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Alva Review-Courier Vol. 121 No. 93

Friday, November 22, 2013 - $1.00

Airport IFR approach progress Page 2

www.alvareviewcourier.com

Alva street work and future plans Page 3

620 Choctaw, Alva, OK 73717

Rangers place 3 on all-GAC squad Page 10

Autumn leaves on Oklahoma Blvd. Photo by Lynn L. Martin


November 22, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Declarations Airport board hears IFR for candidacy approach progress

By Lynn L. Martin A frustrating part of the runway upgrade at the Alva Regional Airport has been the difficulty in getting an instrument approach approved by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Month after month has passed without the engineering firm being able to upload data to the FAA. Greg Murrry, airport manager, told the board that all files have now been upload to the A. G. I. S. website and is now in their hands as of Sept. 23. Murray said on Monday, Sept. 30, he received an email from Kyle Sewell with Myers Engineering clarifying that the data was submitted “as built” rather than as “designed.” He said they are now waiting to hear from the FAA as to the approval of all data submitted. The engineering firm hopes the FAA can complete its review in December if their funding issues are resolved. Fuel sales at the airport are holding steady with September sales toBy Lynn L. Martin taling $15,868. October sales were The county commissioners approved trading in four tractors and four pegged at $15,536. mowers for the same number of replacements. D#3 is trading four JD tractors with $7,000 difference after trade per tractor. D#3 is trading four JD cutter mowers with $2,500 difference after trade per mower. Mike Goucher explained that it is almost impossible to hire anyone to repair and maintain this equipment at county pay rates; it is smarter to trade them in every year. By Lynn L. Martin Road crossing permits were approved as follows: The average daily census for 1 6-27-14 Access Midstream Gas Gas $500 Share Medical Center in October 1 31-28-13 Chesapeake Energy Electric $500 was up to 2.39 patients per day com1 9-27-14 Select Energy Services Water $250 pared to 1.77 last year in the same 1 10-28-15 Chesapeake Energy Electric $500 month. Swing bed census was 1.07 1 16-28-13 Chesapeake Energy Electric $500 compared to .00 last year same time. 1 28-28-16 Select Energy Services Water $250 Physical therapy visits were up to 1 26-28-16 Select Energy Services Water $1,250 1,059 over 931 a year earlier. How1 22-28-15 Alfalfa Electric Coop Electric $ ever emergency room visits were 1 15-28-15 Alfalfa Electric Coop Electric $ down a bit to 1,606 year to date com1 15-28-15 Alfalfa Electric Coop Electric $ pared to 1,776 year to date a year 1 15-28-14 Select Energy Services Water $500 earlier. 3 3-25-13 Midstates Petroleum Company Water $1,000 Clinic visits were as follows: 3 3-25-13 Midstates Petroleum Company Electric $500 after-hours clinic – 542 this year, The commissioners approved the schedule of meetings for next year. 289 last year; Colvert clinic visits – All meetings are scheduled for Monday unless otherwise designated 672 this year, 725 last year; Colvert and will convene at 10 a.m. in the commissioners’ office at the Woods emergency room – 408 compared to County Courthouse in Alva. There will be no Friday meeting dates or 347 last year; Kinzie clinic visits – Monday meeting if a meeting has been held on Wednesday or Thursday 1,225 compared to 968 last year. of previous week. The hospital’s operating loss was Meeting Dates $16,005 in October compared to a January 6, 13, 21 (Tuesday), 30 (Thursday) loss of $109,093 in September. The February 10, 18, (Tuesday), 27 (Thursday) nursing home loss was $34,907 comMarch 10, 17, 24, 31 pared to a loss of $62,529 in SeptemApril 7, 14, 21, 30 (Wednesday) ber. The Homestead had a profit of May 12, 19, 29 (Thursday) June 9, 16, 23, 30 July 7, 14, 21, 31 (Thursday) August 11, 18, 28 (Thursday) September 8, 15, 22, 30 (Tuesday) October 6, 13, 20, 30 (Thursday) Oklahoma is set to get its first November 10, 17, 26 (Wednesday) real taste of winter weather this December 8, 15, 22, 31 (Wednesday) week and early next week across The only other items covered included routine approval of the previour region. The forecast is callous meeting’s minutes and correction of a typo of 2013 to 2014 in the ing for freezing temperatures along OSU Extension Service agreement. with rain, freezing rain and snow. To make sure you and your family are prepared, the Red Cross offers these safety tips. • Avoid driving when conditions include sleet, freezing rain or drizzle, snow or dense fog. • Before tackling strenuous tasks in cold temperatures, consider your physical condition, the weather factors and the nature of the task. • Protect yourself from frostbite and hypothermia by wearing warm, loose-fitting, lightweight clothing in several layers. Stay indoors, if possible. • Check on your animals. If possible, bring them indoors. Frostbite and Hypothermia Frostbite and hypothermia are cold-related emergencies that may quickly become life or limb threatening. Preventing cold-related emergencies includes not starting an activity in, on or around cold water unless you know you can get help quickly in an emergency. Be aware Candidates for the board of education in four Woods County school districts may file declarations of candidacy beginning at 8 a.m. Monday, Dec. 2. Wylodean Linder, Secretary of the Woods County Election Board, said the filing period ends at 5 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 4. The board of education positions at stake will be filled at the annual school election scheduled for Feb. 11, 2014. If no candidate receives more than 50 percent of the total votes cast in this election, the two candidates receiving the highest number of votes will meet in an election on Tuesday, April 1, 2014. Offices for which declarations of candidacy will be accepted at the County Election Board office include the following: • Alva School District, office no. 4 • Freedom School District, office no. 4, unexpired term no. 3 • Waynoka School District, office no. 4 • Northwest Technology Center, zone no. 4

Woods County commissioners upgrading tractors and mowers

Each of the motorized vehicles at the airport had problems. The block heater went out on the Jet-A truck. Manager Murray said he has found a replacement, but the job is too big to be handled at the airport. He hopes it can be handled at the city maintenance shed. The Ford av-gas truck had problems with a corroded PTO switch. Murray also installed a rebuilt starter, distributor cap and rotor. The old av-gas truck will not start. They hope to sell it at the city auction planned in January 2014. The small tractor had a front wheel seal leaking. It was also due for its 1,200-hour service, so it was taken to Western Equipment for service. The airport pickup truck had a problem when the heater core started leaking and had to be replaced. Other maintenance had to do with a leaky seal on the toilet in the women’s restroom and an overflowing urinal in the men’s restroom. The old courtesy car is still at K & K, which is much longer than

expected. It is awaiting a new paint job. A key safe with an electronic combination lock has been installed so transient customers can have access to the restrooms and the courtesy car. Murray said he has received very positive feedback from several after-hours customers. Finally, Murray praised the work of employee Michael Degan and said he deserves a pay increase. He also mentioned that Keyton Byrd is no longer with the airport. The board approved a request by Lynn Martin to install a concrete apron from the front of his hangar to the taxiway about 20 feet away. They spent some time discussing a previously dropped topic of a car-port type structure to cover the courtesy cars and fuel trucks. Previous bids came in too expensive. They asked manager Murray to check on a different approach to the structures. The board also discussed the need for insulation for the maintenance hangar. Murray was asked to get some bids once again.

Alva Hospital Authority meets $6,919 in October versus a profit of $33,163 in September. Share Chief Executive Officer Kandice Allen praised the staff on up-front collections in October of $30,998.45. She said, “Our estimator software is working well and we continue to add more insurance companies and procedures.” Allen reported that OU physical therapy student Jordan Gaskill has started her clinical rotation in the physical therapy department. Sarah Armbruster was accepted to the Texas Tech physical therapy program. New employees hired for October include Heather Blumer, Homestead; Michael Calhoun, Homestead; Betty Jones, Share Medical Center (SMC), HIM coder; Vickie Harmon, SMC, HIM clerk. Departing employees include Starlette Hall, cook; KayLynn Kovat, housekeeping; Miranda Rebarchik, housekeeping; and Mary Sasnett, Home Health and Hospice. The employee turnover

rate was 12.04 percent for October. The board spent some time discussing general liability insurance quotes. Assurance Agency quoted Lexington Insurance for $128,000 plus an umbrella of $46,000 for a total of $174,000. Medical Protective came in with a total quote of $64,593 and Plico came in at $64,652. Allen recommended Plico since they have continuing experience and the price was so close, The medical staff credentialing committee recommended the following appointments: to active staff, Dr. Phillip Self, M.D.; and to courtesy staff Dr. Matthew Hudkins, MD, Teleradiology; Dr. Troy Smith, OD, Optometry; and Dr. Kenneth Tan, MD, Teleradiology. At the end of the meeting, under the AHA Chairman’s Reports agenda item, Jason Gaisford thanked the board members, the staff and community for their efforts in the successful sales tax election.

Red Cross offers cold weather safety tips of the wind chill. Dress appropriately and avoid staying in the cold too long. Wear a hat and gloves when appropriate with layers of clothing. Drink plenty of warm fluids or warm water but avoid caffeine and alcohol. Stay active to maintain body heat. Take frequent breaks from the cold. Avoid unnecessary exposure of any part of the body to the cold. Get out of the cold immediately if the signals of hypothermia or frostbite appear. Frostbite is the freezing of a specific body part such as fingers, toes, the nose or earlobes. Signals of frostbite include lack of feeling in the affected area; skin that appears waxy, is cold to the touch or is discolored (flushed, white or gray, yellow or blue). Hypothermia is another coldrelated emergencies. Hypothermia may quickly become life threatening. Hypothermia is caused by the cooling of the body caused by the failure of the body’s warming system. The goals of first aid are to restore normal body temperature and to care for any conditions while waiting for EMS personnel. Signals of hypothermia include shivering, numbness, glassy stare, apathy,

weakness, impaired judgment, loss of consciousness. Prevent House Fires The Red Cross wants the number of house fires not to rise as the temperatures drop, so it offers the following fire prevention tips: • All heaters need space. Keep all things that can burn (paper, matches, bedding, furniture, clothing, carpets and rugs) at least three feet away from heating equipment. • Never leave a fire in the fireplace unattended, and use a glass or metal fire screen to keep fire and embers in the fireplace. • Never use a cooking range or oven to heat your home. • Turn off portable space heaters every time you leave the room or go to sleep. • Have wood and coal stoves, fireplaces and chimneys inspected annually by a professional, and cleaned if necessary. • If you must use a space heater, place it on a level, hard and nonflammable surface (such as ceramic tile floor), not on rugs, or carpets or near bedding or drapes. Plug power cords directly into outlets and never into an extension cord.


November 22, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Obituary OLIVE MAE (RYAN) WELLS Olive Mae (Ryan) Wells, 92, passed away in Medicine Lodge, Kan., on Nov. 18 surrounded by her loving family members. Olive was born in Midian, Kan., on October 23, 1921, to John and Adeline (Clark) Ryan. Joe and Olive were married Feb. 7, 1942, at the Christian Church in Medicine Lodge.

She is survived by one sister, one brother, three daughters, 12 grandchildren, 36 great-grandchildren and 11 great-great-grandchildren. The family will be holding a Celebration of Life for Olive to be announced at a later date. Condolences may be sent to June Crosby at 104 First Street, Medicine Lodge, Kan.

Street work and plans for future By Marione Martin For the past few years, the poor condition of city streets was at the top of everyone’s list on how to improve Alva. Since July of this year, the city has made steady progress in fixing that problem. Alva Business Manager Joe Don Dunham told the Alva City Council Monday that 34 blocks of streets have been patched or repaired. Dunham gave the following list of work done on streets since July: • Chip and seal completed on Flynn from 10th west to the city cemetery and also on Flynn from Third to Noble. • Repairs on roads in the Industrial Park. • Chip and seal on Hunt Street from Flynn to Barnes, on Hunt Street from Church to Locust, on Seiling Street from Church to Locust, on a half block on Park Street from Flynn to Barnes, on Park Street from Center to Locust, on Meno from Oklahoma Boulevard to Flynn, and the block on Church Street between Seiling and Hunt. • Repairs on the 800 block of Hunt Street. • Repair work at the corner of Barnes and Seiling. Equipment Purchases Aging equipment hampered the early efforts to fix city streets. Several lease-purchases were included in this fiscal year’s budget, but other equipment unexpectedly broke down. The city applied for a grant from the Charles Morton Share Trust to buy several pieces of equipment. Although the full request was not granted, the Share Trust awarded the city a $100,000 grant. From that the city purchased a new Crafco crack sealer and a used steel wheel roller. In addition, the city earlier

purchased an asphalt zipper to help with repairs of streets and alleys. The staff is currently working to wrap up the financing package of $885,000 for equipment. Slated for purchase in that package are an oil distributor, a chip spreader and a front end loader. Winter Plans During the winter months, the street department will be working to prepare streets for repair next spring. They will be accumulating rock, cold mix asphalt and other materials. They will also be doing miscellaneous repairs on the alleys in the city and minor street repairs and patches using the new crack sealer. REAP Grant Application Monday night the Alva City Council also approved Resolution No. 2013-069 authorizing an application for a REAP grant of $50,000. During the previous fiscal year, the city applied for REAP funds but that application was denied. The city will apply for the same street projects as before. The application is for curb and guttering along Locust, Church and Center streets for two blocks each as well as repairing the corner of Third and Flynn. The addition of the curb and guttering will allow the city to add a chip seal coat, which will bring this from dirt streets to a surface much like other city streets. The application asks for $20,622 for materials to replace the Third and Flynn corner and $29,378 for materials for the curb and guttering. The city will pay an additional $50,400 for the chip seal materials The estimated labor cost for both projects is $41,131. The total cost of the project is estimated

African American Bible quilt answers By Marione Martin An intriguing exhibit is now on display at the Graceful Arts Gallery, 523 Barnes, in Alva. From now through Jan. 4, the gallery is featuring a traveling Smithsonian exhibit called “New Harmonies: Celebrating American Roots Music.” While the main focus of the exhibit is our history in music, you’ll find other related displays and information. One is an African American Bible quilt made by Harriet Powers around 1886. The quilt is featured on the front cover of today’s newspaper. The creator of the quilt was a former slave who needed money.

She offered to sell the quilt for $10 and a lady agreed. When Powers went to deliver the quilt, the woman only had $5. Powers asked her husband what she should do, and he said, “Take the $5.” Here’s a list of the Bible scenes shown on the quilt, starting from the top left corner and going left to right: Top row: Adam and Eve in the garden, Eve with her son, Satan among stars. Middle row: Cain and Able, Cain goes to the land of Nod to find a wife, Jacob’s dream, baptism of Christ. Bottom row: Crucifixion, Judas

and the thirty pieces of silver, the Last Supper, and the Holy Family. The Graceful Arts Gallery is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. and on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It’s located on the south side of Alva’s downtown square. Call 580-3272787 or check the web at www. gracefulartscenter.org for more information. Several programs have been scheduled in conjunction with the exhibit. The Smithsonian exhibit is made possible by the Smithsonian Institution and the Oklahoma Humanities Council as well as funding from local donors.

Woods County 4-H Share the Fun results The Woods County 4-H Share the Fun Contest was held on Sunday, Nov. 17, at the Alva High School auditorium. Judges for the contest were Extension Educators Liz McBee and Carol Laverty. All acts received blue ribbons. The results were as follows: • Champion Jr. Division Individual Act: Austin Rankin, Waynoka 4-H, tuba solo, “Gonna Fly Now;” Reserve Champion: Riley Lee, Alva 4-H, flute solo, “Over the Rainbow.” Other individual acts receiving blue ribbons were Laney Stewart, Alva 4-H, vocal solo, “Lifetime;” TamLynn Link, vocal solo, “Blown Away.” • Champion Junior Small Group Act: Sagelyn Budy and Maddie Holt, Waynoka 4-H, vocal duet, “I Can Do Anything;” Reserve Champion: Laney Stewart and Joe Parsons, Alva 4-H, “Ice, Ice Baby.” • Senior Division Individual Champion: Cathy Mapes, Alva 4-H, piano solo, “Carol of the Bells;” Reserve Champion: Emma Reed, Freedom 4-H, monologue, “The Fear of Imperfection.”

