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Sports

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Lady Rangers come close to taking down Harding

2013 in Review Pages 2 & 9

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Today’s weather Partly sunny, high near 22, Wind chill as low as -3 Page 3

Alva Review-Courier Vol. 122 No. 2

Sunday, January 5, 2014 - $1.00

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620 Choctaw, Alva, OK 73717

Alva child battles genetic disorder Love fund started for treatment expenses By Helen Barrett 22q11.2 deletion syndrome occurs nearly as often as Downs Syndrome. Treatment for the disorder, however, requires a multidisciplinary team of specialists like those at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Pa. When Brysen Jeffries was born, his parents Kevin and Michelle Jeffries thought their son was normal and healthy. Only later did they learn his pediatrician suspected he might have a heart disorder. “We dealt with failure to thrive,” Michelle said. At eight months of age, Brysen still only weighed 10 pounds. About that time he became sick and started running a high fever. Their regular pediatrician was out of town and the on-call doctor recommended the regimen of alternating Tylenol and ibuprofen. “We were really lucky to have the Burkes here at that time,” the mother said. “I think God sent the Burkes here for Brysen.” When Dr. Chris Burke examined Brysen, she immediately suspected the condition was something more serious than a normal cold. Her entry in his medical records stated she suspected 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, a disorder she witnessed once before. Burke sent the Jeffries to a geneticist in Tulsa. Chromosome tests verified the suspected diagnosis. When Brysen reached the age of 18 months, his parents took him to Philadelphia to be seen by specialists in the Clinical Genetics Center. He was fortunate to

Brysen Jeffries, a sixth grader at Alva Middle School, needs specialized treatment for his genetic disorder known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

be seen by Director Dr. Elaine H. Zackai, M.D In a letter detailing some of Brysen’s problems, Zackai said approximately 50 genes in the region of chromosome 22 are missing. “Brysen has multiple physical complications due to this syndrome,” Zackai said, “including Hirschsprung’s disease, a submucosal cleft palate, frequent infections, asthma and joint pain.” By the time Brysen reached the age of 12 years, he became part of a clinical study on the syndrome. Those studies paid for a portion of Brysen’s cognitive studies. Since his diagnosis, Brysen underwent surgeries on his colon as well as surgery for his submucosal cleft palate. While his palate did not have a hole like many born with cleft palate, the muscles lacked the development to work properly. Surgery in Oklahoma to correct that condition was unsuccessful. Doctors removed 12 inches of his colon, temporarily requiring a dependence on a colostomy bag. That was removed in subsequent surgeries. Michelle said that in some cases of 22q11.2 syndrome, children are born with a misplaced carotid artery. They have to do a special test to determine the artery’s placement. “They really feel like with one surgery they can get Brysen speaking as well as we do,” Michelle said. “That will be a huge thing. It’s hard to see what we’re missing because we have the language barrier and the stool barrier. When that’s fixed we can begin to see what else he needs.” A second procedure is planned in which doctors will insert a balloon to stretch the colon and strengthen the muscles. Doctors need at least a week to look at both problems. In addition to the two major problems, Brysen suffers with restless legs syndrome, difficulty sleeping and a compromised immune system. Because of his immune deficiencies, Brysen cannot have any of the normal immunizations using live vaccine. “The syndrome comes with a list of 180 things that we need to look into,” Michelle said. “We kind of backed off the other things and concentrated on his immediate needs. He doesn’t have the heart issues, but he’s had some of the other symptoms.” The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia developed a team

A pile of rubble marks the future location of new construction at BancCentral National Association of Alva. After various carport shelters were removed, the pavement was pulled up to reach bare dirt at the corner of College Ave. and Choctaw St. The bank will describe their plans in next Wednesday’s Newsgram. Photo by Marione Martin

Parking shelters are removed during an earlier phase of demolition at BancCentral National Association of Alva. The shelters were removed to prepare for new construction on the north end of bank property. Photo by Marione Martin

Woods County commissioners meet last day of the year

By Lynn L. Martin At their previous meeting, the Woods County commissioners voted to approve an agreement to finance a grader with Shattuck Bank for a unit price of $240,439, with a lease purchase price of $252,833.80 at 1.99 percent interest. At this week’s meeting, approval of the necessary documents and signatures were gathered. In a deal between commissioners, District 2 (Randy McMurphy) agreed to lease a 2007 Cat 140 H grader with snowplow from District 1 (Clint Strawn) for $145,000. The

payments will be over five years at $2,417 per month. An agreement was made with the state, saying that no federal funds will be utilized for a road project labeled CIRB-176C(150)RB to “grade, drain, bridge and surface Craig Road beginning .1 miles west of US-281 and extending west 5.9 miles. Bids will be opened in May of 2014 with construction beginning in July and continuing for about 120 days. The commissioners voted to junk one computer tablet from the county clerk inventory. They also declared

surplus three tractors from District 1 and three tractors from District 2, along with two mowers from District 2. This makes possible trading them in for newer equipment. The commissioners agreed to take no action on the agenda entry “regarding changes to the Woods County Free Fair Board” because in discussion they felt the entry was too vague. Next week they will come back with a more detailed agenda entry. After approving all the blanket purchase orders, the meeting was adjourned.

School resource officer, heat and air on council agenda

By Marione Martin The Alva City Council has a short agenda for their Jan. 6 meeting. They meet at 6:30 p.m. Monday in the council chambers of City Hall. The council will discuss and act on authorizing the mayor to sign a surface damage settlement and release with SandRidge Exploration See Jeffries Page 3 in the amount of $15,000. Council members will also dis-

cuss and act on agreements with the Alva Public Schools and Northwest Technology Center to provide a school resource officer for the balance of the 2013-2014 school year. The council will also hear the manager’s report and consider the approval of minutes and claims. The Alva Utility Authority will meet after the council. The only items on the agenda are votes on approval of minutes and claims.

The Alva Economic Development Authority will then meet. Besides votes on approving minutes and claims, the trustees will discuss and vote on entering an agreement with Myers Engineering to provide mechanical engineering services for the design, construction and installation of an air conditioning and heating system for the Alva Recreation Center with estimated costs not to exceed $16,500.


January 5, 2014

Alva Review-Courier

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From fireworks to beauty pageants July, August, September 2013

The street department began work on Alva streets and experienced equipment problems. First the chip spreader malfunctioned, putting down too much material which then had to be removed. Then the steel-wheel roller had repair problems. Rep. Jeff Hickman spoke to the Bill Johnson Correctional Center Advisory Committee on July 24. He said Helena and Granite prisons had been mentioned for closure. He showed a video produced by OETA about the conflict in the Oklahoma Legislature over publicly-owned versus privately-owned prisons. Bids were opened for a new road inside the Avard Rail Park. The road would provide access to one of the tenants. The month ended with a report of break-ins at five church buildings in Alva. Although the buildings were damaged it appeared the burglars didn’t leave with anything of value. August 2013 Woods County sculptress Nancy Russell displayed her work at the Graceful Arts Gallery in Alva during August. Russell along with her husband, author Sheldon Sherman, lives on a farm near Waynoka. The Alva Hospital Authority announced their intention to schedule a special election on Nov. 12 to change the designation of a 1.25

percent city sales tax. When approved, the sales tax was limited to capital improvements at Share Medical Center. It was intended to By Marione Martin pay off bonded indebtedness that The third quarter of 2013 in was used to remodel the facility. Alva began with 4th of July celebraHowever, with the oil boom the tions and culminated with a huge tax brought in much more revenue car show and a beauty pageant. than expected. The excess could be Sandwiched in between were nuused to purchase equipment, but merous activities such as rodeos, not pay operating expenses. Meanthe county fair and a mud run. The while the hospital was struggling Girl Scouts completed their silver to pay its bills due to changes in project marking the POW Trail and reimbursement from Medicaid and building a gazebo for the HomeMedicare. stead. A special sales tax election The Rocking M Whip & Cowwas scheduled. The Alva Recreboy Company opened on 7th Street ation Complex loan was refinanced in Alva. Jeff Erhardt and Melody to lower interest costs. Hofer offer western items as well July 2013 as doing repairs on boots, shoes July began with the Alva Rotary and saddles. Club’s 4th of July festivities. This The Alva Public Library inyear the fun lasted all day. Activistalled an early literacy computer ties included breakfast, a bounce to encourage children to learn with house, a white elephant auction, educational games. The first comfree lunch, free swimming at the puter was installed downstairs in pool, games and contests at Ranger the children’s section and two more Stadium. A spectacular fireworks were planned for the upstairs main display topped off the festivities. library. Alva Girl Scout Troop 969 told There was major flooding in the city council about their plan to neighboring Missouri. Alva Reprovide markers designating the view-Courier reporter Kathleen World War II POW Walking Trail Lourde told the story of being as well as building a gazebo for stranded there, and the kindness of the Homestead. The girls obtained strangers in helping her get around funding for the projects and comthe flooded areas. pleted them with the help of KiAugust is rodeo season. The wanis and Rotary. fun began with the Cimarron River Stampede at Waynoka Aug. 9-10. The Freedom Rodeo and Old Cowhand Reunion followed the next weekend. Oklahoma Insurance Commissioner John Doak was in Alva to talk about the importance of insuring businesses and homes more than $1 billion in claims were paid due to the severe tornado damage in May. Wickedly Rustic opened its doors in 2013. The furniture door owned by Erica Kraft features rustic furniture and décor as well as custom made furniture. Chad Campbell was named the new director of the Alva Emergency Medical Service. Campbell had worked previously for an ambulance helicopter service. Following the resignation of Melody Theademan from her Ward 2 Alva City Council seat due to moving, Jessica Kreigh was appointed to fill the position. She was sworn in on Aug. 19. Alva City Council members asked ODOT to lower the speed limit on US 64 through Alva and on US 281 South. Following a survey later in the year, ODOT declined to Girl Scout Troop 969 is working on a project to improve the World make any changes. Rachel Carter was crowned War II prisoner ofwar walking trail in Alva. Scouts, from left, Isabella Stout, Leah Maier, Jazmine Vest and Autumn Stout present their plan See 2013 Page 10 to the Alva City Council July 1. Photo by Marione Martin

The Rotary Club provided a water slide that proved to be extremely popular with the kids at the Alva swimming pool July 4. At far left climbing is Jacquelyn Melton, in the center is Lacie Swenn and at right is Elizabeth Webster. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

THE ARTIST - Nancy Russell shows some of her Dragon Bone pottery. Russell was the featured artist during August at Graceful Arts Gallery. Photo by Helen Barrett

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Before the mock gunfight at Waynoka on Tuesday night, Aug. 6, children filled the street to play games and win prizes. Kohl Ince is pictured on a practice roping steer. Photo by Alex Cole


January 5, 2014

Alva Review-Courier

Page 3

Dec. brings end to ‘boisterous’ 2013 Okla. weather NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — A snowy, icy and cold December brought an end to what the Oklahoma Climatological Survey calls a “boisterous” 2013. “A frigid and sometimes icy December seemed a fitting way to close out the boisterous weather of 2013,” associate Climatologist Gary McManus said. Preliminary data from the Oklahoma Mesonet ranks the month as the 17th coldest December in records dating to 1895 with a statewide average temperature of 35.2 degrees, nearly 4 degrees below normal, according to McManus. The average temperature for the year was 58.9 degrees, more than 4

degrees cooler than the 63.1 degree average of 2012. The highest temperature recorded during 2013 was 111 degrees at Freedom on June 27 while the lowest was -10 at Kenton on Jan 2. The average rainfall statewide was 37.01 inches, 0.32 inches above normal, but McManus noted that the total was not spread evenly across the state with parts of central through eastern Oklahoma receiving 50 to 60 inches of rain while far western Oklahoma received just 15 Alva judgers competing at the Kansas Beef Expo are, from left, back row: Kory Dietz, Dakota Nusser, to 20 inches. More than 38 percent of the state Tyler Burton, Tanner Burton, Terrill Burton, Julie Owen, Traci Owen and Cole Koppitz. Front: Cooper was classified in at least moderate Sneary, Kaden Slater, Colby Mackey, Jarin Shirley, Tara Owen and Carson Gaisford.

Oklahoma grain elevator cash bids as of 2:00 pm Friday. U.S. No 1 HARD RED WINTER WHEAT: .11 to .12 higher. 6.14-6.34. Davis 6.14, Frederick, Hobart, Shattuck 6.18, Alva, Buffalo 6.19, Cherokee, Manchester, Medford, Ponca City, Temple 6.22, Lawton 6.23, Clinton, Perry, Stillwater 6.25, Banner, Eldorado, El Reno, Geary, Okarche, Okeene, Watonga 6.27, Weatherford 6.28, Keyes 6.33, Hooker 6.34, Gulf 7.12 1/2. MILO: Mixed, mostly .05 to .06 higher. 7.03-7.28. Alva, Buffalo, Weatherford 7.03, Manchester 7.04, Keyes, Medford, Ponca City, Shattuck 7.12, Hooker 7.28.

SOYBEANS: Mixed. 11.9912.32. Hooker 11.99, Alva, Buffalo 12.13, Shattuck 12.14, Medford, Ponca City 12.18, Stillwater 12.32, Gulf 13.90 1/2. CORN: Mixed, mostly .03 higher. 3.94-4.50. Manchester 3.94, Medford, Ponca City 3.99, Keyes 4.39, Hooker 4.50, Gulf 4.99 1/2. CANOLA (CWT) 15.76-16.26 cwt.: Red Rock 15.76, El Reno 16.16, Yukon 16.26, Dacoma, Clyde, Hillsdale, Apache, Enid, McWillie, Bison N/A. Grade 41, Leaf 4, Staple 34 Cotton in Southwestern Oklahoma averaged 78.75 cents per pound.

Alva FFA wins again at Oklahoma grain prices the Kansas Beef Expo

From Front Page

See Weather Page 7

Jeffries

of doctors specifically devoted to helping children, adolescents and adults with this syndrome. “More than 1,100 patients with this syndrome have been evaluated through this hospital, making it the leading center in the world for a 22q11.2 multidisciplinary evaluation,” Zackai said. “Patients receiving care at facilities not familiar with this syndrome are not likely to receive optimal treatment. Problems are likely to be missed and then mistreated if not identified by experienced specialists.” The Jeffries hope to travel to Philadelphia during spring break for the mouth surgery so they will have a month of recovery to determine what other procedures will

need to be done during the summer break. They don’t know exactly what costs will be incurred. Michelle said the doctor used the $30,000 figure at one point, but she didn’t know if that was for just one surgery or not. Their medical insurance only covers a minor portion of the costs. An account established at the Alva State Bank will allow donations to be made specifically for Brysen’s treatments. “The financial burdens associated with Brysen’s care are great,” Zackai said. “On behalf of the Jeffries family, we would like to ask you to assist them in caring for the health and welfare of their son.”

Woods County Forecast Sunday Partly sunny, with a high near 22. Wind chill values as low as -3. North wind 13 to 18 mph, with gusts as high as 25 mph. Sunday Night Mostly cloudy, with a low around 6. Wind chill values as low as -6. North wind 6 to 11 mph becoming light north northeast. Monday Sunny, with a high near 22. Wind chill values as low as -10. North wind 7 to 13 mph becoming southeast in the afternoon. Monday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 11. Southeast wind 5 to 8 mph.

Tuesday Sunny, with a high near 42. Tuesday Night Mostly cloudy, with a low around 27. Wednesday Mostly cloudy, with a high near 41. Wednesday Night Mostly cloudy, with a low around 23. Thursday Partly sunny, with a high near 41. Thursday Night Mostly cloudy, with a low around 27. Friday Mostly cloudy, with a high near 46. Friday Night Mostly cloudy, with a low around 30. Saturday Mostly sunny, with a high near 50.

By Traci Owen Alva FFA Reporter For the second year in a row the Alva FFA livestock judging team won the Kansas Beef Expo Judging Contest. For this contest members judged eight classes of cattle during the day. Team members Tanner Burton, Kory Dietz, Traci Owen and Courtney Mapes were recipients of the large traveling trophy. Mapes was third overall in the contest. The Senior FFA team consisting of members Tyler Burton, Dakota Nusser and Terrill Burton placed 5th in the contest. Representing the Junior FFA

team were members Julie Owen, Cathy Mapes and Cole Koppitz. They placed fourth in their division and Cathy Mapes was high individual. After just competing in four contests this year, the young new Alva 4-H team had a great day placing second overall in the junior 4-H division. These young kids were really excited with their placing. Team members included Kaden Slater, Tara Owen, Cooper Sneary, and Colby Mackey. Tara Owen received a plaque for her fifth high individual placing for the day. Jarin Shirley and Carson Gaisford trav-

eled with the judging teams and participated in their first judging contest. Be looking for their names in future results, as they enjoyed the experience. This month will be a busy one for the Alva FFA senior members Tanner Burton, Kory Dietz, Courtney Mapes, Traci Owen, Tyler Burton and Dakota Nusser. These six seniors will be attending the National Western in Denver, Colo. The team will be representing Oklahoma during the livestock judging contest. Follow the judging team and all Alva FFA events at alvaffa.org.

