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Alva Review-Courier Vol. 121 No. 86

Sunday, October 27, 2013 - $1.00

www.alvareviewcourier.com

620 Choctaw, Alva, OK 73717

Oklahoma Department of Corrections board meets at BJCC By Lynn L. Martin The board of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections (DOC) travels around the state to hold its monthly meetings. Friday, it was Bill Johnson Correctional Center’s (BJCC) turn to give the members a tour and explain their programs. At 1 p.m. the board meeting started in the chapel on the BJCC grounds. Warden Jannice Melton stood and welcomed the board and provided details about the mission, staffing and prison population at BJCC. She introduced four community advisory board members in attendance and noted their importance to the institution. Bayley Zehr (left) and Jake West (right) were crowned the 2013 After approval of the previous NWOSU football homecoming King and Queen. Photo by Leslie Nation meeting’s minutes, the board heard a report about the entire DOC system from Ed Evans, interim director. Next, Jason Bryan, deputy warden, and Angela Allison, BJCC’s lead alcohol and drug counselor, described the programs in place at BJCC and told of the importance of

their relationship with Northwestern Oklahoma State University to provide these services. A board policy was approved that outlined the “legislative initiative process” the DOC board will use to approach the legislature for needed laws and help in implementing its mission. Neville Massie, executive assistant, outlined the 2014 proposed legislative initiatives. : • Clarify list of crimes excluded from eligibility for delayed sentencing. • Amend Sex Offender Registration Act to clarify registration requirement does not apply while offender is incarcerated. • Increase time frame from six months to twelve months from scheduled release for parold board docketing of nonviolent offenders when all facilities reach maximum capacity and DOC contracts for bedspace. • Amend a staute on ofender medical care to have DOC pay

By Marione Martin The City of Alva has been making progress on resurfacing and maintaining city streets. Alva City Council members approved an equipment purchase Oct. 21 that will help the street department continue that work. The city has been leasing a Crafco SuperShot 125 DC 70 for the past few months and decided to purchase the machine. “This piece of machinery is a vital part of the current street maintenance program,” said Alva Business Manager Joe Don Dunham. The melter machine is being purchased off the HGAC contract list so it has already been “bid out” and does not require going out for bids. It comes with a one year warranty and costs $52,149.42. Dunham said the machine is used to seal cracks in the street surface prior to applying chip or slurry sealing. He said the leased machine has helped greatly in the repair of city streets, and having a machine available all year will add to the ability of the department to make repairs. Other Business The council approved the application from Randy Parker to withdraw retirement funds from the city pension plan in a lump sum. A list of items no longer needed by the Recreation Complex was submitted, and the council voted to declare them surplus. Dunham said the city will eventually offer any usable surplus items for sale. All council members were present at the meeting Oct. 21. They approved paying claims to-

With the changes in health insurance, the commissioners took no action on the employee health insurance plan until a few questions could be answered. Last year at this time, the commissioners opted to give the employees a bonus to help compete with the wages paid by many oil field firms. The bonus was capped at $1,500 and utilized a formula that included years of service. They plan to look at the bonus idea each year to see if revenue is sufficient for a bonus that year. The matter was tabled until more information

City decides to buy instead of lease

taling $198,391.44. Alva Utility Authority The same members then met as the Alva Utility Authority. They approved paying claims of $85,248.74. A request for water service outside the city limits for Atwood Distributing, L.P. at 1600 E. Oklahoma Blvd. was approved. It is also anticipated they will use city garbage service. At the request of Dunham, the trustees voted to acknowledge the closure of a couple of checking accounts associated with The Homestead. When the city restructured the accounting system under the Municipal Budget Act, several accounting functions were consolidated. Dunham presented information on strategic goals for the water/ sewer system that were developed by the water/sewer committee, the strategic planning committee and city employees. “One of the biggest concerns for the community of Alva since I have been employed, and I suspect much longer, here has been the condition of the water and sewer system to include the water well fields,” Dunham stated. The plan calls for a comprehensive evaluation of the condition of city water distribution and sewer collection systems along with action to address issues. Water System The report lists the good and bad of the water system. Strengths listed are: available resources, plentiful, additional resources exist, two day supply in reserve

Medicaid reimbursement for inpatient hospitalization rather than current network rate. • Exempt offenders serving life without parole from requirement to deposit 20 percent of wages in mandatory savings, payable upon discharge. Greg Sawyer, chief of business operations, reviewed the month’s financial statistics and announced the fiscal year 2015 appropriation request is $495,237,750. Laura Pitman, deputy director of institutions, Division 1, asked for and received approval of an increase in bed capacity at the Eddie Warrior Correctional Center by 158 beds to a total capacity of 2,431. The board entered into executive session to discuss to discuss two lawsuits: the suicide of Christopher Short, and Starkey vs. Oklahoma DOC. For more details of the meeting, a video is available on the newspaper web site, www.AlvaReviewCourier.com

The October 2013 meeting of the board of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections was held Friday at 1 p.m. at the Bill Johnson Correctional Center in Alva. Board members from left: Gene Haynes, Linda Neal, Michael Roach, T. Hastings Siegfried, Kevin Gross, Ed Evans (interim director) and Steve Burrage. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

Woods County commissioners hold special meeting

By Lynn L. Martin The Woods County commissioners met Tuesday, Oct. 22. They approved the minutes of their previous special board meeting on Oct. 9. Several road crossing permit requests were examined and most were tabled. For example, a water crossing permit for the new construction at the Cedar Grove church was tabled because they believe a water cross permit already exists and they wanted to check to see if there really a need for anothSee Council Page 3 er permit.

is available. A water break at the senior citizens building was discussed. The building is owned by the county. The Alva city manager told them they should not have called a plumber for the break since the problem was on the city side of the meter. So the city is declining to play the plumbing bill (less than $100) and asking the commissioners pay it. One commissioner commented, “The city must have forgotten about some of the dirt

See Meeting Page 3


October 27, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 2

Small Oklahoma Three from hospitals losing money Woodward die in head-on collision

By Clifton Adcock of much brighter. Small non-specialOklahoma Watch and Ziva ty hospitals are struggling with Branstetter of the Tulsa World declining patients, a slow econA majority of small omy and dramatic changes in the general hospitals in health-care industry. Oklahoma are losing Rural hospitals in Georgia, money, and health care Alabama, North Carolina and Ariofficials warn that some zona have closed their doors in rehospitals could close, be sold or cent months, said Brock Slabach, cut services. senior vice president of the NaFederal financial reports for tional Rural Health Association. nearly every hospital in the state, “I wish I could say (the situaobtained by Oklation) is rosy, but it’s homa Watch and not,” Slabach said. analyzed and re“This is not someported with the thing we’re crying Tulsa World, show wolf about. This is that in each year happening now.” from 2009 to 2012, The financial between half and data on Oklahoma three-fourths of genhospitals was oberal hospitals with tained from the Cenfewer than 100 beds ters for Medicare lost money. Most are — Brock Slabach, and Medicaid Serin small cities or ruvices via a Freedom ral areas. More than senior VP, National Rural of Information Act Health Association request, and from half posted losses in multiple years. the American HospiLarger hospitals fared better. tal Directory, which compiles cost In each year during the four-year report data. period, between 7 percent and 19 The federal government repercent of general hospitals with quires most hospitals to file cost 100 beds or more lost money. reports annually. Figures were The financial strains affecting collected for 120 Oklahoma hosthe state’s more than 70 small gen- pitals from 2007 to 2012, although eral hospitals has many adminis- not all hospitals’ reports were filed trators on edge about what happens each year. Nearly all reports were next. One hospital, Pauls Valley available for 2009 through 2012. General Hospital, declared bankTroubled Hospital ruptcy earlier this year, although it On Easter Day this year, James remains open. Rural health experts Frizell took his wife to the nearby and officials say more bankrupt- emergency room at Pauls Valley cies or even closings could occur. General Hospital after she began The loss of a hospital in a small behaving unusually and had troucommunity can seriously impede ble performing simple tasks. access to health care as well as At the ER, workers found that hurt the local economy, health of- Frizell’s wife had low potassium. ficials say. She also was suffering from an alNationally, the picture isn’t lergic reaction to new medication,

Frizell said. The hospital workers were able to save her life. Now, Frizell, who is city manager of Pauls Valley, wonders who will save the hospital. “Had they not done what they did, my wife would have died,” Frizell said. “To me personally, it’s important that it stays open.” Pauls Valley General Hospital filed for bankruptcy in February, the same month the group managing the hospital, SSM Health Care, declined to purchase the city-owned hospital after several months of negotiation. SSM Health Care is a hospital management company owed by St. Anthony Hospital in Oklahoma City. In 2012, the hospital lost nearly $4.2 million, according to cost report data. Frizell said the hospital had several issues, including not sending out many bills and failing to secure federal reimbursement for mandated equipment. Some of the Pauls Valley hospital’s problems are unique. Others reflect what most small nonurban hospitals are confronting, particularly a decline in the number of patients, Frizell said. The Pauls Valley City Council has assumed oversight of the hospital for now. The bankruptcy filing has residents and community leaders wondering how much longer the hospital will last. “It think it’s to the front of everybody’s mind, that there’s a possibility it could close,” Frizell said. “The future may be that it closes down. We don’t want that to happen, but it could.” A Critical Role Small hospitals play a vital role in small and rural communities. Without a local hospital, residents may have to travel for hours to get emergency and other health care. The community may have a harder time attracting doctors to set up practice, which already is a serious issue throughout the state. Gayle England of Stroud depends on the hospital about 17 miles from her home, the Bristow Medical Center. England, a 65-year-old horse rancher, was diagnosed with lupus five years ago, and easy access to health care became a top priority. She has made regular trips to the Bristow hospital because of chronic dehydration, including a trip to the emergency room last Bruce Mayhan, lab manager at Pauls Valley General Hospital, looks spring for dehydration and low at a blood sample through a microscope in the hospital’s lab. Photo blood pressure. “They (hospital staff) truly live by Clifton Adcock, Oklahoma Watch by the standard of ‘do no harm.’ They kept me where they could see me at all times, and the emergency nurse never left my side,” England said. Bristow Medical Center has lost money in four of the past five years. If the hospital weren’t there, England said, she would probably have to drive 50 miles to Tulsa to get treatment.

“This is not something we’re crying wolf about. This is happening now.”

By Marione Martin Three people including a sixmonth-old baby died in a two vehicle collision Thursday night near Ft. Supply. The three were in a car in the wrong lane on SH183, 3.8 miles south of Ft. Supply in Woodward County. The wreck occurred at 9:40 p.m. According to the report from the Oklahoma Highway Patrol, a 2012 Dodge pickup driven by Don Witman, 60, of Vici was traveling northbound on SH183. A 1996 Honda Accord driven by Billy Jade Lowry, 26, of Woodward was going southbound in the northbound lanes. The two vehicles collided head-on. Witman’s pickup rolled a quarter turn, coming to rest on the driver’s side. The Lowry car rotated 180 degrees, coming to rest 60 feet

north of impact. Witman was pinned in the pickup 50 minutes until extricated by Woodward Fire Department. The driver and passengers in the car were extricated about two hours after the collision by Woodward Fire Department. Lowry and passengers Katie Leann Peeples, 22, of Woodward and Aries Jade Lowry, six months, were pronounced dead at the scene. All had head and trunk internal injuries. Neither of the adults was wearing a seatbelt and the infant was not in a child restraint. Witman, the driver of the pickup, was wearing a seatbelt. The fatal collision was investigated by Trooper Mike Fike of the Woodward detachment, assisted by Lt. Stan Walker and troopers James Crowder and Phillip Ludwyck.

Erratic driving leads to police stop and felony charge

By Marione Martin A report of erratic driving led police to stop a vehicle in Alva. The driver was arrested for felony DUI. According to documents in the case, Alva police officers Patrick Hawley and Blake Fogle were dispatched to the west side of Alva about 6:22 p.m. on Sept. 14. They were looking for a four door Dodge pickup driving east on US64. A caller said the pickup was swerving to the ditch and over the yellow line multiple times. The officers saw the pickup and pulled out of a private drive to follow. There was another vehicle between their police unit and the Dodge pickup. Hawley saw the Dodge pickup go left of center traveling in the oncoming traffic lane and swerve back over into the eastbound lane in front of Washburn Motors. He saw the pickup go over the fog line then swerve left going left of center again at Skyline and Oklahoma Boulevard. Hawley activated his emergency lights signaling the vehicle to pull over. After the vehicle between the police unit and the pickup turned off, Hawley pulled closer to the Dodge and observed the driver moving around inside the vehicle constantly. The pickup turned north onto 13th Street and stopped in the middle of the street at 13th and Maple. As Hawley was going to put his unit in park, the pickup started moving and turned east onto Maple Street, then turned south onto 12th Street. The pickup then stopped close to the 12th and See Hospitals Page 8 Maple intersection.

Hawley exited his patrol unit, approached the driver’s side of the pickup and spoke to the driver, Rebecca Michelle Shaver, 40, of Mannford. He could immediately smell an overwhelming odor of intoxicating beverage coming from inside the pickup. Hawley asked Shaver to step out of the vehicle. As she was exiting, he saw a prescription pill bottle in the driver’s side door. He also saw a liquid on the floor board that appeared to be recently spilled. He saw Blue Moon beer bottle caps on the floor board. As Shaver exited the vehicle, she had to use the vehicle for balance to keep from falling. Hawley asked Shaver for her driver’s license and insurance. She said the pickup belonged to Richard Shaver and she did not have the insurance. Hawley described Shaver’s speech as being slurred and hard to understand. As Shaver continued to look for her driver’s license, Hawley noted a loss of fine motor skills. After waiting, Hawley asked Shaver to come have a seat in his patrol unit. She started to put a piece of something in her mouth, and he told her not to put that in her mouth. She did anyway. Hawley told her to spit it out. He had to tell her again before she spit it out. He told her again she needed to come back to his patrol unit so he could get her information. She turned around and leaned in the driver’s seat and reached for her purse. Hawley saw her grab a pre-

See Charge Page 5


October 27, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Obituaries HARRY KLINE Harry, son of Frieda (Ehrlich) and Dave D. Kline, was born on April 5, 1922, on the family farm near Shattuck. He passed away at the Oklahoma Heart Hospital in Oklahoma City on Oct. 24, 2013, at the age of 91 years, 6 months and 19 days. In 1929, when Harry was 7 years old, the family moved to a farm seven miles northwest of Alva. He grew up on that farm and graduated from Horace Mann High School in Alva. After graduation, Harry became a WWII veteran by serving in the US Army from 1942 through 1946. On March 26, 1947, at the Hardtner, Kan., Methodist parsonage, he married Norma Kathyrn Albers, with whom he celebrated 56 years of marriage prior to her death in 2003. Harry and Norma made their home in Alva where they raised their three children – Stanley, Darrell and Kathy. In 1958, Harry and Howard Kurth established K&K Body Works, which he owned and operated for over 20 years. Harry was a member of the First United Methodist Church, the Alva Blackwing Post of the VFW, the Antique Car Club, and the Do-Little Camper Club. He was a master craftsman, whether restoring antique automobiles or

From Front Page

working in his wood shop. He was preceded in death by his parents, wife and sister – Alene Sternberger. Harry will be deeply missed by his surviving children and their spouses: Stanley and Debbie Kline, and Darrell and Ann Kline, both of Alva; and Kathy and Troy Hampton of Wichita, Kan. Also surviving are three grandchildren: Heather Kline, Jesse and Mistie Kline, and Scott Kline and his fiancée Janet Moffatt, all of Alva, plus three great grandchildren: Carrington, Taylor and Wesley Kline, also of Alva; one sister, Rose Blunk of Alva, and one brother, Ted Kline of Centralia, Wash.; numerous nieces, nephews and cousins, plus many friends. Memorial services will be Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2013, at 1:30 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church in Alva with Rev. Terry Martindale, pastor, officiating. Interment will be in the Alva Municipal Cemetery. Wharton Funeral Chapel is in charge of arrangements. Memorial contributions may be made to the First United Methodist Church in Alva, directed to the Methodist Men’s organization. Condolences may be made online at www.whartonfuneralchapel.com.

ies, SPC said they can’t fix it. So the county has purchased another printer from another vendor and it is working fine. At first, the commissioners had placed the SPC printer on a “junk” list resolution. Then they researched and learned they even had an extended warranty on the defective printer and it is ridiculous to junk a $9,000 machine that was only two years old. There was some talk of placing SPC on a “never-buy-from” list or perhaps asking the district attorney for help. They took no action after this discussion.

Woods County Forecast Sunday Areas of frost before 10am. Otherwise, sunny, with a high near 68. Light and variable wind becoming south 8 to 13 mph in the afternoon. Sunday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 50. South southeast wind 5 to 9 mph becoming light after midnight. Monday A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms after 2pm. Mostly sunny, with a high near 78. Light south southeast wind becoming south 10 to 15 mph in the morning. Winds could gust as high as 21 mph. Monday Night Showers and thunderstorms likely, mainly between 8pm and 2am. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 61. South wind 9 to 13 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. Tuesday A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Cloudy, with a high near 71.