The champion in the Senior Large Group Act categoryat the recent Woods County Share the Fun contest was the Alva 4-H Club with “Monster Mash.” Actors were Hannah Kornele, Max Parsons, Maya Stewart, Karlee Dietz, Shadi Nettles, Riley Lee, Julie Owen and Tara Owen

See 4-H Page 5

See Streets Page 9

Woods County Forecast Friday A chance of freezing rain and sleet. Cloudy, with a high near 29. North wind 13 to 22 mph, with gusts as high as 31 mph. Chance of precipitation is 50%. New sleet accumulation of less than a half inch possible. Friday Night Cloudy, with a low around 23. North wind 5 to 11 mph. Saturday Partly sunny, with a high near 37. North northeast wind 8 to 13 mph. Saturday Night A slight chance of snow and sleet after midnight. Partly cloudy, with a low around 24. East northeast wind 8 to 13 mph. Chance of precipitation is 20%. Sunday A chance of snow and sleet before noon, then a chance of snow. Mostly cloudy,

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with a high near 30. Chance of precipitation is 40%. Sunday Night A slight chance of snow and sleet. Cloudy, with a low around 25. Chance of precipitation is 20%. Monday A slight chance of rain and snow. Partly sunny, with a high near 38. Chance of precipitation is 20%. Monday Night Partly cloudy, with a low around 29. Tuesday Sunny, with a high near 43. Tuesday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 25. Wednesday Sunny, with a high near 47. Wednesday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 27. Thanksgiving Day Sunny, with a high near 47.

The reserve champion in the Senior Large Group Act category at the recent Woods County Share the Fun contest was the Freedom 4-H Champions in the Junior Small Club with “Human Lights.” The actors were Nicole Hughes, Iridian Group Act category at the recent Herrera, Casey Luddington, Luke Bolar, Lance Bolar, Myles Nixon Woods County Share the Fun and Austin Reed contest were Maddie Holt and Sagelyn Budy

Pictured are the winners of the Individual Acts, Senior Division category at the Woods County Share the Fun contest: Champion Cathy Mspes and Reserve Junior individual acts shown are (l-r) Tamlynn Link, Laney Stewart, Champion Emma Reed Austin Rankin (Champion) and Riley Lee (Reserve Champion)


November 22, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Thanks, Oklahoma! Office of Lt. Governor Todd Lamb I am thankful. I am very thankful. I am thankful for my wife of 18 years. She is a wonderful mother to our two children. She is a great helpmate to me. She has a very busy schedule, but when her other family obligations permit, she has served alongside me and in my stead at multiple state events. I am thankful for my family. I am thankful for Oklahoma. I’m thankful our state has a rich history and heritage. Our state personifies hard work, fulfilling big dreams and working together. I’m thankful for the small businesses that account for over 97 percent of all our employers. They are the backbone

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The Alva Review-Courier is combined with the Woods County News, The Alva Advocate and Newsgram, and is published every Sunday and Friday by Martin Broadcasting Corp., 620 Choctaw St., Alva, OK 73717-1626. Periodical postage paid at Alva, Oklahoma. Annual subscription rates in Woods County, Oklahoma $72. Elsewhere in Oklahoma $90, elsewhere in the United States $108. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Alva Review-Courier, 620 Choctaw St., Alva, OK 73717-1626. Contents Copyright 2013 Member of the Associated Press, Oklahoma Press Association, National Newspaper Association

of our economy and employ so much of our workforce. In the last few years they have experienced such quantifiable growth they have been ranked at the top or near the top in several economic indicators. I am thankful for their growth. I am thankful for the people of Oklahoma. Our people are second to none. Our work ethic was referenced above. As a people we also are generous. When multiple tornadoes wreaked havoc across our state last spring, the people of Oklahoma did not wait for official requests to help. As soon as the clouds broke, neighbors rushed out to help neighbors as well as perfect strangers. “Love thy neighbor” is lived out regularly in Oklahoma. I am thankful our state’s future looks bright. Significant companies have expanded or opened new operations in Oklahoma, like Boeing and Google. Even more growth has been happening organically. Many of our homegrown companies have reinvested in their business and have hired more Oklahomans. I am thankful that so many of my lieutenant governor colleagues came to Oklahoma for our national conference last summer. I’m also thankful for the many compliments they spoke of our state. Just as a winning football coach breaks down game film and sees areas his team must improve to be even better, similarly I often do the same. We still have more work to do, but I am thankful for the successes Oklahoma has achieved in the last couple of years. I wrote of my family in the opening paragraph. I close by writing that I am very thankful Monica and I were born in Oklahoma, as were our children. I am thankful we are raising our family right here in the great state of Oklahoma. Happy Thanksgiving, Oklahoma! As always, my office is open and ready to assist you in any way we can. I am excited to hear your ideas. Feel free to visit our website at www.ok.gov/ltgovernor, find us on Facebook and Twitter (@LtGovToddLamb) or call our office at 405-521-2161.

In My Corner By Arden Chaffee “The election’s not over until the cemetery is counted” may have some credibility, but today there is proof that identity thieves are targeting the deceased. According to AARP, nearly 2,200 per day are targeted while others may result from a fraudulent Social Security number that happens to match someone who has died. Like the ambulancechasing attorney, identity thieves glean their information from hospitals, funeral homes, and obituaries. Unlike conventional identity theft, which is sometimes discovered immediately, this form, called “ghosting”, can last for months as information is finally shared by financial institutions, credit reporting agencies, and the government. Grieving relatives

seldom monitor the decedent’s records and, as a result, criminals can file for tax refunds which amounted to $5.2 billion in 2011. They may also apply for credit cards, loans, and cell phone service. AARP offers some insight in preventing such activity. In the obituary, list the age but leave out the date of birth and mother’s maiden name. Leave out addresses to prevent burglary. It’s vital to alert the decedent’s banks to prevent activity and you or they should report the death to the major credit-reporting agencies. Be sure to cancel driver’s license and, if a recipient, alert Social Security to stop payments and issue the death benefit. While survivors are not responsible for charges, identity theft, like other seemingly “victimless” crimes like shoplifting, inevitably cost all of us. Follow up by checking credit reports for activity. This crime is a new low, 6 feet under, for criminals.

Random Thoughts

A golfing story – Part 2

By Roger Hardaway On any given weekend when the weather is nice, countless people around the world will be following a small ball all over the countryside, hitting it occasionally with a stick designed for that purpose. What these folks are doing is playing golf. A few people play it professionally but most of those who love the sport are only trying to enjoy a little outdoor recreation. Moreover, golf is a sport that people can play long after they have passed their athletic prime – assuming they ever had an athletic prime in the first place! The professional brand of golf is usually played on 18-hole courses that have a par of 72 strokes. That equals four strokes per hole, and the majority of the holes on any particular professional golf course are par-4s. Augusta National Golf Club in Georgia, where the most famous U.S. golf tournament (the Masters) is played, is typical in the sense that it is a par-72 course.

Ten of Augusta National’s holes are par-4s. It also has four holes that are par-5s and four that are par-3s. Again, this is fairly typical. As I noted last week, one of the rarest but most sought-after achievements in golf – for professionals and amateurs alike – is to record a “hole-in-one.” Since most “holes-in-one” are scored on the shorter par-3 holes, the opportunity to get a “hole-in-one” is quite limited. But back on Aug. 9, a man named Ed Manderville from Minneapolis, Minn., defied all of the odds when he scored “holes-in-one” on back-to-back holes. This could not have been done on a regular professional course because the few par-3 holes are never situated consecutively. Manderville was playing on a course where all of the holes were par-3s. While this increased his chances for a “hole-in-one,” the odds of scoring one – much less two in a row – are still astronomical. One other thing about Manderville is that he has been playing golf for a long time. You see, when he pulled off this unheard-of feat, he was 81 years old!


November 22, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Click and Clack Talk Cars

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Annie’s Mailbox®

Spark plugs have Animal and roommate abuse individualized fit By Tom and Ray Magliozzi Dear Tom and Ray: I was shopping for spark plugs for my 2002 Dodge truck from a company that has a site on the Internet. They had spark plugs for carbureted engines and fuelinjected engines. I bought plugs for injected engines. Is there a difference? – Tony TOM: Every engine has its own unique requirements for spark plugs, Tony. It’s not really based on whether the engine is carbureted or fuel-injected; it’s based on the way the engine was designed. RAY: For one thing, engines have different physical characteristics. For instance, some engines have thicker cylinder heads and require longer plugs with more threads to get the tip of the plug into the combustion chamber. TOM: The amount of room on top of the cylinder head is another consideration. Older engines had only two valves per cylinder, so there was plenty of room for a nice, fat spark plug to stick its nose into the cylinder. But the majority of engines today are multivalve. You could have four or five valves cut into the top of each cylinder now, leaving much less room to fit a plug there. So most newer engines call for smaller, thinner plugs. RAY: The other reason plugs are specific to engines is because the vehicle’s engineers designed the plug as part of a system needed to create a very specific pattern of combustion. They may want a spark

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plug with a hotter spark, or one that sits farther down in the combustion chamber to produce the precise shape, size and duration of flame they’re looking for in there. Those details affect an engine’s power, gas mileage and emissions. TOM: For those reasons, there are hundreds of different spark plugs on the market. The only way to know which one you need is either by removing an old one and reading the number, or by looking up a car’s year, make, model and engine size in a parts locator, and getting the plug number that way. RAY: Perhaps what you were seeing was a general “spark plugs for Dodge trucks” page on a website. Over time, there certainly have been both carbureted and fuel-injected engines used in those trucks. TOM: But not in 2002. By then, every car and truck sold in the United States was fuel-injected. That means there’s only one correct spark-plug type for your truck, Tony. I hope you got that one. *** Tom and Ray share secrets on how you can save tens of thousands of dollars on your cars over the next 20 years in their pamphlet “Should I Buy, Lease, or Steal My Next Car?” Send $4.75 (check or money order) to Next Car, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. *** Get more Click and Clack in their new book, “Ask Click and Clack: Answers from Car Talk.” Got a question about cars? Write to Click and Clack in care of this newspaper, or email them by visiting the Car Talk website at www. cartalk.com.

4-H

• Senior Division Champion Small Group Act: Freedom 4-H Club, “The Bean Skit.” Members were McKenna Nixon, Emma Reed, Mariah Luddington and Ciara Vance. • Senior Division Large Group Act Champion: Alva 4-H Club, “Monster Mash.” The act included members Hannah Kornele, Max Parsons, Maya Stewart, Karlee Dietz, Shadi Nettles, Riley Lee, Julie Owen and Tara Owen. Reserve Champion Large Group Act: Freedom 4-H Club “Human Lights”. Members participating included Nicole Hughes, Iridian Herrera, Casey Luddington, Luke

Bolar, Lance Bolar, Myles Nixon, and Austin Reed. The District 4-H Share the Fun Contest will be held on Saturday, Jan. 25, 2014, in the Fairview School auditorium in Fairview. Those selected to represent Woods County on the district level were: • Large Group Act: “Monster Mash,” Alva 4-H Club. • Small Group Act: “I Can Do Anything,” Sagelyn Budy and Maddie Holt. • Individual Act: “Carol of the Bells,” Cathy Mapes. The awards were sponsored by the Woods County 4-H Parents and Leaders Council.

The champion of the Small Group Act, Senior Division category of the Woods County Share the Fun contest, was the Freedom 4-H Club with “The Bean Skit.” Actors were McKenna Nixon, Emma Reed, Mariah Luddington and Ciara Vance

Dear Annie: I recently moved into an apartment with a longtime friend. We both have dogs, but I was misled about hers. He is 15 months old and not trained. My roommate has no time for the dog. She takes college classes and works two part-time jobs. The dog usually sits in a crate all day. She rarely takes him out and doesn’t feed him regularly. When she does take him out, she is too tired to exercise him, which means he goes nuts in the apartment, peeing everywhere and chewing up the furniture – which is mine. He tried to bite me last week. He also barks incessantly, and her solution is to put a muzzle on him. My roommate takes no responsibility and blames me, saying I am making the dog uncomfortable. I feel so bad for this animal. I’ve asked her repeatedly to spend more time with the dog and train him, but she hasn’t. I cannot live in my own apartment. Now we have a ruined friendship and eight months left on a lease. Help! – Dogged Out Dear Dogged: It is unfair to you that this animal is not trained, but we would consider it abuse to keep the dog in a crate all day, not exercising, feeding or disciplining him appropriately. Present your roommate with a bill for the ruined furniture, and then report her to the humane society. She is not capable of caring for this animal. The friendship may be over, but you can still protect the dog.

Dear Annie: I have lupus, but because I usually look OK, people assume I’m doing fine. I am part of a small group of Christian ladies that meets monthly. Often, I’m unable to attend because I’m not well. I notify our group’s coordinator and tell her specifically what is wrong that day – headache, fatigue, achiness, etc. – so that the ladies can pray for me. No one has ever called to check on me afterward. Our group has provided meals for families when one woman had emergency surgery and two others had bouts with cancer. Yet, no one has ever offered to bring my family a meal. My husband’s job limits the time he can assist me. Many days, we order takeout because I don’t have the energy to cook. The women know this, but I’m an outgoing, positive person, so they don’t see the pain I endure daily. I’m thinking of leaving the group because it causes me stress, but they are otherwise wonderful women. I think they simply don’t understand. Am I wrong to feel this way? – Sick and Confused Dear Sick: There is no right or wrong to how you feel. Lupus is an autoimmune disease that damages joints, skin, kidneys, blood, heart and lungs. The women may not understand the severity of your illness. But the other part of the problem is that the disease is ongoing. Emergency surgeries and bouts with cancer are finite. It’s easier to bring meals when

you know it won’t be forever. You could voice your hurts to these women, or you could look for support elsewhere. Also visit the Lupus Foundation of America at lupus.org. Dear Annie: This is in response to “Little Doctor,” the ob-gyn who is too “busy and forgetful” to remember patients’ names and uses an all-purpose term of endearment, claiming it makes the patient “feel relaxed and comfortable.” I am also a busy doctor, but I address each patient by name and also review their medications, lab test results and notes from the last visit. I can’t imagine anyone could feel comfortable and relaxed knowing the doctor was so busy and forgetful that he calls you by a generic endearment. It is disrespectful and a red flag. How can such a busy, forgetful doctor be alert and responsive to issues that pertain to a patient’s health? – Conscientious Doctor Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@ comcast.net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annie’s Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.

Rep. Shelton: third grade reading sufficiency mandates A train wreck waiting to happen OKLAHOMA CITY – Oklahoma children will be the real losers when the third grade reading sufficiency mandates go into effect in the coming year, said Rep. Mike Shelton, D-Oklahoma City. Shelton said parents should engage with their school administrators and state legislators about the third grade reading sufficiency mandate, because many are unaware of its existence. As a result, the state faces a train wreck due to lack of preparation and adequate funding for the mandate. “The third grade reading sufficiency mandate is well-intentioned,” said Shelton. “We should, by all means, have our children reading at grade level by the third grade. We know students benefit in the long-term if they have key literacy skills by third grade. However, this is another education mandate falling to our teachers and our students that we have not had the time or the resources for proper preparation. “20 percent of Oklahoma students have dyslexia, a neurological condition that impacts a child’s ability to learn to read,” said Shelton, “yet the state of Oklahoma does not recognize dyslexia as a reading condition that requires specific instruction from a welltrained teacher. Dyslexia falls under the federally defined education category of Learning Disability. There is no recourse in this mandate, as it is currently written, for children with dyslexia. You have many school districts, like Oklahoma City, that have almost NO teachers trained to know how to teach reading to students with

dyslexia. Students with dyslexia, who are typically without a special education Individualized Education Plan (or IEP), will be held back because the Reading Sufficiency mandate does not take their learning difference into consideration even with an IEP. We have not funded or implemented training for teachers to help those students. Yet we expect teachers to pass or retain students who have not had access to instruction adequate to their reading needs. Teachers cannot teach what they do not know; generally, teachers do not have the knowledge base of how to identify or teach children with dyslexia how to read. 80 percent of children in special edu-

cation have a language learning issue; 20 percent of all children have dyslexia. That is a failure of the mandate. “In short, this is one more instance where we, as legislators, have failed to put our money where our mouths are,” said Shelton. “Teachers, who are already underpaid and overworked, will be struggling to meet all the requirements of the Reading Sufficiency mandate. Teachers, students and parents will suffer next year when eight year-olds are held back because of another unfunded mandate. We need to take the time and invest the resources in every one of our schools so that teachers can do the job we ask them to do and students can succeed in the long term.”


