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Alva Review-Courier Vol. 121 No. 74

Sunday, September 15, 2013 - $1.00

www.alvareviewcourier.com

620 Choctaw, Alva, OK 73717

Three-vehicle collision

Police responded to a three-car collision Tuesday, Sept. 3, on Oklahoma Boulevard. Police reported a silver Ford pickup driven by William Torbett was turning south on College Boulevard when it was struck by Melissa Cunningham in a green Honda. Torbett said after the collision his foot slipped off the brake and hit the accelerator, causing him to collide with Jesse Schroeder in a black GMC pickup A member of the Alva Fire Department speaks to William Torbett after the collision. Photo by Alex Cole that was facing north on College Boulevard. Photo by Alex Cole

Tourism Tax Committee Two men charged with vehicle theft, intoxication to hear one request One also charged with assault

By Marione Martin This is a tale of two men who are suspects in the theft of a vehicle. The investigation includes arrests for public intoxication, an arrest some months earlier for assault and someone else’s report of a different stolen vehicle. Three police officers filed documents on different parts of the story. Between them the two men accumulated seven charges in Woods County District Court. SandRidge Pickup Stolen According to officers’ affidavits in the case, on Thursday, Sept. 5, at 8:45 a.m. Alva Police K9 Officer Patrick Hawley went to K & S Tire to take a report of a motor vehicle larceny. He met with Eric Gene McClain who said his company told him a 2012 Chevy pickup belonging to SandRidge Energy was parked outside K & S on the north side ready to be picked up. K & S owner Scott Riley said they had video of two men getting into the vehicle around 10:30 p.m. on Sept. 4. Riley started the video, and Hawley recognized the man getting in the driver’s seat from a prior arrest as Ronald Collins. Hawley contacted Officer Brian File who had told him earlier that he had arrested Ronald Collins and Lawrence Compo for public intoxication. Meanwhile, McClain said he was on the phone with Craig Madsen, who told him the SandRidge truck was located on Second Street north of Oklahoma Boulevard. Hawley went to Second and Locust where he met with Madsen and Kristi Kelly and saw the vehicle matching the

description of the stolen vehicle. Hawley observed damage to the front right of the vehicle. The back tool box lid was opened but Madsen said it appeared nothing was stolen. While they were waiting for the wrecker to retrieve the pickup, Reyes Nunez, a SandRidge security representative, arrived. He signed consent to search so Hawley could collect any evidence. Then Kim Rader arrived and stated she had reported her vehicle stolen the night before. She and her son Mitchell Rader were waiting outside for the police to arrive and saw the SandRidge truck pull up and one man exit the driver’s side. She said the man walked past them and the police who were investigating their theft. Kim and Mitchell Rader identified Collins from a photograph. Officer File later told Hawley that he viewed the video at K & S Tire and confirmed the identities of Collins and Compo as the men getting in the pickup and driving away. He told Hawley both men in the video were wearing the same clothing when he arrested them for public intoxication. The pickup was towed to the SandRidge lot east of Alva. Officer Hawley and Officer Ronald Vasquez went there to check the vehicle. They collected the rearview mirror that had been pulled off of the windshield, causing the windshield to break. Also inside the vehicle, the glove box was opened and items were taken out and were lying on the floor board. Vasquez removed the glove box, and the officers collected it as well as the items that appeared to have been removed from it. Public Intoxication Arrest Earlier that morning at 5:01

a.m. Officer Brian File went to 118 Oklahoma Blvd. to check a report that two men were around a garage at the residence and appeared to be trying to break in. File searched the premises. He went through the gate of the privacy fence and saw a shed next to the west end of the residence. He looked inside and discovered a man later identified as Ronald Ray Collins. He asked him to come outside and talk. File asked Collins if he lived there and he said no. He asked him if he knew who lived there and why he was there at 5 a.m. Collins said he was trying to wake up Lisa Melton, the resident. He said she owed him money, and he needed to get to Enid to work that morning. File observed that Collins had slurred speech and an odor of alcohol about his breath and person. He asked if he would submit to standardized field sobriety tests, and Collins agreed. Woods County Deputy Sheriff Keith Dale was contacted by Woods County Communications and arrived on the scene. Collins did not do well in the first two tests administered and refused to cooperate further. He was handcuffed, arrested for public intoxication and seated in File’s patrol vehicle. File and Dale went back inside the privacy fence and saw two Bud Light cans, one on the porch and the other at the west end of the fence. Dale discovered another man, later identified as Lawrence Anthony Compo, inside the shed. File observed that Compo was unsteady on his feet, had red watery eyes and thick slurred speech with an odor of alcohol about his breath and person. He placed Compo in handcuffs, arrested him for public

By Marione Martin The City of Alva Tourism Tax Committee will hear one request for funding during its meeting Wednesday. The committee meets at 5:30 p.m. in the council chambers of City Hall. The Northwest Concert Series is requesting funds not to exceed $8,000. The organization schedules and promotes several concerts each year that are held at Northwestern Oklahoma State University.