Burglary charge filed By Marione Martin A burglary charge has been filed in the theft of a cellphone from a dorm room at Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU) in Alva. According to an affidavit in the case, on Sept. 11 Kleme A. Yarh reported to NWOSU Police Officer LeRoy Burks his cellphone had been stolen out of his locked dorm room. He said he left his room on Sept. 10 about 1:30 p.m. and returned about 6:30 p.m. He said his room was locked when he left and locked when he returned. His white Samsung Galaxy S3 phone valued at $400 was missing.

Tuesday Night Showers and thunderstorms likely, mainly after 8pm. Cloudy, with a low around 56. Chance of precipitation is 70%. Wednesday Showers and thunderstorms likely. Cloudy, with a high near 70. Chance of precipitation is 70%. Wednesday Night A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 50. Thursday A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 69. Thursday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 43. Friday Sunny, with a high near 65. Friday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 39. Saturday Sunny, with a high near 68.

Yarh reported the missing phone to the head resident, Alex Haines, and was told to contact campus police. Yarh said Haines had watched the video and knew who the suspect was. Burks contacted Haines who said the video showed the only person who entered Yarh’s room during his absence was Ty’liq Brazille. Burks watched the recording and saw Brazille enter the hallway at 4:18:39 p.m. on Sept. 10, knocking on Yarh’s door two times. He then went to the restroom, and then came back out into the hallway. At 4:20:10 he went to the room and

placed a key in the door but did not enter the room. He went back in the restroom and then stood in the hallway looking both ways several times. At 4:22:29 he placed the key in the lock, looked up and down the hall, and then entered the room. He left 23 seconds later, locked the door and then looked up and down the hall, leaving the hallway at 4:23:13. He was the only person seen on the recording entering the room after Yarh left. Ty’liq J. Brazille, 19, has been charged with a felony of second degree burglary and has an outstanding warrant.

Broken Arrow men arrested for drugs

By Marione Martin Two men from Broken Arrow are facing drug charges after being stopped at Little Sahara State Park at Waynoka. According to documents on file, Ranger Kyle Hair was on patrol in the park on Sept. 15 about 1:20 a.m. when a vehicle traveling southbound toward him failed to dim bright lights and also had aftermarket fog lights on. The lights made it difficult to see the roadway (North Campground road). Due to the narrow roadway, Hair could not immediately turn around so Ranger Webster who was with Hair radioed to Ranger Trekell to stop the vehicle. Hair JACK ALLEN LANCASTER knew his location at Buttercup Jack Allen Lancaster, 63, died Campground since he had just talkon Oct. 22 in Stillwater. His servic- ed with Trekell there. As the vehicle arrived at Butes are pending with Strode Funeral tercup, Ranger Trekell saw the Home. same problem with the lights and conducted a traffic stop. The driver was identified as Benjamin Arthur

Meeting

and gravel work we have done for them.” As the city made repairs to the leak, the concrete work damaged the entrance to the Senior Citizens building. They believe handicapped access needs to be improved and may consider an automatic type door. So the matter was tabled. The longest discussion was about a 2011 model multi-function copier purchased from SPC Office Supply. The $9,000 printer has been called a “lemon” by some employees because it misfeeds a lot and the scanner portion quit working. According to the secretar-

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From Front Page

Schremeck, 21, of Broken Arrow. Trekell had the driver exit the vehicle and sit with him in his patrol vehicle. Rangers Hair and Webster arrived a few minutes later and talked to the passenger who said he did not have his ID, but it was found later inside a wallet in the vehicle. The passenger was Kenneth Daniel Marder Jr., 20, of Broken Arrow. Hair and Webster noticed the distinct odor of marijuana coming from the vehicle. They had Marder exit the vehicle. As he spoke with Marder outside, Hair noticed the odor of alcohol coming from Marder. Ranger Trekell issued a citation for the traffic violation and asked Schremeck for consent to search the vehicle, and Schremeck agreed. A 12 oz. Coca-Cola bottle containing a liquid with a strong smell of alcohol was found in the passenger side door.

The following items were seized following the search of the vehicle: a plastic bag containing a green leafy substance with the distinct odor of marijuana, a blue pipe commonly known as a one-hitter, a black electronic scale in a backpack, a white plastic box containing “blackberry brandy” rolling paper, a black lighter, a plastic bag labeled “pill pouch” and a plastic straw cut to the size of a pipe, a metal grinder containing a green leafy substance with the distinct odor of marijuana, 2 glass pipes containing burnt residue with the distinct odor of marijuana, a hand tool with a round file and point with burnt residue, a modified ink pen with burnt residue, an “elements 79 mm rollers” cigarette hand roller, and a silver razor blade. In a post Miranda interview with Ranger Trekell, Schremeck

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Council

tanks, good for ground water, affordable, gravity fed, boosters for recharging system, limited threat of contamination, longevity of personnel. Weaknesses of the system are: well field back up power, communicating outages, well field production not maximized, shallow and susceptible to contaminants, susceptible to tourism, well field not secured, distance of well field from Alva, life span of well field equipment, city aging infrastructure, not mapped system and longevity of personnel. Possible threats to the water system are: existing distribution lines’ life span, fire suppression, unable to isolate key end users, potential communication, non-redundant power supply, competition for water. Sewer System Likewise, the report lists strengths and weaknesses of the

sewer system. Strengths are: aroma neutral, extra capacity, model of historical enhancement strategies, no apparent problems, new sewer jetter truck, reasonable rates and longevity of personnel. Weaknesses listed are: septic systems within the city limits, annexation requires city to have plan for water sewer, lagoon infrastructure, line infrastructure, grease balls – old restaurant lines, lines not adequately mopped, repairs to surface after line repairs, longev-

ity of personnel and line capacity insufficient for demand. The board took no action concerning the reports. They are part of the continuing effort to develop a strategic plan for Alva. Alva Economic Development Authority The Alva Economic Development Authority had the final meeting of the evening. It was very brief. The members approved the payment of claims totaling $28,185.59.


October 27, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Written off for dead, immigration reform could still live By Byron York The Senate and House had not even settled the final details of ending the government shutdown before President Obama was on to his next priority. “We still need to pass a law to fix our broken immigration system,” Obama said on the night of Oct. 16 as Capitol Hill scrambled to end the standoff. In case anyone missed it, the next morning he declared: “We should finish the job of fixing our broken immigration system.” There’s no doubt the president wants an immigration deal; he’s talked about it for

years, and now can’t put it off until another term. But could the Republican-controlled House of Representatives – exhausted, dazed and confused after the self-inflicted battering of the last few weeks – actually get itself together to pass a reform bill to go along with the Gang of Eight bill the Senate already passed? The prospect alone makes some observers laugh. “People talking about immigration being next: have you been watching the House?” tweeted National Review’s Jonathan Strong during the worst of the shutdown battle, adding the hashtag “#craziness.” In this (entirely reasonable) view, there’s no way the fractured GOP could ever unite to pass such a far-reaching piece of legislation. But that doesn’t keep immiAlva Review-Courier gration reformers from trying (USPS 016-180) – and hoping. “There is still a 620 Choctaw St. window,” says one House GOP Alva, OK 73717-1626 aide involved in crafting a re(580) 327-2200 form proposal. “The leadership Fax: (580) 327-2454 has said keep working on it and see what you can do.” Office Hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Republican immigration Monday - Friday proponents have been quiWebsite: etly talking to GOP members www.alvareviewcourier.com throughout even the craziest days of the shutdown and deHERE TO HELP YOU fault fights. They report some Publisher.............Lynn L. Martin progress. Yes, the most conserEditor..................Marione Martin vative House Republicans are (marione@alvareviewcourier.net) mostly against them. But those Ad Sales...........Angela Courson with a libertarian bent are more (sales@alvareviewcourier.net) Colette Baier open to the cause. The aide (colette@alvareviewcourier.net) says reformers have had good meetings “with a few of those Reporters...................Alex Cole (news@alvareviewcourier.net) guys who were with Ted Cruz at Tortilla Coast,” referring to Yvonne Miller Sports...................Leslie Nation the House conservatives who (leslie@alvareviewcourier.net) met with the Texas senator at Subscriptions a Washington, D.C. restaurant & Action Ads..........Linda Toone and ended up holding out lon(manager@alvareviewcourier.net) gest against a deal to end the Ad Design.............Paula Oakes shutdown. But the problem for reformPage Design........Patty Hankey ers is not the fractiousness of Legal Notices.....Lisa Wickham House Republicans, although (legals@alvareviewcourier.net) that doesn’t help. The problem is that the reformers have never The Alva Review-Courier is found a way to balance the borcombined with the Woods der security demands of conCounty News, The Alva Advocate and Newsgram, and is servatives with the reformers’ published every Sunday and demand for quick legalization Friday by Martin Broadcasting of the 11 million-plus immiCorp., 620 Choctaw St., Alva, grants currently in the United OK 73717-1626. Periodical States illegally. The conservapostage paid at Alva, Oklahoma. tives must have security first, Annual subscription rates in Woods County, Oklahoma $72. and then legalization (and even Elsewhere in Oklahoma $90, then, some won’t ever support elsewhere in the United States reform). The reformers won’t $108. POSTMASTER: Send wait until security is in place a d d r e s s c h a n g e s t o A l v a before starting legalization. Review-Courier, 620 Choctaw The Senate papered over the St., Alva, OK 73717-1626. problem by throwing billions Contents Copyright 2013 Member of the Associated Press, of dollars at border security in Oklahoma Press Association, National Newspaper Association

Junkman’s Gems By Jim Scribner If you ever saw the movie “The Godfather,” there was a scene where two guys were in an elevator and when the door opened Clemenza offed them both with a shotgun. We were in an elevator at St Mary’s with several people and I mentioned that every time I was in an elevator, I was afraid the guy from “The Godfather” with the shotgun would be waiting when the door opened. Everyone chuckled and then one lady said the sad truth in these times it could happen. I wonder where the stairs are? On the political front, there is news from ME TV. November 4th Mr Ed, the talking horse, will be a regular show again. The back half of Ed is working and talking also, in Washington, D.C. There will be more next week, but let’s set the record straight sooner rather than later on the hospital vote. When we voted for the sales tax for the hospital’s repairs and equipment purchases ugly rumors were passed around that if it didn’t pass, the hospital would have to close. This was a scare tactic meant to put every senior citizen in a panic about the hospital’s future. I have already heard this same pile of crap being spread around again. It wasn’t true

then and it isn’t true now. Don’t let the wool be pulled over your eyes again. Let’s vote yes or no on the merits of the issue.* (Publisher’s editorial in response to the above comment: “I’m certainly relieved to hear Jim’s knowledge that the hospital won’t close! I wish Jim could have attended an Oklahoma City forum I traveled to just before the Oct. 1 Affordable Care Act started and set them straight. At that meeting, some professor-type shocked me by reading a list of 31 hospitals he thought would close because of both the Affordable Care Act and the Governor’s denial of future participation in Medicaid by the State of Oklahoma. His list was alphabetical and Alva’s Share Medical Center was the first name he cited. Let’s see, Paul’s Valley Hospital just took bankruptcy, Thomas, Watonga, Cherokee, Waynoka all lost their hospitals. Blackwell quit being a hospital and now is a clinic. So I’m glad to hear Jim’s assurance that won’t happen here. As you can surmise, I believe a “yes” vote to give the local hospital board more management flexibility is very smart. But in support of Jim’s comment, I have not heard a single hospital board member mention the word closure. Like Jim, they don’t want to see that scare tactic used. LLM) See Gems Page 6 I failed to mention I

GOP aims at website, hopes to hit law 

By David Espo An AP News Analysis WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional Republicans are waging war against a hapless website and hoping it leads to the destruction of “Obamacare,” the health care program they loathe so fervently. As a tactic, it’s no more likely to succeed than this autumn’s self-wounding decision by Republicans to force a partial government shutdown and flirt with default on the national debt. Or the dozens of previous GOP attempts to defeat, defund or delay the law. Or their unsuccessful bid to have the Supreme Court declare unconstitutional the signature program of President Barack Obama’s first term. Rather than political or legal arguments determining its fate, it’s likely the health care overhaul will succeed or fail based on the reaction of millions of Americans in search of coverage. “Let me remind everybody that the AffordSee York Page 6 able Care Act is not just a website. It’s much

more,” Obama said this week as he took the lead in his administration’s efforts at damage control over the major online problems in the programs’ first signup month. He said that because of the law, which has been taking effect in stages for three years, “preventive care like mammograms and birth control are free through your employers,” young people up to age 26 can remain on their parents’ coverage plans and some seniors are paying less for their prescription drugs. Republicans skip over any well-received benefits the law might have bestowed. Instead, they speculate that the website is a gateway not to health care coverage but to bigger and more painful failures in the near future. “Will enrollment glitches become possible provider payment glitches? Will patients show up at their doctor’s offices or hospitals to be told that maybe they aren’t covered or even in the system?” asked Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., as he chaired a hearing See GOP Page 6 of the House Energy


October 27, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Annie’s Mailbox®

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Click and Clack Talk Cars

Request supervised visitation Recommendations for lady who wants to feel the wind in her hair Dear Annie: My son is a second grader. Over the summer, while he was staying with my exhusband, a boy touched my son’s private area over his clothes. This was no slight, accidental touch. It was deliberate. My son’s stepmother called child protective services regarding the incident, because the family of the other child runs an inhome daycare. As I have sole custody, the child services caseworker contacted me about the incident. I spoke with my ex and his wife, and we were all in agreement that our son would not be in contact with the other child again. It is now four months later, and my son tells me that his father allowed him to play at the home of this same boy who grabbed his genitals. I called my ex, and he doesn’t seem to think the initial incident was serious. He feels his wife “blew it out of proportion,” and they’ve had fights about it. I have spoken with child protective services about Dad continuing to allow our son to interact with the neighbor boy who obviously has boundary issues. While my son has not reported a second incident, I am left feeling that I cannot trust his father to parent effectively. Dad seems more interested in proving his wife wrong than he is in protecting our son at this vulnerable age. I cannot in good conscience allow visitation under the current circumstances. I refuse to permit my

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son to be in a potentially questionable environment, and I can’t trust Dad to make the right call. How can I effectively protect my son when he’s on Dad’s watch? I don’t want to refuse visitation altogether. – Mom in Nebraska Dear Mom: First, please don’t demonize this neighbor boy. You were right that the situation needed to be reported, not only because the family runs a daycare program, but also because children who molest others are often being abused themselves. We hope CPS checked it out. Still, if you cannot trust your ex to honor the joint decisions you make, your best recourse is to request supervised visitation. Dear Annie: I have a very talented younger sister. She creates beautiful greeting cards for every occasion. Each one is a work of art and needs to be displayed. After all these years, I have accumulated so many that there is just no place to keep them all. They are too pretty to throw away and too personal to “re-card.” Any ideas other than telling her not to send any more cards? – No Hallmark Dear No: Your sister likes making these cards. It’s how she shows her love and creativity. Once you have finished enjoying them, however, you do not need to display them. Put them in a box, paste them into a collage, donate the fronts to a local kindergarten or hospital, or toss them in the garbage. You only need to ask your sister to stop send-

ing them if she demands that you exhibit them. Dear Annie: I would like to respond to “Don’t Hate Those Harleys,” who tried to justify having loud motorcycle exhaust pipes as a safety measure. Nothing could be further from the truth. How are they protecting themselves by blaring their loud pipes at 2 a.m.? As a motorcyclist for 38 years and a motorcycle safety instructor for the state of Ohio for 10 years, I can attest that the only reason people put loud pipes on motorcycles is to try to be cool. Many of them have never taken the motorcycle safety course, which is offered in all states. The people with the fewest accidents are those with the most training. – Oregon, Ohio Dear Ohio: We appreciate your expertise on the subject. Thanks for responding. Dear Readers: Today is Mother-in-Law Day. Call yours and tell her how much you appreciate her. (We hope you do.) Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@ comcast.net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annie’s Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.