November 22, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Junior High plays in Cherokee Basketball Tournament By Heather Armbruster Round 1 The Burlington Junior High Elks and Lady Elks participated in the Junior High Basketball Tournament in Cherokee from Monday, Nov. 11 to Saturday, Nov. 16. For the first round of the tournament, both the Elks and Lady Elks played the South

Barber Tornadoes and Lady Tornadoes. The Lady Elks came prepared and played aggressively; however, the game ended as a Burlington loss. The Elks came out strong in the first half, playing good defense; yet, the second half was slightly more challenging. The Elks were unfortunately defeated by the Tornadoes. Round 2 For the second round of the JH Cherokee Basketball Tournament, the Burlington Lady Elks were matched up to play the Waynoka Lady Railroaders. The Lady Elks played with confidence and passion. The Lady Elks’ offensive strength was too much for the Lady Railroaders; the Lady Elks outscored the Lady Railroaders 30-11 at the final buzzer. After their loss on Monday, the Elks faced the Cherokee Chiefs. The Chiefs’ defensive game was powerful and challenged the Elks; however, the Elks never gave up. The second half of the game was a close battle that ended as a Chief victory 18-22. Round 3 After a big win on Wednesday, the Lady Elks moved on to the third and final round of the tournament. The Lady Elks were set to play on Saturday, November 16, against the Attica Lady Bulldogs. The Lady Elks were unstoppable with a final score of 32-11, another Burlington Lady Elk Caitlin Flackman victory. The Lady Elks were then The third grade poses with their drinks they received from the C-store for achieving their AR points. drives through the middle for a awarded with a consolation chamlayup. pion’s plaque. Photo by Tabitha James

Advisor: Mrs. Robyn Turney

The busy third grade class By Jenell Newman The students enjoyed a trip to the Fairview Threshing Bee in October where they were able to experience different activities they had been reading about in their Oklahoma history book. They all enjoyed

Red Ribbon Week and the activities they participated in each day. The class won the food drive and were treated to pizza and drinks. The students are working hard on multiplication and cursive in class right now.

The third graders are enjoying science and all the experiments they get to do (and they do not even know they are really learning). They are now looking forward to other activities, the Christmas Program and the end of the semester.

BHS basketball season begins By Tabitha James The Burlington Elks and Lady Elks started off the season playing against the Drummond Bulldogs on Tuesday, Nov. 5, and then took on the Cimarron Trailblazers on Friday, Nov. 8. Many Burlington fans came to support the Elks and Lady Elks. Lady Elks On Tuesday, November 5, the

Burlington Lady Elks traveled to Drummond to take on the Drummond Lady Bulldogs. After an intense game of aggressive Lady Elk defense and offense with countless quick shots, the Burlington Lady Elks got their first victory with a final score of 69-21. Some of the stats from the game are as follows: Heather Armbruster: points: 13,

fouls: 2; Sadie Vore: points: 12, fouls: 1; Tabitha James: fouls: 1; Sarah Garvie: points: 27, fouls: 1; Alysson Stewart: points: 4, fouls: 3; Abbie Newman: fouls: 1; Julia Ferrell: fouls: 1; Kelsi Smith: Seventh grader Gavin McCullough brings the ball down the court to points:13, fouls: 3. For the Lady set up an offense for the Elks. Elks’ second game of the season, they challenged the Cimmaron Burlington’s Sarah Lady Trailblazers on Friday, NoGarvie sports her vember 8. The Burlington Lady medal and AllElks came prepared and won a secState jacket after ond victory with a final score of finishing 6th place 65-36. in the Class 2A Elks State Cross CounThe Burlington Elks took on try Meet in Shawthe Drummond Bulldogs. The nee, Oklahoma. Bulldogs’ offensive game was very powerful and quick. After a long battle between the Elks and the Bulldogs, the Elks unfortunately fell short, with a final score of 38-64. Then on Friday, November 8, the Elks traveled to Cimmaron to play against the Cimarron Trailblazers. Some of the Elks’ stats include the following: Carter Stewart: points: 5, fouls: 4; Reno Talbott: points: 11, fouls: 1; Kyle Ellerbeck: points: 16, fouls: 3; Daniel Ross: points: 3, fouls: 2; Blake Baker: points: 3; Jonathan Armbruster: points: 10, fouls: 2; Tanner Rieger: points: 5, fouls: 3. The final score of the game was 51-84, a Trailblazer victory.


November 22, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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The Black Mamba ‘picks up’ sixth place

By Richard Fischer Saturday, Nov. 9, Burlington’s Robotics team attended the Heartland BEST Contest held annually at the NWOSU campus. Armed with their robot, the Black Mamba, they were able to make it to the semi-finals and walked away with sixth place! The team was mentored by Burlington teacher Mrs. Jennifer Newlin and Mr. Fred Buck. Mr. Buck is a Cherokee native and retired from the Air Force in 1977, where he was a fighter pilot. After retiring from the Air Force, he became a technical writer for Boeing, writing maintenance manuals, including one for Air Force One.

The Burlington FFA Food Science and Technology team competes in the National FFA Food Science Contest in Louisville, Kentucky. These gold medalists placed 6th overall! Left to right are: Travis Bradshaw, Carter Stewart, Jenna Maltbie, Heather Armbruster and Richard Fischer.

Burlington wins gold at Nationals By Heather Armbruster The Burlington FFA chapter recently sent 15 members to the National FFA Convention in Louisville, Kentucky, from Oct. 28-Nov. 2. The members attending were: Seniors – Richard Fischer, Heather Armbruster, Carter Stewart, and Jenna Maltbie; Sophomores – Sarah Garvie, Alysson Stewart, Sadie Collins, and Abbie Newman; Freshmen – Jonathan Armbruster, Bayli Hyde, Kelsi Smith, Tanner Rieger, and Marshall Burnet; and

8th grade – Stephanie Croft, and Jaden Allen. The freshmen who attended competed in the National FFA Greenhand Quiz and received 4th place team overall; Jonathan Armbruster also placed 10th high individual in the Greenhand Quiz. The sophomore members competed in the National FFA Agronomy Career Development Event. After many tests and plant identification, the team placed silver.

The Burlington Robotics Team exhibits their robot, the Black Mamba. From left to right are Caleb McCullough, Marshall Burnet, Richard Fischer, Daniel Ross, Kyle Ellerbeck, Tanner Rieger, Carter The seniors competed in Stewart, and Reno Talbott. the National FFA Food Science and Technology CDE, a contest consisting of a test over the science of food safety practices, sensory evaluation, and product development. The seniors on the Food Science and Technology team placed 6th overall, winning gold! Congratulations to all the By Keyra Clark Banner” and “America, of Thee I chapter members who competed Burlington School held their Sing”. The K-3rd also sang “You’re or participated at the National FFA annual Veteran’s Day assembly on a Grand Old Flag.” Convention. Burlington was very November 11 at 11:00 a.m. with Speaker Kristen Guffy spoke a well represented! guest speaker Chief Warrant Officer few words about honoring fellow 3 Kristen Guffy, a 1989 graduate of veterans and her service for our Burlington High School. country. The ceremony closed with The high school vocal class a tribute of “Taps” to all the fallen opened the ceremony with an soldiers who have lost their lives arrangement of the “Star Spangled making the ultimate sacrifice.

Veteran’s Day assembly held

After speaking to the Burlington student body, Chief Warrant Officer 3 Kristen Guffy stands with other veterans from the Burlington area. Photo by Keyra Clark

The Burlington 4th grade experiments with magnets, which they learned about in science. Photo by Keyra Clark

Fantastic fourth grade By Danielle Jewell This is the year when students learn a lot personally about time management, responsibility, and extracurricular activities. While trying to continue absorbing familiar concepts like magnets and electricity, 4th graders are gaining new knowledge while learning three-digit multiplication and the Northeast states and capitals. This is all added in to their ongoing reading goals, grammar practices, and writing lessons. Of course, the students are now juggling their academics with

band, basketball, and 4-H, just to name a few of the extra activities in which they participate. Luckily for them, they are a highly moti-

vated and competitive group that steps up to any challenge they face! What an exciting year we have ahead of us!


November 22, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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One man’s junk is Handguns taken another’s grandkid fund from pickup By Marione Martin While the growing collection of scrap appliances and other discarded items behind Sights & Sounds, the Alva Radio Shack store, might seem like a pile of junk, one man recognized the value. On Monday, Nov. 18, store owner Gary Brown discovered the items missing and contacted the Alva Police Department. Brown told Officer Brian File that he had a surveillance camera

pointed at the alley that captured the suspect making four trips to pick up the scrap metal on Saturday, Nov. 16, between 4:56 p.m. and 5:52 p.m. The man was driving a white Dodge half ton, single cab vehicle with a missing rear bumper and a chrome toolbox in the bed. While the collection might have appeared to be junk, Brown told the newspaper they accumulate the items and later sell them at

the salvage yard. He said the money goes into the “grandkid fund.” Officer File and Brown went to Band of Brothers salvage to see if they could identify any of the stolen items. When they arrived, the suspect was already there. He confessed to taking the scrap metal thinking it wasn’t wanted. He gave Brown the money he had received and said he would return any leftover scrap to Brown where he had found it.

By Marione Martin Alva Police K9 Officer Patrick Hawley went to the home of Roger Hada in the 800 block of Second Street Tuesday, Nov. 12, about 6 p.m. regarding a theft from a vehicle. Stolen were two handguns and related items. Hada said he had a camo bag containing the items in the unlocked back tool box of his 1999 Ford pickup. Reported stolen were two revolvers: a 22LR Germany Model LR Revolver and a Smith and Wesson Model 38 15-2, along with a range finder, a leather holster made by Wheat’s Western Store, and ammunition, 33 special and 22 LR. Hada provided serial numbers for the handguns, and they were entered into the NCIC. The theft is still under investigation.

Eighth annual Ranger Research Area youth excel Day scheduled for Nov. 22 in 4-H shooting Northwestern Oklahoma State University’s Office of Graduate Studies is playing host to the eighth annual Ranger Research Day Nov. 22 from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the Ranger Room.

Students will present a poster or academic research paper depicting the research they have been working on in class. These will be read and reviewed in the afternoon. Ranger Research Day is open to

participation by all Northwestern students and faculty. Everyone is invited to the viewing. This day is a preliminary to Oklahoma Research Day, which is a statewide and regional research event set to be held at the University of Central Oklahoma on March 7, 2014. “This is an excellent chance for our students to share the research they are doing in their classes,” Dr. Shawn Holliday, associate dean of graduate studies, said. “At 59 participants, this is the highest number we have ever had.” Anyone seeking more information can check out the website at www.nwosu.edu/rangerresearch-day, or by contact Holliday at 580-327-8589 or spholliday@ nwosu.edu.

sports contests Woods County 4-H member Garrett Tyree, of the Alva 4-H Club, placed first in the compound bow, junior age division of the Northwest District Archery Contest. This week’s event was the Dewey County 4-H Shooting Sports contest held on Saturday, Nov. 16. Improving to third place, also in the junior division, was Ethan Nusser of Alva. There were 18 participants in the junior division. In the Intermediate age division of compound bow, Stanton Earnest placed sec-

ond out of 15 entries. Competing in her first 4-H archery event of the season was Kaitlyn Rich of the Waynoka 4-H Club. Dustin Rankin, Woods County shooting sports volunteer leader, said, “The kids continue to practice hard and improve each week. I am very proud of the time and effort these youth devote to improving their skills.” This was the second of four winter contests conducted by the Northwest District 4-H program.

Sanitation worker injured By Marione Martin An Alva sanitation worker was injured Thursday, Nov. 14, when he was pinned between two vehicles. According to the report by Alva Police Chief Gary Sanderson, Waynoka resident Ricky L. Woodard, 54, was crushed between a city sanitation truck and a parked vehicle. The incident occurred about 9 a.m. on Davis Street. Corwyn Madison, 23, of Alva was driving the 2013 Freightliner sanitation truck north on Davis between two parked vehicles. Madison stopped the truck then began backing between the two vehicles with Woodard standing on the right rear of the truck. The truck backed 11 feet before striking a parked 2013 gray Ford Explorer owned by Randy Hamilton, crushing Woodard between the two vehicles. Madison then stopped and pulled forward 14 feet. Woodard was taken to Share Medical Center by the Alva EMS.

Are you the picture of health? “ You might look and feel fine, but you need to get the inside story. Colorectal cancer is one cancer you can prevent.” Katie Couric, Co-Founder EIF’s National Colorectal Cancer Research Alliance Photo by Andrew Eccles

If you’re over 50, get screened. 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636) www.cdc.gov/screenforlife


November 22, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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November Students of the Month honored

Northwestern students who have been in area schools student teaching are (front row, from left) Brooke McNaughton, Andrea McDow, Debbie Goodson, Ashley Schmitz, Alexis Peterson, Brenda Alvarado, Jacey Ford, April Swinnea-Ogg, Director of Student Teaching and Professor of Education Dr. Martie Young; (second row) Hallie LaRue, Olivia Hammontree, Megan Boone, Audrey Richmond, Kristi Hunter, Stacia Paul, Emily Atkinson, Tracie Soutter; (third row) Ryan Nelson, Dalton Holliman, Jonathan Washington, Tyler Laubach, Brock Wardlaw and Mike Arnold. Not pictured: Brandon Curtis.

Northwestern student teachers gain hands-on experience in area schools Students from Northwestern Oklahoma State University left campus at the beginning of the 2013 fall semester with the knowledge to succeed in a particular field. Twenty-three senior education students have gained handson experience as they entered the field through student teaching this semester. The students will return to campus for seminars in December. Their portfolio exit interviews will be during finals week in May. Listed below are the students, their hometowns and teaching assignments. English Education – Kristi Hunter, Woodward, Woodward Middle School; Alexis Peterson, Mooreland, Mooreland High

School. Health and Sports Science Education – Brandon Curtis, Laverne, Laverne Schools; Ryan Nelson, Beaver, Okeene High School. Elementary Education – Brenda Alvarado, Enid, Enid Garfield Elementary; Emily Atkinson, Enid, Enid Hayes Elementary; Megan Boone, Lacygne (Kan.), South Barber Elementary (Kan.); Jacey Ford, Mill Creek, Guthrie Fogarty Elementary; Debbie Landes-Goodson, Fairview, Fairview Cornelsen Elementary; Hallie LaRue, Ponca City, Ponca City Roosevelt Elementary; Stacia Paul, Enid, Enid Hayes Elementary; April Swinnea-Ogg, Enid, Enid Monroe Elementary. Early Childhood Education – Olivia Hammontree, Medford,

Kory Dietz Dietz is the son of Greg Dietz and Kate Nickel. He is involved in football, FFA vice president 2012 and 2014 and Sentinel 2010-2012, freshman class president, student council, Key Club and basketball. He is a member of the Baptist Church Youth Group. Dietz is self-employed with his own mowing business. After high school he plans to attend Redlands Community College on a livestock judging scholarship and finish school at Oklahoma State University, graduating with an ag business degree. The best advice Dietz can give to a freshman is, “Get involved. More involvement in your school and community means you have more fun and you get to meet more people.” His personal philosophy is, “Follow your dreams or work for those who did, get more involved in your school and community, go to school and be on time, all this relates to the

real world.” Rachel Carter Carter is the daughter of Andy and Rena Carter. She is involved in Miss Alva, Key Club treasurer, Parliamentarian for National Honor Society, student council executive officer, Electric Gold, speech, member of safety committee, junior and senior class president and filmer for girl’s football and basketball teams. She is the secretary of SWAT and member of the First Baptist Church Alva youth group. Carter is employed at Sonic Drive-In. After high school she plans to attend a four-year university majoring in pre-med. The best advice Rachel can give to a freshman is, “The people you surround yourself with are a reflection of you, so choose wisely.” Her personal philosophy is from 1 Thessalonians 5:16-17 – Be joyful always; pray continually; give thanks in all circumstances, for this is God’s will for you in Christ Jesus.

Deer Creek-Lamont Elementary; Andrea McDow, Enid, Enid Taft Elementary; Audrey Richmond, Cherokee, Alva Washington Elementary; Tracie Soutter, Ponca City, Ponca City Woodlands. Agriculture Education – Dalton Holliman, McDonald (Kan.), Alva High School; Tyler Laubach, Guymon, Verden High School. Special Education – Mike Arnold, Ponca City, Ponca City High School/Trout Elementary; Brooke McNaughton, Enid, Enid Monroe Elementary. Ashley Schmitz, Laverne, has been teaching music at Cherokee Public Schools. Jonathan Washington, Guthrie, Left to right are November Rotary Students of the Month Kory Dietz has been teaching history at Alva and Rachel Carter with Cory Washburn. Middle School.

From Page 3

Streets

to be $143,172.95 with the city paying 64.09 percent of the cost. The application states that the corner of Third and Flynn is one of the main arteries into the downtown area of Alva and is a heavy truck traffic route to the grain elevator. This intersection is deteriorating due to heavy truck traffic along with aging, crumbling concrete and failing sub-base. After rains, water stands in the intersection until vehicular traffic dries it out. The project calls for replacement of the entire intersection and the returns. The application describes the six block area needing curb and guttering as underserved. The area has seen a resurgence of development with the addition of seven new homes along Seiling and Hunt streets. Improving the streets would also help keep dirt and silt out of the city’s drainage ditches and help clean up an area of Alva that is under-developed. On Saturday, Nov.16, Fred Neuman of Alva was a guest of Mike Huckabee for a taping of the Mike Huckabee show at Fox Studios in New York City.

REAP (Rural Economic Action Plan) grants were created by the Oklahoma Legislature in 1996. The program makes funding available to rural communities with populations less than 7,000 with priority given to those with fewer than 1,500. In northwest Oklahoma, the program is administered through OEDA (Oklahoma Economic Development Authority) based in Beaver.