City clerk appointment on council agenda Monday

By Marione Martin Melody Theademan, who resigned from a Ward 2 city council seat because she moved, is now the mayor’s choice for an appointment as city clerk. Mayor Arden Chaffee will present the appointment for approval at the Alva City Council meeting Monday. The council meets at 6:30 p.m. in the council chambers of City Hall. Once approved, Theademan will be sworn in for the new position. Her swearing in as trust secretary also appears on the two trust meeting agendas that follow. Council members will discuss and act on Resolution No. 2013-066 approving the incurrence of indebtedness by the Alva Economic Development Authority. City officials have been looking at refinancing the loan for the Alva Recreation Complex. Following votes on approval of minutes and claims, the council will hear the business manager’s report. There will be discussion and action on declaring some items surplus that are no longer needed by the city. The council will discuss and vote on Ordinance No. 2013-041 vacating platted alleys that had been requested by BancCentral. There will be discussion and action to approve Resolution No. 2013-067 establishing bulk water rates. The city has drilled non-potable water wells north of town to alleviate the demand on the water crane located at public works. They expect to sell this water to companies supplying the oil fields. After time allotted for council and citizen remarks and inquiries, the council will adjourn. The Alva Utility Authority meeting will follow. The only items on the agenda are Theademan’s swearing in and approval of minutes. Then the Alva Economic Development Authority will meet. After Theademan’s swearing in, the trustees will vote on approval of minutes of the previous meeting and payment of claims. They will then discuss and take action on Resolution No. 2013-065 authorizing the authority to issue its sales tax revenue note, Series 2013 in the aggreSee Charged Page 3 gate principal amount of $1.11 million.


September 15, 2013

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An early look at Affordable Wal-Mart hosts spirited blood drive Care Act insurance rates Oklahoma Blood Institute (OBI) encourages all healthy Alvaarea residents age 16 and older to show their spirit by giving blood from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 18. “Whether donors ‘bleed’ crimson or orange, the critical need for blood crosses team lines,” said John Armitage, M.D., OBI president and chief executive officer. “People typically don’t plan on needing blood, but when the need

arises, nothing else can help. That is why we need Alva-area residents to team up with us to be sure the blood is available to save lives.” Donations can be made every 56 days and usually take about an hour. OBI provides every drop of blood used by Share Medical Center, as well as most other hospitals statewide. Appointments are not required but can be made at obi.org or by calling 877-340-8777.

Thief takes unattended running pickup By Marione Martin An Alva resident left his pickup running while he went inside his house for something. A thief took advantage of the opportunity and drove off in the vehicle. Mitchell Rader, 19, of 810 Second St. told police he went to the house to get something, parked and ran inside. He said he heard the pickup take off and saw it going toward Oklahoma Boulevard. The theft oc-

curred the night of Sept. 4. Rader had left his wallet with driver’s license, debit card and student ID in the vehicle along with a black and red backpack, some CDs and college books. The vehicle was later recovered with damage to the passenger side tail light area. The wallet and keys were missing. Alva Police Officer Jade Cardenas investigated.

Citizen reports Facebook requests for drugs By Marione Martin A concerned citizen (CC) notified police Sept. 4 that she was receiving messages on Facebook from someone asking for drugs. According to documents on file, the CC, whose name is withheld for protection, met with Alva Police Officer Patrick Hawley and showed him the Facebook messages identified as coming from Michelle Jeffries. CC agreed to cooperate with police to set up an undercover transaction of pain medication for money. Officer Hawley, with assistance from Officer Jade Cardenas, Woods County Deputy Sheriff Keith Dale and the Oklahoma Highway Patrol, set up the buy. The CC and the vehicle the CC was driving were

searched to confirm nothing illegal was present. The CC was given four Oxycodone pills and an audio recording device. The CC was followed to a predetermined location for the reverse buy. Hawley parked where he could observe and videotape the transaction. He stated he saw a 2004 green Nissan driven by Jeffries, whom he recognized from many previous occasions. Following the buy, the officers appeared on the scene. Hawley was given the money used in the buy, the baggie containing the four Oxycodone pills and the digital recorder. Jeffries was placed under arrest and transported to the Woods County Jail by Officer Cardenas. In a post-Miranda interview with Hawley, Jeffries admitted to contacting the CC and making the buy. She said she is highly addicted to pain pills and doesn’t know what to do. Michelle Denise Jeffries, 42, of Alva has been charged with endeavoring to possess CDS (controlled dangerous substance) and possession of CDS, both felonies.