Woods County Clerk Shelley Reed appointed to County Clerk Advisory Board The county training program part of the Cooperative Extension Service at Oklahoma State University has appointed Shelley Reed of Woods County to the County Clerk Advisory Board. The County Clerk Advisory Board assists the county training program in meeting the objective of overseeing the professional development of county offices. The board provides input for the county clerk certification program, which is a series of courses designed to improve

Obituary ENOS ‘BUDD’ RIDGWAY Services for Enos “Budd” Ridgway, 94, are pending with Wharton Funeral Chapel of Alva.

the efficiency and technical skills of personnel in the county clerk’s office. Members of the board also provide support and advice for the “Handbook for County Clerks of Oklahoma” updates. The county training program is mandated by state statute and is authorized under the Commission

on County Government Personnel and Training. More information about the county training program may be obtained by contacting the county training program on the Stillwater campus at 405-7446160, or by visiting the website at http://www.agecon.okstate.edu/ cto.


January 5, 2014

Alva Review-Courier

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Democrats will pay politically for Obamacare in 2014 By Byron York As Democrats survey a troubled 2014 political landscape, it’s easy to forget how optimistic they seemed less than a year ago. “I would expect that Nancy Pelosi is going to be speaker again pretty soon,” President Obama told cheering House Democrats at a party retreat last February. In the rosy scenario that took hold in some Democratic circles, the party was positioned to recapture the House in 2014 and maintain control of the Senate, allowing Obama to defy the history of second-term

presidential decline. Great successes and good years lay ahead. Had Democrats forgotten Obamacare, the law they passed in 2010 that was scheduled to take effect in 2014? It almost seemed as if they had. Obama and his allies put off the arrival of Obamacare until after the president faced reelection in 2012. His administration also delayed releasing key rules regarding the law until after the election for fear of angering voters. But now they can’t put it off any longer. 2014 will be the year Democrats pay for Obamacare. When Obama spoke to the House retreat, polls consistently showed Democrats leading in the so-called “generic ballot” question, that is, whether voters will choose a DemocratAlva Review-Courier ic or a Republican representative in the next election. Now, (USPS 016-180) however, there’s been a big 620 Choctaw St. swing away from Democrats Alva, OK 73717-1626 and toward Republicans. (580) 327-2200 In addition, a new CNN poll Fax: (580) 327-2454 found that 55 percent of voters surveyed said that when it Office Hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. comes to congressional races, Monday - Friday they’re more likely to vote Website: for a candidate who opposes www.alvareviewcourier.com Obama than one who supports the president. HERE TO HELP YOU “Those kind of numbers Publisher.............Lynn L. Martin spelled early trouble for the Editor..................Marione Martin Democrats before the 1994 (marione@alvareviewcourier.net) and 2010 midterms, and for Ad Sales...........Angela Courson the GOP before the 2006 elec(angela@alvareviewcourier.net) Colette Baier tions,” CNN polling director (colette@alvareviewcourier.net) Keating Holland reported on the network’s website. Reporters.............Yvonne Miller Meanwhile, support for Obamacare, already low, could Sports...................Leslie Nation (leslie@alvareviewcourier.net) fall further as more middleincome Americans – voters Subscriptions – figure out that they are the & Action Ads..........Linda Toone ones who will be paying for (manager@alvareviewcourier.net) the Democrats’ national health Ad Design.............Paula Oakes care scheme. In 2009 and 2010, Obama, Page Design........Patty Hankey Pelosi and their fellow DemoLegal Notices.......Patty Hankey crats sold Obamacare as a kind (legals@alvareviewcourier.net) of miracle. It would give health insurance to 30 million previThe Alva Review-Courier is ously uncovered people and combined with the Woods cut the federal deficit by more County News, The Alva Advocate and Newsgram, and is than a trillion dollars at the published every Sunday and same time. And the only taxes Friday by Martin Broadcasting needed to pay for it all would Corp., 620 Choctaw St., Alva, fall on the very wealthy. It OK 73717-1626. Periodical seemed impossible, but that’s postage paid at Alva, Oklahoma. what they claimed. Annual subscription rates in Now, millions of middleWoods County, Oklahoma $72. income Americans who probaElsewhere in Oklahoma $90, elsewhere in the United States bly felt safe from Obamacare’s $108. POSTMASTER: Send taxes are learning that they will a d d r e s s c h a n g e s t o A l v a pay for the program after all, in Review-Courier, 620 Choctaw the form of higher premiums. St., Alva, OK 73717-1626. Democrats constructed a sysContents Copyright 2013 Member of the Associated Press, tem in which insurance comOklahoma Press Association, National Newspaper Association

Junkman’s Gems

New year starts on a good note

By Jim Scribner I hope you and yours made it through New Year’s Eve and day in good shape. I went to Wal-Mart for some last minute 2013 shopping New Year’s Eve. There were several people out there, and I mentioned to a couple of them it is sad that life has gone from parties and being goofy to Wal-Mart for entertainment. We kind of concluded that we would not be arrested, run over, would be home early from a Wal-Mart New Year’s trip or would listen to bad jokes. Unfortunately for them, they did have to endure at least one joke before they could escape me. Justin and the grand kids went on a short trip, and we hadn’t really made any plans other than to veg out and clean house (unfortunately this is always on the to-do list), so when Dad wanted to know if we wanted to go to Mulvane to the casino New Year’s Day, a plan was formed. Most of my gambling is done at the salvage buying cars and junk and waiting for the right prices to sell. Sometimes it is an easy

gamble and sometimes not. I can get all the slot machine betting I need in a short time, but I enjoy going because they have free drinks (soda, coffee and such), lots of people to visit with and usually something close to investigate. At Canton, Cleo and I go driving around reliving old times because this is where I stole her away from her folks. On the Canadian side of the lake there are lots of prairie dogs and buffalo, which are great fun to watch. Cleo has about all of the prairie dogs named. I went to the first road I ever took Cleo parking on hoping to con her into a repeat performance, but the road was closed and a fence across it. I suspect the state will be erecting a monument real soon stating Jim took Cleo parking on this road and it has never been the same since. Or not. The casino at Mulvane had a buffet special and it only cost $5 each to eat. This started me out on a positive note getting a great meal for cheap. After dinner we started home and decided to go to Newkirk to the casinos there. By the time we were done it was supper time so we went to Ponca City to eat Chinese, another plus for 2014 eating my favorite food the first day See Gems Page 6

Contrast for parties in 2016 presidential race

By Ken Thomas and Steve Peoples WASHINGTON (AP) — For Democrats and Republicans, the early stages of the 2016 presidential contest are worlds apart. Many Democrats already view Hillary Rodham Clinton as a quasi-incumbent, someone who could take the reins from President Barack Obama. The former secretary of state has made no decisions about her political future but has done little to dampen enthusiasm about another presidential campaign, traveling the country making speeches and preparing to release another book. Republicans have no clear front-runner and expect a crowded primary field that could include fresh-faced candidates like New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul and Florida Sen. Marco Rubio. For a party that typically backs established politicians, 2016 could be the most jumbled GOP White House campaign in a generation. As the Obama era nears its final midterm elections, the campaign to succeed him has already begun: Prospective candidates on both sides have been quietly courting donors, taking steps to build an organization and making See York Page 6 scouting trips to early voting states like Iowa,

New Hampshire and South Carolina. The official starting line, however, is likely a year away. The coming year will be about building the foundations of a campaign, compiling a policy agenda and raising money for House, Senate and gubernatorial candidates who could become future allies. And each side faces its own intra-party divisions. Republicans are in the middle of a feud that pits establishment figures against tea party adherents. Democrats run the risk of souring on Obama’s brand — polls have shown a decline in his popularity since his re-election — and face a brewing split between liberals and centrists. For Democrats, the presidential race hinges on whether Clinton runs again. The former New York senator and first lady to President Bill Clinton has dominated early polls among Democrats, with Vice President Joe Biden a distant second. There is no obvious challenger from the left, considering Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s vow to serve her full six-year term. Potential canSee Contrast Page 7 didates like Mary-


January 5, 2014

Alva Review-Courier

Annie’s Mailbox®

Page 5

Click and Clack Talk Cars

Keep vigilant and let them Advantages of smaller tires know you’re in their corner outweigh disadvantages By Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar Dear Annie: I have five younger brothers who mean everything to me. Three of them still live with my mother. Mom lived with an abusive man for years. When I was 11, she chose this man over me and put me in a foster home for two years. He is now out of the house and away from my precious little ones, but I’m afraid it’s temporary. Mom claims she is glad he’s gone, but I know she can’t stand being alone and doesn’t have the best judgment. I think he’ll be back. How can I make her see that as much as being alone is hard on her, she needs to grow up and be a mother to her children? I called the police and DCF and reported this man’s crimes, but nothing happened. I wish I could get custody of my brothers, but there is no way I could support so many people. How do I keep them safe? How can I make sure my mother doesn’t invite this man back into her house? – Scared for Them Dear Scared: You cannot do anything about your mother’s choices. You can only keep an eye on the situation, and if this man returns, report it immediately to the police and DCF. While there would need to be evidence or corroboration of abuse for the authorities to take action, your vigilance may make it unpleasant enough that Mom will keep this man at arm’s length.

Is the boys’ father in the picture? Are there other relatives who would take the boys? You are a kind and caring sibling, but sometimes these things are beyond your control. Do what you can, and make sure your brothers are aware that you care. They need to know you’re in their corner. Dear Annie: I am a teenage boy and have been chubby all my life. So, I started not eating much and, four weeks later, have lost 20 pounds. But not eating is driving me crazy. I had to go home from school early the other day because I started having random seizures. Annie, I know I should eat again, but since I’ve lost weight, I’ve gotten much more popular. The girl I like even hugged me yesterday. So should I start eating normally again, or can I keep on skipping meals? – Starving in Florida Dear Florida: Please start eating, or you’ll end up in the hospital. Starvation eventually shuts down your entire body. You could die. You know this is a bad way to lose weight, but here’s something you might relate to better: Starvation diets do not work in the long term. You are likely to go right back to your old eating habits. You already have dropped 20 pounds. Fine. Talk to your parents today, tell them what’s going on and ask them to make an appointment to see your doctor. Or talk to the school counselor or a favorite

teacher. You need to reintroduce healthy foods into your system. If you eat a balanced diet and get a reasonable amount of exercise, you will be able to keep that weight off without starving yourself. You will be healthier and happier. Dear Annie: I’d like to respond to “Working Hard,” who resents a co-worker who does nothing all day while the rest of them are unappreciated: Suck it up. For the past 10 years, I have worked at the greatest job of my life. But the company has some real numbskulls in upper management. They make bad decisions, and there is also blatant favoritism. There are always employees who get fed up and leave for greener pastures or stand up to management and get fired. Each one of them has told me they wish they had stayed. I would rather keep my job and ignore the annoying things that go on in most companies. – Yes Man Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast. net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annie’s Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators. com.

Museum to feature Charles Banks Wilson portraits By Kristi Eaton OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Charles Banks Wilson was just a boy when he saw Will Rogers for the first time, but the encounter led to a lifelong fascination for the artist who created a variety of portraits of the American humorist. That experience at the historic Coleman Theatre in Miami, Okla., in February 1931 led to Wilson’s first sketch of Rogers. The sketch later became the basis for a portrait Wilson completed that is on permanent display at Smithsonian’s Institution’s National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. Wilson continued to create portraits of Rogers, until his death last May in Rogers, Ark., at age 94. Several of Wilson’s portraits of Oklahoma’s favorite son will be on display at a permanent exhibit set to open by next month at the Will Rogers Memorial Museum in Claremore, Okla. An exact date for the opening has not been set. “Charles Banks Wilson was always a big fan of Will Rogers. One of his favorite topics for his art was Native Americans, and he always kind of described himself as a storyteller,” said Jacob Krumwiede, business manager at the Will Rogers Memorial Museum. “Of course, with Will Rogers being kind of a Cherokee folk hero ... he was very proud of his Cherokee roots during a time when it was not widely accepted and there was still a lot of bigotry in the country.” While attending the Art Institute of Chicago in the 1930s, Wilson sketched faces of more than 100 people from 65 Native American tribes. Fulfilling a promise that he would not capitalize on

the sketched, Wilson donated the works to the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa. The display at the Will Rogers Museum will consist of several original Wilson works, including a life-size portrait called “Welcome Folks,” and another portrait of Rogers created for the cover of Southwestern Bell phonebook in 1979, to coincide with Roger’s 100th birthday. Another work depicts a small scene of cowboys, one of them Rogers, gathered around a campfire, Krumwiede said. Wilson was a fan of the museum who stopped by several times when he had exhibits in display, and he even acted as the grand marshal of the annual parade honoring Will Rogers in Claremore in 2008, Krumwiede said.

He was also generous with his talent. The Oklahoma Press Association once commissioned Wilson to create a portrait of Rogers for their building, but the association only had $1,500 in its bank account. After some back-and-forth, Wilson agreed to make the piece and get paid in installments, said Pat Reeder, Will Rogers Memorial Museum spokeswoman. Though Rogers played an important part in Wilson’s creative work, he wasn’t the artist’s only subject. Wilson also created portraits of other famous Oklahomans, including Cherokee Indian Sequoyah, Olympic gold medalist Jim Thorpe and Congressman Carl Albert, among others. Several of the artist’s portraits adorn the state Capitol.

By Tom and Ray Magliozzi Dear Tom and Ray: I’m going to buy a 2014 Ram Laramie pickup. I have a choice of 17-inch or 20inch tires. I don’t plan to drive offroad much, if at all. I do plan to drive several thousand miles around town and then perhaps 10,000 miles towing a travel trailer that weighs about 7,500 pounds. My thinking is that the 17-inch tires would weigh a lot less and so would provide better mileage around town. They also might be quieter rolling down the road. Another nice feature is that my wife and dog have short legs, so getting into and out of the truck will be easier. What I’m wondering is: What effect will the smaller tires have on mileage on the highway as I tow the trailer long distances at 65 mph? – Stewart TOM: You’ll get better mileage on the highway, too. I think you’re right to lean toward the 17-inch wheels, Stewart. We’re generally opposed to people supersizing their wheels. Or their french fries, for that matter. RAY: Smaller wheel-tire combinations provide better mileage (city and highway), better acceleration and a quieter, more comfortable ride. TOM: So why, you ask, would anyone give up all those things and pay extra to get ginormous wheels? RAY: ‘Cause they look cool! Have you seen those 20-inch bad boys on the Ram, Stewart? I was grunting and growing a forehead ridge after just a few hours of driving around with those. TOM: The other reason people opt for larger wheels is that, up to a point, they can improve handling. Usually as a wheel gets larger, the tire’s sidewall (or aspect ratio) gets smaller, so the total diameter of the wheel-tire combination stays about the same. RAY: This is so the speedometer stays accurate and, more importantly, so the wheel-tire combination fits inside the wheel well and doesn’t scrape!

TOM: And by the way, since the wheel-tire combination usually ends up being about the same size, your dog and wife might not get much help from the smaller wheels in terms of getting into the truck. Definitely get the running boards so that they have a step! RAY: Or mount a large slingshot in your garage and launch them into the vehicle. TOM: But in terms of cornering, when a tire has a shorter sidewall, it’s stiffer, so you get less flexing from the tires on turns. That’s how larger wheels improve handling. RAY: But that same stiffness is what makes your overall ride harsher. TOM: And the extra weight of the larger wheels is what cuts into your acceleration and fuel economy. RAY: And here’s one more strike against fancy, colossal wheels: Because of the shorter sidewalls of their tires, the rims are closer to the pavement, so they get bent and damaged more easily by potholes and curbstones. TOM: The replacement cost for these larger wheels tends to send their poor owners into shock. RAY: That’s why we keep smelling salts next to every lift at the shop. TOM: So my advice would be to have a look at the truck in both configurations. Sometimes, very small or very large wheels can look out of scale on a vehicle. RAY: But if you’re content with how the 17-inch wheels look on the Ram, that’s what I’d go for. Happy travels. *** Used cars can be a great bargain, and reliable, too! Find out why by ordering Tom and Ray’s pamphlet “How to Buy a Great Used Car: Secrets Only Your Mechanic Knows.” Send $4.75 (check or money order) to Used Car, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. *** Get more Click and Clack in their new book, “Ask Click and Clack: Answers from Car Talk.” Got a question about cars? Write to Click and Clack in care of this newspaper, or email them by visiting the Car Talk website at www.cartalk.com.