November 22, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Rangers place three on Pipkin named to AllAll-GAC football squad Conference squad

NWOSU Sports Information The Great American Conference (GAC) released its 2013 AllConference football squad Tuesday afternoon. Three Northwestern Oklahoma State players made the list. Offensive lineman Jacob McGuire and linebackers Derrick Thompson and Alex Hemberger were each named Honorable Mention All-GAC.

McGuire, from Newton, Kan., started all 11 games at left tackle. The 6-foot-3, 290-pound junior finished out his first season as a Ranger after transferring from Independence (Kan.) Community College. Thompson, a two-year starter from Houston, Texas, finished third on the team with 65 tackles. He logged a pair of tackles for loss to go with one interception, one forced fumble and a blocked kick.

Hemberger, an Argonia, Kan. Native, was another impact junior college transfer for Northwestern. The sophomore was leading the team in tackles before he suffered a season-ending injury in week nine at Pittsburg State. Hemberger’s 7.3 tackles per game ranked 12th in the GAC, and he led the team in tackles for loss (7.0). He also grabbed a share of the team-lead in interceptions (2).

NWOSU Sports Information HOT SPRINGS, Ark. – The Great American Conference (GAC) released its 2013 Women’s Volleyball All-Conference selections. Northwestern Oklahoma State freshman Asia Pipkin was an Honorable Mention selection. Pipkin – an outside hitter from Rancho Cucamonga, Calif. – was one of just five freshmen included from around the league. She set a new Northwestern record with 312 kills (2.76 kills per set), while hitting .165. She also ranked third on the team with 287 digs. Since the restart of the program in 2012, Pipkin is the first Northwestern volleyball player to win all-conference honors. Earlier this year, she also became the first to win a GAC Player of the Week award.

Winter youth hitting/ pitching camp dates announced

ALL-GAC HONORABLE MEN- ALL-GAC HONORABLE MEN- ALL-GAC HONORABLE MENTION - Jacob McGuire TION - Derrick Thompson TION - Alex Hemberger

Volleyball signs three NWOSU Sports Information Northwestern Oklahoma State volleyball coach Gene Krieger announced the signing of three high school seniors during last week’s early signing period. Elizabeth Dwyer 6’0 – Middle Blocker Wichita, Kan. – Kapaun Mt. Carmel High School Club: Heartland Explosion 18’s Dwyer comes to Northwestern from Wichita, Kan., where she was part of a third-place volleyball team at the 5A state tournament in 2013. An all-league hitter in each of her last two years of high school, Dwyer was also a three-year letterman in Bowling and a 5-1A State medalist. She is the daughter of Suzanne Dwyer and the stepdaughter of Paul Ailslieger. She plans on majoring in Psychology at Northwestern. Coach Krieger: “I was impressed with Liz from my first time watching her in the Kansas Classic last summer. She has a big block,

high arm swing to hit over most teams’ blockers, and we feel like she will improve tremendously in college. Liz is also being rewarded by Northwestern for her academic achievements. I am excited to welcome an extremely nice, personable young lady, with great academic and athletic accomplishments to the Ranger Family!” Mary Margaret “Maggie” Ireton Middle Blocker Stillwater, Okla. – Stillwater High School Club: OKC Jrs. An accomplished athlete during her career at Stillwater High, Ireton was named “Athlete of the Week” by the Stillwater Newspress and Vype Magazine “Athlete of the Month” for the north Oklahoma region during her season. She was also an all-tournament selection. She is the daughter of Joy and Phillip Ireton and has an older sister, Sarah. Ireton plans to study preveterinary medicine at Northwestern. Coach Krieger: “Maggie is the middle blocker I have wanted since the first day I saw her at Regionals last spring. She is hard-working and committed, super athletic and men-

tally tough. No one will ever hit over her and she will be a force at the net for years to come. Fans will love to watch her kill overpasses and get stuff blocks. She will fool a lot of people with her improved game at the NCAA level. I am very proud of her personal, athletic and academic accomplishments and that she will now be a Ranger!” Carley Mae Geer 5’4 – Libero Stillwater, Okla. – Stillwater High School Clubs: Stillwater Volleyball Team, Charge Volleyball Team Geer has been part of the Stillwater varsity volleyball squad for four years, and was selected for the OCA All-State volleyball team. She also set the school record for digs in a season with 660. The daughter of Robert and Jessica Geer, she has four siblings. Sister Alexia is a freshman on the Ranger volleyball team. Geer is torn between majoring in accounting or early education at Northwestern. Coach Krieger: “Carley is the definition of a libero. She is relentless and passionate about the back row, and she makes a great impact on the match of stopping the other teams’ best spikes. Her intensity and mental toughness will be a great asset to the team.”

NWOSU Sports Information Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU) baseball is once again pleased to offer winter hitting and pitching camps for area youths ages 6-15 years old. The camp sessions, designed to help area youth baseball players hone their skills and prepare for the spring season, will take place at the Northwestern indoor baseball facility under the expert guidance of the Ranger coaching staff. Hitting Camp will take place over six sessions, beginning Sunday, Nov. 24. Additional sessions are slated for Nov. 26 and Dec. 3, 8, 10 and 15. Campers ages 6-10 will go from 6 to 7 p.m. with the 11-15 year old group scheduled from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. each night. Campers will learn a variety of hitting skills to help them with their stance, timing, swing and pitch selection. Pitching Camp will take place over the course of three weeks (six sessions) in January on Sundays and Tuesdays. Ages 6-10 will run from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. with the 11-15 year old group running from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Campers will work on basic mechanics, grips and pitching strategy. The cost of each camp is $150 and includes all six sessions. Campers will also receive a Ranger baseball T-shirt. To register, fill out the bottom portion of the Hitting Camp and/or Pitching Camp flier (which can be found on the baseball page at www. riderangersride.com) and mail to Northwestern Baseball Office/ 709 Oklahoma Blvd./ Alva, OK 73717 along with a $25 deposit. Campers may also register on the first day of camp. Parents/guardians of all campers will also need to sign a NWOSU waiver/medical treatment form. For more information, contact Camp Director and Northwestern Assistant Baseball Coach Bill Neale at 580-732-0200 or by e-mail at wjneale@nwosu.edu.

Mens’ basketball signs high-scoring Texas guard NWOSU Sports Information Northwestern Oklahoma State mens’ basketball coach Andrew Brown inked his first recruit from the Class of 2014 during the early signing period. Zach Dumas, a six-foot guard from Huffman, Texas, signed a letter of interest and will be eligible as a freshman next fall. Dumas was named District MVP and All-Region following his junior season (2012-13) at Huffman High School, averaging 27.9 points, 4 rebounds and 2.5 assists per game. He’s been a contributor in each of his first three varsity seasons. Dumas earned first-team all-district honors as a sophomore and won the team’s Newcomer of the Year award as a freshman in 2010-11. “Zach is a really athletic wing who can score in a variety of ways,” Brown said, “He plays both ends of the floor, and is a really good teammate. We think he has a bright future here.” Dumas plays AAU basketball for RL-9 out of Houston.


November 22, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Sooners’ Stoops Royals reach $32 close to record win million, 4-year By Murray Evans NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — Some of the most successful coaches in college football history have led Oklahoma. Step off the elevators into the club-level seating lounge at the Gaylord Family-Oklahoma Memorial Stadium and there are life-size photos of the three most famous - Bud Wilkinson, Barry Switzer and Bob Stoops. Now Stoops, in his 15th season at the Sooners’ helm, is set to pass Switzer as the winningest coach in Oklahoma history. A win for No. 22 Oklahoma (8-2, 5-2 Big 12 Conference) at Kansas State (64, 4-3) on Saturday would be No. 158 for Stoops. It’s a milestone that Stoops claims he hasn’t thought about “at all.” “You can say that he’s lying, but why would I?” Stoops said. “I haven’t picked up a paper since the week before the first game or looked at it. I watch national news and CNN isn’t talking about it. I try to keep up with what’s happening in the world. That kind of stuff has no place for me, just because it’s not what is important.” Oklahoma has more 10-win seasons (34) than any other Football Bowl Subdivision program. Bud Wilkinson won 145 games from 1947-63. Barry Switzer passed Wilkinson, winning 157 games from 1973-88. Entering the season, Stoops’ average of 10.6 wins per year was tops among active FBS coaches with 10 or more years of experience. He is the only active coach at an FBS program to have taken his

team to a bowl game in each of his first 14 seasons and that streak will be extended this season. He is 15739 overall, an 80.1-percent winning clip. Stoops guided Oklahoma to a somewhat surprising national title in 2000, in just his second season. Stoops’ success came after a five-year stretch during which the Sooners failed to post a winning record under Gary Gibbs (whose six-year tenure ended in 1994), Howard Schnellenberger (1995) and John Blake (1996-1998). Stoops recorded his 150th career win in this season’s opener against Louisiana-Monroe, in his 187th game. He became the sixthfastest to reach 150 wins at the FBS level — a list topped by Switzer, who did so in 180 games. Oklahoma’s football offices are dubbed the “Switzer Center” and even a quarter-century removed from his coaching career, Switzer remains an Oklahoma icon revered as much for his folksy, open personality and approachability as his three national titles. Switzer didn’t return a phone message left by The Associated Press this week, although he and Stoops have a friendly relationship, as evidenced by Stoops’ postgame comments Saturday, after the Sooners beat Iowa State to allow Stoops to tie Switzer. “All I’ll do is compliment coach Switzer,” Stoops said. “He was a special coach at his time. Not many coaches have a Super Bowl with three national championships (and have) his unique ability to relate to his players. And then I appreciate

his friendship. He’s been a great friend to me, a great friend to everybody in this program. We’re fortunate he still comes around and sees us. “He’ll always be one of the most special and one of the greatest coaches in all of college football.” Stoops often has said the reason he’s remained so long at Oklahoma has to do with his relationship with athletic director Joe Castiglione and university President David Boren, the two men who hired him in 1999. The trio have been together ever since, the longest current grouping of a president, athletic director and football coach at the FBS level. On Wednesday, Castiglione declined comment about Stoops surpassing Switzer’s win total, saying he’d discuss it at length after it happens. But Oklahoma’s players certainly are aware of what their coach has achieved and want to give him the record win on Saturday. “It would be great,” senior tailback Brennan Clay said. “That’s why I came, because of the tradition and history and be a part of the team to help coach Stoops possibly surpass that mark. We’re going to do a great job this week preparing for K-State and I congratulate coach Stoops for such an accomplishment. He’s done a great job for this university even before I was here and we’re going to continue to do so.” Stoops said he isn’t concerned about how many wins he’ll eventually record.

deal with Vargas

By Dave Skretta KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — The Kansas City Royals agreed to a $32 million, four-year contract with left-hander Jason Vargas on Thursday, trying to fill the void in their rotation created by Ervin Santana’s free agency. Vargas was 9-8 with a 4.02 ERA in 24 starts for the Angels last season. He was 6-4 with a 3.65 ERA before going on the disabled list with a blood clot in his arm that required surgery. Kansas City was searching for a veteran to replace Santana, another former Angels pitcher who rediscovered himself in Kansas City. Santana went 9-10 with a 3.24 ERA last season, driving up his price in free agency to the point where the Royals are unlikely to sign him. “Our medical team felt very comfortable, our scouting judgment was very sound, with the length of the contract as well. It all kind of lined up together,” general manager Dayton Moore said. “We felt very confident and secure in making him a Royal.” Vargas, a soft-tossing lefty who turns 31 in February, gets $7 million next season, $8.5 million in each of the following two years and $8 million in 2017. He had shown a propensity for giving up home runs, but that should be mitigated by cavernous Kauffman Stadium. That was the with Santana, who also alSee Stoops Page 12 case lowed homers by the bushel in Los

Angeles before getting things under control in Kansas City. “The biggest thing for me was being in a place where I knew I would be at for a significant amount of time, and with an organization where I felt comfortable,” Vargas said, “and I believed in what they’re doing and continuing to get better, and Kansas City was definitely at the top of that list going into the offseason.” Vargas will be joining a club that finished 86-76 last season, its best finish since 1989, and was in contention for a playoff berth until the final weeks of the season. “What excited me about the team is how I’ve seen the team grow and progress a lot over the last four or five years,” Vargas said. “Their defense is spectacular and I’m just hoping I can be a piece of the puzzle that helps move us forward.” Vargas isn’t the sort of splashy signing that will make Royals fans salivate, but he does solidify the back end of what’s expected to be a young rotation. James Shields returns next season as their clear-cut ace and Jeremy Guthrie provides a dependable No. 2 starter. Danny Duffy is a near-lock to make the rotation out of spring training after he worked his way back from Tommy John surgery this past season, leaving one more spot in the rotation up for

See Royals Page 12


November 22, 2013

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Okla. megachurch, mom Lenexa teacher pleads of rape victim settle suit guilty in teen sex case  By Justin Juozapavicius TULSA, Okla. (AP) — A Tulsa megachurch has settled a lawsuit brought by a mother whose then-13year-old daughter was raped last year in a ministry stairwell by a janitor. Details of the settlement between the 17,000-member Victory Christian Center and the mother — approved Tuesday by a judge — were confidential, and a church spokesman declined to comment further on the case Thursday. “We want to give it time for things to settle down out of respect for everyone involved,” said spokesman Justin Johnson. “And at a later point, there may be more opportunity to speak to this.” Michael Atkinson, an attorney for the mother, said the settlement represented “a positive resolution of a bad situation for the child and her mother.” Malinda Matlock, an attorney for the ministry, said the agreement was reached after the parties met last month to negotiate. “All the parties are pleased that a mutual agreement could be reached,” she said. The ex-janitor, who pleaded guilty to raping the teenager, was sentenced in December to 55 years in prison.

Five Victory employees — including the son and daughter-in-law of ministry co-founder and head pastor Sharon Daugherty — were charged because they waited two weeks before reporting the girl’s rape to authorities. The mother accused the church in the lawsuit of caring more about doing damage control than about what happened to her daughter. Until the settlement, the church had repeatedly denied that claim. The Associated Press generally does not name victims of sexual assault and is not identifying the mother so as to not identify her daughter. Another former janitor at the church was sentenced last month to 18 months in prison for a sex crime unrelated to the rape. The scandals roiled the large evangelical church, which is across the street from Oral Roberts University in south Tulsa. This summer, Victory leaders said the church had reached out to two state agencies to help update its child abuse and neglect manual and ramped up security measures across its sprawling campus. “As a church, we are learning from the past and continually looking ahead for ways in which we can better serve our community and our members,” Daugherty told the AP then.

OLATHE, Kan. (AP) — A former Johnson County high school teacher pleaded guilty to having sexual contact with two teenage boys he met through online ads. Forty-three-year-old Jeremy John Way, of Shawnee, entered the plea Wednesday to two counts of criminal sodomy with the boys. The boys did not attend St. James Academy in Lenexa, where Way taught science until the allegations against him surfaced in February. Before going to St. James in 2008, Way taught at Mill Valley

Governor’s husband to donate 1 ton of turkeys  OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Gov. Mary Fallin’s husband is donating more than one ton of frozen turkeys to a homeless mission in Oklahoma City. Oklahoma’s First Gentleman Wade Christensen and his brother, Clay Christensen, teamed up Thursday to donate more than 2,000 pounds of frozen turkeys to the Jesus House in Oklahoma City.

Distracted teen injured after walking into traffic  TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — While there has been a big push against distracted driving, Topeka police say an incident Wednesday in which a 15-year-old high school student was seriously hurt after wandering into traffic shows how important it is for pedestrians to pay attention, too. Witnesses told investigators the boy — later identified as a student at Hayden High School — had just pushed the button on the lighted crosswalk and “didn’t even wait a half a second” before stepping into oncoming traffic, police spokesman Lt. Mike Cross told the Topeka Capital-Journal (http://bit.ly/1aTHScQ ).

“He walked right in front of the car, and the car couldn’t react fast enough to what he was doing,” Cross said, adding that all of the witnesses said Harmon was talking on his cellphone. Paramedics found the teen had head wounds and other lacerations. Cross said the student was taken to a local hospital and in stable condition. The newspaper reported that a single tennis shoe that came off during impact was cordoned off by orange road cones. The woman who was driving the car and three young children in it with her were not injured.