By Warren Vieth Oklahoma Watch Three large insurance companies are planning to offer health policies to individual Oklahomans at rates ranging from less than $100 to more than $1,000 per month through the new insurance marketplace being set up under the Affordable Care Act. The rates posted by Aetna Life Insurance Co., Blue Cross Blue Shield of Oklahoma and Coventry Health & Life Insurance Co. for policies they will offer under the health-care law vary widely based on age, geographic location, tobacco use and plan type. The lowest rate is $61 per month for a Blue Cross Blue Shield policy that requires buyers to pay virtually all of their medical expenses up to $6,350 per year. It would apply only to people below the age of 21 who live in central Oklahoma or Comanche County. At the upper end, a $1,241 monthly rate would apply to smokers over the age of 63 who live in the Lawton area and who choose an Aetna Premier policy with a $2,000 deductible and $10 co-pays for routine doctor appointments. The rates posted by the insurers do not take into account federal tax credits that will reduce the net cost to many buyers by hundreds of dollars, and in a few cases to zero, de-

pending on their income. “This is an enormous change,” said Deputy State Insurance Commissioner Mike Rhoads. “Now everybody has the assurance regardless of their health insurance that they can get coverage … It’s the largest change with respect to health insurance since the passage of Medicare and Medicaid in 1965.” Rhoads expressed concern that the rates posted by insurance companies for the new marketplace appear to be consistently higher than those charged for existing plans, although federal tax credits will soften the blow for most people. The Oklahoma figures appear to compare favorably, however, with Affordable Care Act rates in other states where rates already have been announced. Aetna, for example, said it will charge $302 a month for a benchmark “silver” plan sold to a 40-year-old non-smoker living in the seven-county Oklahoma City metropolitan area. That falls below the $320 average that the Congressional Budget Office projected for benchmark silver plans nationwide. A recent study of rates posted in 17 states showed a range of $212 in New Mexico to $413 in Vermont for comparable plans. Under “Obamacare,” as it is known, a silver plan is designed to cover 70 percent of all medical

costs incurred by an average policy holder. In Oklahoma, the $302 rate applies to an Aetna Classic policy with a $5,000 deductible, $30 copay for routine physician services and 30 percent patient cost-sharing for hospitalization. Cheaper rates apply to “bronze” and catastrophic plans that require policy holders to pick up more of the tab. A 40-year-old non-smoker in central Oklahoma will pay $239 a month for an Aetna Advantage plan that offers almost no reimbursements until holders exceed a $6,350 deductible. Based on the three companies’ rate filings, it appears most marketplace customers are likely to wind up with policies that cost somewhere in the range of $200 to $700 a month, before tax credits. The biggest variable is age. The Affordable Care Act allows insurers to charge three times as much to cover a 64-year-old as they charge a 21-year-old for the same plan. All of them appear to be doing so. Aetna’s rates for its benchmark silver plan start at $150 per month for people below the age of 21 in the Oklahoma City metro area. Those aged 21 to 24 will pay $236. The rates rise to $268 for 30-yearolds, $302 for 40-year-olds, $421 for 50-year-olds, $640 for 60-yearolds and $707 for 64-year-olds.

See Insurance Page 7

Hospital board to meet Tuesday By Marione Martin The Alva Hospital Authority will hold its September meeting Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. in the Share Medical Center Media Room. After discussion and action on the minutes of previous meetings and the check report, the trustees will consider the Chief Executive Officer’s (CEO) report. The CEO will present the Share Medical Center written report that in-

cludes the hospital, hospice and convalescent center and quality measures. The trustees will also vote on whether to approve the BKD 2013 audit. The trustees will review and possibly discuss the statistics report and financials report from the Chief Financial Officer. The credentialing committee will present the appointment to the allied health staff of Marilyn

Ann Becker, APRN, CNP, FNP. Under electronic health records (EHR) item, the board members will vote on the Meditech Patient and Consumer Protal and on the Intelligent Medical Objects Content subscription. Other reports on the agenda are from Share Convalescent Home, The Homestead, SMC Foundation, St. Anthony’s and the hospital authority chairman.

Vehicle on wrong side of highway leads to drug charges for couple By Marione Martin A vehicle traveling on the wrong side of the highway caught the attention of a law enforcement officer Sept. 6 about 12:05 a.m. in Alva. According to documents on file, Woods County Deputy Sheriff Adam Honeyman was traveling eastbound on U.S. 64 near Logan Street when he met a silver passenger car traveling west in the inside eastbound lane. Honeyman turned around and activated his emergency lights to make a traffic stop of the 2010 Toyota with a California license plate. It took approximately four blocks for the driver to stop. Deputy Honeyman asked the driver for his license, which identified him as Jason Allen Martyn.