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Senior citizen report By Betty Riggins Friday, Dec. 27, was a very nice, cool day. The attendance was very low – guess everyone was full of ham and turkey. We had a good fish dinner plus soup and salad bar. I sold most of our noodles so now we will be making more on Monday, Jan. 6, so all noodle helpers be prepared. I hope everyone that reads my notes will forgive me for not doing last week’s writeup – just too much going on, getting older and things do not work out as well as planned. I went to Share Nursing Home and delivered some Christmas sacks to

friends; they loved them. We lost a wonderful gentleman again as Bart Scott left us. He was a wonderful person and will be missed by many. Monday was a wonderful, cool day and we had a good attendance at the center with oven fried chicken and all the trimmings. Our new cook, Jeanette, has been doing a great job, as Nita has been on vacation. She should be back next week so it will be easier with the two of them. Tuesday we had a good attendance with a sloppy Joe dinner. Alan Smith is busy trying to get the books all done for the month, then

will be off for a couple of days to check his Colorada home. Wednesday was New Year’s Day and the center was closed. Thursday – what a cold and blistery day! The attendance was very low due to the cold, slick streets. We received news that we lost another one of our senior citizens, as Carol Plummer passed away. Her husband, John, is one of our meals on wheels deliverers. She will be missed. If you are interested in volunteering to deliver meals on wheels, just drop in and we will sign you up. Thanks for reading my notes.

Sarah Copley and Frank Evans

Copley, Evans Twentieth Century Club honors exchange vows Beagley, Sherman at Dec. meeting Marian Roberts, Secretary The Twentieth Century Club met for its monthly meeting on Thursday, Dec. 19, at the home of Helen Thiesing. Celia Roots was the co-hostess. The meeting opened with the flag salute and the club woman’s collect. Seventeen members answered roll call. Due to the death of Johnette Beagley, the club president, it was decided that the club would not replace her, letting the vice president preside at the remaining meetings. The minutes of the November meeting were read and approved.

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The treasurer reported a balance of $410.68 in the treasury. One hundred dollars was given the to the Bank-It program for the food bank. The club has lost two members. A $25 memorial was given to the Methodist church in memory of Johette Beagley and a $25 memorial was given to the scholarship fund at Northwestern Oklahoma State University in memory of Joy Sherman. A thank you note was read by Paula Bloyd from the Act I executive director for the monetary donation. Towanda Mallory will host

Gems

of the year. They were building a new casino there, so we went down to see if it was done and sure enough it had been open a couple of weeks. I was disappointed because I had heard it was to be a smoke-free facility, which turned out to not be true. While at the casino Cleo called her sister who lives in Braman and she and her husband came to the casino and we all had a wonderful visit. Every place we stopped we ran into a huge crowd. Oh yes, for those that wondered if I will miss any meals after all that gambling. After the free cash the

From Page 4

York

panies would be forced to cover more people and then spread the cost around among those who had coverage all along, meaning many middle-income Americans will have to pay more for what they already had. Taxpayer-paid subsidies would go to lower-income Americans. “The Affordable Care Act was not designed to reduce costs or, the law’s name notwithstanding, to make health insurance coverage affordable for the vast majority of Americans,” health care consultant Kip Piper told USA Today. “The law uses taxpayer dollars to lower costs for the low-income uninsured, but it also increases costs

overall and shifts costs within the marketplace.” It was a clever strategy, allowing Democrats to sell their bill as a deficit cutter that wouldn’t raise taxes on the vast majority of Americans. But the public had to find out eventually. “ACA taxes were imposed only on highincome people,” the conservative writer David Frum noted recently in a series of tweets. “But large costs fall on the middle class, too, in the hidden, kludgy form of rate hikes. ‘Obamacare is deficit neutral’ wasn’t technically a lie, but it was highly misleading. The middle class will pay and is paying.” Did most Americans under-

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biology, and a graduate of the University of Central Oklahoma with a master of business administration in 2011. Sarah is a Starbucks store manager. Frank is a 2001 honors graduate of Alva High School and a 2005 summa cum laude graduate of St. Gregory’s University with a bachelor of science in political science. He was salutatorian and a member of Beta Phi Gamma social fraternity. Frank is a 2008 graduate of the University of Central Oklahoma master of business administration program where he won the Student Achievement Award for having the highest grade point average. He is a data analyst for the Sonic Corporation.

Better Homes OHCE enjoys mini-lessons on recycling and radish garnishes

casinos gave me all I was out was the noon meal, so the 2014 entertainment cost started on a good note but I was surprised not to run into someone that I knew. I did hear one pretty good joke to start the year out with: A man is on vacation in China. While shopping at a local gift shop, he finds something neat for his wife back home. Wondering where it was made, he Better Homes OHCE group met turns it over, only to read: Made around the corner! Let’s all have a safe, prosperous, happy and blessed Dec. 11 at the home of Vicki LogsNew Year. Great job Sooners! I really was amongst don. Members present were Carmen Eicken, Tami Cooper, Elaine Graythe doubters, but glad they got the win. bill, Melissa Graybill, Vicki Logsdon, Sally Nighswonger and Cherri Pfleider. Logsdon presented a minilesson on cutting up old Christmas

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the January meeting on Jan. 9 in the Methodist church parlor. Cohostess will be Shirley Cummings. There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. Susie Schlarb presented a most interesting program to the members on making wreaths. She designed a beautiful wreath with black and gold metallic ribbon, and also showed two other wreaths, an OSU and an OU wreath. All members were amazed how quickly she designed the wreath. Refreshments of cake and coffee were served.

Frank Evans and Sarah Copley were married Wednesday, Jan. 1, at the Hamilton Event Center in Edmond. Frank is the son of Jody and Annie Evans, Enid. He is the grandson of Ella Juanita Evans and the late Dan Evans of Alva, and the late Frank and Mary Olive Cromwell of Wakita. Sarah is the daughter of Ed and Morrisa Copley of Marlow. She is the granddaughter of Chuck and Garnita Johnston and the late Dick and Maxine Copley, all of Duncan. Sarah is a 2006 graduate of the Oklahoma School of Science and Mathematics, a 2010 cum laude and honor graduate of Oklahoma City University with a bachelor of science in cellular and molecular

stand that when Obamacare was passed and signed into law? Unlikely. But 2014 will be the year they find out. And they are unlikely to be kind to the people who sold them that bill of goods. Democrats can comfort themselves by noting that the public disapproves of Republicans, too. But if Obamacare is a major political issue in November 2014 – and indications are that it will be – then Democrats will be the party that pays. And all their optimism of 2013 will seem like it was a long, long time ago. (Byron York is chief political correspondent for The Washington Examiner.)

cards and making gift tags out of them. E. Graybill presented a minilesson on making rosy radish flowers. After the meeting adjourned, the members enjoyed snacks and playing Dirty Santa. The next meeting will be at the home of Cherri Pfleider on Jan. 13 at 7 p.m.

Jan. 6 to Jan. 10, 2014 Breakfast Menu for Alva Public Schools Monday – Pancake on a stick, maple syrup, mandarin oranges, milk Tuesday – Whole Grain Cinnamon Crunch, buttered toast, peaches, grape juice, skim milk Wednesday – Scrambled eggs, biscuit, fruit cocktail, milk Thursday – Whole Grain Trix, buttered toast, banana, apple juice, skim milk Friday – Sausage gravy, biscuit, pears, milk Lunch Menu for Alva Public Schools Monday – Popcorn chicken, garlic bread, french fries, blackeyed peas, peaches, milk Tuesday – Hamburger, dill

pickles, corn, rosy applesauce, oatmeal cookies, milk Wednesday – Chicken rice soup, crackers, green beans, cheese stick, banana, milk Thursday – Nachos, refried beans, salsa, bread sticks, mandarin oranges, milk Friday – Hot ham and cheese sandwich, french fries, pickle spear, orange pineapple gelatin, milk Menu for Woods County Senior Citizens Monday – Oven baked chicken, green beans, mashed potatoes, cream gravy, biscuit, oatmeal cookie Tuesday – spanish rice with beef, ranch beans, apricots Wednesday – Steak fingers, mashed potatoes, brown gravy, green beans, hot roll, gelatin Thursday – Homemade stew, coleslaw, crackers, cinnamon roll Friday – Scalloped potatoes with ham, winter mix vegetables, applesauce


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Subzero cold, little snow Kansas GOP leader threatens winter wheat proposes dress By Roxana Hegeman WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — Subzero cold forecast to sweep into the Plains next week threatens to damage winter wheat across much of Nebraska and north-central Kansas in places where there is little snow to provide crops a protective cover, agriculture experts warned Friday. Temperatures are expected to dip to a low of between minus 5 to minus 15 in those areas by Monday, said Don Keeney, agricultural meteorologist for Maryland-based commodity risk firm MDA Weather Services. Some freeze damage is likely to hit about 15 to 20 percent of the Plains wheat belt, Keeney said. The region generally encompasses Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, northern Texas and eastern Colorado. “I expect there is going to be pretty widespread potential for damage, and so we are going to watch it pretty closely,” said Justin Gilpin, chief executive officer for the industry group Kansas Wheat.

From Page 4

“But we won’t know the full extent really until that plant goes to green back up in the spring.” Winter wheat in northern states such as Montana and the Dakotas for the most part are not in as great a risk from the subzero temperatures, because fields in those states are protected by a thick blanket of snow now on the ground. Generally, a couple of inches of snow are sufficient to protect winter wheat when temperatures dip as low as minus 4 degrees. But wheat needs at least 4 inches of snow cover to protect it when temperatures get much colder. “Four inches and above, it can get as cold as it wants and it is not going to hurt it, but a couple of inches isn’t going to be enough when it gets to 10 or 15 below,” Keeney said. While more snow forecast across nearly all the Midwest wheat belt this weekend should help insulate the crop, the snow cover is expected to remain thin across a large swath of the Plains by the time frigid temperatures hit.

Between 1 million and 1.2 million acres of winter wheat across much of Nebraska and north-central Kansas are at risk of some freeze damage, he said. The quick moving cold front is expected to surge into the central Plains on Monday morning, but the subzero temperatures are not expected to last more than a day or two before it begins warming up again. It is still too early to gauge any effect on wheat prices, because the market right now is more focused on world wheat numbers, export numbers and demand numbers and hasn’t turned their full attention to the coming crop yet, Gilpin said. But Keeney said that if the freeze is as bad as forecast, it might cause “a little ripple effect” now on prices and the market will take notice. “Once we get into spring and farmers are able to get into the field and see the damage ... if it is that bad, then obviously I think we will see a bigger market jump at that point,” Keeney said.

Contrast

land Gov. Martin O’Malley and former Gov. Brian Schweitzer of Montana have visited early voting states but remain largely unknown to most voters. Some liberals might encourage former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean to run again, but Clinton has the potential to unite the party. Clinton’s movements will be closely watched this year. She avoided most political activity in 2013 but is expected to be a top draw at Democratic fundraisers. The spring release of her memoir about her State Department years will include a national book tour, allowing her to discuss themes that might precede a presidential campaign. Until she announces her decision, every word will be parsed for clues. “It’s maybe an unprecedented situation, with Hillary Rodham Clinton being as strong as an incumbent president running for reelection,” said Democratic strategist Tad Devine. “I really see her in a unique situation.” If Clinton decides not to run, the Democratic primary could turn into a free-for-all. Biden could inherit many Obama and Clinton supporters, but a Clinton-free race would open the door to candidates like O’Malley, who has assembled a record admired by many liberals, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, a fundraising powerhouse, and Warren, who would be pressured by progressives to run. Other potential candidates could include New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar and Virginia Sen. Mark Warner. Republicans face much different terrain.

During the past half-century, the GOP has rarely nominated a candidate who has not previously run for president — the exceptions are Gerald Ford in 1976 and George W. Bush in 2000. That could change in 2016. “More than any other time in my lifetime, things are wide open,” said Republican strategist Ron Kaufman, who noted that Republicans are also weighing significant changes to their nominating calendar and debate schedule. Christie, the new chairman of the Republican Governors Association, boosted his national profile in November by easily winning a second term. Christie’s team contends he wrote the playbook for GOP success in 2016 by appealing to strong percentages of women and minorities. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, who left office in 2007, commands attention from donors and party leaders as the brother and son of presidents. His presidential ambitions are unclear, however, and this year could offer a better indication of his intentions. Bush’s decision could weigh heavily on his protégé, Rubio, who tried but failed to get congressional Republicans to support sweeping immigration reforms. Few expect Rubio to challenge Bush in a presidential primary, but the CubanAmerican senator is expected to travel the country in 2014 in support of House and Senate candidates. Paul has been among the most active Republicans exploring a presidential campaign, and he could inherit the loyal supporters of his father, libertarian hero and former Texas congressman Ron Paul. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, in office just a

year, has built a strong following in conservative circles. Many Republicans are watching Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan, who impressed as Mitt Romney’s youthful running mate in 2012 and recently negotiated a budget deal with Democrats. Beyond Christie, a large group of Republican governors may join the field, including Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and Ohio Gov. John Kasich, who both face re-election in 2014. Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal may also run and has urged Republicans to develop a strong policy agenda as an alternative to Democrats. Veterans of past presidential campaigns like former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum and former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee could compete for social conservatives if they run again. Texas Gov. Rick Perry chose not to seek reelection, giving him ample time to prepare for another presidential race. Kaufman suggested Republicans could be helped by a contested primary, something that helped Democrats in 2008. “Running for president is like nothing else you do in your life,” he said. “Mrs. Clinton has an advantage of having gone through the process — once for herself and twice with her husband. She doesn’t need to go through the gantlet. All the folks on our side, they need the gantlet. We need a primary.”

code for interns

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — A Republican leader in the Kansas House has developed a proposed set of rules governing the appearance and social media behavior of volunteer interns who work for state lawmakers. The list developed by House Speaker Pro Tem Peggy Mast, an Emporia Republican, is in response to a few complaints about decorum, she said. It does everything from banning mohawk haircuts to allowing only female interns to wear earrings — and even then, only one pair. “We want it set up so they can take pride in the position they hold,” Mast told the Topeka Capital-Journal (http://bit. ly/1aopQ3r). “Hopefully, they’ll benefit from it.” Tennis shoes and strapless tops would be forbidden, as would unflattering photographs or criticism on the interns’ Facebook pages. Violations of Statehouse personal conduct rules could result in dismissal from the intern program, she said. The guide directs “gentlemen” to wear a suit or dress shirt, tie, slacks and shoes; keep their hair clean and “neatly” styled with no “over-the-top colors;” and they should be clean shaven or have their facial hair trimmed very short. For the “ladies,” options include suits, business dresses, skirt/dress pants and a “dressy” top, according to the draft plan.

From Page 3

Halter tops, miniskirts or “skirts/ pants that are too tight, skinny dress pants and revealing necklines” are not allowed. Interns should use very little, if any, perfume or cologne, and they are to cover tattoos and remove all facial and body piercings under the plan. Women would be allowed only one earring in each ear, while men can’t wear any at all. The plan also admonishes interns to view themselves as a “direct representation of the senator or representative” to whom they are assigned, including during their free time, and to never say anything derogatory about others with whom they interact. Some of the proposal’s recommendations raise First Amendment issues, said Will Lawrence, intern coordinator and legislative counsel to the Senate’s Democratic leader. “It is unacceptable for the speaker pro tem’s office to draw an arbitrary line as to what they find inappropriate for an intern’s appearance or their activity on social media,” Lawrence said. “Legislators and their interns should be free to make these decisions on an individual basis.” A spokeswoman for House Speaker Ray Merrick, a Stilwell Republican, said the guidelines don’t appear to be unreasonable. “They seem to be pretty standard for private business,” spokeswoman Rachel Whitten said.

Weather

drought at the end of the month, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. The group said the outlook for January is for drought to persist in areas where the state where it already exists, but for no new drought to develop. Oklahoma’s preliminary tor-

nado count for 2013 stands at 79, with 56 occurring between May 19 and May 31, according to the National Weather Service. That includes violent tornadoes that struck Moore on May 20 and El Reno on May 31 and left dozens dead in their wakes.


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Documents: 7 disciplined Okla. speaker by NORCE in past 5 years wants to continue drilling breaks ENID, Okla. (AP) — Documents show the Northern Oklahoma Resource Center of Enid has disciplined at least seven employees in the past five years — including firing three — for abuse or neglect of patients. The documents obtained by The Enid News and Eagle show the fired workers had direct care of the developmentally disabled patients living at the center. One was fired in 2011 for misconduct, neglect and

maltreatment after she watched a client hurt himself; another was fired in 2009 after grabbing a patient by the loops of her protective helmet and pulling her up OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — House Speaker T.W. Shannon says he from a couch. The third was fired in 2008 before his wants to extend a generous tax break for horizontal drilling in Oklahoma, probationary period ended. No reason was given for saying the incentive is encouraging economic activity in the state. the dismissal. Shannon issued a statement Friday saying he intends to introduce a bill NORCE is scheduled to close in 2015 and residents that would make permanent the tax break for horizontal drilling that was must be placed in other housing. initially implemented in the 1990s when such drilling was experimental and very costly. While the gross production tax on oil and gas production typically is 7 percent, producers are exempt from all but 1 percent of that if they drill qualifying deep or horizontal wells. Gov. Mary Fallin’s Secretary of Finance Preston Doerflinger has said the tax breaks cost the state about $321 million last fiscal year and should be re-examined by legislators next session.