Charge

scription bottle with no label that contained a plastic baggie and attempt to throw the bottle. Hawley told her to stop, and he had to grab her arm while she continued to throw it. The officers put her in handcuffs for obstruction and attempting to get rid of evidence. Fogle took Shaver to the front seat of the patrol unit while Hawley took photographs of the outside and inside of the vehicle along with the pill bottle with no label. Hawley told Shaver why she was under arrest and read her the implied consent test request. She would not give an answer but requested a sobriety test. Hawley said for her safety he did not want to get her out for fear of falling since she was so unsteady on her feet. While he spoke to her, Shaver could not keep her eyes open. Hawley ran Shaver’s information

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Arrested admitted to smoking marijuana early that day and said the glass pipes in the center console were his. He also said he had been arrested previously for possession of marijuana about 8 to 10 months ago. Schremeck’s vehicle was impounded. Both Schremeck and Marder were placed under arrest and taken to the Woods County Jail. Both men have been charged with felony possession of controlled dangerous substance within 1,000 feet of park or school and with misdemeanor unlawful possession of paraphernalia.

through dispatch and later learned she had a revoked Oklahoma driver’s license. Both officers inventoried the vehicle, locating multiple prescription bottles along with an open container of 1800 Tequila, opened Dekuyper Buttershots Butterscotch Schnapps Liqueur, and two Blue Moon beers on ice within Shaver’s arms reach. Also found and seized was a pill crusher. While conducting the inventory, Fogle saw Shaver lean over in the patrol unit and went to check on her. He told Hawley she must have been thirsty because she was taking a drink of tea sitting in the cup holder. As the officers continued the inventory, they heard a banging noise and saw Shaver hitting her head on the patrol unit’s passenger side window. Fogle took her out of the vehicle and sat her on the curb. She said she wanted a cigarette. Shaver’s vehicle was towed.

Before they left the scene, Shaver asked to take the state’s test, and Hawley asked dispatch to contact someone to run the intoxilyzer. While they were en route to the Woods County Jail, they were contacted by the jail dispatch and told no one was available to run the intoxilyzer. At the jail, Hawley re-read the state’s request and requested a blood test. Shaver became angry and said she wanted a breath test, not a blood test. She became very belligerent about the blood test request. Hawley took her reaction as a refusal. He told her she did not have to take it and asked her several times to go with Officer Fogle to get booked in. In a post Miranda interview, Shaver told Hawley the stuff in the prescription pill bottle was crushed up Xanax, which is a Schedule IV controlled dangerous substance. Shaver was charged on Oct. 16 with DUI – second felony offense.

By Tom and Ray Magliozzi Dear Tom and Ray: I want one more crack at a convertible, having had a wonderful Dodge Dart convertible in earlier years (it was stolen in Detroit when I left it with a company to replace the top and they parked it on the street – boo hoo!). Background: I’m 93 years old, drive a 2000 Subaru Outback (also a great car but has high mileage and a roof). I have extensive driving experience – across the country twice, 3,300 miles last summer (Mill Valley, Calif.; Durango, Colo.; Moab, Utah; across Nevada and back home). No arrests, no accidents, no problems (so far). What would you recommend for a secondhand, moderately priced, safe (air bags), serviceable and FUN convertible? Many thanks for your assistance. I’ve loved your column and radio show for many years. – Anne RAY: Well, first I have to ask if you’d accept a marriage proposal from my brother. He’s been looking for someone like you ever since Wife No. 2 changed the locks. TOM: I see you in a Porsche Turbo Carerra, Anne – as long as I’m not making the payments. I’ve made enough “payments” already, if you know what I mean! RAY: Actually, the car that first comes to mind for you is the Toyota Camry Solara. It’s basically a Camry with two doors and a convertible top. TOM: There are several things that make me think the Solara is the convertible for you. First, it’s based on the Toyota Camry, which means it’ll be durable, reliable, ergonomically practical and easy to service. RAY: Second, it’s a little bigger than some of the sportier convertible alternatives, like the Mazda Miata, the Mini Cooper or the VW Golf Convertible. And if you’re driving across the country, it’s nice to have a little room for your belongings and not feel cramped. Plus a slightly

larger car will feel more stable on the interstate at high speeds. Not to mention that size often adds some measure of safety if you do have an accident. TOM: Third, the Solara’s a little higher off the ground than those other cars. That means you can get into it without having to “fall” down into the driver’s seat, or rappel back out of the car with a grappling hook. That also means you’ll see better when you’re driving. I thought of the Mustang for you, too. But you sit pretty low in the Mustang’s seat, and I don’t know how tall you are (you didn’t mention a playing career in the WNBA), but you may feel a little bit like you’re sitting in a bathtub when driving the Mustang. RAY: Finally, it’s an easy car to drive. Yeah, it doesn’t corner at 90 mph like a Porsche, but it won’t require constant vigilance on your part to keep it in its lane, either. And with the top down on a nice day, any car is fun. TOM: I don’t know what you consider affordable, Anne, but for $15 or $20 grand, you can pick up a very nice used Solara. I recommend red. Send us a picture, and enjoy it! *** If you buy a used car, will you just be inheriting the previous owner’s problem? Tom and Ray dispel this and other myths about used cars in their pamphlet “How to Buy a Great Used Car: Secrets Only Your Mechanic Knows.” Send $4.75 (check or money order) to Used Car, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. *** Get more Click and Clack in their new book, “Ask Click and Clack: Answers from Car Talk.” Got a question about cars? Write to Click and Clack in care of this newspaper, or email them by visiting the Car Talk website at www. cartalk.com.


October 27, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Oct. 28 to Nov. 1 Breakfast Menu for Alva Public Schools Monday – Cheese toast, peaches, milk Tuesday – Whole Grain Fruit Loops, cinnamon toast, pears, applesauce, milk Wednesday – Waffle stix, maple syrup, pineapple, milk Thursday – Sausage gravy, whole grain biscuit, fruit cocktail, milk Friday – Yogurt with granola, mandarin oranges, milk Lunch Menu for Alva Public Schools Monday – Pizza with cheese topping, corn, garlic bread, pineapple, milk Tuesday – BBQ on a bun, hash browns, baked beans, pickle spear, rosy applesauce, milk

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Wednesday – Baked potato, chili sauce, broccoli and cheese, shredded cheese, strawberry cup, milk Thursday – Bat chicken nuggets, carrots, potato rounds, hot rolls, mandarin oranges, milk Friday – Nachos with ground beef, refried beans, bread sticks, fruit cocktail, milk Menu for Woods County Senior Citizens Monday – Baked ham, au gratin potatoes, carrots, bread Tuesday – Chicken tetrazinni, mixed vegetables, broccoli, gelatin Wednesday – Goulash, corn, green beans Thursday – Goldwater beans, tomato spoon relish, cornbread, sugar cookie Friday – Krispy fish fillet, french fries, coleslaw, cheese biscuit, fruited gelatin

Gems

lost another friend last week, Richard Heaton. My first recollection of Richard was he had about a ‘73 White Mercury two-door car with a huge set of cow horns in front of the hood. I didn’t know Richard personally back then, but sure knew who it was when I saw the horns coming my way. Later in life I got to know him better. He had an infectious grin when he deemed something funny. I went out to his farm to buy something from him once and we liked to never got it away from where it was setting for all the assorted poultry surrounding it. He did love his livestock. I read Wayne Lane’s obituary and he had many accomplishments. All these things showed how talented he was, but from what I knew of him, what sums up his life to me is he was one of the nicest guys I ever met. When someone passes away, usually someone somewhere will have something negative to say about them. That person is not around in Richard and Wayne’s cases. What did the blonde say when the airplane went to shaking? “Oh no, we are having an earthquake!!” I hope we all had a good time at the parade.

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Twentieth Century Club learns about Alva’s drug dog at Oct. 3 meeting By Marian Roberts, secretary The Twentieth Century Club met for its monthly meeting at Paula Bloyd’s home on Thursday, Oct. 3. Jeanie Wade was the co-hostess. The meeting was opened with the flag salute and the Clubwoman’s Collect. Celia Roots presided at the meeting in the absence of Johnette Beagley. Roots read the thought for the day. Fifteen members answered roll call. Marian Roberts, secretary, read the minutes from the September meeting, and they were approved. Joyce Dixon reported a

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presented the program on their drug dog. The dog is from Czechoslovakia, and began his training at the age of 6 weeks. His training continued until he was 17 months old, and at that time the city of Alva purchased the dog. He lives with Hawley and continues to receive drug training. Hawley answered several questions from the group and the dog demonstrated how he finds drugs. This was a very interesting program. Delicious cake was served by the hostesses, as well as water and coffee.

York

the final rush to pass the Gang of Eight bill. But that didn’t make the Gang’s solution any more attractive to House conservatives. “I think there would be overwhelming opposition from within the ranks to going to conference with the Gang of Eight bill,” one conservative House member said in an email exchange. “Indeed, this would be way more divisive than the last four weeks have been for the House GOP.” The conservatives seek to avoid a scenario in which the House passes some sort of immigration bill, goes to conference with the Senate, and comes out of the negotiations with a bill that looks a lot like the Gang of Eight’s. “Everyone has seen the bad faith exhibited by Obama and (Senate Majority Leader Harry) Reid during this fiscal fight, and I can’t imagine any-

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balance of $428.34 in the treasury. The club voted to give $100 to Act I. The club will give a book to the Alva Public Library in memory of Betty Jo Pangburn. Paula Bloyd will be responsible for choosing the book. It was announced that the Nov. 7 meeting will be in the parlor of the Methodist church. Warren Little will present his program on “Israel.” There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned. Patrick Hawley and Blake Fogel of the Alva Police Department

one making the case that a final (immigration) product would reflect conservative principles in any fashion,” the lawmaker says. “Reid has all but said that no matter what the House passes the Senate will simply jam the Gang of Eight bill through a conference committee.” That skepticism is probably shared by a large number of House Republicans, perhaps enough to kill any reform proposal. But the reformers, led by Obama, are still trying. They have the Senate bill in their pocket. They have nearly unanimous Democratic support plus a significant number of Republicans. They have the support of powerful interest groups. And they have money, money, money. At a recent Congressional Hispanic Conference meeting, Democratic Rep. John Yarmuth of Kentucky noted that the forces of

comprehensive immigration reform include vastly wealthy businesses willing to spend big to win. And the other side? “There is no money on the other side of the issue,” Yarmuth said. “There is nobody out there ready to spend $100 million against this.” For the pro-reform side, supporters like Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg – who wants looser visa standards for foreign high-tech workers – can rustle up that much with the help of a few Silicon Valley friends. An initiative with that much money and that much clout behind it can never be dismissed. Which means that, even if comprehensive immigration reform appears to be dead, its opponents can never, ever assume the game is over. (Byron York is chief political correspondent for The Washington Examiner.)

GOP

and Commerce Committee on Thursday. Democrats were having none of it, even though they express their own frustration and anger at the debut of the website. “Here we go again, another cynical effort by the Republicans to delay, defund or ultimately repeal the Affordable Care Act,” said Rep. Frank Pallone, D-N.J., speaking at the same hearing. “Their effort, obviously, isn’t to make this better but to use the website and the glitches as an excuse to defund or repeal Obamacare.” Ironically, the roles were reversed a decade ago, when the Bush administration struggled to implement a new prescription drug benefit under Medicare. Many Democrats had voted against the change and harshly criticized it, yet they failed to turn it into a winning issue in 2004. At some point, Obama may yet find himself agreeing to major changes in the law. There is growing Democratic sentiment inside Congress for a oneyear delay in the requirement for individuals to purchase coverage, given the difficulty with the website. Senators on the ballot in 2014 are notably nervous. Support inside both parties is strong for repealing a medical device tax contained in the law. For now, though, the focus is the website, a problem the administration insists it can and will fix.

Republicans’ decision to seize on the flawed roll-out comes as the party is desperate to shift the public’s attention away from the recent partial government shutdown and the clash over the debt ceiling, and resurrect an issue they hope will benefit them in next year’s elections. No wonder, since every new poll seems to bring more bad news for the GOP. Among them was a finding in a recent Washington Post-ABC survey that only 20 percent of those questioned said Republicans are generally interested in doing what’s best for the country, with 77 percent saying the GOP is acting out of political self-interest. The 20 percent figure drops to 14 percent among independents, who probably hold the key to victory in next year’s midterm elections. Nor are Obama and congressional Democrats alone in discerning purpose in the law, a major part of which allows states to expand health care to the poor by easing income restrictions under Medicaid. After a long struggle, Republican Gov. John Kasich of Ohio prevailed this week over inter-party critics in the Legislature, and his state became the latest to agree to the expansion. “We’ve improved both the quality of care from Medicaid and its value for taxpayers,” he said in a statement. Republican governors in Arizona, Michigan, Pennsylvania and elsewhere have backed the Medic-

aid expansion in their states, often over opposition from critics aligned with the tea party. Funding for the expansion comes entirely from the federal government for the first two years. Even so, several Republican governors and legislatures have chosen to decline it, saying it would inevitably lead to a financial burden on their states in future years. Nor have Republicans yet offered an alternative to the law, even though they campaigned on a platform of “repeal and replace” in 2010. Efforts to formulate a different approach have been thwarted in significant part by conservative critics who insist anything short of full repeal is unacceptable. Yet in the wreckage of the shutdown struggle, there are hints of a grudging Republican recognition that the law may survive. Despite their long-held positions against government mandates, House Republicans voted during the recent faceoff with Obama to leave in place some of the politically popular provisions they have strenuously opposed in the past. Among them is a pair of requirements that the president cited in his remarks this week. One is a requirement for insurers to cover individuals with pre-existing conditions, and another allows young people up to age 26 to remain on their parents’ plans. Neither required a website before taking effect.


October 27, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Seminar to be presented on dementia Waynoka man arrested for DUI

Marietta Lynch

A free seminar, “Understanding the World of Dementia and the Person with the Disease,” will be offered at the Alva Public Library on Monday, Oct. 28, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. This session is open to the community with the mission of providing public awareness and understanding of dementia. This program is sponsored by Beadles Nursing Home. The instructor, Marietta Lynch RN, BSN grew up in Alva. Her professional work includes but is not limited to the US Navy, OU Medical Center and Oklahoma State Department of Health. She presently serves as the

quality assurance director for the Oklahoma Association of Health Care Providers and as compliance officer for Beadles Nursing Home. She also serves on the Oklahoma Board of Nursing Education and Practice Advisory Committee and recently served on the Board of the Oklahoma HealthCare Workforce Center. Marietta has years of experience providing training and consulting related to dementia- related care and services. Mark your calendar and come and join us on our journey in understanding and caring for the person with dementia. Refreshments provided.

By Marione Martin A Waynoka man stopped by police told the officer it was his fourth time being caught. Raymond Roy Huffman, 45, has been charged with DUI – subsequent offense, a felony. According to documents on file, Waynoka Police Officer Matthew Marcum was traveling west on Broadway on Sept. 29 about 2:49 a.m. when he saw a red pickup in front of him driving over the solid white line. The pickup turned onto Cedar Street and drove in the grass. Marcum initiated a traffic stop. Marcum identified the driver as Raymond Roy Huffman and asked for his driver’s license and proof of insurance. He noticed a strong odor associated with alcohol from Huffman’s breath. He also noted Altus Police Chief Tim Murphy Huffman had bloodshot watery told reporters that the investigation eyes and thick slurred speech. He began after witnesses told authorities that Carey said he had explosives and could use them. Murphy says no bombs were found, but materials for making a bomb were recovered.

Altus airman arrested with bomb-making materials  ALTUS, Okla. (AP) — An airman at Altus Air Force Base in southwestern Oklahoma has been arrested after authorities say materials used to make bombs were found in his home. Authorities say 26-year-old Timothy Francis Carey is charged

with possession of bomb-making materials with intent to either intimidate or harm another person or to damage property. Carey is being held in the Jackson County jail pending a hearing scheduled for next week. Court records do not list an attorney for him.

USGS: Quakes in central Oklahoma here to stay  By Justin Juozapavicius PRAGUE, Okla. (AP) — This central Oklahoma town of 2,400 claims two things as its own: Olympian Jim Thorpe and an annual kolache festival that honors its Czech heritage every May. Some locals here say the place should be known for a third: earthquakes. “There’s been more than 10 or so,” since a magnitude 5.6 quake hit west of town in November 2011, damaging buildings and rattling nerves, said longtime resident Mark Treat, 54, sounding downright blase about them all. “I’m pretty sure we had one or two last year.” Quakes with 3.4, 3.3, 3.1, 2.9 and 2.3 magnitudes have all rumbled near this town about 60 miles east of Oklahoma City in the past two years, and a new report by the U.S. Geological Survey suggests a quake “swarm” continues to plague central Oklahoma, which is far more accustomed to dealing with natural disasters that come from above than below. Since January 2009, more than 200 magnitude 3.0 or greater earthquakes have hit central Oklahoma — marking a significant rise in the frequency of the seismic events, the survey reports. The study released Tuesday shows that one to three magnitude 3.0 earthquakes or larger occurred yearly in Oklahoma from 1975 to 2008, but the average grew to around 40 earthquakes per year from 2009-2013. The swarm includes the 2011 quake, the largest ever recorded in Oklahoma, which damaged 200 buildings, shook a football stadium and could be felt throughout the state and in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, northern Texas and some parts of Illinois and Wisconsin. Until then, the biggest earthquake in the state had been a 5.5 magnitude temblor that jolted the city of El Reno, located just west of Oklahoma City, in 1952. “When I came to Oklahoma, I would do public outreach, saying that Oklahoma does have an earthquake hazard, and I got the blank stares and they didn’t almost quite believe it,” remembered Austin Holland, seismologist with the Oklahoma Geological Survey, which co-issued the report.