While standing at the driver’s open window, Honeyman noticed a strong odor of marijuana. He asked the driver to exit the vehicle and sit in his patrol car. Inside the patrol car, Honeyman could still detect the odor of burnt marijuana about Martyn’s breath and person. He told Martyn what he smelled, and Martyn denied any use of possession of marijuana. He asked Martyn for consent to search his vehicle, which Martyn denied. Honeyman noted that he seemed to be extremely nervous and fidgeting as he answered questions about marijuana. Honeyman then spoke to Martyn’s passenger, Danary Hernandez. He told her he believed he

could smell marijuana and asked if there was anything illegal in the vehicle. She said yes and opened the center console exposing a glass pipe with marijuana and residue, a black container containing a green leafy substance and a pink “grinder” also containing a green leafy substance. The green leafy substance fieldtested positive for marijuana. Both Martyn and Hernandez were placed under arrest and transported to the Woods County Jail. Their vehicle was impounded. Hawley said that in a post-Miranda interview Martyn said he was aware of the marijuana in the vehicle and admitted to possessing it. He said he smoked marijuana regularly. In a post-Miranda interview, Hernandez said she and Martyn frequently smoke marijuana together and she had knowledge of the items in the vehicle. Jason Allen Martyn, 24, of Alva has been charged with misdemeanors of possession of CDS (controlled dangerous substance) and possession of paraphernalia. Danary Hernandez, 23, no address listed, has been charged with misdemeanor possession of CDS and possession of paraphernalia.


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Obituaries LEOTA BEULAH FULTON Graveside services for Leota Beulah Fulton, 97, will be at 10 a.m. Monday, Sept. 16, at Alva Municipal Cemetery. Interment is under the direction of Marshall Funeral Home of Alva. Leota Beulah Fulton passed away on Wednesday, Sept. 11, in Alva. She was born on Feb. 5, 1916, to Alvia and Beulah (Darr) Moreland of Freedom. In 1935, she married the love of her life, Mart Fulton. The couple had one daughter, Marietta Jean Fulton (Graham), born Aug. 20, 1936. Leota is preceded in death by her parents and her husband Mart, who passed away on Oct. 3, 1993. Leota is survived by her daughter, her grandson and her granddaughter, as well as several cousins. Remembrances may be shared with the family at www. marshallfuneralhomes.com.

From Front Page

CARL HENRY LEHL Funeral services for Carl Henry Lehl will be at 11 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 17, at the First United Methodist Church with Rev. Terry Martindale officiating. Interment will be in the Short Springs Cemetery under the direction of Marshall Funeral Home of Alva. Carl Henry Lehl, son of the late William and Pauline (Schlegel) Lehl, was born on Dec. 2, 1928, on the family farm, which was purchased before 1907 and was still owned by Carl. He passed away Sept. 13, 2013, at Alva at the age of 84 years, 9 months and 11 days. He went to Elmdale School, then graduated from Alva High School in 1948. A skating outing to

Charged

intoxication, and put him the back passenger seat of his patrol vehicle. File knocked on the door of the residence but no one answered. The two officers walked around the residence and saw the screen of the east window was off and lying on the ground. File also noticed the wooden privacy fence, near the gate, appeared to have been broken. He took pictures of the damage and took the two men to the Woods County Jail. About 7:15 a.m. Officer File returned to 118 Oklahoma Blvd. where Melton answered the door. She said she did not know Collins or Compo and had no idea why they would have been knocking at her residence early in the morning. He asked Melton if she wanted to press charges, and she said no, that she didn’t want anything to do with getting both individuals in more trouble. Assault and Battery Arrest On July 17 about 1:20 a.m., Alva Police Officer Jade Cardenas was dispatched to Share Medical Center to check on a person who had been stabbed. She spoke with James Mark Jokel, who was being treated for a stab wound. Jokel said Lawrence Compo had been staying at Ginny Miner’s house with him. Jokel said he and Compo started drinking in the

afternoon around 3 p.m. Compo began arguing with and threatening both him and Miner. Jokel said he pointed a fork at Compo’s chest and told him to shut his mouth and leave. Miner took Compo and dropped him off across town. Jokel said he went to sleep in his recliner and hours later he woke up. When he woke up, Compo was on top of him with a knife but jumped off. At approximately 12:50 a.m. Miner arrived home to find Compo at her house again. She told him to leave and that he wasn’t supposed to be in her house. Jokel said he got up from the recliner to go to the bathroom and noticed that he was bleeding and sore. He said the blood wasn’t stopping so Miner took him to the hospital. Charges Filed On Sept. 6 Lawrence Anthony Compo, 32, of Alva was charged with unauthorized use of a motor vehicle, malicious injury to property, and assault and battery with a deadly weapon, all felonies. He was also charged with public intoxication, a misdemeanor. On Sept. 6 Ronald Ray Collins, 37, of Alva was charged with unauthorized use of a motor vehicle and malicious injury to property, both felonies. He was also charged with a misdemeanor of public intoxication.