Historic freeze could break Midwest temp records By Carson Walker SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — The deep freeze expected soon in the Midwest, New England and even the South will be one to remember, with potential record-low temperatures heightening fears of frostbite and hypothermia. It hasn’t been this cold for decades — 20 years in Washington, D.C., 18 years in Milwaukee, 15 in Missouri — even in the Midwest, where bundling up is second nature. Weather Bell meteorologist Ryan Maue said, “If you’re under 40 (years old), you’ve not seen this stuff before.” Preceded by snow in much of the Midwest, the frigid air will begin Sunday and extend into early next week, funneled as far south as the Gulf Coast. Blame it on a “polar vortex,” as one meteorologist calls it, a counterclockwise-rotating pool of cold, dense air. “It’s just a large area of very cold air that comes down, forms over the North Pole or polar regions ... usually stays in Canada, but this time it’s going to come all the way into the eastern United States,” said National Weather Service meteorologist Phillip Schumacher in Sioux Falls, S.D. The predictions are startling: 25 below zero in Fargo, N.D., minus 31 in International Falls, Minn., and 15 below in Indianapolis and Chicago. At those temperatures,

exposed skin can get frostbitten in minutes and hypothermia can quickly set in as wind chills may reach 50, 60 or even 70 below zero. Even wind chills of 25 below zero can do serious damage, according to National Weather Service meteorologist Scott Truett in St. Louis. “A person not properly dressed could die easily in those conditions,” he said of the expected wind chill in Missouri at daybreak Monday. Already, parts of New England dropped into the negatives Saturday, with East Brighton, Vt., seeing 30 below zero just after midnight and Allagash, Maine, hitting minus 36. The cold will sweep through other parts of New England where residents are digging out from a snowstorm. Snow will reduce the sun’s heating effect, so nighttime lows will plummet because of the strong northwest winds, Maue said. Fresh snowfall is expected Saturday night, ranging from up to a foot in eastern Missouri and southern Michigan, 6 to 8 inches in central Illinois, 8 or more inches in western Kentucky and up to 6 inches in middle Tennessee. The South also will dip into temperatures rarely seen. By Monday morning, western and central Kentucky could be below zero — “definitely record-breaking,”

said weather service meteorologist Christine Wielgos in Paducah, Ky. And in Atlanta, Tuesday’s high is expected to hover in the mid-20s. The arctic chill will affect everything from sports to schools to flights. Mike Duell, with flighttracking website FlightAware.com, says to expect airport delays and flight cancellations because of the cold temperatures. “For some of them, they run into limitations on the aircraft. They’re only certified to take off at temperatures so low so if they get into a particular cold front it can prevent them from being able to legally take off,” he said. “In a lot of cases, it’s just ice.” Sunday’s NFL playoff game in Green Bay could be among one of the coldest ever played — a frigid minus 2 degrees when the Packers and San Francisco 49ers kickoff at Lambeau Field. Medical experts suggest fans wear at least three layers and drink warm fluids — not alcohol. Minnesota has called off school Monday for the entire state — the first such closing in 17 years — as well as the Wisconsin cities of Milwaukee and Madison. Before the polar plunge, Earth was as close as it gets to the sun each year on Saturday. The planet orbits the sun in an oval and on average is about 93 million miles away. But every January, Earth is at perihelion, and on Saturday, it was only 91.4 million miles from the sun. That proximity doesn’t affect the planet’s temperatures. Maue noted that it’s relatively uncommon to have such frigid air blanket so much of the U.S., maybe once a decade or every couple of decades. Yet, Truett said there are no clear trends in weather patterns to indicate what kind of temperatures are in store for the rest of the winter.

5 people found dead after house fire in Oklahoma BARTLESVILLE, Okla. (AP) — Authorities say five people were found dead after a house fire in the northern Oklahoma city of Bartlesville. Bartlesville Police Sgt. David Hackler says the fire was reported shortly before 5 a.m. Saturday. After firefighters extinguished the blaze, responders discovered five people dead inside the home. Hackler said the case is still under investigation by police and fire authorities, along with the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation and the state medical examiner’s office. The victims’ names haven’t been released and authorities have not yet released a cause of death. Bartlesville is about 45 miles north of Tulsa.

Deadline for aviation art contest extended OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission is extending the deadline for students to enter an aviation-themed art contest. Young artists now have until Jan. 24 to submit an entry into the International Aviation Art Contest. The deadline had been Jan. 17. The state Aeronautics Commission says it moved the deadline because of the early December winter storm that closed many school districts across the state. Students age 6 to 17 are eligible to participate in the art contest, which has a theme this year of “Flying Saves Lives.” To participate in the 2014 International Aviation Art Contest, entries must be sent to the Oklahoma Aeronautics Commission at 120 N. Robinson, Suite 1244W in Oklahoma City. The zip code is 73102.

Oklahoma City police ID man shot by officer OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma City authorities have identified the man fatally shot by a police officer. Police said Saturday that 21-year-old Joeshawn Williams of New Orleans died in the gunfight Friday afternoon. Authorities say Sgt. Jimmy Cortez and Lt. Larry Northcutt were working in a federally funded program that allows cities to put extra officers in high-crime areas. Authorities say the two officers tried to speak with Williams, but he ran into traffic. Capt. Dexter Nelson says the officers pursued Williams, who then fired at police with a handgun. Cortez was wounded by a gunshot and returned fire, killing Williams. Authorities say Cortez was treated and released from the hospital for his injuries. He’s been placed on routine paid leave pending the outcome of an internal investigation.


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From homecoming to Christmas October, November, December 2013 By Marione Martin The final three months of 2013 featured homecoming for Alva High and Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU), a sales tax election and holiday festivities. Bill Johnson Correctional Center had its biggest GED graduating class ever, and several local citizens received honors. October 2013 NWOSU kicked off its Homecoming 2013 button sales at the beginning of October. Homecoming was set for Oct. 24-26, and the theme was “Ranger Vacation: It’s a Family Tradition.” Nearby Avard held its ninth annual Dutch Oven Cook-Off and Festival on Oct.5. After an assessment by a steering committee and consultants Georgia Williams, arts director for the Oklahoma Arts Council, and Ron Franz, architect for the Institute for Quality Communities, Dr. Kay Decker unveiled the goals for the Alva downtown cultural district. Joby Allen and Traci Owen were named the Alva High School

fall homecoming king and queen during halftime ceremonies on Oct. 11. Thamazin Harrison of Alva was selected to receive a state Community Service Award. She was honored along with 16 other individuals and two organizations at a Nov. 13 ceremony at the Oklahoma Capitol. The City of Alva renewed its agreement with the Alva Girl Scouts for the Girl Scout Hut in Hatfield Park. The original agreement was made in 1947. The Alva City Council approved the purchase of a new steel wheel roller for the street department. It replaced a 1951 Army surplus model and was purchased from a Share Trust grant. Judge Ray Dean Linder of Alva was honored by an Award of Merit from Southwestern Oklahoma State University (SWOSU). The award was presented Oct. 26 at the SWOSU homecoming game. Share Hospital of Alva completed the first phase of project converting their records to EHR (electronic health records).

Despite the Homecoming vacation theme, the NWOSU Aggie Club float says there’s no vacation in agriculture and no rest for the Ranger footballl. The float received the President’s Award. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

The top five contestants of the Miss Cinderella Pageant join Miss Oklahoma on stage at NWOSU’s Herod Hall Friday night. From left are fourth runner-up Victoria Kimbrell, Miss Cimarron; second runner-up Ashlee Shryock, Miss Shattuck; Miss Oklahoma Kelsey Griswold; Miss Cinderella Amanda Covalt, Miss Woodward; first runner-up Kelsey Castle, Miss Timberlake; and thrid runner-up Kaci Livingston, Miss Seiling. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

AHS Fall Homcoming queen Traci Owen poses with homecoming king Joby Allen after coronation ceremonies prior to the Alva High/Pawnee football game Oct. 11. Traci is the daughter of Jeff and Terri Owen. Joby Allen is the son of Jimmy and Kandice Allen. Other queen candidates were Courtney Mapes, Siera Earnest, Lyndsey Bellah, Jordan Coffman, Sage Sunderland, Emily Harris and Darian Carothers. Other king candidates were Cody Jones, Brandon Ellis, Riley Hess, Collins Fouts, Cade Pfleider, Ty Hooper and Dakota Nusser. Photo by Lynn L. Martin After the February snows caused heavy structural damage to their building, Bible Baptist Church embarked on demolition and rebuilding. The new sanctuary was expected to be ready for use in about three months. Amanda Covalt of Woodward won the Miss Cinderella Pageant during NWOSU’s homecoming weekend in October. Jake West and Bayley Zehr were named Ranger homecoming king and queen. The Oklahoma Department of Corrections met at Bill Johnson Correctional Center in Alva on Oct. 25. November 2013 Bill Johnson Correctional Center in Alva had its largest GED graduating class on Nov. 1 when 76 inmates received their diplomas. Rep. Jeff Hickman told the Alva Kiwanis Club that the state’s correctional system had reached a crisis point with inmates exceeding 100 percent of the capacity of prisons while needed staff members were only at 60 percent. He also said that water management was a looming issue for the state. Two Alva Middle School students, Max Parsons and Hayden Vasquez, qualified for the state academic contest to be held April 5. As the Alva sales tax election approached, Alva Hospital Authority members and Share Medical staff spoke at many meetings to explain the issue. Some opposition developed, but when the results of the Nov. 12 election were announced nearly 79 percent of voters were in favor of the change to the sales tax. The vote allowed the hospital to use any overage received in the 1.25 city sales tax to pay operating expenses. Previously, the tax was designated to be

Alva Girl Scouts Calissa and Chesney Fouts and Don Knox show off their pumpkin creation. The scouts helped residents of the Homestead Retirement Community carve pumpkins for Halloween.

The October 2013 meeting of the board of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections was held Friday, Oct. 25, at 1 p.m. at the Bill Johnson Correctional Center in Alva. Board members from left: Gene Haynes, See Christmas Page 19 Linda Neal, Michael Roach, T. Hastings Siegfried, Kevin Gross, Ed Evans (interim director) and Steve Burrage. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

Photo by Lynn L. Martin The BEST program stands for Boosing Engineering Science and Technology. Northwestern Oklahoma State University’s (NWOSU) Dr. Tim Maharry said this is a national program going on now for about 20 years. NWOSU has been involved for 12 years. The Nov. 9 event attracted 18 high school and middle school teams from around the state of Oklahoma and a few from Kansas. Maharry said the teams were here about six weeks ago to get a kit with lots of parts to build a robot. They are here with their assembled robots trying to score points on the game field, which is an obstacle course. He concluded,”The goals of this program are to promote science, engineering and technology.”


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2013

Miss Alva 2013. She and four oth- ing the Northwestern Oklahoma Although they found some cash, er AHS seniors competed for the State University Homecoming. thieves were unsuccessful in openhonor. She represented Alva in the Red’s Place was burglarized. ing a safe with a sledgehammer. Miss Cinderella Pageant held dur- Damage was estimated at $5,300. September 2013 At the Alva City Council meeting on Sept. 3, Kenny King voiced his concern over the lack of upkeep of the cemetery. The city had been advertising for months for a cemetery sexton. King said he’d rather be buried in the park because it was in better condition. Dwight Bushman of Wakita spoke to the council about a proposal for a faith-based private corrections facility, but the council showed no interest in supporting the idea. The Woods County Fair was held Sept. 5-7 at the fairgrounds south of Alva. The Alva Fire Department Mud Slinger Shootout was held on the final day of the fair. The newly installed early literacy computer has been very successful with young people at the library, and plans have been made to purchase more. Dylen and Dalton Marteney are shown doing an activity together. Photo by Alex Cole

Hannah Duke, age 10, of Freedom, prepares her lamb “Charlotte” for judging at the Woods County Fair. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

The Alva Airport Commission expressed their frustration that the final report on the new runway was still not filed with the FAA. Other grant work at the airport could not be started until it was filed. Longtime Alva City Clerk Wayne Lane resigned. Melody Theademan was appointed to serve in his place. Alyssa Brewer and Kelan McKnight were announced as the Alva High School Band King and Queen for 2013. The Alva City Council and Economic Development Authority passed resolutions to refinance the loan for the Alva Recreation Complex. The restructured loan was expected to save the city money by cutting the interest rate. The Alva 4-H and FFA livestock judging team took top honors at the

Freedom Rodeo Queen and Princess contestants were ready to compete Aug. 15. From left are Raelyn Gabrel, Shyanna Dixon and Shawna DeWitt. The rodeo was held Aug. 15-17 at the Freedom Rodeo arena just north of town. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

2013 state fair. Kory Dietz, Tanner Burton, Courtney Mapes and Traci Owen won the senior 4-H division. The junior team placed sixth. The Charles Morton Share Trust approved a grant of $100,000 to the City of Alva to buy some muchneeded street department equipment. The Big Cruise and Car Show held Sept. 20-22 attracted the largest number of exhibitors yet. Perfect weather drew crowds of people to look at vintage autos and watch fun contests. On Sept. 22 Alex Smith of Mooreland was crowned Miss Northwestern 2014, Ashley Tucker of Fairview was crowned Miss Northwestern’s Outstanding Teen, and Rylee Ferguson of Mooreland was named Miss Northwestern Star.

Rachel Carter, Miss Alva, will represent Alva High School in the Miss Cinderella Pageant during the Northwestern Oklahoma State University homecoming. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

Marvin Jenkins won first place in multiple classes at the Mud Slinger Shootout at the Woods County Fairgrounds on Sept. 7. Photo by Alex Cole

Alesi Streich, Alva, participates in the Big Cruise and Car Show burnout contest in a 1960 Apache pickup. Photo by Alex Cole

Alex Smith (right) was crowned as the 2014 Miss Northwestern Oklahoma State University during a pageant Sept. 22. She will represent Northwestern at the Miss Oklahoma Scholarship Pageant in June. Ashley Tucker (left) was crowned as the 2014 Miss Northwestern’s Outstanding Teen, and Rylee Ferguson (front) was named Miss Northwestern Star.


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Lady Rangers come close to taking down No. 12 Harding 75-76 By Leslie Nation After getting their first win against Arkansas Tech Thursday night, the Lady Rangers almost pulled off a repeat against No. 12 Harding University on Saturday afternoon in Percefull Fieldhouse. Raining Threes In Percefull Fieldhouse The Lady Bison quickly showed Northwestern why they were ranked 12th in the nation with an undefeated record by going on a 7-0 run in the first three minutes of gameplay. But with two backto-back treys from Dierra Gilmore (#3), the Rangers were trailing by only one point. D. Gilmore answered with another three, getting the Rangers’ first nine points of the game with 15:42 still left to play in the first half. With the score at 9-10 in Harding’s favor, the Lady Bison drained two three-pointers to kick the lead back up to six points. Northwestern put the pressure on Harding with over 11 minutes in the period. Relina Johnson (#42) powered in for a layup to trail by two at 14-16. Ashley Pride (#1) got the defensive rebound at the other end and pushed down the court drawing defenders off Kamera Bozeman (#32) underneath the basket. This gave Pride the opening to pass it inside to Bozeman for the easy bump to tie the score at 16. A minute later, the Lady Bison won back the lead to put the score at 16-18, but Johnson tied it back, driving hard toward the bucket to spin away into a fade-away jumper. Pride gave Northwestern its first lead of the night against the Lady Bison off of two foul shots. That lead was short, as A’ndrea Haney (#14) answered with a wide-open three to get the one-point lead for Harding. The Lady Bison went on an 8-1 run after that to get a five-point lead. Three-pointers drained from both ends of the court put Harding up by four with the score 28-32 with 3:45 left on the play clock. Another three pointer from Johnson and a layup by Bozeman within 30 seconds gave the Rangers back a one-point lead over Harding. As hard as Northwestern fought in that final minute of the period, Harding battled right back to take away the Rangers’ three-point lead and go into halftime with the score at 37-39 in Bison’s favor.