Pedestrians need to be aware that they are part of the roadway and need to be alert and not distracted, Cross said. “As pedestrians, we also need to be careful that we’re paying attention to our surroundings and that we’re careful of what the other vehicles are doing around us,” he said. Mike Monaghan, dean of students at Hayden High School, identified the boy on Twitter as a freshman and said, “Thank God he is OKAY.” *** Information from: The Topeka (Kan.) Capital-Journal, http://www. cjonline.com

US judge sides with the Comanches in tobacco dispute By Sean Murphy OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A federal judge in Oklahoma City sided with the Comanche Nation on Thursday in a dispute with the governor’s office over the state’s tobacco compact with the tribe. U.S. District Judge Robin Cauthron issued a temporary restraining order that allows the Comanche Nation to enjoy the same tobacco compact the state has with the Chickasaw Nation. Under that deal, the $1.03 state tax rate per pack of cigarettes is distributed with 70 percent of the revenue to the tribe and 30 percent to the state during the first two years of the compact. The temporary restraining order will remain in place until the court resolves the dispute. “The Comanche Nation sought a fair compact that was equal to the (Chickasaw Nation compact),” Wallace Coffey, the chairman of the

nearly 16,000-member southwest Oklahoma tribe, said in a statement. “We feel like the state of Oklahoma didn’t give us fair treatment and showed a lack of respect, and so we took action.” Each of the state’s 38 federally recognized Indian tribes has the opportunity to negotiate a compact with the state that determines how much of the $1.03-per-pack tax is distributed between the state and the tribe. Nearly all of the existing tribal tobacco compacts expired this year, and new ones have been negotiated with the governor’s office for 23 tribes so far, said Steve Mullins, Gov. Mary Fallin’s general counsel who negotiates with the tribes on behalf of her office. Eleven other tribes, including some that don’t sell tobacco or sell it only to their members, chose not to sign a compact. Negotiations are ongoing with the Ponca Tribe, and three

others, including the Comanches, are currently tied up in litigation or arbitration. Mullins said he was disappointed in Cauthron’s ruling. He said most of the new compacts are unique for each individual tribe and that the governor’s office used the compact negotiations “to find joint public policy goals.” For example, the Kaw Tribe was able to negotiate a better rate in exchange for making one of its casinos smoke-free. “We basically said let’s make individualized compacts a partnership,” Mullins said. “If you

See Dispute Page 19

From Page 11

Stoops “Why would I?” he said. “My legacy, hopefully, is my players like playing for me and care about me. They knew I cared about them. Whenever we see each other, we’ll be glad to see each other. That’s what I care about what my legacy will be. And that the university felt like I did it the right way, with character and . integrity.”

High School in Shawnee. The Kansas City Star reports the (http://bit.ly/1aTC8zQ ) investigation began when the parents of a 14-year-old boy called police after discovering sexually explicit emails on his cellphone. Police traced phone records to Way and during the investigation learned about the second boy. Sentencing is scheduled for Jan. 21. *** Information from: The Kansas City Star, http://www.kcstar.com

The mission prepares Thanksgiving grocery baskets each year filled with a traditional meal, including turkey and dressing, and distributes them to low-income Oklahomans. Christensen and his brother are attorneys for the Christensen Law Group. Fallin holds an annual food drive in October for the state’s two regional food banks.

Color Me Badd ex-frontman appears in Okla. court  NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — The court case against former Color Me Badd frontman Bryan Abrams, who’s accused of not complying with terms of his probation in a domestic abuse case, will continue. Abrams, 44, appeared in court Wednesday, pushing a walker, to respond to an arrest warrant alleging that he didn’t perform community service and undergo counseling as part of his probation from a 2012 case. Abrams’ attorney, Matt Swain, said his client has not fulfilled the terms of his probation because Abrams has been plagued by health problems over the past few years. Swain said his client has been trying to lose weight and recently had hip surgery, which requires him to use a walker. Abrams was ordered back in court in January, The Oklahoman

From Page 11

reported (http://bit.ly/1aIAggL). “But he wanted everyone to know that he’s sober, he’s trying to get his life back together right now,” Swain said. “The health problems he’s had ... have kind of derailed his life.” Since 2006, Abrams has been charged with domestic abuse four times but two of those cases were dismissed, court records show. The most recent charges, filed in January 2012, accuse Abrams of punching his wife in the face during an argument. “He’s going to continue his counseling, he’s got court costs to pay and community service still to do,” Swain said. “We’re hopeful he can make progress between now and January.” Color Me Badd’s hits in the early 1990s included “All 4 Love” and “I Adore Mi Amor.”

Royals

grabs among a handful of in-house candidates. Among those would could land the fifth spot are Wade Davis, Luke Hochevar and Will Smith — all former starters who spent time last season in the bullpen — and hardthrowing right-hander Yordano Ventura, who made his big league debut last season and dazzled in three September starts. Most people within the organization believe that Ventura will be in the rotation at some point next season, even if he doesn’t earn a spot in spring training. There’s also a chance that Kyle Zimmer, their former first-round pick, will be ready at some point next season. Zimmer finished last season at Double-A Northwest Arkansas. “There’s still ways we can improve our team, through the rotation, trying to add another bat, we feel like we have some quality

young pitchers who are going to be competing for spots,” Moore said. “There’s still a lot of opportunity out there to improve our starting pitching.” Vargas, who missed the 2008 season with a torn labrum in his hip, is 51-58 with a 4.30 ERA in parts of eight seasons spent with the Marlins, Mets, Mariners and Angels. His best season came two years ago, when he went 14-11 with a 3.85 ERA in 33 starts for Seattle. If nothing else, Vargas should be able to eat innings. He was limited to 150 by his surgery last season, but went over 200 innings each of his final two seasons with the Mariners. “You try to get 200 innings out of your starters and Jason has been able to do that,” Moore said. “He’s been one of the more consistent pitchers in all of baseball over the last few years, and we feel like he’s right in the prime of his career.”


November 22, 2013

LPXLP

By Cassandra Vinograd LONDON (AP) — Three women have been freed after spending 30 years held captive in a south London home, including one woman believed to have spent her entire life in domestic slavery, police announced Thursday. London’s Metropolitan Police spoke about the rescues after two people — a man and a woman, both 67 — were arrested early Thursday on suspicion of forced labor and domestic servitude. The arrests came as part of a slavery investigation launched after one of the women contacted a charity in October to say she was being held against her will along with two others. The charity went to the police, the force said. Those freed on Oct. 25 are a 69-year-old Malaysian woman, a 57-year-old Irish woman and a 30-year-old British woman, police said. Kevin Hyland, head of the Metropolitan Police’s human trafficking unit, said the women are “highly traumatized” having had “no real exposure to the outside world” for the past 30 years.

“Trying to find out exactly what has happened over three decades will understandably take some time,” he said. Police initially said they did not believe any of the victims were related. Later, however, they appeared to backtrack, saying the relationship between the three women is part of the investigation and they will not speculate on it. The force also said there is no evidence to suggest anything of a sexual nature — but cautioned that the investigation is still not finished. Police would not speculate on any motivation, name the suspects’ nationalities or say if the suspects were a couple. The revelations raised numerous questions — all still unanswered — about how the women’s ordeal began and why it endured for so long. What brought them to London? What freedoms — if any — did they have? What restrictions and conditions were they subject to? Did neighbors ever see them, or did they ever try to escape? The women — whose names have not been released — are now safe at an undisclosed location in

Britain and have been working with severe trauma experts since their rescue, Hyland said. It is not known how the women ended up in the house. The 30-yearold, who would have had to either been born in the home or enter it as an infant given the police timeline, appears to have been held in domestic servitude for her entire life, police said. The Irish woman called the charity from what appears to be an “ordinary house in an ordinary street,” said Aneeta Prem, founder of the charity that promotes awareness of child abuse, forced marriages and honor killings. Police said the woman “found the courage to call” in October after seeing a documentary on the BBC about forced marriages. What followed were secret, “in-depth” conversations with the women, Prem told Sky News. “It had to be pre-arranged when they were able to make calls to us and it had to be done very secretly, because they felt they were in massive danger,” she said.

Hearing Docket at the Eastern Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Room 114, 440 South Houston, Tulsa, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 10th day of December, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT any person interested or protesting the application please advise the Attorney of record and the Court Clerk’s Office of the Corporation Commission five (5) days before the hearing date above. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person and persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause, if protested, may be subject to a prehearing or settlement conference pursuant to OCCRP 165:511-2. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact Drew Veitch (918) 9478551, or Michael D. Stack, Attorney for Applicant, 943 East Britton Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73114; Bus (405) 286-1717; Fax (405) 286-2122. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, CHAIRMAN BOB ANTHONY, VICE CHAIRMAN DANA L MURPHY, COMMISSIONER DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 13TH DAY OF NOVEMBER 2013. ATTEST: PEGGY MITCHELL, SECRETARY OF THE COMMISSION

be issued thereon to Raymond Jacobson, and requesting that this Court determine the identity of all the heirs, devisees and legatees. Pursuant to an Order of said Court made on the 18th day of November, 2013, notice is hereby given that Thursday, the 5th day of December, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M., of said day of the regular term of said Court, has been appointed as the time for hearing said Petition and proving said Will at the District Courthouse in Alva, in said County of Woods, and when and where all persons interested may appear and contest the same. In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 18th day of November, 2013. s/Mickey J. Hadwiger JUDGE OF THE DISTRICT COURT Edward E. Sutter, OBA #8778 Attorney for Executor 401 College Avenue P.O. Box 213 Alva, OK 73717 (580) 327-1511

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UK police: 3 women held Frantic rescue for captive for 30 years 5 kids trapped in

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, November 22, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: MIDSTATES PETROLEUM COMPANY LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: INCREASED DENSITY LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 26 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA CAUSE CD 201307685-T NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA: To all persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma; and if any of the named individuals or entities be deceased or a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, successors, and assigns of any such deceased individual or dissolved partnership, corporation or other association. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT the Applicant in this cause has filed an application requesting the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma to enter an order amending Order No. 586163 to authorize and permit an additional well in the drilling and spacing units formed for the Mississippian common source(s) of supply in Section 29, Township 26 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. The additional well to produce hydrocarbons from such separate common source(s) of supply, with such authorization and permission running in favor of Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant, and to establish a proper allowable for such well and such unit. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT the Applicant in this cause is requesting the following special relief: [A] To increase density by permitting the Applicant or some other party as operator for an additional well within an existing drilling and spacing unit(s) for production from the above common source(s) of supply as an exception to the drilling and spacing order for the captioned unit. [B] That the order to be entered in this matter be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and that the authorization and permission requested herein run in favor of Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause be set before an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this Cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Initial

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, November 22, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA In the Matter of the Estate of Gary L. Jacobson, Deceased. Case No. PB-2013-44 NOTICE OF HEARING PETITION FOR PROBATE OF WILL, APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE, AND DETERMINATION OF HEIRS, DEVISEES AND LEGATEES Notice is hereby given to all persons interested in the Estate of Gary L. Jacobson, deceased, that on this 18th day of November, 2013, Raymond Jacobson produced and filed in the District Court of Woods County and State of Oklahoma, an instrument in writing purporting to be the Last Will and Testament of Gary L. Jacobson, deceased, and also filed in said Court his Petition praying for the probate of said Will, and that Letters Testamentary

Minn. Crash

By Steve Karnowski ST. LOUIS PARK, Minn. (AP) — Rescuers worked frantically to free five children trapped in a submerged car after it veered off a highway ramp in suburban Minneapolis and into a frigid pond, smashing windows to get inside even as a tow truck winched the car out. The car was under water for up to 45 minutes after Thursday’s crash. St. Louis Park city spokesman Jamie Zwilling said the children were unconscious and unresponsive when pulled from the vehicle. Their conditions were not available as they were treated at two Minneapolis hospitals, and officials didn’t provide details on how the children were able to survive or whether the car had filled up with water before rescuers got to them. The driver of the car — mother and stepmother to the children — made it out on her own. One witness described seeing her in the See Captive Page 19 pond, screaming for help.

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, November 22, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA In the Matter of the Estate of Patricia Ann Chesson, Deceased. Case No. PB-2013-45 NOTICE OF HEARING PETITION FOR PROBATE OF WILL, APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE, AND DETERMINATION OF HEIRS, DEVISEES AND LEGATEES Notice is hereby given to all persons interested in the Estate of Patricia Ann Chesson, deceased, that on this 18th day of November, 2013, Bradley Scott Chesson produced and filed in the District Court of Woods County and State of Oklahoma, an instrument in writing purporting to be the Last Will and Testament of Patricia Ann Chesson, deceased, and also filed in said Court her Petition praying for the probate of said Will, and that Letters Testamentary be issued thereon to Bradley Scott Chesson, and requesting that this Court determine the identity of all the heirs, devisees and legatees. Pursuant to an Order of said Court made on the 18th day of November, 2013, notice is hereby given that Thursday, the 5th day of December, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M., of said day of the regular term of said Court, has been appointed as the time for hearing said Petition and proving said Will at the District Courthouse in Alva, in said County of Woods, and when and where all persons interested may appear and contest the same. In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 18th day of November, 2013. s/Mickey J. Hadwiger

JUDGE OF THE DISTRICT COURT Edward E. Sutter, OBA #8778 Attorney for Executrix P.O. Box 213 Alva, OK 73717 (580) 327-1511

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, November 22, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT IN AND FOR WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA In the Matter of the Estate of Betty Jo Pangburn, Deceased. Case No. PB-2013-48 NOTICE FOR HEARING PETITION FOR PROBATE OF WILL, APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE, DETERMINATION OF HEIRS, DEVISEES AND LEGATEES, AND ISSUANCE OF LETTERS OF TESTEMENTARY Notice is hereby given to all persons interested in the Estate of Betty Jo Pangburn, deceased, that on the 19th day of November, 2013, Samuel Pangburn produced and filed in the District Court of the County of Woods and State of Oklahoma, an instrument

“The car was under water, and she must have been standing on top,” Jeff Robertson, who lives in a nearby apartment building, told the St. Paul Pioneer Press. “That pond is 8 or 9 feet deep, and the water was at her knees.” The crash happened in St. Louis Park, a western Minneapolis suburb. Minnesota State Patrol Lt. Eric Roeske said the car angled left off the ramp from Highway 7 to Highway 100 and plunged down a slope into the pond about 40 to 50 yards from the roadway. He said there was no guardrail separating the pond from the ramp. The driver was identified as Marion Guerrido, 23, of Brooklyn Center. The Minnesota State Patrol identified the children as Aliyana E. Rennie, 1; Zenavia C. Rennie, 5; Zarihana M. Rennie, 6; Amani N. Coleman-Guerrido, 5; and Alarious M. Coleman-Guerrido, 7; all of Brooklyn Center.

See Rescue Page 19 of writing purporting to be the Last Will and Testament of Betty Jo Pangburn, deceased, and also filed in said Court their petition praying for the probate of said will, and that Letters Testamentary issue thereon to Samuel Pangburn, the Personal Representative named in said will, that the heirs, devisees and legatees of said decedent be determined by the Court. Pursuant to the order of said Court made on the 19th day of November, 2013 notice is hereby given that Monday the 2nd day of December, 2013, at the hour of 1:30 o’clock p.m. of said day has been appointed as the time for hearing said petition and proving said will, at the District Court Room of the County Courthouse in Alva, Woods County, Oklahoma, when and where all persons interested may appear and contest the same. In Testimony Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 19th day of November, 2013. s/Mickey J. Hadwiger JUDGE OF THE DISTRICT COURT Dal L. Houston, OBA #17065 BENSON & HOUSTON, P.L.L.C. Attorney for Petitioner P.O. Box 488, 615 Barnes Alva, Oklahoma 73717


November 22, 2013

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Lessons from palm trees By Hartsell Johnson, College Hill Church of Christ As the fall season has come, Woods County has provided beauty to be seen in the colorful leaves on the trees. However, in this article the emphasis is on the palm tree. There is an unusual and impressive similitude that the psalmist draws between the palm tree and the righteous (Psalm 92:12). Our Lord also taught heavenly lessons from earthly objects, thus binding up spiritual truth in material forms. The text compares the righteous to the palm tree, a common object in some parts of Palestine. Wherever it is, this tree attracts attention. It is slender, straight and unbending.

Its limbs do not hang down as do those of the willow. Neither does it need support like the ivy. Palm trees reach out their arms to the world. Similarly, the righteous are in the world but are not of the world. They rise in sharp contrast above it. The palm is wholly unaffected by the storm or rain. It is said to be the only tree that can be bent to the ground and then return to its original positions. Christians, though they have hardships, rise to their former stature when the storm has passed. The palm tree elects to grow near fountains of water where its plumes rise in a place of rest and

Alva Friends Church

refreshment. Thus it stands as a beacon to weary travelers, promising them an oasis. In like manner, Christians have a stabilizing influence wherever they live and do good to all men through their help and understanding. It is interesting that every part of a palm tree is useful. The leaves are used as fans, the trunk supplies wood for fuel and the roots have medicinal value. Every activity of the righteous is to do performance of service to God and man. They desire their lives to be blessings for all. Finally, the older the palm, the more valuable and useful it is. So with the righteous, as wisdom and more experience in life will make them more capable of discharging obligations. Hopefully each person who reads this article will resolve to conform to the characteristics of the palm tree, and so flourish and thrive in the fashion that David affirmed of the righteous in the long ago.