Woods County Forecast Sunday A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly after 1pm. Partly sunny, with a high near 90. South southwest wind 7 to 11 mph. Sunday Night A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 66. Calm wind becoming east northeast around 6 mph after midnight. Monday A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Cloudy, with a high near 82. East wind around 6 mph. Monday Night A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 66. Tuesday A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 86. Tuesday Night A 20 percent chance of showers and thunder-

storms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 67. Wednesday A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 89. Wednesday Night A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly cloudy, with a low around 67. Thursday A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 89. Thursday Night A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly cloudy, with a low around 66. Friday A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 86. Friday Night Partly cloudy, with a low around 66. Saturday Sunny, with a high near 87.

Waynoka with some friends found him helping a skater up from the floor. Her name was Beulah Corbin and he thought she was a “dandy.” They were married in 1951, three days after she graduated from high school. Nine months later he was drafted into the Marine Corps, and served in Korea until 1954. Upon returning from the service he and his father bought their first rotary rig and started Lehl and Son Water Well Drilling. He and Beulah worked as a team for the next 39 years. He drilled and installed windmills and pumps while she managed the shop and the books. They raised their four children, Ron, Judy, Gary and Mark. They enjoyed making kites, snow igloos, sledding over the farm terraces, traveling and camping. He was an expert and cleaned all their fish, built tree houses and fixed things. His talents were put to work in the church. His stained glass hobby became a project of the heart as he and other members of the church removed and restored each of the 78 stained glass windows. First United Methodist was his church home since birth. He sang in the choir, served on the board and was a member of the Homebuilders Sunday school class. The grandkids remember his teasing, wiggly ears, arm wrestling, as well as him cutting wheat and digging for dinosaur bones at the farm, and his love of ice cream and Dr. Pepper. Besides his parents, he was preceded in death by two brothers; Harold Lehl and Elvest Lehl; and one great granddaughter, Savannah Lehl. Carl is survived by his wife, Beulah, of Alva; three sons, Ron and Susie Lehl of Wilmore, Kan., Gary and Myrhenda Lehl of Alva, and Mark and Carla Lehl of Alva; one daughter, Judy and Ron Strahan of Edmond; and two sisters, Nellie Lohrding of Coldwater, Kan., and Frieda Staake of Forsythe, Mo. Also surviving are 12 grandchildren, Mike and Renee Lehl, Rocky and Marci Lehl, Ashley Lehl, Nicholas Strahan, Tad Strahan, Travis Lehl and fiancé Ashley, Blake Lehl, Ryan Tune, Rhenda and Daren Bunch, Alisha and Ron Willett, Keyla and Dave Flavell, and Jacob and Jill Estep; 13 great grandchildren; other relatives and friends. Memorial contributions may be made through the funeral home to the First United Methodist Church or the Ronald McDonald House. Remembrances may be shared with the family at www.marshallfuneralhomes.com.

Woods County Republicans to host pizza party Woods County Republicans will host a pizza party at the pavilion in Alva’s Hatfield Park on Sept. 28 at 6:30 p.m. All area citizens are invited to attend. A salute to long-time Republican Wes Nixon will be the first order of business. U.S. Rep. Frank Lucas and possibly members of his knowledgeable staff will address topics including recent activities in Washington, the vacillation on war against Syria, the state of the farm bill and implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ObamaCare). There will be no charge to participate, but those wishing to eat pizza can call 580-327-1273 for more information.

JEAN SMITH Funeral services for Jean Smith will be on Monday, Sept. 16, at 10 a.m. at Wharton Funeral Chapel with Dr. Mark Davis officiating. Burial will follow in Alva Municipal Cemetery. Wharton Funeral Chapel is in charge of arrangements. Online condolences may be made at whartonfuneralchapel.com. Eula Jean, daughter of Ruby Agnes (Mackey) and Chester James Wenzel, was born on Aug. 29, 1926, in Alva. She passed away at the Alva Share Medical Center on the 11th day of September at the age of 87 years and 13 days. She attended elementary school in Avard and graduated from Alva High School on May 19, 1944. Working on the wheat farm with her father driving the tractor was a great joy to her. After graduating Jean went to Santa Ana, Calif., where she did her part helping with war efforts as a fork lift operator at the McDonald Douglas aircraft factory. In 1945 she returned to Alva where she met the love of her life, William McKinley Smith, who was attending college. On July 7, 1949, in Fort Worth, Texas, they were married. To their marriage four children were born: Randy Bill, Debra Denise, Robin Troy, and Ginger Rhea. Following their marriage they lived in Texas, Nebraska, Tulsa and Oklahoma City where she raised her family. In 1985 they returned to Alva to make it their home. Jean worked at the John A. Brown Company, other small dress boutiques, the telephone company and later owned and operated The Trading Post with her husband Bill. She was a member of the VFW Ladies Auxiliary. She was a very proud supporter of the Alva Cardinals and Ranger athletics, and loved a lively game of pitch, traveling, garage sales, auctions and bargaining for what she wanted at these sales. Her family was a vital part of her life, each member was very