Intense Finish For The Rangers Harding started the half out with a 7-2 run in less than three minutes to get a seven-point lead. Freshman Kaci Hansen (#14) drove along the baseline to get the layup and the foul to cut that lead down to six and put the score at 4551. Northwestern drained 10 more point to get the lead over the Bison and a huge momentum shift. Emily Eaton (#10) started it that 10-0 run with a layup followed by two treys from Johnson. Bozeman finished it out after Johnson dribbled across the key to find Bozeman open under the basket. Northwestern fought to hold on and build some cushion between them and Harding, but the Lady Bison went on another 7-0 run to get an eight-point lead – their biggest lead of the night – to put the score at 60-68 with less than five minutes left in the game. The Lady Rangers were showing a knack for getting out of trouble. After Bozeman hit another layup, Eaton stole the ball at the other end to drive it back and score. With one defender to beat, Eaton crossed over to go behind Haney and put up the layup. Another minute later, Eaton cut the lead to one point with a wide-open three at 67-68. The Lady Rangers tried back to get the win, but Hardin’s lead was enough to come out on top 75-76. Stats For The Game Leading scorer for Northwestern was freshman Johnson, who had a career-high of 18 points and she was five of nine from threepoint range. Bozeman had a second team-high of 15 points with five rebounds followed by Gilmore with 11 points, six rebounds and five assists. Eaton did well for the Rangers getting all eight of her points in the second half with six assists. The Lady Rangers were just 36.7 percent from the filed in the first half, but in the second half they improved to 64 percent to get a game percentage of 49.1. On the opposite side, it was Montana Lewis (#00) who got a game-high of 20 points for Harding (12-0, 4-0 Great American Conference) including six rebounds to tie with Gilmore. Kristen Celsor (#40) put up 16 points followed Haney, who added 12 points with her eight assists. The Lady Rangers also outrebounded the Bison 36-22 with 12 of those rebounds on the offensive side of the court to give them the

needed second-chance shots. Northwestern (1-10, 1-4 GAC) will hit the road to face East Central in Ada on Jan. 9 at 5:30 p.m.

The Lady Rangers follow that up with another away game in Durant against Southeastern Oklahoma State at 2 p.m.

Score By Period Team 1st 2nd F NWOSU 37 38 75 Harding 39 37 76

Relina Johnson (#42) sinks a three-pointer as A’ndrea Haney (#14) attempts to block it. Johnson had a career-high of 18 points against the No. 12 Lady Bison on Saturday. Photo by Leslie Nation

Oklahoma beats Alabama 45-31 in Sugar Bowl By Brett Martel NEW ORLEANS (AP) — In the final year of the BCS, Oklahoma coach Bob Stoops won the one major bowl that had eluded him, and proved a point about parity in the process. After taking the past month to cultivate a young quarterback who was still coming into his own, Stoops brought a confident and motivated Sooners squad to the Sugar Bowl, where they stunned 16-point favorite Alabama 45-31 on Thursday night. Freshman Trevor Knight completed a Sugar Bowl-record 32 passes for 348 yards and four touchdowns for 11th-ranked Oklahoma, outshining Heisman Trophy runner-up AJ McCarron, who saw his otherwise charmed college career come to a sour end with No. 3

Alabama. The convincing victory also gave Stoops an I-told-you-so moment, backing up his comment last offseason that the gap between the Southeastern Conference and other top leagues like the Big 12 is not as great as some “propaganda” makes it out to be. “I have the utmost respect for Alabama, and I think this shows that obviously we can play with anybody,” Stoops said. “So, enough of that. And I just watched them go through their entire conference and play pretty well. I’m not pointing any fingers. But I think sometimes the comparisons aren’t necessarily very true.” Stoops became the first coach to win all four BCS bowl games, having already won the Orange, Rose and Fiesta bowls.

Before the game Stoops had provided an element of mystery by declining to say whether he would start Knight or junior Blake Bell, or how much he’d play either one. Alabama led 7-0 — having scored on the opening drive — before Stoops made his decision know by sending Knight out with the offense for Oklahoma’s first series. Knight had played behind Bell much of the season. His completion percentage entering the game was 52.2. He had completed 47 passes all season — before a breakout performance in which two of his TDs went for more than 40 yards. “It’s huge for our program, to get a win like this after no one gave us a chance all year,” Knight said. “We’ve got to ride this into next year. We can’t settle with this. ... We want the big one.”

Oklahoma (11-2) needed him to play that well in the 80th Sugar Bowl, the first in which quarterbacks for both teams threw for more than 300 yards. His Big 12 team vanquished an Alabama (11-2) squad that had been ranked No. 1 much of the past three seasons, winning the previous two national titles before its shot at a third straight was derailed by Auburn on the last play of the Iron Bowl in late November. Coach Nick Saban didn’t find his team, favored by 16 points, was too deflated from its loss to Auburn to play up to its standard. “I actually thought that the players responded in practice pretty well for this game,” Saban said. “We put over 500 yards of offense up. Somebody had to do something right. I don’t think that we played

as well on defense as we’re capable of or should have.” McCarron passed for 387 yards and two TDs, but his two interceptions set up Oklahoma TDs. He was also sacked seven times, fumbling on the last one, and Geneo Grissom returned his second recovery of the game 8 yards for a score, sealing Alabama’s first two-game skid since its Sugar Bowl loss to Utah in January 2009. “Put it all on me. I had two turnovers, (Oklahoma) ended up scoring 14 points, and we lost by 14,” said McCarron, who won 36 of his first 38 games before losing his last two. “I wish it wouldn’t have happened, but I’ll definitely take the loss and definitely take the blame, because a lot of it is probably my

See Sugar Bowl Page 13


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Harding’s second-half rally gave them the win over Northwestern

Bruce Wright (#22) pulls up to hit a layup over Hayden Johnson (#21). Wright had a second team-high of 12 points against the Harding University Bison on Saturday. Photo by Leslie Nation

By Leslie Nation The Rangers men’s basketball team suffered a loss in a close game against Arkansas Tech, but Saturday afternoon they battled with Harding University to get a win in conference action. Northwestern started out with a 5-0 run as T’aries Taylor (#10) hit a layup followed by a threepointer from Eze Akwari (#24). The Bison answered back quickly to tie it up at 5 in similar fashion with less than four minutes ticked off the clock. Harding got a brief lead over the Rangers at the 14:38 minutemark. With the score tied up at 8, Andraz Kavas (#44) hit a layup to get a two-point lead. The Rangers kicked up the pressure on the Bison by answering with a 12-0 run, starting out with 6-foot-7 Jesse Smith (#33) fighting hard under the basket to get two and tie the game again. Adrian Motley (#15) helped move Northwestern along, running across the key to take the pass from Darrian Dempsey (#11) and hitting a floater over Will Francis (#3) to get the lead back. Motley drained another jumper to increase that lead to four with the score at 14-10 with 11:13 left in the first half. Two three-point plays from the Rangers rounded out their rally, as Bruce Wright (#22) drained a three-pointer followed by Akwari, who got a three-point opportunity off a jumper that drew the foul for a freebie. With 9:04 left in the first half, the Bison finally ended their drought as Hayden Johnson (#21) drove hard for layup. The Rangers continued to hold off Harding to get as much as a 14-point lead with less than seven minutes left in the first, but the Bison chipped at the lead to get it down to six before halftime with the score 31-25 in Northwestern’s favor. Though the Rangers put Harding through their paces in the first half, the Bison were not going down without a fight. At the 16:15 minute mark, Harding tied

the score again at 35 and less than two minutes later took the lead for the second time as Francis posted up and worked his way to spin in for a layup. Johnson followed 30 seconds later with a three pointer to take the Bison’s biggest lead of the night with five points. The Rangers did not get the lead back, and trailed by as much as nine points with the score 47-56 after Francis got the offensive rebound and the put-back with 7:37 left in the game. Northwestern was finally able to eat away at the lead that Harding had built with just over three minutes left. Eventually, the Rangers had to resort to sending Harding to the foul line with a 1:52 on the game clock, and the Bison delivered, making eight of ten from the free-throw line. Taylor shot a buzzer-beater from three-point range, but Harding won 69-63. Stats for the Game Four out of five of Northwestern’s starters hit double figures in points with Taylor leading the way hitting 12 points. Wright and Awkari added 11 points each, followed by Motley with 10. Foul shots hurt the Rangers, as they were only five of 13, shooting 38.5 percent for the game. The game-high scorer was Johnson with a total of 23 points. Andraz Kavas (#44) and Francis added another 11 points each, followed by Tony Cochran (#2) with 10. Harding was 72 percent from the line hitting 18 of their 25. The Rangers had the upper hand in rebounds as they outrebounded the Bison 38-30. Smith led the way with eight rebounds followed by Johnson and Kavas from Harding each with seven. The Rangers (4-7, 1-4 Great American Conference) hit the road to play East Central on Jan. 9 at 7:30 p.m. and then Southeastern Oklahoma State on Jan. 11 at 4 p.m. following the women’s games. Score By Period Team 1st 2nd F NWOSU 31 32 63 Harding 25 44 69

No. 13 OSU loses 41-31 to No. 9 Mizzou in Cotton Bowl By Stephen Hawkins ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — Oklahoma State cornerback Tyler Patmon was in the end zone with his jubilant teammates after returning an interception for an apparent go-ahead touchdown. A penalty flag, though, quickly doused the celebration for the No. 13 Cowboys in the fourth quarter of the Cotton Bowl. No. 9 Missouri kept the ball when Patmon was called for pass interference, and got a tiebreaking

field goal as part of an exchange of points on six consecutive drives by the former Big 12 rivals before the Tigers pulled out a 41-31 victory late Friday night. “I didn’t see it. I just saw two guys competing for the ball,” Cowboys coach Mike Gundy said after the game. “They said that our guy interfered with him. Obviously have to go with that.” The Cowboys (10-3) did manage to get the lead in that late sequence, when Desmond Roland bulled

through the line for a 2-yard TD run. But Mizzou responded when Henry Josey ran 16 yards for his third touchdown with 3:08 left, and Shane Ray returned a fumble 73 yards for a touchdown in the final minute when Oklahoma State quarterback Clint Chelf fumbled while being sacked. “It’s tough. We had two opportunities to do that, and came up short both times,” Chelf said. “It’s disappointing.” The end of the Cotton Bowl was eerily similar to their regularseason finale a month ago, a 33-24 home loss to Oklahoma that cost the Cowboys the Big 12 title and a spot in the Bowl Championship Series. Roland had a go-ahead 1-yard run with 1:46 left that day, but the Sooners drove to score with 19 seconds left and added a 3-yard fumble recovery for a score on the final play of that game. SEC East champion Missouri (12-2) matched its school record for victories, giving the SEC its 10th win in the last 11 Cotton Bowls, all against the Big 12. The Tigers were the last Big 12 team to win the game, six years ago in their other 12-win season. Josey’s go-ahead TD came a play after James Franklin’s 27-yard pass to Dorial Green-Beckham

to convert third-and-9. Franklin, the Missouri quarterback whose final two seasons were plagued by injuries, had two fumbles earlier in the second half when Oklahoma State overcame a 10-point deficit to tie it in just over 3½ minutes. Franklin was only 15 of 40 passing for 174 yards with an interception, and almost another returned for a score. Chelf threw for 381 yards and two touchdowns with two interceptions, completing 33 of 57 passes. He also ran 10 times for 48 yards, including a 23-yarder to convert third-and-10 only a few plays before he was sacked by AllSEC defensive end Michael Sam, who knocked the ball loose. That gave Sam 11½ sacks, the most in the SEC and matching a school record. “All the drama you don’t want as a coach in the fourth quarter,” Mizzou coach Gary Pinkel said. “We had a lot of adversity, and our team handled the adversity well and made the plays we needed to win. I wanted that trophy really bad, wanted it bad for them.” Missouri wrapped up its second SEC season since leaving the Big 12. The Tigers debuted in their new league with a losing season, but

made it to the SEC championship game in year two before losing to No. 2 Auburn. “What a great way to finish the season,” said Pinkel, whose 102nd victory in his 13th season snapped a tie with Don Faurot for the most in school history. With the game tied, Franklin appeared to throw his second interception with 9 minutes left with Patmon running 40 yards to the end zone. But the penalty negated the touchdown, giving back the ball to Missouri. The Tigers settled for Andrew Baggett’s 46-yard field goal. “I felt as if both guys were competing for the ball,” Cowboys linebacker Shaun Lewis said. “It’s unfortunate. That play would have turned the game.” Gundy said he was told only that Patmon interfered and didn’t really get an explanation about the penalty from the referees. The Cowboys were trying to win 11 games for the third time in four seasons. Before Mike Gundy became the coach in 2005, the Cowboys had never won 11 games. “It’s hard on our team,” Gundy said. “That’s a very, very disappointed locker room right now.”


LPXLP

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Vandy regroups, tops Houston Luck rallies Indy to 45-44 41-24 in Compass Bowl playoff win over Chiefs By Charles Odum, AP Sports Writer BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — James Franklin wanted to savor Vanderbilt’s bowl win. Any public comment about his interest in another job would have to wait. Patton Robinette threw two 50yard touchdown passes to Jordan Matthews, and Vanderbilt recovered after blowing a 24-point lead to beat Houston 41-24 on Saturday in the BBVA Compass Bowl. Robinette, starting after senior Austyn Carta-Samuels had seasonending surgery to repair a torn ACL in his left knee, also had an 8-yard scoring run as Vanderbilt built a 24-0 lead in the first half. After Houston (8-4) pulled even by scoring 24 points in the third quarter, Vanderbilt reclaimed the lead on Brian Kimbrow’s 21-yard touchdown run. It was the start of 17 fourth-quarter points for the Commodores. “The thing that’s probably the most exciting to me is there is a culture of winning at Vanderbilt,” Franklin said. “These guys know how to win. A lot of different ways they do it, ugly, pretty, people can describe it however they want.” Vanderbilt (9-4) closed the season with five straight wins, adding to Franklin’s status as a possible candidate for coaching vacancies, including at Penn State and with the NFL Browns and Redskins. The Commodores played in three straight bowl games under Franklin — a first for the program — and completed their first back-to-back nine-win seasons. Franklin talked after the game about Vanderbilt’s returning players. He left the interview room without replying when asked if he would be back. Vandy players doused Franklin with a water bucket in the final seconds. Houston gained only 22 yards and had one first down in the first half but rallied with 24 points in the third quarter to pull even. Kenneth Farrow had a 6-yard scoring run and Deontay Greenberry and John O’Korn threw scoring passes to Markeith Ambles. Franklin joked the Houston comeback was arranged to protect the TV ratings. “Statistically, it was crazy,” Franklin said. “Our defense gave up 22 yards in the first half, 300 yards in the third quarter. We were told by the ESPN people that the ratings had gone down so we wanted to spike them back up by making it exciting in the third quarter.”

From Page 11

The Commodores regrouped with two big gains on direct snaps to running backs early in the fourth quarter. Jerron Seymour ran for 38 yards to the Houston 34. Kimbrow’s touchdown run gave the lead back to Vanderbilt. Jahmel McIntosh’s interception less than a minute later gave the ball back to Vanderbilt, setting up Carey Spear’s 35-yard field goal. Seymour added a 2-yard scoring run with less than 2 minutes remaining. “We turned it around and caught up, but it didn’t end the way we wanted it to,” Houston linebacker Steve Taylor said. Matthews, a senior who set Southeastern Conference records for career catches and yards receiving, had five catches for 143 yards and two touchdowns and was selected the game MVP. Robinette completed only one pass to another receiver — for 11 yards to Jonathan Krause. Robinette completed 6 of 17 passes for 154 yards with two touchdowns and an interception. Seymour had 14 carries for 46 yards. O’Korn completed 16 of 31 passes for 220 yards and two touchdowns. Daniel Spencer had three carries for 69 yards for Houston and Ambles had six catches for 105 yards and a touchdown. Matthews took advantage of a lead block by Krause to make his first touchdown catch. A forced fumble by linebacker Chase Garnham set up the Commodores’ second touchdown. After Houston’s O’Korn threw a pass to Greg Ward Jr., a big hit by Garnham forced the fumbled recovered by Andrew Williamson at the Houston 16. Robinette, making his third career start, scored on an 8-yard keeper on fourth down. No Houston defender was near Matthews on his second 50-yard scoring catch in the second quarter. It capped a dominant first half for the Commodores. Levine said he told his players at halftime they could make up the 24-point deficit quickly. A lost fumble by Robinette set up Farrow’s 6-yard touchdown run to start Houston’s third-quarter comeback. Houston built on the momentum. Spencer’s 62-yard run set up O’Korn’s 6-yard touchdown pass to Ambles. O’Korn’s 58-yard pass to Ambles set up a 30-yard field goal by Kyle Bullard. The Cougars completed their big third-quarter comeback on O’Korn’s 67-yard touchdown pass to Greenberry to tie it.