Area Church Directory

College & Center, Alva 327-2524

Alva Wesleyan Church Third & Church, Alva 327-2636

Barnes Street Church of Christ 1024 Barnes Street, Alva

Bible Baptist Church 402 Choctaw, Alva 327-1582 www.BBCalva.com

Capron United Methodist Church 580-829-4416

Cedar Grove Wesleyan Church

Our Mother of Mercy Catholic Church

First Baptist Church

Sacred Heart Catholic Church

Fifth & Maple, Alva 327-0894

210 S. Main, Waynoka

Twelfth & Church, Alva 327-0339

College & Church, Alva 327-2623 alvafbc@yahoo.com

St. Cornelius Catholic Church 404 S. Massachusetts, Cherokee

First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

Seventh Day Adventist Tenth & Church, Alva 327-4752

College & Maple, Alva 327-0194

Town & Country Christian Church

First Presbyterian Church

Ninth & Church, Alva 327-0811

Seventh & Church 327-3895

Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church

First United Methodist Church

Ninth & Center, Alva 327-2846

Freedom United Methodist Church

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

1407 Thunderbird Rd., Alva 327-2993

Church of the Nazarene College & Locust, Alva 327-2566 www.alvanaz.org

College Hill Church of Christ 1102 College Blvd., Alva 327-0130 www.alvaok.net/collegehill

Community of Christ First & Church, Alva 327-0719

Dacoma Church of God 505 Broadway, Dacoma

Alva Church of God Sunday, November 24: Sunday begins at 9:30 a.m. Worship will begin at 10:30 a.m. Pastor Robert Brown will bring a sermon entitled “Hard to Give Thanks.” We will nothave an evening service this week. We will dismiss to attend the Community Thanksgiving service at the Presbyterian church at 6 p.m. Please visit our website at www. AlvaChurchOfGod.org. Alva Friends Church Sunday, November 24: We invite you and your family to join us as together we worship and serve the Lord. Sunday school for all ages will begin at 9:30 a.m. The worship hour begins at 10:30 a.m. Pastor Mark will share with the Little Friends, lead the worship and preach the message, “Thanksgiving Three” from Colossians 3:15-17. Franklin Murrow will lead the singing. Accompanists are Sherry Williams on the organ and Sally Byrd on the piano. Wednesday, November 27: Our

First Assembly of God

7 mi W on Hwy 64, 10 mi N, 2 mi W 430-9026

Church of God

Church Calendar

College & Church, Alva 327-2571

Third & Maple, Alva 327-0510 zlcalva@cneconnect.com

800 Eagle Pass, Freedom 580-621-3580

Campus Ministries

Park & Church, Alva 327-4210 (327-0817) www.freewebs.com/graceandfaith

1020 College, Alva - 580-371-5957 bsu1933nw@yahoo.com

Grace & Faith Fellowship

Baptist Student Union

Green Valley Free Methodist Church South of Alva on Hwy 45 580-871-2456

Hopeton Wesleyan Church

Chi Alpha Student Fellowship

(Upstairs at First Assembly of God) 904 Fifth, Alva - 327-0894

Church of Christ Bible Chair 1108 College, Alva - 327-4511

8 miles S of Alva on Hwy 281 580-435-2400 hwc@hopetonchurch.org

College & Barnes, Alva - 327-5433 extreme@hopetonchurch.org

1.6 miles E on Hwy 64, Alva

1027 Eighth, Alva - 327-2046 wesleyhousenwosu@yahoo.com

Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witness

The eXtreme

Wesley House

Marshall Funeral Home www.marshallfuneralhomes.com

PO Box 804 230 Flynn • Alva, OK 327-2311

1-800-656-2311

PO Box 178 1872 Cecil • Waynoka, OK 824-2311

Bible study will not be held today due to the Thanksgiving holiday. Alva Wesleyan Church Sunday, November 24: Sunday worship is at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., with Sunday school at 9:30 a.m. Evening Bible study is held at 6 p.m. Alva Wesleyan Church is on the corner of Third and Church streets, Alva, 580-327-2636. Wednesday, November 27: Awana for kids three years through eighth grade meets at 6 p.m. Youth – grades nine through 12 – also meet at 6 p.m. If you have any questions, call 580-327-2636. Avard Christian Church Sunday, November 24: Sunday school is at 10 a.m, Worship begins at 11 a.m. Avard Christian Church is 7 miles west of Alva on Highway 64 and 7 miles south on County Road 370, or 6 miles south on Highway 281 and 7 miles west on Garvin Rd. Avard Christian Church, Rt. 2 Box 92, Alva, OK 73717. Pastor Neal Gordon, 580-431- 2646; cell 580430-8464. Barnes Street Church of Christ Sunday, November 24: Sunday worship services will be at 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. (7 p.m. during daylight savings time). Wednesday, November 27: Evening services will be at 6 p.m. (7 p.m. during daylight savings time). Visitors are most welcome to attend the worship services. For more information, contact Landis Trekell (327-0865), Andrew Rhodes (327-3368), Brian Gaddy (3275130) or Gray Fields (327-6676). Bible Baptist Church All services will be held at Fourth and Choctow in the fellowship hall of our church building Saturday, November 23: Women’s Bible study continues today at 9:30 a.m. in the back of the fellowship hall. Sunday, November 24: Sunday school starts at 10 a.m. There are graded classes for children, a teen class, a college and career class and an adult class. Morning worship service will start at 11 a.m. We will continue our study in the Bookk of Revelation. Evening service will begin at 6 p.m. in the church fellowship hall. Teen Impact will also meet at this time and is open to all teens from sixth to 12th grade. Wise Guys also starts at 6 p.m. Wise Guys is a Bible-based character development program for pre-K to fifth grade. Tuesday, November 26: Celebrate Recovery will meet in the church fellowship hall at 7 p.m. This is a Christ-based recovery program to help provide a safe place to discover a Savior who can give freedom from hang ups, hurts and habits. Everyone is invited to attend. Wednesday, November 27: Prayer meeting and Bible study will be at 7 p.m. in the church fellowship hall. Teen Impact will also meet at 7 p.m. for Bible study time. As always, transportation and nurseries are available for all services. We look forward to having you and your family visit us this Sunday! Capron United Methodist Church Sunday, November 24: If you don’t have a church home, we would love for you to worship with us. Service starts at 9:15 a.m. with singing and preaching of the Word. Pastor Clark’s message is entitled “Thanksgiving,” based on Psalm 100. At 10:30, adult Sunday school will begin. We will be starting a

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new series by James W. Moore, “Finding Bethlehem in the Midst of Bedlam.” For more information about our church, activities or if you have a need, please call 580-216-4787. Cedar Grove Wesleyan Church Sunday, November 24: Pastor Harold Henson and the entire Cedar Grove family desire to get to know you and your family when you join our loving and caring congregation of all ages, as we discover the truths of Jesus Christ are love, grace, forgiveness, joy and fellowship through Sunday school at 10 a.m. and at 11 a.m. the morning worship. Church of the Nazarene Sunday, November 24: Experience AlvaNaz! Are you looking for a church to call home? We want to welcome you to our services and experience God’s love with our church family! Be our guest @ AlvaNaz! Come and join our family. Need a ride? Please call 327-2566 or327-7751 to reserve your ride today! We can pick you up for breakfast, Bible study and morning worship. God wants you to spend eternity with him. We have a great time at AlvaNaz! Free continental breakfast @ 9 a.m. Bible study @ 9:30 a.m. and worship @ 10:45 a.m. (Continental breakfast begins in June.) This Sunday, the Stantons will be out guest missionary speakers during worship. Please come and meet them to see how God is working in our world! Prayer for the week: Dear God: Thank you for blessing me with gifts and talents. Help me to use these gifts to honor You! You are an awesome God! In Jesus name, Amen. If you have a prayer request, please email it to WorshipGod@ AlvaNaz.org. We want to pray for you! AlvaNaz – A Church For All People – 728 College – 580-3272566 – www.AlvaNaz.org Email address: worshipgod@ alvanaz.org Email Pastor Gregg at pg@alvanaz.org. Find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ www.alvanaz.org. College Hill Church of Christ Sunday, November 24: Sunday Bible class for all ages begins at 9:30 a.m. and worship begins at 10:30 a.m. Following the weekly fellowship lunch, the afternoon service will begin at 12:45 p.m. Don’t miss a Sunday with our great Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ! Wednesday, November 27: Bible classes for adults, college age and children will be held at 7 p.m. From our family to yours, we sincerely invite you to worship God with us this coming Sunday. Be encouraged and lifted up as we sing songs of praise, lift up our prayers to God, observe the Lord’s Supper, and hear a portion of His eternal word. You will be sure to enjoy our “no visitor left behind” policy which means that, as a visitor, you will be greeted and we would love the opportunity to get to know you more. Dacoma United Methodist Church Sunday, November 24: We will gather at 8:30 a.m. for felowship coffee and donuts. Worship will begin at 9 a.m. At noon will will have our Thanksgiving dinner. Eagle Pass Baptist Church Sunday, November 24: At 9:40 a.m., join us for a friendly visit and have some coffee. 10 a.m. – Bible Explorers: getting you into the Bible and the Bible into you. Groups: Young Explorers ages 5-11, Young Teen Explorers ages 12-16 and Adult Explorers ages 17 and older. 11 a.m. – Praise and worship. 3 p.m.

– Discipleship. When you walk in, you will be our guest, but you will walk out family! Meeting at the Senior Citizens Building, 941 Eagle Pass, Freedom. Contact Pastor Dale at 580-4309079. Jeans and children are welcome! First Assembly of God Sunday, November 24: Morning worship will be at 10:45 a.m. Evening worship will begin at 6 p.m. Wednesday, November 27: Adult Bible study, youth ministry for grades 6-12, and children’s activities at 7 p.m. At 9 p.m. will be Fuel (College and Young Adult Ministry). Nursery is available for all services except for Fuel. For more information please contact us at 580-327-0894. First Baptist Church Sunday, November 24: Prayer time starts at 9 a.m. Sunday school will begin at 9:30 a.m. and at 10:35 a.m. the worship service will begin. Wednesday, November 27: Wednesday night study groups will be at 6 p.m. First Christian Church Sunday, November 24: Sunday school will be at 9:30 a.m. and worship at 10:30 a.m. Youth will gather at 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. Monday, November 25: The quilters will meet at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, November 27: We will have no activities today. We hope everyone has a safe and joyous Thansgiving! First Presbyterian Church Sunday, November 24: Sunday school will be at 9:50 a.m. Worship is at 11 a.m. The ushers will be Larry and Joy Glass, Jason Wickham and Patty Harkin. The sermon title is “Unlikely King,” based on Luke 23:33-43. The Community Thanksgiving Service will be hosted by First Presbyterian Church. It will begin at 6 p.m. Choir rehearsal is at 5 p.m. The Ministerial Alliance uses this opportunity to get many churches involved. Rev. Terry Martindale will be preaching. Wednesday, November 27: We will not have a fellowship dinner today because of the Thansgiving holiday. First United Methodist Church Sunday, November 24: Sunday school for infants through adults will begin at 9:30 a.m. The worship service will be at 10:30 a.m. Rev. Terry Martindale’s sermon is entitled “Responding with Gratitude.” Liturgist will be Janice Melton. Children’s Time will be presented by Karen Linstrum. Ushers will be Saundra Boyd, Joyce Hickman, Fred Neuman, and David and Dana Manning. We will decorate the sanctuary for the Advent Season in the afternoon around 1:30 p.m. Rev. Martindale will preach at the Community Thanksgiving Service at First Presbyterian Church at 6 p.m. All singers are invited to join the choir, which rehearses at 5 p.m. at First Presbyterian. Monday, November 25: The Sherrill Bell Choir rehearsal will be at 5:30 p.m. N.A. Group will meet in Education Building every Monday at 7 p.m. Wednesday, November 27: No Wednesday activities this week. Thursday, November 28: Everyone is invited to join us for a free Thanksgiving Day dinner for the community from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Fellowship Hall. If you wish to pick up carry-out meals or need someone to deliver a meal to your home, please call the church office at 327-2571. Hopeton Church Hopeton: a non-typical church!

You don’t have to dress in a suit to be accepted; you can wear your jeans, get a cup of coffee, and enjoy contemporary music, great videos, and a relevant message. Hopeton Church meets at 10 a.m. at the main campus in Hopeton, just a few short miles south of Alva on 281. Coffee bar begins at 9:30 a.m. in the new children’s wing. A second service is held at the northern campus, The eXtreme, at the corner of College and Barnes Street in Downtown Alva, beginning at 1 p.m. The coffee bar opens at 12:30 p.m. We have something for every age: nursery, children, teens, adults, women’s support groups, and adult small H.O.M.E. groups for fellowship. 19390 County Road 440, PO Box 7, Hopeton, OK 73746. Phone: 580-435-2400, fax: 580-435-2401, email: hwc@hopetonchurch.org, Web site: www.hopetonchurch.org. eXtreme Youth Center All middle and high school students are invited to come to this fun place to hang out after school. Winter hours are Monday through Thursday from 3 p.m. To 5:30 p.m. The eXtreme is under the direction of Hopeton Church youth pastors Jeremy and Melissa Little. For more information, call 327-5433.

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Friday, November 22, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: MIDSTATES PETROLEUM COMPANY LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: INCREASED DENSITY LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 26 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA CAUSE CD 201307683-T NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA: To all persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma; and if any of the named individuals or entities be deceased or a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, successors, and assigns of any such deceased individual or dissolved partnership, corporation or other association. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT the Applicant in this cause has filed an application requesting the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma to enter an order amending Order No. 214227 to authorize and permit an additional well in the drilling and spacing units formed for the Mississippi Lime common source(s) of supply in Section 20, Township 26 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. The additional well to produce hydrocarbons from such separate common source(s) of supply, with such authorization and permission running in favor of Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant, and to establish a proper allowable for such well and such unit. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT the Applicant in this cause is requesting the following special relief: [A] To increase density by permitting the Applicant or some other party as operator for an additional well within an existing drilling and spacing unit(s) for production from the above common source(s) of supply as an exception to the drilling and spacing order for the captioned unit. [B] That the order to be entered in this matter be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and that the authorization and permission requested herein run in favor of Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause be set before an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this Cause will be heard before an

Town and Country Christian Church Sunday, November 24: Sunday school for all ages will start at 9:30 a.m. The Adult Sunday school lesson is “Beginning of the Tabernacle,” from Exodus 40:16-30, 34, 38. The greeter will be Fayetta Acord. At 10:30 a.m. worship service will start. Cherie Lau will play the piano. Song leader will be Kim Foster. Serving communion will be Paul Cole and Justin Lau. Children’s Church will be held. Pastor Paul Cole will bring the message, entitled “Thankful for Godly Living,” based on Psalm 81:1-16. We will have rest home services this afternoon: Beadles from 3 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. and Share from 3:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. The Community Thanksgiving Service will be tonight at 6 p.m. at the Presbyterian church. Tuesday, November 26: Town and Country Saints will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, November 27: The youth group will meet from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. The people at Town and Country Christian Church wish you a blessed and happy Thanksgiving! Zion Lutheran Church Rev. Aaron Wagner is the pastor of Zion Lutheran Church (Missouri

Synod) at Third and Maple. Sunday School and Adult Bible Class meet at 9:15 a.m. Fellowship begins at 10 a.m. and Divine Worship starts at 10:30 a.m. with Holy Communion twice monthly. Youth Group meets monthly. Ladies circles include Ruth Circle at noon the first Monday, Mary Martha Guild is 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of the month, Lutheran Women’s Missionary League meets the first Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. Hand bells practice at 5 p.m. on Mondays Seasoned Saints meet at 1 p.m. on the third Tuesday. On Wednesdays, Confirmation Class (for grades 7 and 8) begins at 5 p.m. Weekday School (grades 3-6) meets at 3:30 p.m. Zion holds Wednesday Services during Advent and Lent at 7 p.m. There is a Fellowship Meal at 6 p.m. The Lutheran Early Care and Education Center (327-1318) offers care for children as young as six weeks old, as well as an after school program. For more information concerning Zion Lutheran Church call 327-0510 or e-mail zlcalva@cneconnect.com.