“A good takeaway from this is that still, the chances of a damaging tornado or damaging ice storm are greater than a damaging earthquake, but people need to be prepared for any hazard we face in Oklahoma. “Certainly, (earthquakes) will be a part of life for a while, and people need to be aware of that,” Holland said. Scientists continue to study why the earthquake rate has changed so dramatically throughout this swath of Oklahoma — including possible links to wastewater disposal related to oil and gas production in the region. Some researchers and environmental groups have long held that hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” — a process employed by energy companies that involves forcing millions of gallons of water, sand and other additives deep into the ground to free up pockets of natural gas — is a chief culprit for the rise in earthquake activity throughout Oklahoma and other states. “It’s important to understand that it’s not the fracking process that causes these earthquakes,” said Bill Leith, the earthquake hazards program coordinator with the U.S. Geological Survey in Reston, Va., who labels the quake swarm affecting central Oklahoma as “unusual.” ‘’During the production from oil and gas activities, there’s a lot of wastewater that’s generated, and it is that reinjection into rock formations” that could trigger some quakes. The energy industry has repeatedly denied that the method is to blame for the increase in seismic activity. “The link between hydraulic fracturing and earthquakes has been exaggerated and distorted by dramatic media headlines,” said Julia Bell, a spokeswoman for the Independent Petroleum Association of America, a Washington-based

group that represents thousands of oil and natural gas producers. “Experts have repeatedly asserted that the energy released from hydraulic fracturing is equivalent to a gallon of milk hitting the floor from a kitchen counter.” Some residents in Prague, like Joe and Mary Reneau, whose twostory brick home was heavily damaged after the 2011 quake, don’t appear to be too alarmed about the USGS findings, even though some of her more paranoid neighbors now phone the couple up every time their ground or house sways after a minor quake. “What is it Mother always said? ‘Don’t go borrowing trouble,’” 70-year-old Mary Reneau said. “In other words, don’t go worrying about something that may not even happen.” The Reneaus, who had earthquake insurance, rebuilt their house nearly from the studs up, to the tune of the $209,000 their policy paid out. But even with the 33 steel piers now reinforcing their home, the earthquakes that have struck since have triggered hairline cracks in the concrete driveway and some of the brickwork on the back patio and have ever-so-slightly pulled the kitchen cabinets away from the ceiling. But such damages are just a part of life around here. “You can’t get excited every time the ground shakes,” she said. Treat, who also lives in the pocket of town that took the brunt of the damage from the 2011 quake, shrugs at news that more quakes could be in the town’s future, even though when they hit the vibrations shake the dishes, TV and the bed and make his floor “feel like an ocean.” “It ain’t going to change nothing, we got to live with what we got to live with,” he said. “It’s like tornadoes — you can’t live your life scared of them, either.”

asked Huffman to exit the vehicle and saw that he was unsteady on his feet. Marcum asked Huffman how much he had to drink, and Huffman replied, “A lot.” He asked Huffman if he would submit to the preliminary breath test, and he said, “Yeah, I’ll take it but I’m going to fail it.” After the test gave a reading of 0.215, Huffman stated, “I know I’m drunk, this is my fourth time being caught, I’m going to prison.” After being read the implied consent, Huffman agreed to take a blood test which was administered at Share Medical Center. He was then taken to the Woods County Jail.


October 27, 2013

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Alva Review-Courier

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Hospitals

“A good, functioning local “A lot of them have just turned said. hospital … means the world to the into Band Aid stations,” he said. The economic climate plays families and those folks who don’t “You have people with pneumonia into what hospital officials and exhave cars,” she said. and sepsis who can be easily man- perts say is one of the biggest isThe impact of local hospitals, aged in the hospital, but they are sues facing rural hospitals today: however, goes beyond providing being transferred out.” lower or stagnant numbers of paconvenient access to health care. Carter suggested that physi- tients. Hospitals also play a significant cians’ lack of confidence in smallSome areas’ populations are role in bolstering the er hospitals might be shrinking as people leave to seek economies of small misguided. He said better jobs in bigger markets. communities. he has reviewed five Also, rising health-care costs and Often, a rural studies comparing low wages have caused people to hospital is one of patient outcomes in put off treatment for health issues. the largest local emrural versus urban Hospital administrators said ployers and a selling hospitals. “In ev- another reason for fewer patients point to attract other erything but cardiac is a severe doctor shortage, which companies to locare, the rural hos- is affecting all but a few counties cate their operations pitals actually have in Oklahoma. nearby. better outcomes,” he If a small hospital with two or “It simply comes said. three doctors loses one, it can cut down to two things: Carter said his significantly into the number of We provide the firm patients a hospital can treat. Pa— Richard Carter, an consulting health care services helps rural hospitals tients go elsewhere, lowering the Oklahoma City and economic ser- physician and consultant improve their cus- hospital’s revenue. vices,” said Tom tomer service and “They’re (hospitals) very deliBriggs, chief finanbusiness models, cate flowers,” said Edward Hercial officer at Marshall County training nurses in advanced life rman, CEO and president of InteMedical Center in Madill. “Madill, saving techniques and encourag- gris Bass Baptist Health Center in our community, is very fortunate ing doctors to admit patients with Enid, a 162-bed hospital that has and unique for its size because we a variety of medical problems. made a profit in recent years. “All have several small industries in “Patients get better customer it takes is for one doctor to leave, the area. Without the hospital here, service when they take their car to and your world can be turned upit may be a challenge for them to get it tuned up than when they go side down. You can go from a fastay locally.” to the hospital,” he said. cility making 3 to 4 percent marSmall Is Vulnerable “It’s had a remarkable impact. gin to being negative by millions All general hospitals, regard- I’ve been in one facility that was of dollars.” less of size, must maintain a cer- bankrupt and a couple that should Another factor affecting profits tain level of staffing and care. have been bankrupt and we were is higher percentages of rural paAll face challenges. “We’re able to turn them around and actu- tients on Medicare and Medicaid, getting less, and we need to do ally make them profitable.” which often reimburse hospitals at more with that less,” said Don In some areas, competition be- a lower rate than private insurers. Ikner, CEO of Great Plains Medi- tween small hospitals has caused Higher staffing costs and uncomcal Center in Elk City, which has at least one to lose money. pensated care also have grown. lost money for the past three years. Owasso’s Bailey Medical CenIt is not only the uninsured who Larger hospitals, however, ter, which competes with St. John contribute to uncompensated care. have economies of scale that can Owasso, has seen double-digit Briggs in Madill and Herrman in insulate them more, such as from losses in its overall profit mar- Enid said Integris hospitals have rising costs. Many also are in ur- gins in each of the last three years. seen increases of insured patients ban areas, where the patient pool Muskogee Community Hospital unable to pay their insurance deis larger. lost money when it competed with ductibles and co-payments. Richard Carter, an Oklahoma Muskogee Regional Medical Cen“Our fastest-rising bad debt is City physician who provides con- ter until the two merged under the having to write off co-pays and sulting services to hospitals ex- name EASTAR deductibles that periencing financial losses, said Health System in patients don’t several trends in health care have 2012. have the ability combined to threaten the survival According to to pay,” Herrman of small, rural hospitals. the Oklahoma said. Among them: the difficulty of Hospital AssociaEffects of recruiting doctors to rural areas, tion, from 2004 to ‘Obamacare’ the bigger returns doctors receive 2007, before the Last year, for providing non-hospital servic- Great Recession, Gov. Mary Fales, and the tendency of some doc- about 35 percent lin chose not to tors to transfer patients out of rural of Oklahoma’s accept federal hospitals. non-urban hospi- — Edward Herman, CEO and funding to expand Doctors generally earn more tals operated at a under president of Integris Bass Medicaid revenue from outpatient proce- financial loss. Bethe Affordable dures and clinic operations than tween 2009 and Baptist Health Center in Enid Care Act, saythey do from in-hospital services, 2011, that number ing it would be Carter said. For patients with more increased to about 60 percent, the too costly. That left more than serious problems, he said, some association reports. 140,000 Oklahomans ineligible physicians move them into bigger Some hospitals have cut back for Medicaid or subsidies to buy facilities even if the rural hospi- services. coverage on the new health-care tals are fully equipped to deal with Jefferson County Hospital in marketplace. them. Waurika cut some services, such Rick Snyder, vice president of as obstetrics, because it could not finance and information services afford them, said Jane McDowell, for the Oklahoma Hospital Asthe hospital’s CEO. sociation, said the biggest single “The (low patient) volume and thing Oklahoma could do to help requirements in order to provide rural hospitals would be to expand those are too costly,” McDowell Medicaid. Herrman said although Medicaid reimbursement doesn’t cover all costs, it would be “better than nothing, which is what we’re getting right now (from the uninsured),” he said. “Obamacare” still could ben-

“In everything but cardiac care, the rural hospitals actually have better outcomes.”

“All it takes is for one doctor to leave, and your world can be turned upside down.”

Share Medical Center, Alva, 37 beds The Alva Hospital Authority oversees the city-owned Share Medical Center. In 2012, the trustees elected to cancel their contract for management with Quorum, an outside management firm, paying cancellation fees. The move to a local management team allowed them to cut operating costs. Year Net Patient Net Income Profit Revenue Margin 2012 $9,457,566 $1,409,669 11.4% 2011 $8,525,017 -$931,667 -9.0% 2010 $9,259.433 $53,147 0.5% 2009 $10,491,962 $190,891 1.6% 2008 $10,057,495 $1,017,266 8.8% Sources: American Hospital Directory and Centers For Medicare and Medicaid Services efit hospitals by requiring people 35 miles from a larger hospital. to get insurance or face a fine. But In August, the U.S. Department hospital officials worry that many of Health and Human Services repeople will buy high-deductible ported that nearly two-thirds of the insurance plans on the market- nation’s more than 1,300 criticalplace, Herrman said. access hospitals do not meet the “Yeah, they have insurance, distance requirements and recombut it’s a $2,500 deductible and mended Congress strip those hosthey don’t have $2,500 in their pitals of their status. savings account to even cover the In Oklahoma, 28 of 34 criticaldeductible,” Herrman said. access hospitals fall into that catUnder the health-care law, hos- egory, according to the Oklahoma pitals will face smaller increases State University Center for Rural in Medicare reimHealth. bursements over the Congress hasn’t next decade. Naacted so far. “That (status) tionally, that could is absolutely crititake $220 billion off cal for the viability the table. Planned of these hospitals,” cuts in payments said Smalley, of for treating the Mercy Hospitals. uninsured, called Risks of Closing “disproportionate — Brock Slabach, When a rural share,” will likely closes, have little impact on senior VP, National Rural hospital Health Association it’s likely gone for Oklahoma hospitals good, said Slabach, in early years, according to the Oklahoma Hospital of the National Rural Health Association. The number of closings Association. The Affordable Care Act also of small hospitals nationally has will push hospitals to reduce increased in recent years, he said. “Rural health is like arctic health-care costs while improving tundra – once you step on it, it’s patient care. New “accountable care organi- gone,” he said. Several rural health profeszations,” voluntary groups made up of hospitals and other provid- sionals and managers said it’s ers, will aim to improve care for possible there will be closings of patients yet lower costs by avoid- Oklahoma rural hospitals in the ing duplicate services, according next few years. “I think we’re going to see to the Kaiser Family Foundation. Providers will get bonuses when more and more of those smaller hospitals go out of existence,” they keep costs down. State Rep. Arthur Hulbert, said Ikner, of Great Plains MediR- Fort Gibson, a member of the cal Center. “Even for somebody in House Public Safety Committee, the business, it is very scary.” The solutions to small hospisaid he is concerned small hospitals will not qualify for, or will be tals’ problems are elusive. Other than Medicaid expanshut out of, such organizations. In July, according to the Tul- sion, “there aren’t a whole lot of sa World, Hulbert was asked at real promising opportunities on a meeting if it would take a rural the horizon that would reverse hospital’s closing to convince the some of this downward trend,” state to accept federal money to said Snyder, of the Oklahoma expand Medicaid. “I think there Hospital Association. The pressures have caused will be many hospitals that close some hospitals to merge or partner regardless,” he replied. with larger health-care provider Smallest Hospitals A separate issue has exposed groups. That can expand access to more than two dozen of the small- physicians, equipment, technolest Oklahoma hospitals to possible ogy and administration at a lower cost, Smalley and others said. loss of federal funding. The Pauls Valley City Council A designation called “critical access,” created in the 1990s to is seeking a larger group to purshore up rural hospitals with 25 chase the hospital there, Frizell or fewer beds, makes a hospital said. “Obviously, it’s going to take eligible for greater Medicare reimbursement of certain costs. The a partnership with somebody to hospitals must be located at least keep it running,” Frizell said. “We can’t run it by ourselves. We can’t do that. It just cannot happen.” Whatever the strategy, a cure for rural hospitals’ financial ills must be found, Herrman said, because the alternative isn’t pretty. “I think we all agree it’s not easy, but I don’t think it should be acceptable for us as a state to say, ‘Yeah … you have to drive two hours to get care.’ I don’t think that’s a scenario anyone wants to see.”

“Rural health is like arctic tundra – once you step on it, it’s gone.”


October 27, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 9

2013-2014 NWOSU Homecoming Parade Despite the Homecoming vacation theme, the NWOSU Aggie Club float says there’s no vacation in agriculture and no rest for the Ranger footballl. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

In patriotic colors and a cowboy hat, district attorney candidate Danny Lohmann waves to potential Members of Northwestern’s International Student voters during the NWOSU Homecoming Parade. Association ride in Saturday’s Homecoming Parade. Photo by Lynn L. Martin Photo by Lynn L. Martin

With a Las Vegas style welcome sign for Ranger Field and an exhaust-spouting Griswalds RV, this was one of the more colorful floats Miss Ringwood Kellie Wostal waves to onlookers in the NWOSU Homecoming Parade. Photo by Lynn L. Martin during the NWOSU Homecoming Parade. She was one of 19 contestants in the Miss Cinderella Pageant Thursday and Friday. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

Miss Cimarron Victoria Kimbrell waves to the crowd Saturday. She was fourth runner-up in the Miss Cinderella Pageant held Friday night. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

The Pioneer-Pleasant Vale band marches in the NWOSU Homecoming Parade Saturday. The red, white and blue banners along the parade route are a new addition this year after parade goers com- Wayne Kinzie of Alva and his antique music ma- Miss Burlington Heather Armbruster rides in replained they missed the old banners, which were retired. Photo by chine circle the parade for NWOSU Homecoming. gal splendor in an antique car during the NWOSU Lynn L. Martin Photo by Lynn L. Martin Homecoming Parade. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

A friendly Dalmatian greets the Shirley girls driving their mini pickup along the NWOSU Homecoming Parade route Saturday. Photo by Dance students attired in Ranger red and black provide the main decoration for this Standing Ovations float in the NWOSU Homecoming Parade. Photo by Lynn L. Martin Lynn L. Martin

Northwest Technology students demonstrate their life-saving skills on this float in the Woods County 4-H Club members delight young parade goers with thrown candy durNWOSU Homecoming Parade Saturday. Photo by Lynn L. Martin ing the NWOSU Homecoming celebration Saturday. Photo by Lynn L. Martin


October 27, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 10

Rangers stamp out the Savage Storm at homecoming By Leslie Nation The Rangers football team is celebrating its first victory of the 2013 season, defeating the Savage Storm 25-21 on Saturday in Ranger Stadium. The Rangers had an early rough start in their first possession after two plays Reid Miller (#8) threw into the hand of Southeastern Oklahoma State University (SOSU) coverage, Donnie Hamilton (#23). Not a full minute off the play clock and the Savage Storm had the ball in their control in Ranger territory. Starting at Northwestern Oklahoma State’s 41, SOSU began their first drive for the afternoon. But the Ranger defense held strong and after three plays driving only two yards, SOSU punted away back to Northwestern. The Rangers had some good drives on this possession, but Southeastern was plagued with penalties that kept Northwestern alive. After seven plays, running back Jarion Tudman (#21) ran a one-yard rushing touchdown to lead the Savage Storm 6-0. Tudman had a 17-yard run just prior to that one to get the Rangers in scoring range. Getting the kickoff, the Savage Storm started the new drive at their own 18 and they were ready to give Northwestern a response. Twelve plays on an 82-yard march,

starting running back for SOSU, Devlon Wortham (#35) ran the ball in for a 32-yard touchdown. The successful extra point attempt gave Southeastern the 7-6 lead with 3:32 left in the first quarter. After that it wasn’t until the final two minutes in the first half that the Rangers were able to respond. Miller took the first snap to connect with receiver Jeremi Anderson (#4) for a 23-yard pass to put Northwestern in SOSU territory. Penalties had been handed out in abundance to both teams throughout the game as the officials gave Northwestern a 10-yard penalty to put them back at the Rangers’ 45. Southeastern was flagged on the very next play that moved Northwestern forward to SOSU’s 48. Second and 14 at the 48, Miller snapped the ball then opted to take it down the field, blasting past the Savage Storm’s secondary all the way to the 10-yard line. Three plays later, Miller finally connected with Reginald Harris (#82) in the far right side of the end zone to steal back the lead with less than 10 second left in the half. Southeastern took one snap to end the first half with Rangers in the lead 12-7. A Fight to the Finish The Savage Storm started out with the ball on their 35 for the second half to try and take back

