekly hometime. Join us today! 855-430-8869. Apply online at AverittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer EXPERIENCED FLATBED DRIVERS needed. Regional and OTR positions available. Pay is 26% to 28% to start. Call 1-866-515-6990 for more information OWNER OPERATORS - Dedicated, year 'round recession-proof freight. $3,500 Holiday Bonus. CDL Class A & 1 yr driving experience. Call Cornelius: 888-220-6718. DriveForGreatwide.com

LEGAL SERVICES SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY CLAIMS. Saunders & Saunders Attorneys at Law. No Recovery – No Fee. 1-800-259-8548. DRIS

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PORTABLE OUTDOOR BUILDINGS. Sheds, Storage Barns & more. No Credit Check. Low monthly payments. FREE Delivery. No Deposit. As low as $58 per month. www.qbi-ok.com 877595-1875.

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Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 7 p.m. Widows and widowers support group will meet at College Hill Church of Christ. Call 580430-6083 with questions. 7 p.m. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday at the Bible Baptist Church, 4th & Choctaw, Alva. The purpose is to help people dealing with alcoholism, divorce, sexual abuse, domestic violence, drug addiction, sexual addiction,

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Sunday, November 3, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: MIDSTATES PETROLEUM COMPANY, L.L.C. RELIEF REQUESTED: WELL LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 21, TOWNSHIP 25 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA CAUSE CD NO. 201307360-T NOTICE OF HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicant in this cause is requesting that the Commission enter an order amending Order No. 584503, dated April 15, 2011, for the Mississippian common source of supply, to permit a well for such common source of supply at the following location: SURFACE LOCATION:  Will be specified in the order to issue in this cause. LOCATION OF WELLBORE AT COMPLETION INTERVAL:  The proposed location of the end points of the completion interval will be no closer than 165 feet from the North and South lines and no closer than 1,700 feet from the East line of the unit comprising said Section 21, Township 25 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. Same to be a well for the unit consisting of said Section 21, a 640acre horizontal unit by said order which requires the well to be located not less than 660 feet from the unit boundary.  The legal descriptions of the land sections adjacent to the area within which the location exception lies are Sections 15, 16, 17, 20, 22, 27, 28 and 29, Township 25 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma.  Applicant further requests that Applicant or some other party be authorized the right to drill said well.  Applicant further requests that it be permitted to produce said well at said location from all common sources of supply covered hereby with no downward allowable adjustment. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Initial Hearing Docket at the Corporation Commission Tulsa facility, Kerr State Office Building, 440 S. Houston, Suite 114, Tulsa, OK 74127, at 8:30 a.m., on November 19, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost

food addiction, co-dependency, gambling addiction, anger, grief and more. Wednesday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. The board will meet at 12:30 p.m. Noon Alva Kiwanis Club meets at Champs Restaurant. 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 7 p.m. Alva Moose Lodge men’s meeting is held every Wednesday. of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use.  Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their names and telephone numbers. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard.  For information concerning this action contact Stephany Nichols, Landman, Midstates Petroleum Company, L.L.C., 321 S. Boston, Suite 600, Tulsa, OK 74103, Telephone:  918/947-8566 and/or Gregory L. Mahaffey, Attorney, 300 N.E. 1st Street, Oklahoma City, OK  73104-4004, Telephone: 405/236-0478. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice-Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner DONE AND PERFORMED ON OCTOBER 31, 2013. BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, October 27 and November 3, 2013.) NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY FOR AN ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE In accordance with Title 37 Section 522 Randy Stewart 910 Main Street Waynoka OK 73860 hereby publishes notice of his intention to apply within his sixty days from this date to the Oklahoma Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement for a Mixed Beverage License under authority of and in compliance with the said Act: That intend(s), if granted such license to operate as a he intends (s), if granted such license to operate as a Mixed Beverage establishment with business premises located at 1521 Main Street in Waynoka, Woods, Oklahoma, under the business name of Sandbar Saloon. Dated this 22nd day of October, 2013. Signature of applicant(s): If partnership, all partners must sign. If corporation an officer of the corporation must sign. If limited liability company a manager must sign. Randy Stewart County of Woods, State of Oklahoma. Before me, the undersigned notary public, personally appeared; Randy Stewart to me known to be the person(s) described and who executed the foregoing application and acknowledged that he executed the same as his free act and deed. Sharlotte Y. Bolar 8-19-2017 13007588


November 3, 2013

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November 3, 2013

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The costume contest winners for the 1-2 age group were Keagan The infant costume contest winners at the Spooktacular Parade were Schnebel as a bulldozer, Jaylin Martyn as a mermaid and Joplin Tucker Swonger as a minion, Anna-Lee Kelly as an octopus, Asa Bradt as Richard Simmons. Photo by Alex Cole Thomas as a cupcake and Piper Rhodes as a scarecrow. Photo by Alex Cole

The winners of the costume contest for 3-4 year olds were Breckin Willyard as a vampire, Franky Jo and Fern Delaine Weaver as Batman and Robin, Luke Taylor as an airplane and Cooper and Connor Shafer as an artist and canvas. Photo by Alex Cole

Spooktacular afternoon for Trick or Treating

Rebecca Kinney creeps around the courthouse lawn during the Halloween Spooktacular Parade on Thursday. Photo by Alex Cole

Warren Walborn is pictured in a mask holding a knife while colDebbie, Rebecca and Max Boothby enjoy the Daylin Smart, Chase Hickson and Lyla Gluth Friends enjoy fun and trick-or-treating at the weather on the square during the Halloween hang out on the square during the spook pa- lecting candy from businesses on the square in downtown Alva. courthouse on Thursday. Pictured from left Spooktacular Parade. Photo by Alex Cole rade on Thursday. Photo by Alex Cole Photo by Alex Cole to right are (front) Presley Shramek, Elijah Herren, Aleana Johnston, Xavier Johnston; (back) Miranda Gilliland and Andrea Herren. Photo by Alex Cole ®

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It was a perfect afternoon for the annual Trick or Treating event on Alva’s downtown square. Hundreds of children, along with supervising parents, enjoyed a huge haul of candy from merchants participating in the Chamber of Commerce sponsored event. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

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November 3, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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