close to her heart. She had a smile that everyone loved and never knew a stranger. Jean was a wonderful cook, who always had supper on the stove for her family and whoever wondered in. Preceeding her in death were her parents; sister Wanda Bagenstos-Boatman; five brothers in law: Mynard Smith, Joe Shell, Arnis Payne, Roscoe Bagenstos and Ray Boatman; and two nieces, Gayle Owl and Kay Baker. Jean is survived by her husband Bill of the home; four children and their spouses, Randy and Mitzi Smith of Goddard, Kan.; Debbie and Ron Hipp of Keller, Texas; Robin and Loretta Smith of Raton, N.M.; and Ginger Smith of Alva. MiMi had three grandchildren: Jed Smith and Caleb Smith, both of Alva; and Madison Smith of Goddard, Kan.; two sisters in law, Essie Shell and Rose Jean Smith; a host of nieces, nephews, great nieces and great nephews; other relatives and friends. Memorial contributions may be made in her memory to the Alva VFW Post #2847. JERRY DEVOND STEWART Funeral services for Jerry Stewart, 81, will be at 2 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16, at the Carmen Christian Church. Interment will be in the Eagle Chief Cemetery under the direction of Wentworth Mortuary, LLC. There will be a visitation with the family at the funeral home from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday evening. Jerry Devond Stewart, son of the late Charles and Katie Stewart, was born on April 24, 1932, and passed away Sept. 11, 2013, at Alva. He served in the United States Army. When he returned, he married Roberta Simon in 1957. In 1966, he married Opal Lee Morstain. Then in 1996 Jerry married Margie Doty. Jerry is survived by one daughter, three stepsons, one step daughter, two sisters, six grandchildren and four great grandchildren. Memorial contributions may be made through the funeral home to Share Hospice. Remembrances may be shared with the family at www. marshallfuneralhomes.com.


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How do we tell good guys from bad in Syrian opposition? By Byron York Lindsey Graham, perhaps the Senate’s leading hawk on military intervention in Syria, says the most important part of U.S. strategy there is “supporting vetted opposition forces.” Bob Corker, ranking Republican on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, says he is dismayed by “the lack of support we are giving to the vetted moderate opposition.” The committee’s amendment to the intervention resolution, authored by John McCain, calls for strengthening the “vetted elements of Syrian opposition forces.”

In Washington, use of the word “vetting” is usually confined to unknown political candidates and cabinet nominees. So what is this vetting in Syria everyone is talking about? Is the U.S. government requiring opposition fighters to fill out questionnaires? Show photo ID? Hand over bank statements and tax returns? Whatever it is doing – a good bit of it is classified – the Obama administration, along with some supporters on Capitol Hill, claims its vetting can distinguish the good guys from the brutal jihadist killers among the Syrian rebels. But some key members of Congress remain very concerned. “In places like Syria, vetting can be unreliable and inconsistent,” Republican Rep. Michael McCaul, chairman of Alva Review-Courier the House Homeland Security Committee, told me via email (USPS 016-180) recently. “So far, the adminis620 Choctaw St. tration has not made a compelAlva, OK 73717-1626 ling case that it can differen(580) 327-2200 tiate between the factions, or Fax: (580) 327-2454 that it even knows the makeup of the factions. The concluOffice Hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. sions it has drawn as a result of Monday - Friday its vetting are in stark contrast Website: to the briefings I’ve received, www.alvareviewcourier.com and I remain concerned that a HERE TO HELP YOU large part of these rebels pose a great threat to our interests.” Publisher.............Lynn L. Martin The true nature of the SyrEditor..................Marione Martin ian rebels has turned into per(marione@alvareviewcourier.net) haps the pivotal issue in the inAd Sales.............Stacy Sanborn tervention debate. Among the (sales@alvareviewcourier.net) Colette Baier many question that opponents (colette@alvareviewcourier.net) of intervention have, perhaps the most fundamental is this: Reporters...................Alex Cole (news@alvareviewcourier.net) Who are we helping? Leslie Nation The question came up when (leslie@alvareviewcourier.net) Secretary of State John Kerry Yvonne Miller recently visited both House and Subscriptions Senate foreign affairs commit& Action Ads..........Linda Toone (manager@alvareviewcourier.net) tees. And it became clear that there are stark differences in Ad Design.............Paula Oakes opinion -- and “opinion” seems the right word – over who is Page Design........Patty Hankey who in the Syrian opposition. Legal Notices.....Lisa Wickham “Who are the rebel forces?” (legals@alvareviewcourier.net) asked McCaul, who receives classified briefings in his role The Alva Review-Courier is with the Homeland Security combined with the Woods C o u n t y N e w s , T h e A l v a Committee. “Every time I get Advocate and Newsgram, and is briefed on this it gets worse and published every Sunday and worse, because the majority Friday by Martin Broadcasting now of these rebel forces – and Corp., 620 Choctaw St., Alva, I say majority now – are radiOK 73717-1626. Periodical cal Islamists pouring in from postage paid at Alva, Oklahoma. Annual subscription rates in all over the world to come to Woods County, Oklahoma $72. Syria for the fight.” Kerry strongly disputed Elsewhere in Oklahoma $90, elsewhere in the United States McCaul’s question. “I just $108. POSTMASTER: Send don’t agree that a majority are address changes to Alva al-Qaida and the bad guys,” Review-Courier, 620 Choctaw he told McCaul. “That’s not St., Alva, OK 73717-1626. true. There are about 70,000 to Contents Copyright 2013 Member of the Associated Press, 100,000 oppositionists, about Oklahoma Press Association, National Newspaper Association