Traveon Kelly (#5) fights for a 48-yard punt return with less than four minutes left in the first quarter against the Savage Storm while Chris Ladd (#33) and Tanner Jones (#29) block for him. Photo by Leslie Nation the lead from the Rangers. But after seven plays, Southeastern was forced to punt the ball away on a fourth and long from Northwestern’s 41. The Rangers were prepared

to put this game away, as Miller dropped back to pass and found Devontaa Bryant (#11) wide open for a 49-yard pass all the way to SOSU’s 13-yard line. But two costly penalties on the next play put the Rangers back at the 33 with a first and 30 situation. After that huge drive by Bryant to put them in the red zone, Miller came out with his second interception of the game four plays later by Savage Storm’s Jacobi Crowley (#26). After 10 plays starting from Northwestern’s 12-yard line, SOSU’s quarterback Nick Sioson (#16) threw a 21-yard passing touchdown to Kaymon Farmer (#9) with 7:19 left in the third quarter. Eight plays later and nearly four minutes off the play clock, Northwester answered back with a 31yard touchdown run from Tudman to take back the lead 19-14. The Rangers had another huge play to keep that drive alive when Miller connected with Anderson on an 18yard pass. It wasn’t long before the Savage Storm came back with an answer, starting from their 18. After three plays making a lot of headway down the field, Wortham found a huge hole up the middle

for a 62-yard rushing touchdown. With the extra point, Southeastern was back in the lead with 2:25 left in the third quarter 21-19. Barely a minute later, Miller showed some athleticism in the back field after a fake handoff he blasted up the left side of the field for a 65-yard touchdown to lead 25-21. The Rangers defense held off the Savage Storm for the rest of the game as time ran out to win their first Great American Conference game. Even though the Rangers had 385 yards on offense against the Savage Storms’ 407, SOSU had 22 penalties called on them for a total of 205 yards that could have cost them the game. Northwestern had 245 passing yards as Miller was 11-for-21 with three picks for the game. The Rangers added 140 rushing yards with Miller as their lead rusher of 112 on five carries. Tudman came behind him with 88 yards on 10 handoffs. The Rangers will go back on the road as they face a very tough opponent in Kansas: the Pittsburg State Gorillas. The Gorillas are currently 7-1 for the season. Northwestern will face them Nov. 2 at 2 p.m.

Linebacker Derrick Thompson (#53) stops Devlon Wortham (#35) for a short rushing gain on the play. Photo by Leslie Nation

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Wide receiver Reginald Harris (#82) beats the coverage of Malique Earl (#5) for a 20-yard touchdown pass to take the lead 12-7 late in the first half. Photo by Leslie Nation


October 27, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 11

Alva’s defensive effort stomped the Bucs 34-6 By Leslie Nation Alva sought to get their revenge against the Bucs in Tonkawa on Friday’s game. The Goldbugs were first with the opportunity to get the touchdown after receiving the kickoff. They accomplished that in less than two minutes after five plays for a 6-yard march. Alva’s quarterback, Ty Hooper, found Riley Hess for an 18-yard touchdown pass for the first six points. A failed extra point attempt by Hayden Colwell kept the Alva there as they kicked the ball away. After just three snaps on Tonkawa’s possession, Alva’s offense was back on the field with 8:21 left in the first quarter. Starting on their 34, Alva began another strong drive for the end zone after a 37yard pass to Trevor Johnson put the Goldbugs in Tonkawa territory. Four more plays and Alva was first and goal from the two-yard line and revving to extend their lead. Jones received the hand off, weaving through the Bucs’ defense, fighting for the end zone. As he extended his arm for the touchdown, a Tonkawa defender knocked the ball out of his hands and the officials ruled it a fumble and recovery by the Bucs. Tonkawa started a new drive with some fresh set of downs at their 20, but the Goldbugs’ defense continued to hold strong, stopping

the Bucs after another three plays. Possession and momentum continued to change hands throughout the rest of the quarter, and neither team scored until late in the second quarter. The Goldbugs started from their own 11, and after 14 plays and nearly six minutes later Alva had a two-yard rushing touchdown from Cade Pfleider. A 20-yard handoff to Jones and a 31-yard dash to the twoyard line by Pfleider kept Alva’s drive alive on third conversions to score before the half. A successful two-point conversion put the Goldbugs in a 14-0 lead over the Bucs. Tonkawa was back in possession with just over two minutes left to go in the first half at their 39. They were trying to give a response to Alva’s 14-point lead after running back Brandon Purdy found a hole in Alva’s left side for a 33-yard sprint to the Goldbugs’ 28. Three plays later, the Bucs were in the red zone at the 15 and quarterback Benjamin Hook dropped back to pass. Colton Esch was wide open at the 10 and Hook tried to connect with his receiver, but Hess read the play for an easy interception and return for a 90-yard defensive touchdown. The Goldbugs then had a commanding lead at the end of the half 20-0. Alva Put This One Away The Bucs tried desperately to retaliate and gain control of the game, but after six plays the Gold-

Cade Pfleider (#35) makes a catch and runs for 34 yards with Buccaneers defenders in pursuit. Photo by Leslie Nation bugs were back in possession when Pfleider stripped Purdy of the ball for a fumble recovery. Starting their first drive of the second half from their 21, the Goldbugs battled the Bucs for every yard. After 20 plays, Alva finally found the end zone as Hess caught a 10-yard pass for his

third touchdown of the night. Another failed two-point conversion put the Goldbugs up by 26. Two possession changes later, Tonkawa had a shot to put points on the scoreboard after a fumble recovery on a failed handoff put the Bucs at Alva’s 34. With the good field position, Tonkawa made a run for the end zone. After five plays and 16 yards later, running back Kevin Howard rushed the ball for a nine-yard touchdown to keep the game from being a shutout. With Alva back in possession with over eight minutes to go in the game, after eight plays the Goldbugs gave it back to the Bucs on Tonkawa’s 15 on a failed fourth-

down conversion. With 4:55 left to go in the final quarter, Tonkawa was struggling to find a hole in Alva’s defense. On a fourth and five the Bucs failed to convert and get a fresh set of downs and had to turn the ball over on their own 20. After two plays, Joby Allen ran the ball for a 13-yard touchdown up the left side with 2:43 left in the game. Tonkawa wound the rest of the clock down to hand the game over to the Goldbugs 34-6 The Alva Goldbugs had 322 yards on total offense; nearly 200 of those yards were in the air. Alva’s defense held the Bucs to only 169 yards for the offense and 151 of those yards were on the ground.

No. 19 Oklahoma State runs past Iowa State 58-27 

By Luke Meredith AMES, Iowa (AP) — Clint Chelf certainly didn’t solve Oklahoma State’s issues in the passing game. It didn’t matter though, because Desmond Roland and the Cowboys ran all over Iowa State. Desmond Roland ran for a career-high 219 yards and four touchLinebacker Joby Allen (#30) upends the Bucs’ running back Brandon Purdy (#40) for a short gain on downs and 19th-ranked Oklahoma the run. Photo by Leslie Nation State routed Iowa State 58-27 on Saturday for its third straight win. Quarterback Clint Chelf had 163 total yards in his second start of the season for the Cowboys (6-1, 3-1 Big 12), who ran for a seasonhigh 342 yards. Though coach Mike Gundy wasn’t thrilled with Oklahoma State’s paltry 78 yards passing, he indicated that he’ll stick with Chelf when the Cowboys face Texas Tech next week. “I think Clint did a good job of managing the game. I think he did a good job of getting us in the correct run plays and was an effective runner,” Gundy said. Oklahoma State scored 14 points in a 2-½ minute stretch late in the third quarter to extend its lead to 45-20. Roland ran 58 yards for his third touchdown of the day, and Tyler Johnson took a fumble 54 yards for a TD with 4:17 left in the third. Sam Richardson had 95 yards passing and a touchdown for Iowa State (1-6, 0-4) before leaving the game late in the first half after an The Goldbugs’ Trevor Johnson (#20) breaks a tackle by Buccaneer defender Tucker Alexander (#10) in apparent blow to the head and neck. Tonkawa on Friday. Photo by Leslie Nation Iowa State coach Paul Rhoads

was optimistic that Richardson will be healthy enough to play next week. “When you play an opponent like that, you can’t give them things. You can’t make mistakes, you can’t turn the ball over, you can’t have foolish penalties. We had way too much of that in 60 minutes to give ourselves an opportunity to win,” Iowa State coach Paul Rhoads said. After a blistering start, Oklahoma State let Iowa State sneak back into the game by halftime. The Cowboys blew past the hapless Cyclones with a dominant third quarter. Roland broke at least four tackles during his 58-yard TD run, the longest of his career, to put Oklahoma State up 38-20. Cowboys linebacker Joe Mitchell then stripped Ernst Brun, and Johnson deftly maneuvered through a crowd of Cyclones and found the pylon for the defense’s second TD of the game. Chelf, who got the starting nod over J.W. Walsh, was just 10 of 26 passing for 78 yards. But he added 85 yards rushing and a touchdown for the Cowboys — who had 179 yards rushing in just the third quarter. “The offensive line just ran them down the field,” Roland said. “Coach Gundy said ‘Let’s stop playing with them. Get them out of the way and make some big holes,’ and they listened.”

See Cowboys Page 13


October 27, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 12

Girl scouts attend Lady Ranger soccer game Alva and Waynoka girl scouts attended the Lady Rangers soccer game against the Lady Bulldogs of Southwestern Oklahoma State University. The scouts really enjoyed the game even though their beloved Lady Rangers did not win. The Lady Rangers fought a great game but couldn’t withstand the second half barrage from their rivals, thus losing the game 1-4. After the game, the Lady Rangers soccer team signed the scouts’ shirts and gave them an autographed team picture. They encouraged the scouts to keep playing soccer.

Below: The girl scouts attended the Northwestern vs Southwestern soccer game. Front row, left to right: Kayla Maier, Addisann Weber, Alexis Malicoat, Jocelynn Williams, Kylie Malicoat, Paris Smith-Dunn, Christina Jenlink, Mersaydes Green, Kaylee Sims-Ince, Jorja Durkee, Middle Row—Morgann Martin, Madison Buckley, Jaymee Meyer, Jenna Maier, Brooke Lyons, Serenity Green, Madison Blankenship, Kaitlyn Rich, Sienna Whipple. Back Row—Sammi Hawley, Leah Maier, Justine Meyer, Ashlynn Halloway, Emily Barton, Madison Vaughn and Amithyst Kopisch.

The Lady Rangers soccer team pose for a picture with the Alva and Waynoka girl scouts, presenting their autographed team picture. The girl scouts pictured are Amithyst Kopisch, Madison Vaughn, Christina Jenlink, Paris Smith-Dunn, Jaymee Meyer, Jorja Durkee, Jenna Maier, Kaitlyn Rich, Leah Maier, Kaylee Sims-Ince, Ashlynn Halloway, Mersaydes Green, Brooke Lyons, Justine Meyer, Madison Buckley, Serenity Green, Sienna Whipple, Madison Blankenship, Addisann Weber, Sammi Hawley and Morgann Martin.

Lady Ranger Erica Hostetler autographs Daisy Girl Scout Christina Jenlink’s T-shirt after the game.


October 27, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 13

Graves wins three circuit titles By Ted Harbin DUNCAN – Stockton Graves’ focus all weekend was on winning the steer wrestling average championship at the Chisholm Trail Ram Prairie Circuit Finals Rodeo. He did that, clinching the coveted title on Saturday night during the third go-round of this year’s championship event at the Stephens County Fair and Expo Center in Duncan. Combined with the year-end title he’d clinched before the finale even began, the Newkirk cowboy was quite happy with the outcome. “It’s nice to win both,” said Graves, a seven-time Wrangler National Finals Rodeo qualifier. “I’ve done it numerous times. It’s a goal of mine when I came in here this weekend.” By winning the average, he added $1,767 to his annual total. More importantly, it served as a great bonus; those earnings helped Graves hold off Trell Etbauer of Goodwell for the year-end all-around title. Graves finished the year with $22,634, edging Etbauer by about $800. “I had a good year in the bulldogging, so I though I’d rope a couple of calves and see if I could win the all-around,” Graves said, noting that he earned about $800 in tiedown roping at the Topeka (Kan.) PRCA Rodeo in August. “Trell’s an outstanding athlete, and I thought he’d get me because he’s so good at all three events. I don’t like the calf roping that much; it takes a lot of work and I don’t want to put that much work into it.” But it paid off in the long run; that tie-down roping paycheck was just the difference in Graves’ first Prairie Circuit all-around championship. But Graves is one of the best steer wrestlers in the world, so his $21,836 earned at rodeos primarily in Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska was his priority. He did so on an old friend, 20-year-old Chunk, a steer wrestling horse he bought from

Gene Loch of Maryville, Mo. “That’s the horse that got me to my first NFR in 2004,” Graves said. “I bought him 2000. Gene knows horses. He called and said he had a nice horse, so we went to look at him and bought him. I kind of retired him a couple years ago. Last year, when my little horse died, I jumped around a few horses. Midway through the year, I went and got him out of the pasture.” “A lot of people have money on him over the years. He’s good and broke, and he loves his job.” Chunk came through again over the last three days. Graves placed in both the first two go-rounds, then turned in a solid final-round run to win the average championship by one-tenth of a second over Riley Duvall of Checotah. “I had a great year in circuit, and I wanted to finish the year strong,” Graves said. “Duncan has been good to me as far as the circuit finals goes. I won the average last year. I would’ve liked to have bulldogged a little better, but I got by. This is a big deal to me.” Graves is joined by the other average champions, including bareback riders Brian Leddy of Roll and Caine Riddle of Vernon, Texas; team ropers Troy Boone of Mutual in heading and Derrick Peterson of Louisburg, Kan., in heeling; saddle bronc rider Travis Sheets of Hyannis, Neb.; tie-down roper Caddo Lewallen of Morrison; barrel racer June Holeman of Arcadia, Neb.; and bull rider Sam Wyatt of Fittstown. They all qualify for the Ram National Circuit Finals Rodeo, which takes place next April in Oklahoma City. They will be joined by the year-end champions: Riddle in Bareback riding (by sharing the average championship, Leddy will join Riddle); Graves (year-end runner-up Kyle Irwin of Robertsdale, Ala., will go to the RNCFR); header Nick Sartain of Yukon; heeler Reagan Ward of Edmond; saddle bronc rider Joe Lufkin of Sallisaw; tie-

down roper Jerome Schneeberger of Ponca City; barrel racer Gretchen Benbenek of Aubrey, Texas; and bull rider Sage Kimzey of Strong City. Chisholm Trail Ram Prairie Circuit Finals Rodeo Oct. 17-19 Duncan, Okla. All-around: Circuit Finals: Trell Etbauer. Year-end: Stockton Graves. Bareback riding: First round: 1. (tie) Brian Leddy, on New Frontier Rodeo’s Full House, and Caine Riddle, on New Frontier Rodeo’s Barely Legal, 77 points, $1,014 each; 3. (tie) Brody Cooper and Justin Lindquist, 68, $435 each. Second round: 1. Caine Riddle, 73 points on Rafter H Rodeo’s Blue Yonder, $1,159; 2. Monty Goodwin, 71, $869; 3. Brian Leddy, 69, $580; 4. Logan Glendy, 63, $290. Third round: 1. Brian Leddy, 75 points on Beutler and Son Rodeo’s Satin Sheets, $1,159; 2. (tie) Caine Riddle and Logan Glendy, 71, $724; 4. Justin Lindquist, 70, $290. Average: 1. (tie) Brian Leddy and Caine Riddle, 221 points on three rides, $1,521 each; 3. Brody Cooper, 195, $869; 4. Logan Glendy, 188, $425. Year-end champion: Caine Riddle. Steer wrestling: First round: 1. Chancey Larson, 4.3 seconds, $1,178; 2. Colt Stearns, 4.4, $884; 3. Kyle Irwin, 4.5, $489; 4. Stockton Graves, 4.6, $295. Second round: 1. (tie) Trell Etbauer and Riley Duvall, 4.0 seconds, $1,031; 3. Dean Gorsuch, 4.1, $589; 4. Stockton Graves, 4.4, $295. Third round: 1. Chancey Larson, 3.8 seconds, $1,178; 2. Dean Gorsuch, 4.1, $884; 3. Jule Hazen, 4.5, $589; 4. Trell Etbauer, 5.1, $295. Average: 1. Stockton Graves, 14.2 seconds on three runs, $1,767; 2. Riley Duvall, 14.3, $1,325; 3. Kyle Irwin, 14.9, $884; 4. Shane Sparks, 15.3, $442. Year-end champion: Stockton Graves. Team roping: First round: 1.