Administrative Law Judge on the Initial Hearing Docket at the Eastern Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Room 114, 440 South Houston, Tulsa, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 10th day of December, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT any person interested or protesting the application please advise the Attorney of record and the Court Clerk’s Office of the Corporation Commission five (5) days before the hearing date above. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person and persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause, if protested, may be subject to a prehearing or settlement conference pursuant to OCCRP 165:511-2. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact Drew Veitch (918) 9478551, or Michael D. Stack, Attorney for Applicant, 943 East Britton Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73114; Bus (405) 286-1717; Fax (405) 286-2122. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, CHAIRMAN BOB ANTHONY, VICE CHAIRMAN DANA L MURPHY, COMMISSIONER DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 13TH DAY OF NOVEMBER 2013. ATTEST: PEGGY MITCHELL, SECRETARY OF THE COMMISSION

for distribution of said estate and for final discharge of said Personal Representative, and that the hearing of the same has been fixed by the Judge of the District Court for the 9th day of December, 2013, at 1:30 o’clock P.M. at the Woods County Courthouse in the District Courtroom at Alva, Woods County, Oklahoma, and all persons interested in said estate are notified then and there to appear and show cause, if any they have, why the said account should not be settled and allowed, the heirs of said deceased determined, said Estate distributed and the Personal Representative discharged. Dated this 6th day of November, 2013. s/Mickey J. Hadwiger ASSOCIATE DISTRICT JUDGE JIM HARKINS Attorney at Law Post office Box 329 Buffalo, Oklahoma 73834 580/735-2251 Attorney for Personal Representative

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Friday, November 15 and November 22, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA In the Matter of the Estate of ELMADEAN WILSON, a/k/a ELMA DEAN WILSON, Deceased. Case No. PB-2013-25 NOTICE OF HEARING FINAL ACCOUNT, PETITION FOR DETERMINATION OF HEIRS AND FOR DISTRIBUTION AND DISCHARGE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Judson G. Wilson Sr., Personal Representative of the Estate of Elmadean Wilson, a/k/a Elma Dean Wilson, deceased, has rendered, filed and presented for final settlement, his final account of the administration of said estate, and his petition for determination of the heirs, and

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, November 22, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT IN AND FOR WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA In the Matter of the Estate of Carl Henry Hort, Deceased. Case No. PB-2013-47 NOTICE OF HEARING PETITION FOR LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION, APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES AND DETERMINATION OF HEIRS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on the 19th day of November, 2013, Marie Hort filed in the District Court of the County of Woods, and the State of Oklahoma, a petition praying for Letters of Administration to be issued to her upon the estate of Carl Henry Hort, deceased and that heirs of said deceased be determined by the Court. AND pursuant to an order of said District Court, Monday the 2nd day of December, 2013, at the hour of 1:30 p.m. in the District Courtroom in the city of Alva, Woods County, Oklahoma, has been appointed as the time and place for hearing said petition, when and where any person interested may contest said petition as provided by law, or may assert their own rights to the administration and pray that Letters be issued to themselves. WITNESS my hand this 19th day of November, 2013. s/Mickey J. Hadwiger JUDGE OF THE DISTRICT COURT Dal L. Houston, OBA #17065 BENSON & HOUSTON, P.L.L.C. Attorney for Petitioners P.O. Box 488, 615 Barnes Alva, Oklahoma 73717 (580) 327-1197


November 22, 2013

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subject to a prehearing or settlement conference pursuant to OCCRP 165:5(Published by the Alva Review- 11-2. Courier on Friday, November 22, 2013.) NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that BEFORE THE CORPORATION all interested persons may appear and be COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF heard. For information concerning this OKLAHOMA action, contact Drew Veitch (918) 947APPLICANT: MIDSTATES 8551, or Michael D. Stack, Attorney PETROLEUM COMPANY LLC for Applicant, 943 East Britton Road, RELIEF SOUGHT: INCREASED Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73114, DENSITY FOR TWO ADDITIONAL Telephone: (405) 286-1717; Fax (405) WELLS 286-2122. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION CORPORATION COMMISSION OF 12, TOWNSHIP 25 NORTH, RANGE OKLAHOMA 13 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, PATRICE DOUGLAS, CHAIRMAN OKLAHOMA BOB ANTHONY, VICE CHAIRMAN CAUSE CD 201307680-T DANA L MURPHY, COMMISSIONER DONE AND PERFORMED THIS NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA: To all 13TH DAY OF NOVEMBER 2013. persons, owners, producers, operators, ATTEST: purchasers and takers of oil and gas and PEGGY MITCHELL, SECRETARY OF all other interested persons, particularly THE COMMISSION in Woods County, Oklahoma; and if any of the named individuals or entities LEGAL NOTICE be deceased or a dissolved partnership, (Published by the Alva Reviewcorporation or other association, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, Courier on Friday, November 22, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION devisees, trustees, successors, trustees and assigns of any such deceased COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA individual or dissolved partnership, APPLICANT: MIDSTATES corporation or other association. PETROLEUM COMPANY LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT RELIEF SOUGHT: WELL the Applicant in this cause has filed an LOCATION EXCEPTION application requesting the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma to enter an LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION order amending Order No. 98306 for 12, TOWNSHIP 25 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, the Mississippi Lime common source OKLAHOMA of supply to authorize and permit two CAUSE CD 201307681-T additional wells with multiple horizontal NOTICE OF HEARING laterals in the drilling and spacing unit STATE OF OKLAHOMA: To all formed for the common source of supply in Section 12, Township 25 North, Range persons, owners, producers, operators, 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. The purchasers and takers of oil and gas and additional wells to produce hydrocarbons all other interested persons, particularly from such separate common source of in Woods County, Oklahoma; and if supply, with such authorization and any of the named individuals or entities permission running in favor of Applicant be deceased or a dissolved partnership, or some other party recommended by corporation or other association, then the Applicant, and to establish a proper unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, successors, trustees and allowable for such wells and such unit. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN assigns of any such deceased individual THAT the Applicant in this cause is or dissolved partnership, corporation or other association; and more particularly requesting the following special relief: [a] That the order to be entered in this owners in the following offsetting units: matter be made effective as of the date Section 1, 2, 11, 13 & 14, Township 25 of the execution thereof or as of a date North, Range 13 West; Section 6, 7 & prior thereto and that the authorization 18, Township 25 North, Range 12 West, and permission requested herein run in Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT favor of Applicant or some other party Applicant in this Cause is requesting recommended by Applicant. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Commission establish a well THAT this cause be set before an location with an appropriate allowable Administrative Law Judge for hearing, for the Mississippi Lime common source taking of evidence and reporting to the of supply, as an exception to Order No. 98306 underlying Section 12, Township Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN 25 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, that this Cause will be heard before an Oklahoma, at the following location: Surface Location: To be determined Administrative Law Judge on the Initial Hearing Docket at the Eastern Regional and defined in the final order to issue in Service Office of the Corporation this cause; THE PROPOSED WELL Commission, 440 South Houston, Ste 114, Tulsa, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on SHALL ATTEMPT TO DRILL, the 10th day of December 2013, and that COMPLETE AND PRODUCE THREE this notice be published as required by HORIZONTAL LATERALS: Lateral 1: First perforation closest to the surface loc: law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN No closer than 165 feet to the south line THAT any person interested or protesting and no closer than 2400 feet to the east the application please advise the Attorney line of Section 12; Final perforation No of record and the Court Clerk’s Office closer than 165 feet to the north line and of the Corporation Commission five (5) no closer than 2400 feet to the east line of Section 12, Township 25 North, Range days before the hearing date above. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. Lateral 2: First perforation closest to the Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost the surface loc: No closer than 165 feet of telephonic communication shall be to the south line and no closer than 1800 paid by the person and persons requesting feet to the east line of Section 12; Final its use. Interested parties who wish to perforation No closer than 165 feet to the participate by telephone shall contact the north line and no closer than 1800 feet to Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior the east line of Section 12, Township 25 to the hearing date, and provide their North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. name and phone number. Lateral 3: First perforation closest to NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause, if protested, may be the surface loc: No closer than 165 feet to the south line and no closer than 1200 feet to the east line of Section 12; Final perforation No closer than 165 feet to the north line and no closer than 1200 feet to the east line of Section 12, Township 25 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT the Applicant in this cause is requesting the following special relief: The Commission enter an order, to be effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto, and to authorize the Applicant or some other party recommended by the Applicant as operator for a well to test, as an exception to the above drilling and spacing order for the common source(s) of supply and location stated above. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause be set before an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this Cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Initial Hearing Docket at the Eastern Regional Service Office of the Corporation

LEGAL NOTICE

Alva Review-Courier Commission, Room 114, 440 South Houston, Tulsa, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 10th day of December, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT any person interested or protesting the application please advise the Attorney of record and the Court Clerk’s Office of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission five (5) days before the hearing date above. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person and persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause, if protested, may be subject to a prehearing or settlement conference pursuant to OCCRP 165:511-2. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact Drew Veitch (918) 947-8551 or Michael D. Stack, Attorney for Applicant, 943 East Britton Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73114; Tele (405) 286-1717; Fax (405) 286-2122. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, CHAIRMAN BOB ANTHONY, VICE CHAIRMAN DANA L MURPHY, COMMISSIONER DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 13TH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2013. ATTEST: PEGGY MITCHELL, SECRETARY OF THE COMMISSION

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, November 22, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: MIDSTATES PETROLEUM COMPANY LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: WELL LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 26 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA CAUSE CD 201307686-T NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA: To all persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma; and if any of the named individuals or entities be deceased or a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, successors, trustees and assigns of any such deceased individual or dissolved partnership, corporation or other association; and more particularly owners in the following offsetting units: Section 19, 20, 21, 28, 30, 31, 32 &33, Township 26 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Applicant in this Cause is requesting that the Commission establish a well location with an appropriate allowable for the Mississippian common source of supply, as an exception to Order No. 586163 underlying Section 29, Township 26 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma, at the following location: Surface Location: To be determined and defined in the final order to issue in this cause; First perforation closest to the surface loc: No closer than 165 feet to the north line and no closer than 1700 feet to the east line of Section 29; Final perforation No closer than 165 feet to the south line and no closer than 1700 feet to the east line of Section 29, Township 26 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. The well is anticipated to be completed as a cement cased hole. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT the Applicant in this cause is requesting the following special relief: The Commission enter an order, to be effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto, and to authorize the Applicant or some other party recommended by the Applicant as operator for a well to test, as an exception to the above drilling and spacing order for the common source(s) of supply and location stated above. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause be set before an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this Cause will be heard before an

Page 16 Administrative Law Judge on the Initial Hearing Docket at the Eastern Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Room 114, 440 South Houston, Tulsa, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 10th day of December, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT any person interested or protesting the application please advise the Attorney of record and the Court Clerk’s Office of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission five (5) days before the hearing date above. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person and persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause, if protested, may be subject to a prehearing or settlement conference pursuant to OCCRP 165:511-2. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact Drew Veitch (918) 947-8551 or Michael D. Stack, Attorney for Applicant, 943 East Britton Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73114; Tele (405) 286-1717; Fax (405) 286-2122. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, CHAIRMAN BOB ANTHONY, VICE CHAIRMAN DANA L MURPHY, COMMISSIONER DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 13TH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2013. ATTEST: PEGGY MITCHELL, SECRETARY OF THE COMMISSION

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, November 22, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: MIDSTATES PETROLEUM COMPANY LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: WELL LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 25 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA CAUSE CD 201307682-T NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA: To all persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma; and if any of the named individuals or entities be deceased or a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, successors, trustees and assigns of any such deceased individual or dissolved partnership, corporation or other association; and more particularly owners in the following offsetting units: Section 1, 2, 11, 13 & 14, Township 25 North, Range 13 West; Section 6, 7 & 18, Township 25 North, Range 12 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Applicant in this Cause is requesting that the Commission establish a well location with an appropriate allowable for the Mississippi Lime common source of supply, as an exception to Order No. 98306 underlying Section 12, Township 25 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma, at the following location: Surface Location: To be determined and defined in the final order to issue in this cause; THE PROPOSED WELL SHALL ATTEMPT TO DRILL, COMPLETE AND PRODUCE TWO HORIZONTAL LATERALS: Lateral 1: First perforation closest to the surface loc: No closer than 165 feet to the south line and no closer than 1100 feet to the west line of Section 12; Final perforation No closer than 165 feet to the north line and no closer than 1100 feet to the west line of Section 12, Township 25 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. Lateral 2: First perforation closest to the surface loc: No closer than 165 feet to the south line and no closer than 1800 feet to the west line of Section 12; Final perforation No closer than 165 feet to the north line and no closer than 1800 feet to the west line of Section 12, Township 25 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT the Applicant in this cause is

requesting the following special relief: The Commission enter an order, to be effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto, and to authorize the Applicant or some other party recommended by the Applicant as operator for a well to test, as an exception to the above drilling and spacing order for the common source(s) of supply and location stated above. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause be set before an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this Cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Initial Hearing Docket at the Eastern Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Room 114, 440 South Houston, Tulsa, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 10th day of December, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT any person interested or protesting the application please advise the Attorney of record and the Court Clerk’s Office of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission five (5) days before the hearing date above. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person and persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause, if protested, may be subject to a prehearing or settlement conference pursuant to OCCRP 165:511-2. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact Drew Veitch (918) 947-8551 or Michael D. Stack, Attorney for Applicant, 943 East Britton Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73114; Tele (405) 286-1717; Fax (405) 286-2122. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, CHAIRMAN BOB ANTHONY, VICE CHAIRMAN DANA L MURPHY, COMMISSIONER DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 13TH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2013. ATTEST: PEGGY MITCHELL, SECRETARY OF THE COMMISSION

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, November 22, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT IN AND FOR WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA In the Matter of the Estate of Maude Swann Durkee, Deceased. Case No. PB-2013-46 NOTICE FOR HEARING PETITION FOR PROBATE OF WILL, APPOINTMENT OF EXECUTORS, DETERMINATION OF HEIRS, DEVISEES AND LEGATEES, AND ISSUANCE OF LETTERS OF TESTEMENTARY Notice is hereby given to all persons interested in the Estate of Maude Swann Durkee, deceased, that on the 19th day of November, 2013, Ann F. Graham produced and filed in the District Court of the County of Woods and State of Oklahoma, an instrument of writing purporting to be the Last Will and Testament of Maude Swann Durkee, deceased, and also filed in said Court their petition praying for the probate of said will, and that Letters Testamentary issue thereon to Ann F. Graham, the Personal Representative named in said will, that the heirs, devisees and legatees of said decedent be determined by the Court. Pursuant to the order of said Court made on the 19th day of November, 2013 notice is hereby given that Monday the 2nd day of December, 2013, at the hour of 1:30 o’clock p.m. of said day has been appointed as the time for hearing said petition and proving said will, at the District Court Room of the County Courthouse in Alva, Woods County, Oklahoma, when and where all persons interested may appear and contest the same. In Testimony Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand this 19th day of November, 2013. s/Mickey J. Hadwiger JUDGE OF THE DISTRICT COURT Dal L. Houston, OBA #17065 BENSON & HOUSTON, P.L.L.C. Attorney for Petitioner P.O. Box 488, 615 Barnes Alva, Oklahoma 73717


CAXCA

November 22, 2013

LPXLP

Alva Review-Courier

Action Ads For Rent Computer Plus RV Trailer Storage/Hook-Up. For all computer repair needs call Covered with water and power. 951- Adam Swallow at 580-327-4449 or 743-3438 580-748-2349 or come by 1329 Fair. Will do local housecalls Painting Spruce up your house for the holidays Jack’s Automotive with a fresh coat of paint. Call Alva’s Cherokee, OK. 2 Positions; #1-Retail Full Spectrum Painters for your Hardware Assistant Store Manager interior/exterior painting needs. 580- & #2-Department Manager. 2-3 307-5882 years retail management experience preferred. Working knowledge Double B Carpentry of PC & POS Systems, good For all your carpentry needs from communication skills, multitask remodeling, painting, drywall, orientated. Resume to David Parr at texturing, siding, windows, farm & jacks2438@sbcglobal.net. 580-596ranch, etc. 580-748-1489 2438 Professional Upholstery Help Wanted will all types of furniture. Over 55 Dependable Auto & Truck years experience. Goltry, OK. 580mechanics, CDL, license is needed 496-2351 to drive wreckers. Pay based upon Crooked Oak B & B

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CC Construction

Interior-Exterior improvements. Room additions. Plaster Repair & Painting. Handicap. Structural & Non Structural Concrete. Will also accommodate Farm & Ranch. 580307-4598 or 620-825-4285

Mary Kay Black Friday

MURROW

REAL ESTATE & AUCTION

580-327-1998

www.murrowlandandhome.com www.murrowrealestateandauction.com

Community Calendar

Friday Help Wanted 9 a.m. The Woods County High Pressure Truck Operator/ Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Driver. Hawley Hot Oil. Competitive Alva, is open for games and other wages and benefits. Will train. 580activities. Exercise is scheduled 542-1200 each day at 11 a.m. Transportation For Sale provided upon request. 1 Power House Weight Machine. 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Exc cond. $1600 New. Will sell for Museum in Alva is open every day $450. 580-737-0081 except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327Warmth for Winter Saturday, Nov. 23, 10 a.m. to 1 2030. 7 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous p.m. Coats, clothing and blankets meets every Friday at the Senior giveaway at College Hill Church of Wood Burning Stove