The Coffee House Philosopher

The trials of Stephen Dorsey By Randy Kilbourne All of the adverse publicity in the Star Route case resulted in Stephen Dorsey being charged with fraud in a Washington, D.C., court. To represent him in the case, Dorsey chose Robert Ingersoll, a lawyer considered by many to be the most brilliant lawyer in the United States. In fact, Dorsey became involved in so many lawsuits of various kinds that he had a separate residence set up a few miles from his mansion for Ingersoll. The facts of the Star case involved such things as one mail carrier receiving $30,000 a year for transporting mail “that would fit in a man’s boot” over a mountain once a month. The first fraud trial (which also involved such charges as jury bribing) cost Dorsey $200,000, which at the time was a monumental sum. Some of Dorsey’s confederates were found not guilty in the case, but the jury became deadlocked concerning Dorsey himself. Thus he had to face

the added expense of a second trial on the same matter, leaving him desperate for money. The second trial was also lengthy – Ingersoll’s masterful summation at the end of the trial, alone, took six full days. During Ingersoll’s summation, one of the jurors suffered from severe tremors. Also memorable was when one of the lawyers present got excited and put the lighted end of his cigar into his mouth, thereby burning off half of his mustache. But after eleven months of hearings and 9,000 pages of court records, Dorsey was at last found “not guilty” of all charges. However, Dorsey had begun to drink heavily during his trials, and his doctors claimed the stress of the legal wrangling could leave him totally blind. About this time, Dorsey became well known for liberally plying his many guests at the mansion with the contents of his large, well-stocked wine cellar. During the party that was entertained by the Kansas City chorus girls, Dorsey chose to focus his charm and wit (along with See Philosopher Page 5

Junkman’s Gems

Quantity may be smaller but the quality isn’t

By Jim Scribner The fair is history and, as always, I had a great time and hope you did, too. I never got out of the Merchant’s Building, but Cleo made it to the Women’s Building for a look and ice cream. As usual, the quantity may be smaller than in the good old days, but the quality isn’t. Aunt Johnette Beagley was a big winner again this year with a grand champion in the extension club booth on a skirt. Another of my friends brought their pet rabbits out to the fair and got a champion on one. In the merchant’s building several old friends were gone and new vendors showed up. The Seventh Day Adventists, the Brown’s Shoe Fit girl Cheryl and the photo guy from Fairview were among the missing. Most notable newbies on my end of the building were the friendly See York Page 7 Hamilton Insurance guy, two beauties selling

jewelry and the Fairview ladies across from me (they were cute, too). The Fairview ladies had a program to increase brain power. After visiting with me, the head lady was afraid I didn’t have enough money and they didn’t have enough time to get me up to speed. I was offended just a bit so I had intelligence tests run. The results came back negative! I am glad to see the new faces and will miss the old friends. The field representative for American Farmers and Ranchers from Arapaho were in the Brook’s Agency booth. He told me that he was very impressed with our fair, the number of merchants and the amount of people who came out to it. Good job there, fair board members and all who make it the great time it is. One booth I do miss is the Alva Police/ Sheriff’s Office booth. I think there was a lot of good will spread from there. This year instead of people putting names on little pieces of paper, I used a notebook for my guessing game. It was lots easier to haul See Gems Page 5


September 15, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Annie’s Mailbox®