Tavis Walters/Tad Sheets, 6.2 seconds, $1,178; 2. Troy Boone, 6.4, $884; 3. Joe Macoubrie/Dawson McMaster, 7.0, $589; 4. Andrew Ward/Reagan Ward, $295. Second round: 1. Nick Sartain/Kollin VonAhn, 4.8 seconds, $1,178; 2. Andrew Ward/Reagan Ward, 5.8, $884; 3. (tie) Joe Macoubrie/Dawson McMaster and Troy Boone/ Derrick Peterson, 6.0, $442. Third round: 1. Cole Markham/Jake Pianalto, 4.5 seconds, $1,178; 2. Nick Sartain/Kollin VonAhn, 4.9, $884; 3. Trey Harmon/Jace Crabb, 5.9, $589; 4. Troy Boone/Derrick Peterson, 6.0, $295. Average: 1. Troy Boone/Derrick Peterson, 18.4 seconds on three runs, $1,767; 2. Andrew Ward/Reagan Ward, 19.1, $1,325; 3. Nick Sartain/Kollin VonAhn, 9.7 seconds on two runs, $884; 4. Joe Macoubrie/Dawson McMaster, 13.0, $442. Year-end champion header: Nick Sartain. Year-end champion heeler: Reagan Ward. Saddle bronc riding: First round: 1. Travis Sheets, 79 points on Beutler and Son Rodeo’s Dreamer, $1,178; 2. Joe Harper, 78, $884; 3. Weston Ireland, 72, $589; 4. Trell Etbauer, 69, $295. Second round: 1. Ty Atchison, 82 points on Rafter H Rodeo’s Sand Creek, $1,178; 2. Casey McGooden, 75, $884; 3. Roper Kiesner, 74, $589; 4. Travis Sheets, 68, $295. Third round: 1. Ty Atchison, 80 points on Beutler and Son Rodeo’s Night Latch, $1,178; 2. Joe Harper, 75, $884; 3. Travis Sheets, 74, $489; 4. Cody Hamm, 68, $295. Average: 1. Travis Sheets, 221 points on three rides, $1,767; 2. Casey McGooden, 206, $1,325; 3. Cody Hamm, 192, $884; 4. Ty Atchison, 162 points on two rides, $442. Year-end champion: Joe Lufkin. Tie-down roping: First round: 1. Jerome Schneeberger, 8.8 seconds, $1,178; 2. Caddo Lewallen, 9.7, $884; 3. Garrett Nokes, 10.3, $589; 4. Cole Wilson, 11.0, $295. Second round: 1. Bryson Sechrist, 8.2 sec-

onds, $1,178; 2. Caddo Lewallen, 8.5, $884; 3. Garrett Nokes, 9.3, $589; 4. Ryan Bothum, 9.5, $295. Third round: 1. Bryson Sechrist, 9.1 seconds, $1,178; 2. Jeff Miller, 9.6, $884; 3. Ryan Bothum, 9.9, $589; 4. Cole Wilson, 11.1, $295. Average: 1. Caddo Lewallen, 29.9 seconds on three runs, $1,767; 2. Ryan Bothum, 30.5, $1,325; 3. Jerome Schneeberger, 31.7, $884; 4. Cole Wilson, 34.0, $442. Year-end champion: Jerome Schneeberger. Barrel racing: First round: 1. Emily Miller, 16.28 seconds, $1,178; 2. June Holeman, 16.46, $884; 3. (tie) Gretchen Benbenek and Kyra Stierwalt, 16.50, $442 each. Second round: 1. June Holeman, 16.03 seconds, $1,178; 2. Kyra Stierwalt, 16.18, $884; 3. Gretchen Benbenek, 16.26, $589; 4. Carol Chesher, 16.33, $295. Third round: 1. Kyra Stierwalt, 16.14 seconds, $1,178; 2. June Holeman, 16.20, $884; 3. Alexia Mehrle, 16.27, $589; 4. Gretchen Benbenek, 16.31, $295. Average: 1. June Holeman, 48.69 seconds on three runs, $1,767; 2. Kyra Stierwalt, 48.82, $1,325; 3. Gretchen Benbenek, 49.07, $884; Carol Chesher, 49.58, $442. Year-end champion: Gretchen Benbenek Bull riding: First round: 1. (tie) Brennon Eldred, on New Frontier Rodeo’s Night Rider, and Trevor Kastner, on Beutler and Son Rodeo’s Turbo Ryder, 82 points, $1,031 each; 3. Sage Kimzey, 78, $589; 4. Sam Wyatt, 72, $295. Second round: 1. Sam Wyatt, 87 points on Rafter H Rodeo’s Newsflash, $1,178; 2. Sage Kimzey, 85, $884; 3. (tie) Cody Sierks and Trevor Kastner, 82, $442 each. Third round: 1. Guthrie Murray, 87 points on David Baily Rodeo’s Jim Jam, $1,620; 2. Sam Wyatt, 74, $1,325. Average: 1. Sam Wyatt, 233 points on three rides, $1,767; 2. Trevor Kastner, 164 points on two rides, $1,325; 3. Sage Kimzey, 163, $884; 4. Guthrie Murray, 119, $442. Yearend champion: Sage Kimzey.

Bell guides Oklahoma past Texas Tech 38-30 From Page 11 Cowboys

By Kurt Voigt NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — Blake Bell and Oklahoma did just enough to knock Texas Tech from the ranks of the unbeaten. Bell threw for 249 yards and a pair of touchdowns, and Damien Williams added two more scores as No. 17 Oklahoma outlasted No. 10 Texas Tech in a 38-30 win on Saturday. Jalen Saunders added six catches for 153 yards receiving and both of Bell’s touchdown passes for the Sooners (7-1, 4-1 Big 12 Conference), who rallied after falling behind in the third quarter. Williams finished with 97 yards rushing for Oklahoma, which forced three turnovers by the Red Raiders. The loss was the first of the season for Texas Tech (7-1, 4-1) and first-year coach Kliff Kingsbury. Davis Webb finished 33-of-52 passing for 385 yards for the Red Raiders, who were led by Jace Amaro’s 119 yards receiving on eight catches. Eric Ward added nine catches for 106 yards. Texas Tech led 7-0 after the first quarter and the offensive shootout was on between two of the Big 12’s best — the defending conference champion Sooners and upstart Red Raiders. The two teams combined for 986 yards of total offense, with Oklahoma outgaining Texas Tech 526-460. It was a trio of turnovers, how-

ever, that came back to haunt a Red Raiders team that was eager to prove it was worthy of its lofty ranking — despite just one win over a ranked team this season entering the game. The last of those turnovers came early in the fourth quarter after Oklahoma had taken a 2824 lead on Lacoltan Bester’s remarkable back-and-forth 35-yard touchdown run. Texas Tech had rallied from 21-7 behind to take the lead before Bester’s touchdown, but Webb followed by throwing his second interception of the game — a tipped pass off the hands of Ward that Oklahoma’s Gabe Lynn pulled in for the turnover. Williams followed seven plays and 58 yards later with a 3-yard touchdown run to put the Sooners up 35-24, a lead that held up behind an Oklahoma offense that finished with 277 yards rushing on 50 carries. Bell added 44 yards rushing on nine carries to his big passing day, while Roy Finch finished with 55 yards on the ground in the balanced effort. While Bell and the rest of the Oklahoma offense struggled in the first quarter, gaining just 58 yards on four possessions, Texas Tech did its best to show it belonged among the Big 12’s best and in the national spotlight. The Red Raiders entered the game undefeated in Kingsbury’s first season as coach but facing

their most difficult opponent of the season so far. Once again behind Webb, who has played since Baker Mayfield was injured against Kansas on Oct. 5, Texas Tech took an early 7-0 lead — thanks to a 3-yard touchdown pass from running back Kenny Williams to Ward. Oklahoma answered with a pair of first-half touchdowns — including a 76-yard strike from Bell to Saunders — to take a 14-7 lead. The Sooners extended that lead to 21-7 to open the second half after Williams scored on a 3-yard touchdown run. Trailing 38-30 with 1:17 remaining in the game, Texas Tech was unable to gain a first down — securing the win for Oklahoma.

Iowa State was coming off the most lopsided loss in school history, having been throttled by No. 6 Baylor 71-7 last weekend in Waco. The Cowboys made the Cyclones look just as bad in the first 10 minutes. Roland opened the scoring with a 2-yard touchdown run, and Justin Gilbert made it 14-0 Cowboys by taking a Richardson interception back 31 yards. Oklahoma State pushed its lead to 21-0 on an 8-yard TD pass from Chelf to Charlie Moore midway through the first quarter. To that point, Iowa State had given up an astounding 92 points in the 69:15 dating back to the start of the Baylor game. But instead of burying the Cyclones, the Cowboys allowed them to climb right back into it. Quenton Bundrage caught TD passes of 22 and 20 yards — the first from Richardson, the second from backup Grant Rohach — to help Iowa State pull within 28-20 by halftime. But there would be no repeat

of 2011, when the host Cyclones stunned the Cowboys in double overtime and ruined their shot at a national title. “I would argue that momentum was almost on our side as we went into the locker room,” Rhoads said. “With the ability to come out and get a stop, which we did in a way, and go get a score, you’ve got a chance in the last 30 minutes to knock off a top (20) team. We didn’t do enough execution-wise in the second half to make that happen. Was that frustrating? Sure.” Rohach finished with 97 yards passing for Iowa State, which converted just 4 of 20 third downs and punted 11 times. Rohach will likely return to the bench when the Cyclones play at Kansas State on Saturday. But Chelf will probably get another shot, even though his legs were ahead of his arm on Saturday. “We have to become a better throwing team. We were very average throwing the football,” Gundy said. “But rushing the football was good.”


October 27, 2013

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Alva Review-Courier

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Woods County Court Dispositions 34 Deferred Four Felonies David Tyler Ingraham, 22, Alva: Defendant pleaded nolo contendere on Sept. 9 in case CF2012-115 for Injuring or molesting automobile (amended from Malicious injury to property). Sentence herein be deferred for six months until March 8, 2014. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying fine, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Shane Glendon Callison, 41, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 4 in case CF-2012-128 for (1) Grand larceny; (2) Possession of burglary tools and (3) Possession of stolen copper. Sentence herein be deferred for five years until Sept. 3, 2018. These terms to run concurrent to each other. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Kenneth Mitchell Shafer, 45, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 18 in case CF-2013-1 for Possession of controlled dangerous substance (methamphetamine). Sentence herein be deferred for 24 months until Sept. 17, 2015. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Britney Nikole Bryant, 22, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 4 in case CF-2013-82 for Possession of controlled dangerous substance (methamphetamine). Sentence herein be deferred for five years until Sept. 3, 2018. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS and CLEET. 30 Misdemeanors Kenneth Mitchell Shafer, 45, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 18 in case CM-2013-17 for (1) Possession of controlled dangerous substance (marijuana) and (2) Unlawful possession of paraphernalia. Sentence herein be deferred for 24 months until Sept. 17, 2015. These terms to run concurrent to each other and concurrent to case CF-2013-1. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS and CLEET. Britney Nikole Bryant, 22, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 4 in case CM-2013-266 for

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, October 27, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: SANDRIDGE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION, LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 28 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA CAUSE CD NO. 201307137 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, and all parties listed as respondents on Exhibit “A”, attached to the Application on file herein, and more particularly: ESTATE OF MALCOM MAXWELL; ESTATE OF JAMES M. HANNUM; and ESTATE OF JAMES ROBERT MAXWELL, if living, or if deceased, the known and unknown heirs, devisees, executors, administrators, successors, trustees and/or assigns, immediate and remote, of the above named parties. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Applicant in this Cause is requesting that this Commission grant a

(1) Possession of controlled dangerous substance (marijuana) and (2) Unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia. Sentence herein be deferred for one year until Sept. 3, 2014. Defendant shall receive credit for time served in Woods County Jail. These terms to run concurrent to each other and concurrent to case CF-2013-82. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS and CLEET. Christopher Lee Lundry, 20, Woodward: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 4 in case CM-2011155 for Driving under the influence. Sentence herein be deferred for 18 months until March 3, 2015. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Frankie Lee Chandler, 30, Woodward: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 3 in case CM-201293 for Driving a motor vehicle while license is under suspension. Sentence herein be deferred for 24 months until Sept. 2, 2015. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Robert Adam Bell, 25, Guthrie: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 25 in case CM-2012-198 for Driving under the influence of intoxicating substances. Sentence herein be deferred for two years until Sept. 24, 2015. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Christina D’Ann Smith, 42, Fairview: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 23 in case CM-2012205 for Driving while impaired (amended from DUI). Sentence herein be deferred for 12 months until Sept. 22, 2014. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Heath Ray Tomberlin, 34, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 16 in case CM-2012-308 for Driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. Sentence herein be deferred for 18 months until March 15, 2015. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET

and $40 monthly supervision fee. Dylan Warner Sterling, 21, Marshall: Defendant pleaded no contest on Sept. 20 in case CM2012-313 for Reckless conduct with firearm. Sentence herein be deferred for five years until Sept. 19, 2018. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Eric Dale Swart, 26, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 3 in case CM-2012-314 for Driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. Sentence herein be deferred for 18 months until March 2, 2015. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Darrell Lee Harrison, 51, Enid: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 23 in case CM-2013-8 for Obtaining cash or merchandise by bogus check. Sentence herein be deferred for 24 months until Sept. 22, 2015. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly deferred assessment. James Michael Durkee, 31, Waynoka: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept.25 in case CM-201345 for (1) Public intoxication and (2) Disturbing the peace. Sentence herein be deferred for 24 months until Sept. 24, 2015. These terms to run concurrent to each other and concurrent to case CM-2013-239. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. James Michael Durkee, 31, Waynoka: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 25 in case CM-2013239 for Driving while license revoked. Sentence herein be deferred for 24 months until Sept. 24, 2015. These terms to run concurrent to case CM-2013-45. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Michael Allen Roadenbaugh, 42, Cherokee: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 3 in case CM-201360 for (1) Possession of controlled dangerous substance (marijuana); (2) Unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia; and (3) Unlawful possession of CDS without a pre-

well location for a well to be drilled and produced from the Mississippi common source of supply underlying Section 26, Township 28 North, Range 16 West, Woods County, Oklahoma, at a location as follows: Completion Interval: To be located within the subsurface location tolerance area as set forth below: Not closer than 200 feet from the North line and not closer than 200 feet from the South line and not closer than 1,800 feet from the East line of Section 26, Township 28 North, Range 16 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. as exception to Order No. 100039. A request will be made to designate the Applicant or some other party as the operator of the proposed well. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the drilling and spacing unit described in the caption hereof underlies Section 26, Township 28 North, Range 16 West, and the sections adjacent are Sections 22, 23, 24, 25, 27, 34, 35 and 36, Township 28 North, Range 16 West, all in Woods County, Oklahoma. IT IS ORDERED that this Cause be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. IT IS ORDERED AND NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that this Cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Merits Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, Oklahoma City,

Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 12th day of November, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the Rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Luke Hayes, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 731026406, (405) 429-6660 or CHARLES L. HELM, Attorney, 105 North Hudson, Suite 700, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 73102, (405) 232-9000. Please refer to Cause CD Number. DONE AND PERFORMED this 24th day of October, 2013. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner ATTEST: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary

scription. Sentence herein be deferred for three years until Sept. 2, 2016. These terms to run concurrent to each other. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Shana Lynn Roadenbaugh, 40, Cherokee: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 3 in case CM-201361 for Unlawful possession of CDS without a prescription. Sentence herein be deferred for three years until Sept. 2, 2016. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Marcus James Robertson, 23, Stillwater: Defendant pleaded no contest on Sept. 19 to count one of case CM-2013-63 for Possession of controlled dangerous substance (marijuana). Sentence herein be deferred for 12 months until Sept. 18, 2014. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. For count two Possession of drug paraphernalia, it is in the best interest of justice that count two be dismissed upon payment of costs and assessments. Shelby Tyler Adair, 27, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 25 in case CM-2013-66 for Obtaining cash or merchandise by bogus check. Sentence herein be deferred for four years until Sept. 24, 2017. These terms to run concurrent to existing Woods County cases. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly deferred assessment. Candess Loraen Easley, 40, Lawton: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 23 in case CM-2013-108 for Aggravated driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. Sentence herein be deferred for 36 months until Sept. 22, 2016. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Terry Don Tolle, 50, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 3 in case CM-2013-117 for Driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. Sentence herein be deferred for 18 months until March 2, 2015. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Holden Blaine Collins, 22, Blanchard: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 30 in case CM2013-137 for Driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. Sentence herein be deferred for 36 months until Sept. 29, 2016. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Brenda Nancy Flores, 20, Woodward: Defendant pleaded nolo contendere on Sept. 25 in case CM-2013-138 for Driving while impaired (amended from DUI). Sentence herein be deferred for 24 months until Sept. 24, 2015. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying fine, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Travis M. Harmon-Smith, 24, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 16 in case CM-2013-148 for (1) Possession of controlled dangerous substance; (2) Unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia. Sentence herein be deferred

for 24 months until Sept. 15, 2015. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Andrew Brice Swaim, 23, Sayre: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 18 in case CM-2013-158 for Driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. Sentence herein be deferred for 12 months until Sept. 17, 2014. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Joshua Cory Drake, 30, Wellston: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 16 in case CM-2013-163 for Transporting loaded firearm in motor vehicle. Sentence herein be deferred for 24 months until Sept. 15, 2015. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Jacky Marie Ince, 32, Waynoka: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 16 in case CM-2013-185 for Obtaining cash or merchandise by bogus check. Sentence herein be deferred for 24 months until Sept. 15, 2015. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Matthew Cody Brooks, 30, Hydro: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 25 in case CM-2013-203 for Driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. Sentence herein be deferred for 18 months until March 24, 2015. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Dylan Matthew Lewis, 21, Capron: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 23 in case CM-2013-204 for (1) Driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol; (2) Transporting opened container of beer. Sentence herein be deferred for 18 months until March 22, 2015. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Michael Vernon Bratton III, 46, Hardesty: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 24 in case CM2013-205 for (1) Public intoxication; (2) Transporting opened container of beer. Sentence herein be deferred for nine months until June 23, 2014. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Caleb Lakota Tyrell Smith, 20, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 23 in case CM-2013-210 for (1) Possession of controlled dangerous substance – marijuana; (2) Unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia. Sentence herein be deferred for 24 months until Sept. 22, 2015. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee. Jairo Munoz Gonzalez, 29, Cleburne, Texas: Defendant pleaded guilty on Sept. 23 in case CM2013-258 for Petit larceny. Sentence herein be deferred for 90 days until Dec. 23, 2013. Defendant conforming to certain requirements including paying assessments, court costs, VCA, AFIS, CLEET and $40 monthly supervision fee.