Sugar Bowl

fault.” Freshman Derrick Henry’s 43yard run in the third quarter pulled Alabama to 31-24. But Alabama was unable to add another score before Knight found his groove again. He lofted a perfect pass to Lacoltan Bester for a 34-yard gain to the Alabama 9. Shortly after, Knight rolled left all the way to the sideline before rifling a touchdown strike to Sterling Shepard, making it a two-touchdown game again with 10:44 left. Henry pulled Alabama within a score once more when he turned his first career reception into a tackleshedding 61-yard TD with 6:22 to go, but Oklahoma didn’t fold. Early on, Alabama looked

sharp, leading 7-0 when T.J. Yeldon scored from the 1. Soon after, Landon Collins intercepted Knight’s tipped pass, but Oklahoma got it right back on Gabe Lynn’s interception on the next play. One play later, Knight found Bester for a 45-yard score. Jalen Saunders first TD reception from 8 yards out gave Oklahoma a 14-10 lead, but McCarron’s 67-yard TD to DeAndrew White gave the Tide the lead right back. With the game tied at 17, Alabama appeared on the verge of another go-ahead score when Yeldon fumbled on the 8. Instead, Oklahoma took the lead for good when Knight hit Saunders in stride down the right sideline for a 43-yard score.

By Michael Marot, AP Sports Writer INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The Indianapolis Colts had all the Luck — at least once the second half started. Andrew Luck threw three touchdown passes after halftime, including a 64-yarder to a wide-open T.Y. Hilton for the go-ahead score with 4:22 left, leading the Colts from a four-TD deficit to an improbable 4544 comeback victory over the Kansas City Chiefs in a wild-card game Saturday. Indianapolis (12-5) became only the second team in playoff history to win after trailing by 28 or more points, according to STATS. The other: Buffalo over Houston 41-38 in overtime in January 1993. The Colts will travel to either Denver or New England next weekend for the divisional round with four straight wins. Luck was an incredible mix of good and bad, finishing 29 of 45 for 443 yards, the second-highest total in franchise history for a playoff game, with four TDs and three interceptions. He also picked up a fumble and ran it in for a 5-yard score when the loose ball bounced back to him. “We never panicked,” Luck said.

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Sunday, January 5, 2014.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: SANDRIDGE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION, LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: POOLING LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Section 13, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma Cause CD No. 201400016 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, including the following: Chesapeake Exploration, LLC; Chesapeake Operating, Inc.; Tiptop Oil and Gas US LLC; Herndon, Crudup & Wilder Royalties Limited Partnership; Royalty Clearinghouse Partnership; Frank Bender; Susan Bender; BMNW Resources, L.L.C.; Stroube Energy Corporation; Doyle J. Wilson and Janice E. Wilson Trust dated July 19, 2001, and Doyle J. Wilson and Janice E. Wilson, as Trustees of such trust; L.P. Laird; Calvin J. McGill; Robert Bender; Linda A. Bunch; Rodney Haskell Jim Wilson; Bradley Agee; Blythe Holecek, formerly Blythe Agee; Lisa Sapper, formerly Lisa Riley; Deborah L. Essing; William C. Schock Revocable Trust dated August 22, 1986 fbo Irene Schock Holmes, and William Bevis Schock and Bank of America N.A. as CoTrustees of such trust; William C. Schock Revocable Trust dated August 22, 1986 fbo William Bevis Schock, and William Bevis Schock and Bank of America N.A. as Co-Trustees of such trust; Helen R. Douglas; Royalty Clearinghouse, Ltd.; Gregory A. Holmbeck; Glen E. Holmbeck; Chantel Corporation; if any of the abovenamed individuals be deceased, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such deceased individual; and if any of the abovenamed parties is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity; and if any of the above-

“We took it one play at a time.” Hilton broke a franchise playoff record with 13 catches and 224 yards, finishing with two TDs — including the winner. Kansas City (11-6) finished its turnaround season with three straight losses, two to the Colts and an eighth straight postseason defeat — none more stunning than this one. The eight straight losses broke a tie with the Detroit Lions for the longest playoff skid. Alex Smith was 30 of 46 for 378 yards with four TDs and no interceptions on a day he lost his top two running backs, Jamaal Charles and Knile Davis, and starting receiver Donnie Avery to injuries. But Luck got the last word with his jaw-dropping rally. Things appeared bleak with Indy trailing 31-10 at halftime, and they looked even worse when Luck’s first pass of the second half was picked off and returned to the Indy 18. Three plays later, Smith threw a 10-yard TD pass to Davis to make it 38-10 with 13:39 left in the third quarter. As it turned out, Luck had plenty of time to turn things around. In a big way. With Indy in its no-huddle of-

fense and nothing to lose, Luck started throwing the ball over the field, and Donald Brown’s 10-yard TD run made it 38-17. Then, Luck converted a lost fumble by Smith into a 3-yard TD pass to Brown. Suddenly, it was 3824 and the fans who were booing at halftime were in a frenzy. The noise subsided briefly after the Chiefs turned Luck’s third interception into a 42-yard field goal, but Luck answered with a 12-yard TD pass to cut the deficit to 41-31 after three quarters. Luck was just getting started. Eric Berry’s hit jarred the ball loose from Brown near the goal line early in the fourth, but the ball bounced right into Luck’s hands and he picked it up and squirted through the middle for to make it 41-38 with 10:38 to go. Kansas City drove for another field goal, but this time with Kansas City linebacker Justin Houston out of the game with knee injury, Hilton broke free down the middle of the field and Luck hit him in stride behind the secondary for the 64-yard score that made it 45-44. All the Colts had to do then was stop Kansas City on downs, and kneel down three times.

named parties designated as a trustee is not presently acting in such capacity as trustee, then the unknown successor or successors to such trustee. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicant, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, has filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma to enter an order pooling the interests, and adjudicating the rights and equities in connection therewith, of the oil and gas owners in the 640-acre horizontal well unit to be formed in Section 13, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, for the Mississippian common source of supply, in respect to the development of such common source of supply in such unit. The interests of the oil and gas owners involved herein and the rights and equities in respect thereto are sought herein to be pooled and adjudicated pursuant to 52 O.S. ‘87.1 within and on the basis of the unit covered hereby, and not limited to a single wellbore. The application in this cause states that Applicant has proposed the development of the common source of supply in the unit involved herein under a plan of development and has proposed to commence such plan of development of such unit by an initial well in the lands covered hereby. Such application further states that Applicant has been unable to reach an agreement with the owners of drilling rights named as respondents herein with respect to such proposed plan of development of the common source of supply in the unit covered hereby. Such application further requests up to 365 days within which to commence operations on or in connection with such initial well under such plan of development. Such application further states that there is currently pending before the Commission in Cause CD No. 201308485 an application of Applicant to form a 640acre horizontal well unit in said Section 13 for the Mississippian common source of supply. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, or some other party recommended by Applicant be designated as operator under the order to be entered herein of the common source of supply in the unit covered hereby, including the initial well

and any subsequent well or wells to be drilled under or otherwise covered by Applicant’s proposed plan of development of such unit. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause is set before an administrative law judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma. Notice is further given that the application in this cause may be amended at such hearing in accordance with the rules of the Commission and the laws of the State of Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an administrative law judge on the Conservation Docket at the Western Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, 2101 North Lincoln Boulevard, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 A.M. on the 27th day of January, 2014, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their names and telephone numbers. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact John R. Reeves, attorney, OBA #7479, Seventeenth Floor, One Leadership Square, 211 North Robinson Avenue, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, Telephone: (405) 272-5742; or Ashlei Jordan, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 73102-6406, Telephone: (405) 429-5754. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA. L. MURPHY, Commissioner DONE AND PERFORMED this 2nd day of January, 2014. BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary 14831-0759noh


January 5, 2014 LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Sunday, January 5, 2014.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: SANDRIDGE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION, LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: INCREASED DENSITY LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Section 19, Township 28 North, Range 19 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma Cause CD No. 201400046 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, including the following: Atinum MidCon I, LLC; Bar D. Ranch, Inc.; Episcopal Royalty Company; Bliss Living Trust dated 11/16/2002, and the Trustee of such trust; Wayne A. Bliss; Mary Catherine Bliss; Janice Wade a/k/a Janice McGary; Sandra Wimmer; Billy Wimmer; Staci Bliss; Francis Edward Smith; Michael A. Rainwater; Anadarko Petroleum Corporation; Ladd Petroleum Corporation; Lawrence M. Nilsen; Anne N. Kelly; Marcia N. Anderson; Goldie Reutlinger; Donald D. Reutlinger; Gilbert L. Carlson Trust dated 7/19/99, and the Trustee of such trust; Lois M. Carlson

LPXLP Trust dated 7/19/99, and the Trustee of such trust; Beverly Erwin a/k/a Beverly A. Miller; Linda Erwin; SandRidge Mississippian Trust II, and the Trustee of such trust; Cascade Resources, LLC; Anne N. Kelly Revocable Trust dated 10/8/10, and the Trustee of such trust; Marcia N. Anderson Revocable Trust dtd 9/18/09, and the Trustee of such trust; RABSM, LLC; Universal Resources Corporation; QEP Energy Company; Galatya Minerals, LP; Arrowhead Resources, Inc.; Dale Williston Minerals 2012-B, LP; Dale/ Peregrine Minerals Fund, LP; Dale/P Minerals Limited Partnership; Windswept Royalties, LLC; SLJ/EOF III, Ltd.; Roxstar Investments, LLP; Bounty Minerals, LLC; Pecos Bend Royalties, LLLP; Word B. Wilson Investments, LP; WD Royalties, LLC; Source Rock Minerals, LP; Oil Nut Bay Royalties, LP; McAlister Royalties, LLC; if any of the above-named individuals be deceased, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such deceased individual; if any of the above-named parties is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity; and if any of the above-named parties designated as a trustee is not presently acting in such capacity as trustee, then the unknown successor or successors to such trustee. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that

Alva Review-Courier Applicant, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, has filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma to enter an order, to be effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto, amending the applicable orders of the Commission, including Order No. 615305, to authorize and permit two more wells in the 640-acre horizontal well unit formed for the Mississippian common source of supply in Section 19, Township 28 North, Range 19 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, so as to produce hydrocarbons from such common source of supply, with such authorization and permission running in favor of Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant, and to establish proper allowables for such wells and such unit. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that the order to be entered in this matter (amending the applicable orders of the Commission, including Order No. 615305) be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and that the authorization and permission requested herein run in favor of Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause is set before an administrative law judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. Notice is further given that the application in this cause may be amended at such hearing in accordance with the rules of the Commission and the laws of the State of Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an administrative law judge on the Conservation Docket at the Western Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, 2101 North Lincoln Boulevard, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 A.M. on the 21st day of January, 2014, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their names and telephone numbers. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact John R. Reeves, Attorney, OBA #7479, Seventeenth Floor, One Leadership Square, 211 North Robinson Avenue, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, Telephone: (405) 272-5742; or Ashlei Jordan, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Ave., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102-6406, Telephone: (405) 429-5754. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner DONE AND PERFORMED this 3rd day of January, 2014. BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary 14831-0751noh

permitting an exception to the permitted well location tolerances in the 640-acre horizontal well unit formed in Section 19, Township 28 North, Range 19 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, for the Mississippian common source of supply, so as to allow a horizontal well to be drilled into, to be completed in and to produce hydrocarbons from such common source of supply, with the completion interval of such well in such common source of supply to be located within the subsurface location tolerance area as set forth below: not closer than 200 feet from the south line and not closer than 560 feet from the east line and not closer than 200 feet from the north line of said Section 19, and with such authorization and permission running in favor of Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant; and (ii) establishing a proper allowable for the proposed well involved herein as to the common source of supply covered hereby, which allowable Applicant requests be established as a full allowable with no downward adjustment made thereto. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that the order to be entered in this matter be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and that the authorization and permission requested herein run in favor of Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the “land sections adjacent to the area within the location exception” requested herein in said Section 19 in regard to the subsurface location tolerance area for the completion interval of the proposed well covered hereby, as described above, are Sections 17, 18, 20, 29 and 30, Township 28 North, Range 19 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma. The other “land sections” surrounding said Section 19 are Sections 13, 24 and 25, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause is set before an administrative law judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma. Notice is further given that the application in this cause may be amended at such hearing in accordance with the rules of the Commission and the laws of the State of Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause is set for hearing before an administrative law judge on the Conservation Docket at the Western Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, 2101 North Lincoln Boulevard, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 A.M. on the 21st day of January, 2014, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their names and telephone numbers. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact John R. Reeves, attorney, OBA #7479, Seventeenth Floor, One Leadership Square, 211 North Robinson LEGAL NOTICE Avenue, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (Published by the Alva Review- 73102, Telephone: (405) 272-5742; or Courier on Sunday, January 5, 2014.) Ashlei Jordan, SandRidge Exploration and BEFORE THE CORPORATION Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Ave., COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102-6406, OKLAHOMA Telephone: (405) 429-5754. APPLICANT SANDRIDGE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF EXPLORATION AND OKLAHOMA PRODUCTION, LLC PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman RELIEF SOUGHT: LOCATION BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman EXCEPTION DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Section 19, DONE AND PERFORMED this 3rd Township 28 North, Range 19 West of day of January, 2014. BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Cause CD No. 201400047 Secretary NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All 14831-0753noh persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and LEGAL NOTICE all other interested persons, particularly (Published by the Alva Reviewin Woods County, Oklahoma, including the following: Latigo Oil and Gas, Inc.; Courier on Sunday, January 5, 2014.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION Chesapeake Operating, Inc; Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C.; and if any of the above- COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA named parties is a dissolved partnership, APPLICANT: SANDRIDGE corporation or other association, then the EXPLORATION AND unknown successors, trustees and assigns, PRODUCTION, LLC both immediate and remote, of such RELIEF SOUGHT: LOCATION dissolved entity. EXCEPTION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicant, SandRidge Exploration and LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Section 19, Production, LLC, has filed an application Township 28 North, Range 19 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma in this cause requesting the Corporation Cause CD No. 201400048 Commission of Oklahoma to enter an NOTICE OF HEARING order, to be effective as of the date of the STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto, as follows: (i) authorizing and persons, owners, producers, operators,

Page 14 purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, including the following: Latigo Oil and Gas, Inc.; Chesapeake Operating, Inc; Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C.; and if any of the above-named parties is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicant, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, has filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma to enter an order, to be effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto, as follows: (i) authorizing and permitting an exception to the permitted well location tolerances in the 640-acre horizontal well unit formed in Section 19, Township 28 North, Range 19 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, for the Mississippian common source of supply, so as to allow a horizontal well to be drilled into, to be completed in and to produce hydrocarbons from such common source of supply, with the completion interval of such well in such common source of supply to be located within the subsurface location tolerance area as set forth below: not closer than 200 feet from the south line and not closer than 1320 feet from the east line and not closer than 200 feet from the north line of said Section 19, and with such authorization and permission running in favor of Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant; and (ii) establishing a proper allowable for the proposed well involved herein as to the common source of supply covered hereby, which allowable Applicant requests be established as a full allowable with no downward adjustment made thereto. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that the order to be entered in this matter be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and that the authorization and permission requested herein run in favor of Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the “land sections adjacent to the area within the location exception” requested herein in said Section 19 in regard to the subsurface location tolerance area for the completion interval of the proposed well covered hereby, as described above, are Sections 18 and 30, Township 28 North, Range 19 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma. The other “land sections” surrounding said Section 19 are Sections 17, 20 and 29, Township 28 North, Range 19 West of the IM, and Sections 13, 24 and 25, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, all in Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause is set before an administrative law judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma. Notice is further given that the application in this cause may be amended at such hearing in accordance with the rules of the Commission and the laws of the State of Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause is set for hearing before an administrative law judge on the Conservation Docket at the Western Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, 2101 North Lincoln Boulevard, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 A.M. on the 21st day of January, 2014, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their names and telephone numbers. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact John R. Reeves, attorney, OBA #7479, Seventeenth Floor, One Leadership Square, 211 North Robinson Avenue, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, Telephone: (405) 272-5742; or Ashlei Jordan, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Ave., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102-6406, Telephone: (405) 429-5754. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner

DONE AND PERFORMED this 3rd day of January, 2014.

BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: 14831-0752noh


January 5, 2014

LPXLP

Alva Review-Courier

Page 15

Woods County Real Woods County Estate Transactions Court Dispositions Beginning Book 1168 Page 392 Real Estate Transfers Forrest Rex Baird Trust dated Aug. 27, 2001 to Allen E. Baird: the South Half of the Southwest Quarter, and the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 15; and the South Half of the South Half of Section 16, all in Township 23 North, Range 15, WIM; all of Sections 20, 21, and 22, all in Township 23 North, Range 15, WIM: Warranty Deed. Forrest Rex Baird Trust dated Aug. 27, 2001 to Rex Ivan Baird: the South Half of the Southwest Quarter of Section 10; and the Northwest Quarter, and the North Half of the Southwest Quarter of Section 15, all in Township 23 North, Range 15; and the Northeast Quarter of Section 16, Township 24 North, Range 15, WIM: Warranty Deed. Forrest Rex Baird Trust dated Aug. 27, 2001 to Sharon M. Jacobson: the South Half of the Southwest Quarter of Section 9, Township 23 North, Range 15; and all of Sections 16 and 17, except the South Half of the South Half of Section 16, Township 23 North, Range 15, WIM; and Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 28, 29 & 30 in Block 11 of the Original Town of Waynoka: Warranty Deed. Brian A. Wallis & Kelli L. Wallis to Trottiers Pipe Handlers USA

Ltd.: (1) Lot 9 of the Ranger Estates Subdivision being a portion of the East Half of the Southwest Quarter of Section 5, Township 27 North, Range 13, WIM; AND (2) 2006 Solitaire Mobile Home: Warranty Deed. Vickie Johnson & Johnny Johnson to William J. Neale: Lot 1 in Block 20 of the Hess 3rd Addition to the City of Alva: Warranty Deed. Edward Clark Newton aka E.C. Newton & Joyce Ann Newton aka Joyce Newton to JoycenClark LLC: (1) the Southeast Quarter of Section 25, Township 23 North, Range 13, WIM; AND (2) the Northeast Quarter of Section 23, Township 23 North, Range 13, WIM: Quit Claim Deed. Thomas G. Ramy aka Tom Ramy aka Tommy Ramy & Sherry Ramy and Roberta J. Ramy aka Roberta Ramy to Mark C. Ramy & Rita Ramy: all that part or portion of Section 14, Township 28 North, Range 13, WIM, lying East of the right-of-way of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company, LESS and except a tract conveyed to the Capron Cemetery Association: Joint Tenancy Quit Claim Deed. Georgiana F. Ramy, Trustee of the Georgiana F. Ramy Revocable Trust dated Sept. 18, 2012 to Jeremiah E. Johnson & Misty K. John-

son: Lot 1 in Block 2 of the Windsor Addition, a Subdivision located in the West Half of the Southeast Quarter of Section 26, Township 27 North, Range 14, WIM, LESS and except all oil, gas and other minerals: General Joint Tenancy Warranty Deed. Mortgages Randon E. Miller & Kristina M. Miller to Alva State Bank & Trust Company: Lot 2 in Block 2 of Smith’s Subdivision of East Vale Addition to the City of Alva: maximum obligation limit $120,000. TGM Land Development LLC to BancCentral NA: Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and the West 25 feet of Lot 6, all in Block 1 of Reid’s Addition to the City of Alva, AND Lots 9 thru 14 both inclusive, in Block 13 of the East Hill Addition to the City of Alva: maximum obligation limit $1,003,153.20. William J. Neale to Guaranteed Rate Inc.: Lot 1 in Block 20 of the Hess 3rd Addition to the City of Alva: $104,591. Jeremiah E. Johnson & Misty K. Johnson to Community Bank: Lot 1 in Block 2 of the Windsor Addition to the City of Alva: maximum obligation limit $183,000. Jeffrey C. Boedeker & Cirsty D. Boedeker to BancCentral NA: Lot 1 in Block 1 of Nob Hill 3rd Addition to the City of Alva: maximum obligation limit $55,512.60.

Five Guilty Pleas to case CF-2012-00015. Defendant Three Felonies shall pay a fine of $500 (count 1), Jeremy Newton Tune, 34, Alva: pay costs, fees, assessments and Defendant pleaded guilty on 12-6- restitution. It is in the best interest 13 in case CF-2010-00005 for Un- of justice that count 2 of this case lawful possession of marijuana in be dismissed without costs or asthe presence of child under 21 years sessments. of age. Defendant is sentenced to a Two Misdemeanors term of 2 years under the direction Laura Nicole Heinz, 29, Woodand control of the Department of ward: Defendant pleaded guilty on Corrections, with time only sus- 12-16-13 in case CM-2010-236 for pended pursuant to the rules of said (1) Unlawful possession of paraDepartment. It is further ordered phernalia; and (2) Obstructing an that the said defendant pay the total officer. Sentence is a term of 1 year amount owed, fine, court costs and under the custody and control of $40 monthly supervision fee. the Woods County Sheriff DepartJames Curtis Shramek, 35, ment, with credit for time served Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on in Woods County Jail (1 day) and 12-11-13 in case CF-2012-00015 the balance (364) days suspended for Unauthorized use of motor ve- under the rules and conditions of hicle. Defendant is sentenced to a probation. These terms to run conterm of 5 years under the direction current to each other. It is further and control of the Department of ordered that the defendant pay Corrections, with time only sus- court costs, assessments, and balpended pursuant to rules and condi- ance owed in supervision fees. Laura Nicole Heinz, 29, Woodtions of probation. It is further ordered that the defendant pay court ward: Defendant pleaded guilty on costs, assessments, restitution and 12-16-13 in case CM-2011-00144 for Driving a motor vehicle while fees owed. James Curtis Shramek, 35, license is under revocation. DeAlva: Defendant pleaded guilty on fendant, having violated terms and 12-11-13 in case CF-2012-00129 conditions imposed upon her, the for (1) Grand larceny; (2) Posses- said Order Suspending the Sentence sion of burglary tools; (3) Posses- of the defendant be, and is here resion of stolen copper. For count 1 voked. Defendant is sentenced to sentence is a term of 5 years under a term of 1 year under the custody the custody and control of the De- and control of the Woods County partment of Corrections, all of said Sheriff Department, with credit for term suspended pursuant to rules time served in Woods County Jail and conditions of probation. For (1 day) and the balance (364) days count 3 sentence is a term of 5 years suspended under the rules and conunder the custody and control of ditions of probation. These terms to the Department of Corrections, all run consecutive to case CM-2010December 30, 2013 of said term suspended pursuant to 00236. It is further ordered that the 8:05 p.m. Officer calling about rules and conditions of probation. defendant pay court costs, assessa warrant check – negative. These terms to be served concur- ments, and balance owed in superJanuary 1, 2014 rent to each other and consecutive vision fees. 8:55 a.m. Woodward County calling for a warrant check. 9:15 a.m. Person calling about LEGAL NOTICE individuals bond. (Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, January 5, 2014.) 9:38 a.m. Person calling about RESOLUTION#13-14-18 WOODS COUNTY individuals bond. HOLIDAYS 9:40 a.m. Person calling about As per the authority vested to us by the Oklahoma Statues, WE, The BOARD OF individuals bond. and EXCISE BOARD OF WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA, 12:55 p.m. Bounty Hunter COMMISSIONERS hereby designate the following listed dates as holidays for the Woods County calling about warrants. Employees for the calendar year of 2014.

Woods County Sheriff’s Report December 27, 2013 6:10 a.m. Oklahoma County calling about an inmate. December 28, 2013 8:15 a.m. Call checking to see if we had a subject in custody. 8:25 a.m. Call checking to see if we were able to serve papers to individual. 8:52 a.m. Call checking to see if subject was served papers. 10:35 a.m. Call checking bond on inmate. 10:53 a.m. Call checking bond

on inmate. December 29, 2013 10:25 a.m. Call reporting cattle out at Hwy 64 and 14. 1:20 p.m. Call checking warrant for subject on hold in another state. 7:55 p.m. Pottawattamie County called asking to release individual. 8:25 p.m. Pottawattamie County called saying they cannot hold individual when bond is paid.

Woods County Court Filings

According to the affidavits and petitions on file, the following individuals have been charged. An individual is innocent of any charges listed below until proven guilty in a court of law. All information is a matter of public record and may be obtained by anyone during regular hours at the Woods County Courthouse. The Alva Review-Courier will not intentionally alter or delete any of this information. If it appears in the courthouse public records, it will appear in this newspaper. Protective Order Filings Kayla Dawn Mustard vs. William Elliot Douglas Kowall ($125.70). Marriage Licenses Issued Dec. 23 – Brandon Edward Buttry, 25, of Harlan, IA and Jessica Ann Ramy, 24, of Alva. Dec. 23 – Douglas Richard Tvrdik III, 23, of Alva and Martina Faye Cell, 29, of Alva. Divorce Filings Shawna McKinley vs. Willie McKinley: Dissolution of marriage ($193.70). Lucinda Ibarra vs. Pedro Ibarra-Rios: Dissolution of marriage ($198.70). Traffic Filings Keith Allen Aldridge, 57, Richland Hills, Texas: Operate vehicle

with expired registration ($211.50). Keith Allen Aldridge, 57, Richland Hills, Texas: Failure to provide security verification ($231.50). Ivan Alberto Torres, 21, Pampa, Texas: Operating motor vehicle w/ out valid driver’s license ($340.20). Craig J. Mertens, 50, Zenda, Kan.: Failure to keep right on road of sufficient width ($211.50). Stephen Ryan Dreiling, 39, Alva: Operating a MV at a speed not reasonable & proper ($256.50). Roy Edward Henson, 23, Kiowa, Kan.: Operate vehicle at a speed less than reasonable & proper ($256.50). Sean Campbell Davis, 44, Center, Texas: Failure to pay taxes due state ($221.50). Edgar Luis Colmenares, 22, Pauls Valley: Operate a MV with blue light (s) ($211.50). James Robert Brandes Jr., 51, Woodward: Transporting open container of beer ($316). Landon Chris Olson, 31, Cherokee: Inattentive driving resulting in collision ($211.50). Jerry Warren Marlow, 29, Decatur, Ark.: Inattentive driving resulting in collision ($211.50). Jerry Warren Marlow, 29, Decatur, Ark.: Operating motor vehicle w/out valid driver’s license

($256.50). The following individuals were cited for speeding: Dustin James Waite, 32, Fort Worth, Texas: 75 in 65 ($188.50); Joshua Thomas Price, 27, Dacoma: 92 in 65 ($351.50); Diana Lee Neumeyer, 24, Altus: 80 in 65 ($226.50); Rebecca Leigh King, 44, Woodward: 85 in 55 ($341.50); Jean William West, 23, Pampa, Texas: 71 in 55 ($241.50); Jeremy M. Walker, 31, Mooreland: 75 in 65 ($188.50); Johnathan Alan Gluth, 43, Alva: 71 in 55 ($241.50); Elizabeth Susan Kennedy, 47, Alva: 66 in 55 ($226.50); Casey William Miller, 29, Elk City: 65 in 55 ($188.50); James Robert Brandes Jr., 51, Woodward: 70 in 65 ($188.50); Manuel S. Rodriguez, 27, Borger, Texas: 80 in 65 ($226.50); Joseph Harold Brunkhorst, 52, Arden, N.C.: 75 in 65 ($188.50); Jessica Dawn French, 19, Alva: 75 in 65 ($188.50); Megan Danielle Loomis Smith, no age or address listed: 65 in 55 ($188.50); Gilbert Biera Rivera, 52, Merkel, Texas: 74 in 65 ($188.50). The following individuals were cited for failure to wear seatbelt ($20): Cyle Franklin Goucher, 21, Waynoka.

2014 HOLIDAYS Wednesday January 1 New Year’s Day Monday January 20 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Monday February 17 President’s Day Friday April 18 Good Friday Monday May 26 Memorial Day Friday July 4 Independence Day Monday September 1 Labor Day Tuesday November 11 Veterans Day Thursday & November 27 & 28 Thanksgiving Friday Wednesday & December 24 & 25 & 26 Christmas Thursday & Friday APPROVED by the Board of Commissioners of Woods County, Oklahoma on the 10th day of October, 2013. Attest: s/ Shelley Reed County Clerk s/Clint Strawn, Chairman Board of Commissioners APPROVED by the Excise Board of Woods County, Oklahoma on the 16th day of October, 2013. Attest: s/ Shelley Reed County Clerk s/ Chris Olson, Chairman Excise Board

P.O. Box 213, Alva, Oklahoma, 73717, on or before the presentment date: (Published by the Alva Review- February 27, 2014, or the same will be Courier on Sunday, December 29, 2013 forever barred. and January 5, 2014.) Dated this 27th day of December, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF 2013. WOODS COUNTY STATE OF s/Edward E. Sutter OKLAHOMA EDWARD E. SUTTER In the Matter of the Estate of Patricia Attorney for Executor Ann Chesson, Deceased. 401 College Avenue Case No. PB-2013-45 P.O. Box 213 NOTICE TO CREDITORS Alva, Oklahoma 73717 All creditors having a claim against (580) 327-1511 Patricia Ann Chesson, deceased, are required to present the same, with a description of all security interest and other collateral (if any) held by each creditor with respect to such claim, to the Executor at the office of his attorney, Edward E. Sutter, 401 College Avenue,

LEGAL NOTICE


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Woods County Communication Call Center December 26, 2013 11:01 a.m. $100 bill on counter at JT. 12:30 p.m. 911 call, tight chest at 300 block of Aspen, heart issues. 2:45 p.m. Gas drive off westbound in a black Lexus, $60.69. 6:55 p.m. Needing truck towed. 7:21 p.m. Vehicle accident with injuries on 132 south of Jackson, at least two injured, on west side of road, head and possible broken foot. 7:33 p.m. Welfare check on kids at 1000 block of 10th. 7:53 p.m. 911 call, not feeling good at 100 block of Flynn. December 27, 2013 3:17 a.m. Dodge gray two-door at 900 block of Skyline every night. 9:45 a.m. 911 call, disconnected cell, question about deputy coming to home, wanting Alf Co, will use neighbors phone to call. 10:14 a.m. Bown boxer at north end of 10th. 11:22 a.m. Prisoner in custody x4 JV males. 12:17 p.m. Missing black lab from 1200 block of Choctaw, blue collar. 5:35 p.m. Individual on Maple & Blvd going west from 8th St, Tshirt. 6:03 p.m. Fire alarm at 500 block of S Nickerson in Waynoka. December 28, 2013 11:20 a.m. 911 call, fire at Little Eagle Chief in ditch. 1:21 p.m. Erratic driver on 281 S to Hopeton, white Thunderbird. 5:41 p.m. 911 call, truck on fire at Jiffy Trip. 7:50 p.m. Cows in road side park.

8:31 p.m. Individual with Channel 4. 10:37 p.m. Jacked up SUV possibly shooting at deer in pasture between Apache & Beaver on CR 490. December 29, 2013 1:57 a.m. Back door, inside door and outside door open at Pizza Hut. 8:00 a.m. Steer out by Ridgeview Vet on south side, no color, no ear tag, no brand. 9:34 a.m. 5 head of cattle on Co Rd 240 north of LeFlore. 12:20 p.m. Sewer backed up at 1000 block of Rose. 3:02 p.m. Oilfield trucks on CR 320/Hughes northbound, OHP notified. 4:06 p.m. 911 call, fire at 200 block of Ash in PC. 7:27 p.m. Individual with Channel 4. 8:59 p.m. 911 call, individual drinking on south Cedar, needs to go to hospital. 11:56 p.m. Diabetic individual shaking and sweating on CR 925 Medford. December 30, 2013 9:27 a.m. Animal Control for a medium grey female bird dog on Locust. 10:58 a.m. 2 little dogs at 800 block of Locust, keeps getting in backyard. 11:04 a.m. Get traps for cats in neighborhood of 200 block of Barnes in alley. 11:50 a.m. Medium sized dog missing on west Locust. 5:06 p.m. Port a potty in middle of highway 2 south of Hopeton. 5:07 p.m. Train vs vehicle in Hopeton on Dewey Rd & 470

crossing. 5:18 p.m. Air evac en route. 5:32 p.m. Officer advised of fatality accident on CR 490 & Custer. 8:44 p.m. Loud boom at Main St apts, rattled. 8:45 p.m. Individual at Channel 5. 9:18 p.m. 911 call, fighting in background, man got on, said all is ok, they dialed 911 to scare person away. 10:08 p.m. 911 call, individual asking about explosions. 10:10 p.m. 911 call, repo info needing non emergency number. 10:11 p.m. Individual about explosions. 10:12 p.m. Repo vehicle at 700 block of 2nd, 2012 Ford fusion. 10:12 p.m. Asking about loud booms. 10:14 p.m. Dark vehicle with loud muffler, carboard in window. 10:21 p.m. Loud noises on horizon west of the Lagoons. December 31, 2013 12:12 a.m. Got water shut off on 700 block of 4th. 8:28 a.m. Explosions? 9:10 a.m. 911 call, break in at church. 12:26 p.m. Domestic in Carmen on W Walnut, subject drugged her and tied her up, hands have blisters. 12:38 p.m. Fire in Major Co 4 ½ west of Bouse Jct on both sides of highway, send Waynoka.