West, Woods County, Oklahoma, at the

PATRICE DOUGLAS, CHAIRMAN

For Sale

First perforation closest to the surface loc: No closer than 165 feet to the north line and no closer than 1700 feet to the east line of Section 20; Final perforation No closer than 165 feet to the south line and no closer than 1700 feet to the east line of Section 20, Township 26 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. The well is anticipated to be completed as a cement cased hole. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT the Applicant in this cause is requesting the following special relief: The Commission enter an order, to be effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto, and to authorize the Applicant or some other party recommended by the Applicant as operator for a well to test, as an exception to the above drilling and spacing order for the common source(s) of supply and location stated above. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause be set before an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this Cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Initial Hearing Docket at the Eastern Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Room 114, 440 South Houston, Tulsa, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 10th day of December, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT any person interested or protesting the application please advise the Attorney of record and the Court Clerk’s Office of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission five (5) days before the hearing date above. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person and persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN THAT this cause, if protested, may be subject to a prehearing or settlement conference pursuant to OCCRP 165:511-2. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact Drew Veitch (918) 947-8551 or Michael D. Stack, Attorney for Applicant, 943 East Britton Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73114; Tele (405) 286-1717; Fax (405) 286-2122. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA

ATTEST: PEGGY MITCHELL, SECRETARY OF THE COMMISSION

BOB ANTHONY, VICE CHAIRMAN Heater. Triple wall pipe. 1 90 degree, following location: DANA L MURPHY, COMMISSIONER Surface Location: To be determined 2-30” stove pipe stand. Magic Heat DONE AND PERFORMED THIS and defined in the final order to issue in Blower. $575. 580-829-2601 13TH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2013. this cause;

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Friday, November 22, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: MIDSTATES PETROLEUM COMPANY LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: WELL LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 26 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA CAUSE CD 201307684-T NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA: To all persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma; and if any of the named individuals or entities be deceased or a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees, successors, trustees and assigns of any such deceased individual or dissolved partnership, corporation or other association; and more particularly owners in the following offsetting units: Section 16, 17, 18, 19, 21, 28, 29 & 30, Township 26 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Applicant in this Cause is requesting that the Commission establish a well location with an appropriate allowable for the Mississippi Lime common source of supply, as an exception to Order No. 214227 underlying Section 20, Township 26 North, Range 13

EdwardJones

The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up 109.17 to close at 16,009.99. The NASDAQ Composite Index was up 47.89 to close at 3,969.16. The Transportation Average was up 78.64 to close at 7,173.36 and Utilities CLOSED up 0.32 at 495.87. Volume was approx. 621.82 million shares. Gold fell $21.45 to $1,241.80 and Silver CLOSED at $19.95, up 8¢. Crude oil prices rose $1.33 to $95.18 per barrel. Wheat Price was $6.71, dn 1¢. Prime Rate is 3.25%

Stocks of Local Interest — Courtesy Pat Harkin

Name OGE Energy ONEOK Inc Duke Energy WilliamsCo Chesapeake Energy Wal-Mart ConocoPhillips SandRidge Energy

Close 37.63 57.54 70.75 34.90 26.33 78.87 73.34 5.77

Citizen Center, 122 1/2 E. Second, Cherokee. Saturday 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-3272030. Sunday 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-3272030.

Christ, 1102 6th St., Alva.

experience & ability. Paid vacation House for Sale, Freedom, OK. 580& other benefits. Moser Towing and 542-2970. Repair in Alva. 580-327-1135 or House For Sale 800-813-9078 3bdrm 2bth home in Waynoka, OK. Help Wanted Contact John Fuqua at 580-430-7892 Triple F Oilfield Service in Alva is For Sale seeking Truck Drivers. Must have 3 4 acres. Woodlake Estates. $50,000. years vacuum truck driving exp. Call Serious inquiries only. 580-571the Alva office at 936-572-0603 or 7468 pick up app at 46904 Jefferson Rd. Alva

40% off whole website Nov 24-Nov Help Wanted 30. www.marykay.com. 580-7481755 call/text. amber.leroux@yahoo. Construction company seeking office personal assistant to help com with clerical work and organization. Gene O’s BBQ Computer and communication skills will be open this Friday dinner and required. Must be self-motivated. Saturday lunch for the rest of the Part-Time position. Send Resume to month until Thanksgiving. The week minijaresandsons@yahoo.com of Thanksgiving we will be smoking Help Wanted Turkeys. You supply the Turkey and we will supply the smoke. Call Gene Beadles Nursing Home, 916 Noble, 580-370-5532 for the prices. Only 20 Alva, is accepting applications for a Full-Time Administrative Assistant. Turkeys will be smoked Microsoft Office Skills required. Experience in Human Resources, payroll and Medical Filing preferred, but will train. May pick up an application or print one off our website. EOE

Page 17

Change +0.31 +0.40 +0.72 +0.12 +0.78 -0.03 +1.09 +0.13

30 Yr. U.S. Treasury Bond Insured AAA Tax Free Muni. Bond Yield to Maturity 5 Year C/D, Annual Pct Yield Money Market - 7 Day Avg Rate

Volume 658,037 1,087,549 3,415,455 4,572,606 9,757,684 3,830,014 3,949,632 5,959,026

3.89% 0.38-4.25% 1.90% 0.01%

Stock Market Report — for November 21, 2013

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva ReviewCourier on Friday, November 8, November 15.and November 22, 2013) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA JOHN C. MEYER, Plaintiff; vs. THE HEIRS, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, DEVISEES AND ASSIGNS OF ELMER F. LAMBERT, DECEASED, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, TRUSTEES AND ASSIGNS, IMMEDIATE AND REMOTE, OF ELMER F. LAMBERT Defendants. THE HEIRS, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, DEVISEES AND ASSIGNS OF WILMA VERA LAMBERT, DECEASED, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, TRUSTEES AND ASSIGNS, IMMEDIATE AND REMOTE, OF WILMA VERA LAMBERT Defendants. Case No, CV-13-38 NOTICE BY PUBLICATION THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: THE HEIRS, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, DEVISEES AND ASSIGNS OF ELMER F. LAMBERT, DECEASED, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, DEVISEES, TRUSTEES, ASSIGNS AND SUCCESSORS, IMMEDIATE AND REMOTE, OF ELMER F. LAMBERT, DECEASED. THE HEIRS, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, DEVISEES AND ASSIGNS OF WILMA VERA LAMBERT, DECEASED, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, EXECUTORS, ADMINISTRATORS, DEVISEES, TRUSTEES, ASSIGNS AND SUCCESSORS, IMMEDIATE AND REMOTE, OF WILMA VERA LAMBERT, DECEASED. GREETINGS: Said Defendants are hereby notified that they have been sued in Case No. CV-13-38, in the District Court of Woods County, Oklahoma, styled John C. Meyer, Plaintiff, Vs. The Heirs, Executors, Administrators, Devisees and Assigns of Elmer F. Lambert, Deceased, the Unknown Heirs, Executors, Administrators, Trustees and Assigns, Immediate and Remote, of Elmer F. Lambert, Defendants; John C. Meyer, Plaintiff, Vs. The Heirs, Executors, Administrators, Devisees and Assigns of Wilma Vera Lambert, Deceased, the Unknown Heirs, Executors, Administrators, Trustees and Assigns, Immediate and Remote, of Wilma Vera Lambert, Defendants; and that said Defendants must answer the Petition herein on or before the 19th day of December, 2013, or the allegations of said Petition will be taken as true, as prayed for in Plaintiff’s Petition. Given under my hand and seal this 5th day of November, 2013. COUNTY CLERK OF WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA Sherry Williams EDWARD E. SUTTER Attorney for Plaintiff 401 College P. O. Box 213 Alva, OK 73717 (580) 327-1511


November 22, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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November 22, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Huge amusement, attraction Feds: Child porn ring stayed hidden 12 years trade show in Orlando By Tamara Lush ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Have you ever wondered where your fun comes from? The answer: here, at the International Association of Amusement Parks & Attractions expo. The five-day trade show took place this week in Orlando, smack in the middle of the world’s biggest theme park corridor. It’s the largest such convention in the world, and people from more than 100 countries either attend, or exhibit, at the mind-bogglingly massive show. A few numbers to explain the scale: Organizers sold out 500,000 square feet (46,450 square meters) of indoor show space. More than 27,000 people attended on the first day. If one were to walk the entire show floor, it would tally 9 miles (15 kilometers). No wonder a man was spotted sleeping in a car parked in the convention center’s lot mid-day on Wednesday. Or why another man could be seen on all fours on the floor, hunched over the show’s map (which is the size of a small table when unfolded). Here, leisure is serious business. “We’re trying to pick out what our customers are going to want,” said John Schweiger, the CEO of

From Page 13

Rescue

Roeske said the first victim was pulled from the water about 25 minutes after the crash was reported about 6:10 a.m. Rescuers pulled the children out slowly, one by one, and the last wasn’t removed until her or she had been in the water 45 minutes, he said. Passersby attempted to rescue the children before police arrived, but the 1998 Pontiac Grand Am was submerged in 8 to 9 feet of cold water. Roeske said the “incredibly cold, nearly freezing-temperature

From Page 12

Coming Attractions Theaters, a four-state chain of movie houses and entertainment centers on the West Coast. Schweiger was at the show looking for bumper cars and go-karts for a new indoor entertainment center that he’s opening in Alaska. “Our country needs fun right now,” he mused. “Everything else that’s going on puts you in a state of depression.” There’s everything that a theme park, entertainment center, zoo or museum could want at this show. “You can buy something today and put it in your park immediately, or find a germ of a project for five years from now,” said Jeremy Schoolfield, the editor-in-chief of Funworld, the IAAPA trade magazine. There were architects who design sleek museum exhibits and ones who design tropical mini-golf courses. Companies that manufacture wheels for roller coasters. Vendors of water slides and ziplines. Tickets, trash cans, trampoline supplies. A mall-sized parking lot crammed with bounce houses. Animatronic giant bugs. A lifelike mechanical snake-oil salesman, made to look like something from the 1800s, that lip-syncs the song “Moves Like Jagger.”

water” would have made it difficult for anyone to reach the children. The cold water came up to the neck of one would-be rescuer who stood on the roof of the four-door sedan, Roeske said. Roeske said investigators were working to determine whether speed was a factor in the crash. The road was wet from light mist, but not icy, he said. He said there was no indication that Guerrido intentionally drove into the water. No alcohol was found in her system.

Dispute

agree to do certain things, we will agree to lower rates from the base rate.” In the case of the Chickasaws, the lower rate resulted from an agreement with the tribe to convert its vehicle fleet to natural gas and install compressed natural gas fueling stations at some of its convenience stores, Mullins said. “The first thing we talked about with the tribes was did they want a one-size-fits-all compact where

every tribe gets the same deal,” Mullins said. “The consensus from the tribes was that a one-size-fitsall issue ignores the individual sovereignty of the 38 federally recognized Indian tribes in Oklahoma.” The governor’s office also negotiates compacts with tribes over casino gaming, but Mullins said those compacts don’t expire until 2020 and are the same for all tribes. *** Follow Sean Murphy on Twitter at https://twitter.com/ apseanmurphy

A miniature version of a dark roller coaster that involves shooting zombies in 3-D. Platoons of Hello Kitty. Lots and lots of sugar. “This is a brand new food category,” said Scott Colwell, the owner of the Orlando-based Chilly Ribbons, which is best described as tasty shaved snow sold from what looks like a mini ski chalet. “And it has less than 100 calories!” This is Chilly Ribbons’ first year at the show, and like hundreds of others, Colwell hopes to do business with large parks and attractions by renting space at the expo, talking up the product and handing out free samples. Cinderella stories have happened before at the IAAPA expo. Take Ernest Yale, the president and CEO of Montreal-based Triotech, which creates immersive and interactive attractions. Fifteen years ago, Yale drove to the show with four of his employees in a truck. They slept in the same hotel room and rented a small booth. The team sold one small arcade game three hours before the show ended — and Yale was up all night, programming it the night before. This week, Triotech had one of the largest spaces at the Expo — about 3,600 square feet (335 square meters) — and are developing an interactive, dark roller coaster for Cedar Fair Entertainment Company’s Toronto park. “We met them on the floor a couple of years ago,” said Matt Ouimet, CEO of Cedar Fair. Triotech’s coaster is scheduled to open at Canada’s Wonderland in May 2014. Ouimet said that the IAAPA show is the place to find a new concept that will be a hit with guests in the future. “This is where we come to find the new ideas,” he said. *** Follow Tamara Lush on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tamaralush

From Page 13

By Ken Kusmer INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Investigators have busted an international child pornography ring that remained undetected for 12 years by using data encryption technology that one federal prosecutor said Thursday was the best he’d seen in more than 20 years on the job. A total of 11 men from Indiana, Alabama, California, Florida, New York, Texas, and Virginia have been convicted or are in custody, prosecutors said at a news conference in Indianapolis, where the case was filed in federal court. They are charged with sexually exploiting minors. Ring members have been charged or are under investigation in Canada, Switzerland and other countries, prosecutors said, although they didn’t say how many foreign suspects. Nearly 100 children, most of them boys who ranged from toddlers to teens, were exploited by the ring, prosecutors said. “These defendants engaged in an operation that had one purpose and one purpose only, to promote the abuse and exploitation of our children,” U.S. Attorney Joe Hogsett said. Members of the ring mostly traded pornography instead of producing it, but at least four members allegedly conspired to produce new videos and images of boys engaging in sex, which then could be distributed to other members of the group, prosecutors said. One of the defendants, 42-yearold John Rex Powell, of Fort Myers, Fla., is awaiting trial in a separate child porn case involving two Australians accused of making their adopted son sexually available to men around the world. Powell is charged with the sexual exploitation of children and a conspiracy count in that case. Powell’s involvement in both schemes was key to dismantling the child porn ring described Thursday, Hogsett said.

The ring began operating sometime in 2000 and was shut down in April 2012, but the investigation remained sealed until Thursday, Assistant U.S. Attorney Steve DeBrota said. U.S. postal inspectors investigating a foreign company selling videotapes were led to individuals in Idaho and Pennsylvania, then to two Indiana men, 61-year-old John Richard Edwards, of Indianapolis, and 44-year-old Thomas Vaughn, of Anderson. Edwards pleaded guilty a year ago to engaging in a child pornography enterprise in connection with the ring and was sentenced to 17½ years in prison. The ring was able to operate for so long because of data encryption technology that DeBrota, who specializes in Internet cases, called the best he’s seen in his more than 20 years as a prosecutor. “We were able to identify a previously unidentified super-secret group which we allege trafficked in child pornography in vast quantities over a 12-year period of time,” DeBrota said. The largest individual collection of child pornography in the ring had about 18 terabytes, or 18 trillion bytes, of images, DeBrota said. Some ring members were information technology professionals, and the more tech-savvy members of the group coached the less tech-savvy in the secrecy needed to evade detection, Assistant U.S. Attorney Brant Cook said. He said members communicated through social media and in chat rooms to encourage one another to collect, traffic and produce more child porn “They effectively radicalized one other” Cook said. Vaughn’s attorney, Zaki Ali, declined to discuss the case and Powell’s attorneys, Charles Hayes and Kathleen Sweeny of Indianapolis, didn’t immediately respond to phone messages seeking comment.

Captive

Her charity first sounded the alarm to Metropolitan Police’s sexual offenses exploitation and child abuse unit; the case then was passed on to its human trafficking unit. By tracking where the woman’s calls were coming from, London police managed to find the house in the borough of Lambeth, south of the River Thames. London police were keeping the exact location of the house secret. After repeated, tentative calls to the charity, two of the captive women agreed to meet at another location on Oct. 25, police said. The first two — the British woman and the Irish woman — walked out under their own power and identified the house where they’d

been held. At that point, police said they went in and rescued the 69-year-old Malaysian woman. Hyland said there was a delay in arresting the two suspects — neither of whom are British — as police worked to establish the facts of the case and to ensure that the women who had escaped were not further traumatized. The suspects are now in custody at a south London police station. “When we had established the facts, we conducted the arrests,” Hyland told reporters. Hyland said while the women had some “controlled freedom,” police were still working to establish what sort of conditions they lived under for the past 30 years.

“For much of it, they would have been kept on the premises,” Hyland said. He said his unit, which deals with many cases of servitude and forced labor, had seen previous cases of people held for up to ten years. “But we’ve never seen anything of this magnitude before,” he said. *** Follow Cassandra Vinograd at http://twitter.com/CassVinograd


November 22, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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