October 27, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Woods County Real Woods County Estate Transactions Court Filings Beginning book 1165 page 1073 Real Estate Transfers Wade Lowrie McClure, as Trustee of the William Lowrie McClure Testamentary Trust to McClure Interests LLC: (1) Section 20, Township 25 North, Range 15, WIM; (2) Section 20, Township 23 North, Range 13, WIM; (3) Section 36, Township 25 North, Range 15, WIM; (4) Section 29, Township 25 North, Range 15, WIM; (5) Section 4, Township 27 North, Range 16, WIM; (6) Section 35, Township 27 North, Range 16, WIM; (7) Section 3, Township 26 North, Range 16, WIM; (8) Section 17, Township 29 North, Range 17, WIM; (9) Section 29, Township 23 North, Range 13, WIM; (10) Section 18, Township 24 North, Range 13, WIM; (11) Section 12, Township 26 North, Range 17, WIM; (12) Section 1, Township 28 North, Range 16, WIM: Quit Claim Deed. Jo A. Thompson to Keith V. Reiman: Lot 4 in Block 10 of the Hatfield Addition to the City of Alva: Quit Claim Deed. Charles Morton Share Trust dated June 12, 1959 to Joseph H. Shirley and Sylvia A. Shirley: the Southwest Quarter of Section 33, Township 27 North, Range 16, WIM, RESERVING unto the Grantor an undivided 80 acres of minerals in the above-described property: Warranty Deed. Mary Lou Eden-Farr, formerly Mary Lou Eden & Elmer O. Farr to Bixler & Partners LLC: 1 square acre of land in the Northwest corner of the Northwest Quarter of Section 35, Township 27 North, Range 18, WIM, RESERVING all of the Grantors undivided interest in and to the oil, gas and mineral interests and mineral rights in and under the surface of said land, SUBJECT to existing easements now of record: Warranty Deed. Steven Don Golbek & Lisa Golbek to Steven Don Golbek & Lisa Golbek: all of Lots 5 & 6 and the North 16.40 feet of Lot 7 all in Block 7 of East Hill Addition to Alva: Joint Tenancy Warranty Deed. Michelle Nocera to Zoller Enterprises LLC: In Harper Co (1) all of Section 35, Township 29 North, Range 21, WIM; (2) all of Section 35, Township 28 North, Range 26, WIM; (3) all of Sections 1 & 2, Township 27 North, Range 26, WIM; (4) all of Section 7, Township 27 North, Range 25, WIM; (5) Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 15, Township 25 North, Range 24, WIM; (6) Northwest Quarter of Section 15, Township 24 North, Range 24, WIM; In Woodward Co (7) all of Sections 8, 17 &18 in Township 23 North, Range 17, WIM; In Woods Co (8) all of Section 22, Township 25 North, Range 16, WIM; In Custer Co (9) all of Sections 29 & 30 in Township 15 North, Range 17, WIM; In Major Co (10) Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 32, Township 22 North, Range 14, WIM; (11) all of Section 30, Township 22 North, Range 16, WIM; (12) all of Section 27, Township 23 North, Range 16, WIM; In Seminole Co (13) Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 36, Township 8 North, Range 17, East: Quit Claim Deed. Jeffrey R. Zoller to Zoller Enterprises LLC: In Harper Co (1) all of Section 35, Township 29 North, Range 21, WIM; (2) all of Section 35, Township 28 North, Range 26, WIM; (3) all of Sections 1 &

2, Township 27 North, Range 26, WIM; (4) all of Section 7, Township 27 North, Range 25, WIM; (5) Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 15, Township 25 North, Range 24, WIM; (6) Northwest Quarter of Section 15, Township 24 North, Range 24, WIM; In Woodward Co (7) all of Sections 8, 17 &18 in Township 23 North, Range 17, WIM; In Woods Co (8) all of Section 22, Township 25 North, Range 16, WIM; In Custer Co (9) all of Sections 29 & 30 in Township 15 North, Range 17, WIM; In Major Co (10) Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 32, Township 22 North, Range 14, WIM; (11) all of Section 30, Township 22 North, Range 16, WIM; (12) all of Section 27, Township 23 North, Range 16, WIM; In Seminole Co (13) Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 36, Township 8 North, Range 17, East: Quit Claim Deed. Marianne Zoller to Zoller Enterprises LLC: In Harper Co (1) all of Section 35, Township 29 North, Range 21, WIM; (2) all of Section 35, Township 28 North, Range 26, WIM; (3) all of Sections 1 & 2, Township 27 North, Range 26, WIM; (4) all of Section 7, Township 27 North, Range 25, WIM; (5) Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 15, Township 25 North, Range 24, WIM; (6) Northwest Quarter of Section 15, Township 24 North, Range 24, WIM; In Woodward Co (7) all of Sections 8, 17 &18 in Township 23 North, Range 17, WIM; In Woods Co (8) all of Section 22, Township 25 North, Range 16, WIM; In Custer Co (9) all of Sections 29 & 30 in Township 15 North, Range 17, WIM; In Major Co (10) Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 32, Township 22 North, Range 14, WIM; (11) all of Section 30, Township 22 North, Range 16, WIM; (12) all of Section 27, Township 23 North, Range 16, WIM; In Seminole Co (13) Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 36, Township 8 North, Range 17, East: Quit Claim Deed. Todd A. Zoller to Zoller Enterprises LLC: In Harper Co (1) all of Section 35, Township 29 North, Range 21, WIM; (2) all of Section 35, Township 28 North, Range 26, WIM; (3) all of Sections 1 & 2, Township 27 North, Range 26, WIM; (4) all of Section 7, Township 27 North, Range 25, WIM; (5) Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 15, Township 25 North, Range 24, WIM; (6) Northwest Quarter of Section 15, Township 24 North, Range 24, WIM; In Woodward Co (7) all of Sections 8, 17 &18 in Township 23 North, Range 17, WIM; In Woods Co (8) all of Section 22, Township 25 North, Range 16, WIM; In Custer Co (9) all of Sections 29 & 30 in Township 15 North, Range 17, WIM; In Major Co (10) Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 32, Township 22 North,

Range 14, WIM; (11) all of Section 30, Township 22 North, Range 16, WIM; (12) all of Section 27, Township 23 North, Range 16, WIM; In Seminole Co (13) Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 36, Township 8 North, Range 17, East: Quit Claim Deed. Henry E. Zoller IV to Zoller Enterprises LLC: In Harper Co (1) all of Section 35, Township 29 North, Range 21, WIM; (2) all of Section 35, Township 28 North, Range 26, WIM; (3) all of Sections 1 & 2, Township 27 North, Range 26, WIM; (4) all of Section 7, Township 27 North, Range 25, WIM; (5) Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 15, Township 25 North, Range 24, WIM; (6) Northwest Quarter of Section 15, Township 24 North, Range 24, WIM; In Woodward Co (7) all of Sections 8, 17 &18 in Township 23 North, Range 17, WIM; In Woods Co (8) all of Section 22, Township 25 North, Range 16, WIM; In Custer Co (9) all of Sections 29 & 30 in Township 15 North, Range 17, WIM; In Major Co (10) Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 32, Township 22 North, Range 14, WIM; (11) all of Section 30, Township 22 North, Range 16, WIM; (12) all of Section 27, Township 23 North, Range 16, WIM; In Seminole Co (13) Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 36, Township 8 North, Range 17, East: Quit Claim Deed. Kimberly Hofeldt to Zoller Enterprises LLC: In Harper Co (1) all of Section 35, Township 29 North, Range 21, WIM; (2) all of Section 35, Township 28 North, Range 26, WIM; (3) all of Sections 1 & 2, Township 27 North, Range 26, WIM; (4) all of Section 7, Township 27 North, Range 25, WIM; (5) Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of Section 15, Township 25 North, Range 24, WIM; (6) Northwest Quarter of Section 15, Township 24 North, Range 24, WIM; In Woodward Co (7) all of Sections 8, 17 &18 in Township 23 North, Range 17, WIM; In Woods Co (8) all of Section 22, Township 25 North, Range 16, WIM; In Custer Co (9) all of Sections 29 & 30 in Township 15 North, Range 17, WIM; In Major Co (10) Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of Section 32, Township 22 North, Range 14, WIM; (11) all of Section 30, Township 22 North, Range 16, WIM; (12) all of Section 27, Township 23 North, Range 16, WIM; In Seminole Co (13) Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 36, Township 8 North, Range 17, East: Quit Claim Deed. Mortgages Bixler Development LLC to Bank of Western Oklahoma: Lot 3 in Block 2 of the Cimarron Estates Addition to the Town of Freedom: $116,648.26. Zac M. Ream & Charleen J. Ream to Community Bank: the South 178.4 feet of Lot 6 of Benjamin’s Subdivision of the Southwest Quarter of Section 7, Township 27 North, Range 13, WIM: $73,000.

According to the affidavits and petitions on file, the following individuals have been charged. An individual is innocent of any charges listed below until proven guilty in a court of law. All information is a matter of public record and may be obtained by anyone during regular hours at the Woods County Courthouse. The Alva Review-Courier will not intentionally alter or delete any of this information. If it appears in the courthouse public records, it will appear in this newspaper. Criminal Filings Dustin Morris Blalock, 38, Waynoka: Possession of CDS ($505.40). Rebecca Michelle Shaver, 40, Mannford: DUI – Second felony offense ($905.90). Raymond Roy Huffman, 45, Waynoka: DUI – Subsequent offense ($859.70). Kenneth Daniel Marder Jr., 20, Broken Arrow: Possession of CDS within 1,000 feet of park or school ($459.20). Benjamin Arthur Schremeck, 21, Broken Arrow: Possession of CDS within 1,000 feet of park or school ($459.20). Tyliq Jaquay Brazille, 19, no address listed: Burglary 2nd degree ($265.50) Out-standing warrant. Misdemeanor Filings Dustin Morris Blalock, 38, Waynoka: DUI ($786). Steven Lynn Boren, 37, Alva: Driving while impaired ($312.70). Outstanding warrant. William Kaleb Brown, 23, Conway, Ark.: (1) Public intoxication; (2) Disturbing the peace ($541.70). John Patrick Cairl Jr., 22, Alva: (1) DUI; (2) Unlawful possession of paraphernalia ($1,176.70). Kenneth Daniel Marder Jr., 20, Broken Arrow: Unlawful possession of paraphernalia ($382). Benjamin Arthur Schremeck, 21, Broken Arrow: Unlawful possession of paraphernalia ($382).

Matthew Scott Fecher, 24, Pratt, Kan.: (1) Possession of CDS; (2) Possession of paraphernalia ($764) Outstanding warrant. Merl Allen Jones, 49, Aline: Public intoxication ($358.90). Christopher Elton Rhoades, 28, Alva: Public intoxication ($312.70). Dylan Michael Garrison Knierim, 21, Waynoka: (1) Domestic abuse – Assault and battery; (2) Possession of drug paraphernalia ($458). Jennifer Michelle Blankenship, 37, Waynoka: (1) Domestic abuse – Assault and battery; (2) Possession of drug paraphernalia ($573.50). Civil Filings Dr. James Keeney vs. Dr. Michael D. Meier, Dr. Jason S. Coulter and Northwest Chiropractic Clinic: Accounting in an amount in excess of $75,000 ($228.70). Lois L. Layton and First Interstate Bank vs. Eric Darnell and Bliss Ranch: Accounting ($223.70). Midland Funding LLC vs. Ron Sunderland: Money judgement for an amount $10,000 or less ($205.70). Protective Order Filings Ashleigh Nicole Sheppard, Randy Dale Stewart, Carlson Stewart, and Wilbur Lalone vs. Keith Raymond Solomon and Elizabeth Solomon ($175.70). Marriage Licenses Issued October 14 – Paul James Barnett, 39, of Alva and Danielle Marie Murry, 29 of Alva. Divorce Filings Taylor Ann Cihak vs. Dustin Dean Cihak: Dissolution of marriage ($193.70). October 16 – Brett Justin Weyrick vs. Nicole Rae Weyrick: Divorce granted. Traffic Filings Jimmy Carlton Broom II, 31, Bryan, Texas: Failure to yield from stop sign ($211.50).

Woods County Sheriff’s Report October 16, 2013 9:00 p.m. Individual called asking for the names of our female inmates. 9:30 p.m. Person called about individual’s bond. October 17, 2013 6:30 p.m. Individual’s girlfriend called to check his bond amount. October 20, 2013 10:15 a.m. Person called asking about individual’s bond. 2:50 p.m. Individual called asking to see if we had her phone.

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October 27, 2013

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Page 16

Woods County Communication Call Center

October 16, 2013 1:16 p.m. Dark blue four-door Jeep tow strap broken down on 700 block of Hunt. 1:32 p.m. Question on getting license reinstated, referred to OHP driver’s license examiner office. 2:01 p.m. Report accident on Highway 11 and CR 950, two vehicles, no injuries, backed into. 3:21 p.m. Stray dog following boy home from school on Ninth Street between Church and Locust. 4:26 p.m. Report breaking and entering, car was parked on 1200 block of Choctaw, transferred to police department. 5:13 p.m. Fire in pit A at elevator on north side of Coop on Mill. 5:21 p.m. Theft from employee caught on camera at McDonalds. 9:19 p.m. Domestic at 200 block of N. Fourth in Medford. 10:17 p.m. Lincoln School advising kids have head lice at school and Health Department needs to be notified. 11:51 p.m. Individual with chest pain, vomiting, at 1100 block of Frontier Drive. October 17, 2013 1:18 a.m. 911 call, individual with back pain at 700 block of Maple. 7:16 a.m. 13 year-old having seizures at 100 block of Elm Street. 10:27 a.m. Complaint on dog catcher walking in yard at 100 block of Barnes. 11:02 a.m. Neighbor’s roosters in the garage at 1100 block of Barnes, complaints. 12:57 p.m. Dog tried to attack kids at 2200 block of Waynoka Street in Waynoka, boxer mix.