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Sunday, January 5, 2014.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: SANDRIDGE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION, LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: POOLING LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Section 23, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma Cause CD No. 201400019 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, including the following: Carl E. Gungoll Exploration, LLC; Guard Exploration Limited Partnership; and if any of the above-named parties is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicant, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, has filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma to enter an order pooling the interests of oil and gas owners, and adjudicating the rights and equities in connection therewith, in the 640-acre non-horizontal drilling and spacing

12:46 p.m. 911 call, son going crazy at 1300 block of Missouri, drinking, no weapons. 2:38 p.m. 911 call, 2 fires north on 420 & Jefferson. 4:22 p.m. 911 call, grass fire on 2nd/3rd St on corner house on north side. 4:23 p.m. Grass fire next to house on 300 block of Center St. 4:52 p.m. Control burn in Hopeton/CR 440. 4:53 p.m. Fire south on 281 in Carmen, ditch fire. 4:57 p.m. Domestic in progress in Dacoma, repetitive calling, deputies advised. 10:29 p.m. Officers to 1300 block of Fair for 2 individuals. January 1, 2014 12:09 a.m. Call from individual from 1300 block of College Blvd, about her ex boyfriend, he was sitting at the apts across from hers, when she came out he ran off, officer advised. 4:51 a.m. Individual was beaten up at Waynoka bar, been beaten pretty bad. 7:53 a.m. Cattle call, transferred to SO. 11:13 a.m. Trespasser, officer advised. 11:26 a.m. Gave subject warning regarding banned from Jiffy Trip. 12:25 p.m. Dog with chain in alley of 1300 block of Choctaw, ag-

gressive, officer notified. 2:27 p.m. Tangled up behind house on 1300 block of Choctaw, trapped there. 4:11 p.m. Fire in ditch just west of Nash on 64, advised Jet FD & Nash FD. 5:09 p.m. Break in at 200 block of 8th St, 20 minutes ago, officer notified. 6:04 p.m. Grant Co advised of a semi on fire at Elm/Texas. 6:55 p.m. Question on booms in Waynoka. 7:31 p.m. Blue chevy truck doing do nuts right on Skyline. January 2, 2014 6:39 a.m. Question about road conditions. 6:51 a.m. Semi accident on 64 in Nash, jaws of life, Jet & Nash advised. 7:03 a.m. You can cancel jaws of life from Nash. 7:18 a.m. There are some hot spots at house, fire located. 9:00 a.m. Calf ½ east of Custer on 500, possibly hit on side, black, deputy notified, no tag or brand.

units formed in Section 23, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, for the Tonkawa and Oswego separate common sources of supply and in the 640-acre horizontal well unit formed in such section for the Mississippian common source of supply, in respect to the development of such separate common sources of supply in such units. The interests of the oil and gas owners involved herein and the rights and equities in respect thereto are sought herein to be pooled and adjudicated pursuant to 52 O.S. ‘87.1 within and on the basis of the units covered hereby as a group or unit or in the aggregate, and not limited to a single wellbore. The application in this cause states that Applicant has proposed the development of the separate common sources of supply in the units involved herein under a plan of development and has proposed to commence such plan of development of such units by an initial well in the lands covered hereby. Such application further states that Applicant has been unable to reach an agreement with the owners of drilling rights named as respondents herein with respect to such proposed plan of development of the separate common sources of supply in the units covered hereby. Such application further requests up to 365 days within which to commence operations on or in connection with such initial well under such plan of development. Such application further states that there is currently pending before the Commission an application of Applicant to confirm Order No. 619521,

and to make such order effective as to the parties named as respondents in such pending proceeding, which respondents are also named as respondents herein. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, or some other party recommended by Applicant be designated as operator under the order to be entered herein of the separate common sources of supply in the units covered hereby, including the initial well and any subsequent well or wells to be drilled under or otherwise covered by Applicant’s proposed plan of development of such units. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause is set before an administrative law judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma. Notice is further given that the application in this cause may be amended at such hearing in accordance with the rules of the Commission and the laws of the State of Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an administrative law judge on the Conservation Docket at the Western Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, 2101 North Lincoln Boulevard, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 A.M. on the 27th day of January, 2014, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their names and telephone numbers. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact John R. Reeves, Attorney, OBA #7479, Seventeenth Floor, One Leadership Square, 211 North Robinson Avenue, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, Telephone: (405) 272-5742; or Ashlei Jordan, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Ave., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 731026406, Telephone: (405) 429-5754. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA. L. MURPHY, Commissioner DONE AND PERFORMED this 2nd day of January, 2014. BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary 14831-0755noh

The call center also handled the following calls: abandoned calls -22; accidental calls -8; pocket dial -8; wrong number -1; hang ups -12; animal control -13; sheriff -61; police -43; general info -84; fire dept. -9; ambulance -18; road conditions -1.


January 5, 2014

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Alva Review-Courier

Action Ads For Sale

Community Calendar

Now Hiring

Sunday 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. Monday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. 1 p.m. Alva Duplicate Bridge will meet at the Runnymede Hotel. 3:30 p.m. Storytime will be held at the Alva Public Library for children ages 3-5 and their parents. For Rent 6:30 p.m. Alva City Council Normandy Apts. 1702 College. 405meets the first and third Mondays of 659-4199 or 580-334-5311 the month in the council chambers of City Hall. 7 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous LEGAL NOTICE meets at the First United Methodist (Published by the Alva ReviewChurch. Call 917-855-9086 for Courier on Sunday, January 5, 2014.)

information. 7 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous will meet at 1027 8th (Wesley House) in Alva every Monday and Thursday. 7:30 p.m. Alva Masonic Lodge #105 will meet. Tuesday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 7 p.m. Widows and widowers support group will meet at College Hill Church of Christ. Call 580430-6083 with questions. 7 p.m. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday at the Bible

Baptist Church, 4th & Choctaw, Alva. The purpose is to help people dealing with alcoholism, divorce, sexual abuse, domestic violence, drug addiction, sexual addiction, food addiction, co-dependency, gambling addiction, anger, grief and more. Wednesday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. Noon Alva Kiwanis Club meets at Champs Restaurant. 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 7 p.m. Alva Moose Lodge men’s meeting is held every Wednesday.

Courthouse, Alva, Oklahoma, when and where all persons interested may appear and contest the same. In Testimony Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 2nd day of January, 2014. s/Mickey J. Hadwiger JUDGE OF THE DISTRICT COURT Rick Cunningham, OBA #12629 Attorney at Law 409 College Ave., P.O. Box 433 Alva, Oklahoma 73717 (580) 327-0080 Attorney for Petitioner

that Applicant, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, has filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma to enter an order, to be effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto, as follows: (i) confirming Order No. 619521, in which the Commission enlarged and extended the boundaries of the Tonkawa and Oswego separate common sources of supply of gas so as to cover and include Section 23, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma and formed 640-acre nonhorizontal drilling and spacing units for such separate common sources of supply in such section; enlarged and extended the boundaries of the Mississippian common source of supply of oil so as to cover and include said Section 23, and formed a 640-acre horizontal well unit for such common source of supply in such section; established the boundaries of the Woodford common source of supply of oil so as to cover and include said Section 23, and formed a 640-acre horizontal well unit for such common source of supply in such section; and determined that the above-described 640-acre horizontal well unit formed for the Mississippian common source of supply in said Section 23 superseded the existing non-producing or nondeveloped 80-acre non-horizontal drilling and spacing units previously formed for the Chester common source of supply in such section, and making Order No. 619521 and the units previously formed thereby effective as to the interests of the respondents named herein in said Section 23; and (ii) granting such other and further relief as may be proper based upon the evidence presented at the hearing herein. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that the order to be entered in this matter be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that

this cause is set before an administrative law judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. Notice is further given that the application in this cause may be amended at such hearing in accordance with the rules of the Commission and the laws of the State of Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an administrative law judge on the Conservation Docket at the Western Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, 2101 North Lincoln Boulevard, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 A.M. on the 27th day of January, 2014, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their names and telephone numbers. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact John R. Reeves, attorney, OBA #7479, Seventeenth Floor, One Leadership Square, 211 North Robinson Avenue, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, Telephone: (405) 272-5742; or Ashlei Jordan, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Ave., Oklahoma City, OK 731026406, Telephone: (405) 429-5754. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner DONE AND PERFORMED this 2nd day of January, 2014. BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary 14831-0754noh

2009 3500 Silverado. Butler Arm Cherokee Manor is hiring Certified Bed. 72,000 miles. Exc cond. 580- Nurse Aids for all shifts. We have a 829-3156 or 580-829-4524 new wage scale along with insurance benefits. Staff may set their own CC Construction schedules. If you are interested Interior-Exterior improvements. please contact Administrator/Jack at Room additions. Plaster Repair & 580-596-2141 or call me on my cell Painting. Handicap. Structural & phone at 580-541-0119 Non Structural Concrete. Will also Help Wanted accommodate Farm & Ranch. 580Elston Enterprises LLC is looking for 307-4598 or 620-825-4285 an experienced equipment operator/ Premium Firewood Avail CDL driver. Call 501-593-7913 or Black Jack & White Oak. Also come by our office at 34023 St Hwy quality Firewood Racks. Will stack 45 in Waynoka & deliver. 580-922-1256

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will all types of furniture. Over 55 years experience. Goltry, OK. 580496-2351

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Seasoned Mixed. $65 Rick. Will deliver and stack for free within 35 miles of Alva. 580-327-7687 or 580327-7868

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA Help Wanted In the Matter of the Estate of RICHARD Class A CDL Driver to haul Salt HEZEKIAH CUMMINGS, Deceased Water. Competitive wages & and RUBY ANN CUMMINGS, Insurance. Call Chris at 580-727- Deceased. Case No. PB-2014-2 1562 NOTICE OF HEARING PETITION FOR LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION AND DETERMINATION OF HEIRS Notice is hereby given to all persons interested in the estate of Richard Hezekiah Cummings, deceased and Ruby Ann Cummings, deceased, that on the 2nd day of January, 2014, John Cummings filed in the District Court of Woods County, Oklahoma, a Petition praying that Letters of Administration to be issued to John Cummings upon the estates of Richard Hezekiah Cummings, deceased and Ruby Ann Cummings, deceased, and for a judicial determination of the heirs of the decedents. Pursuant to an order of this Court made on the 2nd day of January, 2014, notice is hereby given that Tuesday, the 21st day of January, 2014, at 2:30 o’clock P.M. the Petition will be heard at the District Courtroom, Woods County

MURROW

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LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Sunday, January 5, 2014.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: SANDRIDGE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION, LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: SPACING, INCLUDING CONFIRMATION OF UNITS LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Section 23, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma Cause CD No. 201400018 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, including the following: Carl E. Gungoll Exploration, LLC; Guard Exploration Limited Partnership; and if any of the above-named parties is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN

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7KLVQHZVSDSHUZLOOQRWNQRZ LQJO\DFFHSWDQ\DGYHUWLVLQJIRU UHDOHVWDWHZKLFKLVLQYLRODWLRQ RIWKHODZ$OOSHUVRQVDUHKHUH E\LQIRUPHGWKDWDOOGZHOOLQJV DGYHUWLVHG DUH DYDLODEOH RQ DQ HTXDORSSRUWXQLW\EDVLV

Page 17

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EdwardJones

The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up 28.64 to close at 16,469.99. The NASDAQ Composite Index was dn 11.16 to close at 4131.91. The Transportation Average was up 39.50 to close at 7327.37 and Utilities CLOSED dn 1.48 at 481.40. Volume was approx. 499 million shares. Gold rose $12.48 to $1,236.88 and Silver CLOSED at $20.14, up 12¢. Crude oil prices fell $1.23 to $94.21 per barrel. Wheat Price was $6.19, up 11¢. Prime Rate is 3.25%

Stocks of Local Interest — Courtesy Pat Harkin

Name OGE Energy ONEOK Inc Duke Energy WilliamsCo Chesapeake Energy Wal-Mart ConocoPhillips SandRidge Energy

Close 33.35 61.31 67.92 38.03 26.42 78.63 69.96 5.94

Change -0.06 +0.13 -0.22 -0.25 -0.20 -0.28 +0.18 -0.05

30 Yr. U.S. Treasury Bond Insured AAA Tax Free Muni. Bond Yield to Maturity 5 Year C/D, Annual Pct Yield Money Market - 7 Day Avg Rate

Volume 700,131 614,393 2,204,610 4,229,362 7,748,229 4,791,654 2,473,413 8,980,932

3.75% 2.17-4.13% 1.90% 0.01%

Stock Market Report — for January 3, 2014


January 5, 2014

Alva Review-Courier

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January 5, 2014

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Alva Review-Courier

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Christmas

used for capital improvements. Taylor Hadwiger was named Miss Route 66 Outstanding Teen 2014. She will advance to the state contest to be held in Tulsa the first week of June. The Heartland Best robotics competition was held at Northwestern Oklahoma State University in Alva on Nov. 9. The program attracts team from all over the state. The controversial A-F school grades were released. Alva schools averaged a C- overall matching the average for all state schools. Individual schools in Alva received grades ranging from A- to D+. ACT I Theatre presented a comedy “Death by Chocolate” Nov. 14-16 in Alva. Alvans were shocked when the life of Seth Farris, 24, was cut short in a collision between his vehicle and a pickup west of Alva. Avard Regional Rail Park Authority discussed the possibility of enticing crude oil shipping at the park. Woods County Economic Development Committee Director Sonja Williams attended a conference in Texas to investigate options. Ryan Bickerstaff, formerly of Alva and now living in California, qualified for the World Iron Man Triathlon. Bickerstaff graduated from Alva High School and started competing in triathlons 23 years ago at the age of 9. His parents are Alva residents. The Smithsonian Exhibit “New Harmonies: Celebrating Ameri-

can Roots Music” opened at the Graceful Arts Gallery in downtown Alva. Open through Jan. 4, 2014, the exhibit was enhanced by lectures and tie-ins with various community events. The City of Alva bought two new police cars in November. Funds came from the general fund and the police department drug fund. The Woods County Commissioners prepared for an audit by the state auditor and inspector. The Mayor’s Christmas Party kicked off the holiday season in Alva after Thanksgiving with the official lighting of holiday decorations on the downtown square. December 2013 Incumbent Lynda Martin was the only person filing for the Alva Board of Education office No. 4. The only race that developed for the Feb. 11 school election in Woods County was in Waynoka where Clint Olson and Anna Milledge filed. The ACT I Theatre held a cowboy Christmas musical with young actors Dec. 13, 14 and 15. “For Unto Y’all” featured three casts for the performances. The Alva Public Library celebrated 50 years in their current location Dec. 9. Local educator Karen Koehn spoke to those attending the ceremony. Six Woods County fire departments received checks of $1,154.38 each from the local Bank It CommUNITY Vision program.

NEW HARMONIES — Celebrating American Music’s Roots, the Smithsonian Museum on Main Street exhibit, fills the Graceful Arts Gallery in Alva from now to Jan. 4, 2014. In the center a listening station allows visitors to hear many musical genres. Photo by Helen Barrett Northwestern Oklahoma State University held their fall commencement on Dec. 15. 1988 NWOSU graduate Michelle Williamson was the featured speaker. Woods County Economic Development Committee Director Sonja Williams reported on what she learned during an oil conference in Houston, Texas. She made some valuable contacts and promoted the Avard Regional Rail Park. The Alva Recreation Complex board discussed the possibility of air conditioning for the fieldhouse at the park. Manager Courtney Nessaeralla said air conditioning would greatly improve participation in the summer MAYB tournament. The Alva City Council agreed to partner with Freedom West and the Graceful Arts Gallery in an application to provide signs designating the downtown area as a cultural arts district. The council also voted to sell a business building at 407 College Ave. The building had been given to the city by the Share Trust. Lynn Heasley of Alva was honored as one of 22 Volunteers with Spirit by the Hospital Volunteers of Oklahoma. Alva sales tax collections in December were up nearly 30 percent from the same month a year Ryan Bickerstaff gets his race number on his body prior to beginning ago. The report reflects local tax the race in Panama City Beach, Fla. He qualified for the World Iron receipts from October business. Man Triathlon to be held in Hawaii in 2014.

RANGER TREE -- Dr. Cunningham calls this tree her Ranger Tree. The tree features red ladies’ pumps and purses with contrasting black tulle and red and black ornaments.The tree was on display for the annual Electric Gold Tour of Homes in December. Photo by Helen Barrett

The young cast members of ACT I’s upcoming play “For Unto Y’all” sing during rehearsals. Left to right are Joshua Scribner, Delaney Lambert, Conor Wienhoffer, Linda McDonald, Aubrey Towns, Ko Brooks and Emily Barton.


January 5, 2014

Alva Review-Courier

Page 20

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Alva, Oklahoma, news, weather, sports

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