2:25 p.m. Officials or visitors present at police department for lost passports. 3:04 p.m. Naked 2 year-old girl playing in street at 1000 block of Second. 3:30 p.m. Female shoplifter at Walmart. 11:02 p.m. Air evac called with question on getting fuel if needed. October 18, 2013 3:52 a.m. White pickup with paper tag 5 miles east of Alva on 64, crossing both lanes. 5:26 a.m. 911 call, where is CR 440? 3:31 p.m. 911 call, no electricity on Canyon Road, reset breaker. 3:41 p.m. Complaint on dog catcher. 3:56 p.m. No electricity at 1900 block of Maple. 4:43 p.m. 911 call, 1300 block of Fair broken into, nothing missing, officer notified. 7:00 p.m. Fire at Jiffy Trip. October 19, 2013 1:14 a.m. Suspicious vehicle stopping behind houses on 12th Street, silver two-door car. 9:02 a.m. Semi broken down in road between Loves and Ampride, someone is going to get nailed. 9:34 a.m. Black lab stuck at 400 block of Church. 10:08 a.m. Question about vehicle towed. 2:18 p.m. Trespassing out of Sand City. 6:32 p.m. Boots on high line at Elm/Main. 9:23 p.m. Loud music at 12th and Barnes. October 20, 2013 5:00 a.m. Motorist assist, vehi-

cle on dirt road by Big Creek with headlights out, front suspension bolt broke. 10:50 a.m. 911 call, man on ground by horse trailer with flat tire, horses are out, nevermind the man is up walking around. 12:23 p.m. Four-wheelers with no mufflers at trailer park cafe in Dacoma, tired of listening to them, notified deputy. 12:47 p.m. Gun shooting on south Waynoka Street, officers notified. 12:58 p.m. Shooting out of city limits. 2:05 p.m. 911 call, controlled burn on Haskell. 2:34 p.m. Missing blue heeler from Fourth/High, pregnant female. 3:41 p.m. 911 call, semi with horse trailer driving erratic. 9:21 p.m. 86 year-old, no meds, lethargic, at 700 block of Santa Fe. 9:39 p.m. 1992 green Dodge with skinny tool box heading towards Cherokee, drives a red van, meth? 10:30 p.m. Officer assisting woman looking for 12 year-old who

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, October 27, 2013.) FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE The East Woods County Conservation District would like to announce State-Cost Share sign up FY15. The East Woods County Conservation District Board of Directors approved the following practices of, Brush Management (Cedar and Mesquite), Terraces, and/or Pasture and Hay Planting not to exceed $2,000.00 per person. The East Woods County Conservation District sign up period will be from October 28, 2013, to close of business on November 12, 2013. You can get an application at the East Woods County Conservation District Office located at 927 Oklahoma Boulevard, Alva, OK, Monday through Friday from 8:00 A.M. to 4:30 P.M.

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, October 27, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: SANDRIDGE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION, LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP 28 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA CAUSE CD NO. 201307136 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Applicant in this Cause is requesting that this Commission grant a well location for a well to be drilled and produced from the Mississippi common source of supply underlying Section 23, Township 28 North, Range 16 West, Woods County, Oklahoma, at a location as follows: Completion Interval: To be located within the subsurface location tolerance area as set forth below: Not closer than 200 feet from the North line and not closer than 200 feet from the South line and not closer than 1,800 feet from the East line of Section 23, Township 28 North, Range 16 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. as exception to Order No. 100039. A request will be made to designate the Applicant or some other party as the operator of the proposed well. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the drilling and spacing unit described in the caption hereof underlies Section 23, Township 28 North, Range 16 West, and the sections adjacent are Sections 13, 14, 15, 22, 24, 25, 26 and 27, Township 28 North, Range 16 West, all in Woods County, Oklahoma. IT IS ORDERED that this Cause be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. IT IS ORDERED AND NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that this Cause

sneaked out of house. October 21, 2013 12:37 a.m. Missing boxer in Dacoma. 6:05 a.m. Noise complaint on S. Sunset, dog barking. 9:36 a.m. Number for funeral home. 9:45 a.m. Question on charges/ warrant. 10:12 a.m. Will be doing some controlled burns on Haskell Road. 12:52 p.m. Young male beagle at 800 block of Barnes. 6:57 p.m. 911 call, grandson high or something, threatening to shoot, at 1400 block of First Street. 7:12 p.m. 911 call, pickup totalled at CR 410. 8:24 p.m. Dogs barking like crazy at 1500 block of Davis. 9:27 p.m. Kids by vet clinic, 5-10 boys. 11:49 p.m. Individual in a blue Jeep Grand Cherokee has 9mm and is suicidal. October 22, 2013 8:32 a.m. Someone ran over mailbox at 300 block of Ridgeview Road, outside city limits.

will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Merits Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 12th day of November, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the Rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Luke Hayes, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73102-6406, (405) 429-6660 or CHARLES L. HELM, Attorney, 105 North Hudson, Suite 700, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 73102, (405) 232-9000. Please refer to Cause CD Number. DONE AND PERFORMED this 24th day of October, 2013. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner ATTEST: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, October 27 and November 3, 2013.) NOTICE OF INTENTION TO APPLY FOR AN ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE In accordance with Title 37 Section 522 Randy Stewart 910 Main Street Waynoka OK 73860 hereby publishes notice of his intention to apply within his sixty days from this date to the Oklahoma Alcoholic Beverage Laws Enforcement for a Mixed Beverage License under authority of and in compliance with the said Act: That intend(s), if granted such license to operate as a he intends (s), if granted such license to operate as a Mixed Beverage establishment with business premises located at 1521 Main Street in Waynoka, Woods, Oklahoma, under the business name of Sandbar Saloon. Dated this 22nd day of October, 2013. Signature of applicant(s): If partnership, all partners must sign. If corporation an officer of the corporation must sign. If limited liability company a manager must sign. Randy Stewart County of Woods, State of Oklahoma. Before me, the undersigned notary public, personally appeared; Randy Stewart to me known to be the person(s) described and who executed the foregoing application and acknowledged that he executed the same as his free act and deed. Sharlotte Y. Bolar 8-19-2017 13007588

11:03 a.m. Needs to bail dog out of pound. 11:52 a.m. Requesting officers to sit on 14th Street. 12:24 p.m. Question on escapees, contact WW County referring Ft. Supply. 2:04 p.m. Center to Maple on Fourth will be closed. 3:17 p.m. 911 call, man hit head at liquor store, weak, head injury, outside in car. 3:18 p.m. Fire in ditch 1 mile north of 500 (Dacoma blacktop). 6:34 p.m. Three black guys in silver Silverado with Miss. plates at construction. 6:43 p.m. 911 call, individual about truck on fire at Walmart. October 23, 2013 10:43 a.m. 900 block of College is blocked off. The call center also handled the following calls: abandoned calls – 46, accidental calls – 7, pocket dial – 16, wrong number – 6, hang ups – 14, animal control – 10, sheriff – 46, police – 63, general info – 82, fire dept. – 13, ambulance – 9, road conditions – 3.

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, October 27, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: SANDRIDGE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION, LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Section 10, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma Cause CD No. 201302513 AMENDED NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, including the following: Atinum MidCon I, LLC; Repsol E&P USA, Inc.; Chesapeake Operating, Inc.; Chesapeake Exploration, LLC; Arkoma Power & Energy Company; Singer Bros.; Tiptop Oil & Gas US, LLC; Harry H. Diamond, Inc.; PAR Oil, Inc.; and if any of the abovenamed parties is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicant, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, has filed an amended application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma to enter an order, to be effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto, as follows: (i) authorizing and permitting an exception to the permitted well location tolerances in the 640-acre horizontal well unit formed in Section 10, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, for the Mississippian common source of supply, so as to allow a horizontal well to have been drilled into, to have been completed in, to have produced from and to continue to produce from such common source of supply, with the subsurface locations of the completion interval of such well as set forth below: Common Source of Supply Subsurface Location Measured Depth (True Vertical Depth) Lateral - 447 feet from the south line 5,900 feet First Perforation and 624 feet from the west (5,700 feet) line of said Section 10 Lateral - 265 feet from the north line 10,527 feet Last Perforation and 644 feet from the west (5,730 feet) line of said Section 10 with the perforation in the completion interval of the well covered hereby that is closest to the west line of said Section 10 being 611 feet from such boundary line, and with such authorization and permission running in favor of Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant; and (ii) establishing a proper allowable for the proposed well involved herein as to the common source of supply covered hereby, which allowable

See Legal Page 19


October 27, 2013

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Alva Review-Courier

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Community Calendar Sunday 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. Monday 8:50-11 a.m. Okla. Dept. of Veterans Affairs Officer will be at the courthouse in Alva to meet with war veterans needing assistance the second and fourth Mondays of the month. (580) 327-2126 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. 1 p.m. Alva Duplicate Bridge will meet at the Runnymede Hotel. 3:30 p.m. Storytime will be held at the Alva Public Library for children ages 3-5 and their parents. 7 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets at the First United Methodist

Farmers Please Help Professional Upholstery 65 year old looking for hunting lease will all types of furniture. Over 55 for Deer anywhere from $1000 to years experience. Goltry, OK. 580- $30,000 a year. 580-554-0999 496-2351 Donate Clean Clothing Boulevard Bistro Annual Warmth for Winter clothing Sunday Menu-Sweet & Sour and blanket collection in progress at Meatballs, Fried Chicken, Mashed College Hill Church of Christ, Alva. Potatoes, Gravy, Green Bean Help those who don’t have enough Casserole, Corn, Roll, Salad Bar and funds by donating your gently used, Dessert. Iced Tea or Coffee included. clean (no repairs needed) clothes for Catering available. 503 E. Okla. all ages. Men’s slacks and blankets Blvd. Everyone Welcome. especially needed. Leave at church building in storage trailer behind. Help Wanted Part-Time Clerical. Sat & Sun pm Thanks! Call 580-327-0130 with LEGAL NOTICE (Published by the Alva Review-Courier required. PT Flexible schedule M-F. questions. on Sunday, October 27, 2013.) $10/Hr. Send Resume to PO Box For Sale BEFORE THE CORPORATION 246. Cherokee, OK 73728 Earthquake Tillers, top of the line and

COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: SANDRIDGE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION, LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: LOCATION For Rent EXCEPTION 2bdrm 1bth apt in Kiowa, KS. 620LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Section 16, 825-4285 Township 28 North, Range 20 West of Help Wanted the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma Cook Aide. Senior Citizen Center. Cause CD No. 201307089 NOTICE OF HEARING EOE. Apply in person at 625 Barnes STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All Help Wanted persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and Looking for Part Time Office Help all other interested persons, particularly and CDL Driver in Alva area. 501in Woods County, Oklahoma, including 499-3338 the following: Tulsa Energy Partners, LLC; Atinum MidCon I, LLC; Repsol E&P USA, Inc.; PAR Oil Company, Inc.; Harry H. Diamond, Inc.; Carole

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Church. Call 917-855-9086 for information. 8 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous will meet at 1027 8th (Wesley House) in Alva every Monday and Thursday. Tuesday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. Marvin and Lois Smith will entertain at 12:30 p.m. 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 7 p.m. Widows and widowers support group will meet at College Hill Church of Christ. Call 580430-6083 with questions. 7 p.m. Celebrate Recovery meets every Tuesday at the Bible

Baptist Church, 4th & Choctaw, Alva. The purpose is to help people dealing with alcoholism, divorce, sexual abuse, domestic violence, drug addiction, sexual addiction, food addiction, co-dependency, gambling addiction, anger, grief and more. 7:30 p.m. Alva VFW will meet at their building. Wednesday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. Noon Alva Kiwanis Club meets at Champs Restaurant. 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 7 p.m. Alva Moose Lodge men’s meeting is held every Wednesday.

J. Drake; Carl E. Gungoll Exploration, Inc.; Henry Gungoll Associates, LLC; Meadowbrook Oil Corporation of OK, Inc.; if the above-named individual be deceased, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such deceased individual; and if any of the above-named parties is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicant, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, has filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma to enter an order, to be effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto, as follows: (i) authorizing and permitting an exception to the permitted well location tolerances in the 640-acre drilling and spacing unit formed in Section 16, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, for the Mississippi Chester common source of supply, so as to allow a horizontal well to be drilled into, to be completed in and to produce hydrocarbons from such common source of supply, with the completion interval of such well in such common source of supply to be located within the subsurface location tolerance area as set forth below: not closer than 200 feet from the south line and not closer than 560 feet from the east line and not closer than 200 feet from the north line of said Section 16, and with such authorization and permission running in favor of Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant; and (ii) establishing a proper allowable for the proposed well involved herein as to the common source of supply covered hereby, which allowable Applicant requests be established as a full allowable with no downward adjustment made thereto. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that the order to be entered in this matter be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and that the authorization and permission requested herein run in favor of Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the “land sections adjacent to the area within the location exception� requested herein in said Section 16 in regard to the subsurface location tolerance area for the completion interval of the proposed

well covered hereby, as described above, are Sections 9, 10, 15, 21 and 22, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma. The other “land sections� surrounding said Section 16 are Sections 8 and 17, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma; and Section 20, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Harper and Woods Counties, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause is set before an administrative law judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma. Notice is further given that the application in this cause may be amended at such hearing in accordance with the rules of the Commission and the laws of the State of Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause is set for hearing before an administrative law judge on the Conservation Docket at the Western Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, 2101 North Lincoln Boulevard, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 A.M. on the 12th day of November , 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their names and telephone numbers. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact John R. Reeves, attorney, OBA #7479, Seventeenth Floor, One Leadership Square, 211 North Robinson Avenue, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, Telephone: (405) 272-5742; or Luke Roberts, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Ave., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 731026406, Telephone: (405) 429-6344. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner DONE AND PERFORMED this 23rd day of October, 2013. BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary 14831-0725noh


October 27, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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October 27, 2013

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Miss Woodward Amanda Covalt wins Cinderella crown Amanda Covalt of Woodward High School was crowned Friday as the 62nd Miss Cinderella at Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU) during a pageant for high school senior women held in conjunction with the university’s homecoming celebration. The Miss Cinderella Talent Show was on Thursday with interviews taking place Friday morning, ending with the pageant on Friday. First runner-up was Kelsey Castle, Miss Timberlake; second runner-up was Ashlee Shryock, Miss Shattuck; the third runner-up award went to Kaci Livingston, Miss Seiling; and fourth runner-up was Victoria Kimbrell, Miss Cimarron. Macy Starks, Miss Cherokee, was voted as Miss Congeniality by her fellow contestants. As the winner of Miss Congeniality she will receive a one-year room waiver at NWOSU. Amanda Covalt also took home the interview portion of the contest,

as well as the talent award. She performed a vocal solo to “Don’t Rain on My Parade.” As Miss Cinderella, Covalt will receive eight semesters of tuition at NWOSU, a one-year room waiver scholarship at Northwestern-Alva, and for winning the interview portion of the contest, she will receive a book scholarship. All Miss Cinderella contestants are a part of the annual homecoming parade that takes place Saturday at 10 a.m. on the downtown square. Each contestant who participates in the Miss Cinderella Pageant automatically receives a one-year tuition scholarship for Northwestern-Alva. The first and second runners-up will receive six and four semesters of tuition, respectively. Third and fourth runners-up will receive a one-year room waiver in addition to the tuition scholarship each contestant already receives.

The top five contestants of the Miss Cinderella Pageant join Miss Oklahoma on stage at NWOSU’s Herod Hall Friday night. From left are fourth runner-up Victoria Kimbrell, Miss Cimarron; second runner-up Ashlee Shryock, Miss Shattuck; Miss Oklahoma Kelsey Griswold; Miss Cinderella Amanda Covalt, Miss Woodward; first runner-up Kelsey Castle, Miss Timberlake; and thrid runner-up Kaci Livingston, Miss Seiling. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

Miss Oklahoma 2013 Kelsey Griswold Miss Cinderella Crown Bearer Parker Schroeder and Flower Girl sings during the Miss Cinderella Pageant Sarah Brown are joined by Miss Oklahoma Kelsey Griswold at the Friday night. She also served as mistress pageant Friday. Photo by Lynn L. Martin of ceremonies. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

From Page 16

Legal

Applicant requests be established as a full allowable with no downward adjustment made thereto. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the amended application in this cause requests that the order to be entered in this matter be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and that the authorization and permission requested herein run in favor of Applicant or some other party recommended by Applicant. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the “land sections adjacent to the area within the location exception” requested herein in said Section 10 in regard to the subsurface locations of the completion interval of the well covered hereby, as described above, are Sections 3, 4, 9, 15 and 16, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma. The other “land sections” surrounding said Section 10 are Sections 2, 11 and 14, Township 28 North, Range 20 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN

that this cause is set before an administrative law judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission of Oklahoma. Notice is further given that the amended application in this cause may be further amended at such hearing in accordance with the rules of the Commission and the laws of the State of Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause is set for hearing before an administrative law judge on the Conservation Docket at the Western Regional Service Office of the Corporation Commission, Jim Thorpe Building, 2101 North Lincoln Boulevard, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 A.M. on the 18th day of November , 2013, and that this amended notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to

participate by telephone shall contact Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their names and telephone numbers. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action, contact John R. Reeves, attorney, OBA #7479, Seventeenth Floor, One Leadership Square, 211 North Robinson Avenue, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102, Telephone: (405) 272-5742; or Luke Roberts, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Ave., Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 731026406, Telephone: (405) 429-6344. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner DONE AND PERFORMED this 23rd day of October, 2013. BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary 14831-0543anoh

The Miss Congenialty award is presented to Miss Cherokee Macy Starks after receiving the most votes from Miss Cinderella contestants. Photo by Lynn L. Martin


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