Page 5

Click and Clack Talk Cars

Taking advantage of Grandma Reader wants older car in case of solar flare Dear Annie: My cousin’s daughter, “Julie,” moved her family of four in with my aunt (her grandmother) after my aunt’s husband died. It was done on the pretense of helping Grandma maintain her home and large yard. In fact, the opposite has happened. They’ve created more work for her by making a mess, not doing their laundry and not picking up after themselves. Julie has a 5-year-old boy who constantly damages things in the home, and his mother does nothing to admonish him. The boy goes into Grandma’s room and takes her things, and when she confronts both Julie and her son, she’s told to lock up her possessions. This same child has hit her and cussed at her. Grandma’s doctor has told her that she needs to move the family out of her home to reduce her stress levels. But when she tells this to Julie and Julie’s mother (my cousin), Grandma is told that she’s exaggerating or lying about the situation. I’ve been in my aunt’s home and have seen what’s going on. I am helpless to do anything but try to calm her nerves and clean up the house. Other family members also have witnessed this and commented to the same effect. My aunt has said that she wants her granddaughter’s family to leave, but can’t handle having her daughter harass her about it. She’s also worried about the little children because she is the one who makes sure they are fed a decent meal

From Page 4

In-Laws To Be Dear Concerned: Please, please, back off. We know you are only thinking of your son’s best interests. But the personal circumstances of his fiancee’s parents’ breakup are none of your business. If your son and his future bride have children someday and Grandpa’s absence becomes an issue, they will handle it then. It is unlikely that anything he discovers now will change his desire to marry her. Dear Annie: I have a solution for “Mom,” who needed her rest but felt she had to wait up for her 18-yearold daughter to get home. A woman in our church had four daughters. When one went out on a date, she gave her a curfew and then set her alarm clock for that time. The daughter would turn off the alarm when she returned home. Otherwise, it would go off, and Mom would know the girl missed her curfew, and she’d be grounded. This allowed Mom to get a good night’s sleep. – A Faithful Reader Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annie’s Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.

Gems

around. They had to guess the number of pennies in the bottle to win. Cleo did the bottles and did not tell me how many were in each one, because she said I wasn’t the best secret keeper. The first night there were 599 pennies in the jar. Michelle Peterman guessed 600 for first and Mark Willson got the jar of pennies with a guess of 619. The second night Tina Pettus guessed 853 and was right on the mark. The second closest guess was 852 by Carolyn Grable. Mrs./ Miss Grable did not leave a phone number, so if you know her please tell her she has a jar of pennies waiting for her. Cleo and I went back Saturday evening for the free food. There

From Page 4

and get a bath. Any suggestions? – Worried and Helpless Dear Worried: Your cousin and her daughter are taking advantage of Grandma. Their interest in her well-being extends only to what works to their benefit. You can report abuse of any kind – financial, emotional, physical – to Adult Protective Services in your aunt’s area. Someone will investigate the situation. You also can call the Eldercare Locator at 1-800-6771116 for resources. However, your aunt may choose not to cooperate with the authorities, in which case, please visit as often as possible, keeping an eye on the situation and making sure your cousin and her daughter are aware that you are watching. Dear Annie: Four years ago, our then 30-year-old son fell in love with a woman he met online. They are now engaged, but her estranged father is not invited to the wedding. Our son describes his future mother-in-law as a “sweet lady,” but has never met the father. My husband and I have yet to meet either one and have some unanswered questions about the missing father. Our son doesn’t seem to know anything and does not share our concerns. He doesn’t even want to learn the circumstances that led to the family splitting up. We worry there could be repercussions later once they have children. How can we advise our son to know all that he should? – Concerned

didn’t seem to be very many people there, but those that were there got a very good meal and some good entertainment from the band that was playing. They handed out the awards for the cook-off completion before the free food. Vendetti, the plumber, is a multi-talented guy, because he won in a couple of categories at the cook-off. The Perks in the cook-off had mud left over on him from his mud-run trip. I asked if it was his secret ingredient in his food and he did not say yes or no. Must be good mud because he won, too. Next weekend is the car show. More free food! I hope it quits raining Friday afternoon and starts back Sunday evening. I think my brother

Philosopher

liberal amounts of champagne) on a particularly argumentative guest. Dorsey made a show of serving one “fresh bottle” after another to his challenger, until his tormentor suddenly lurched and slid off his chair, having literally been drunk under the table. Dorsey studied the fallen person for some time, and finally remarked, “Where is my adversary? He seems to have fallen early in combat.” As might be expected, along with his mounting money troubles, Dorsey began to have serious differences not only with creditors, but also with his ranch managers and some of his associates. As a result, Dorsey developed a rather creative way of settling up with them, using cattle from his ranch as payment. According to Dorsey’s alleged payment scheme, he would have his cattle driven into his holding pens from the south, where they

were counted. Then the cattle were driven out of the pens to the north, then around a large hill to the west, and back south, where some of them would again be driven into the holding pens to be counted again. According to a 1980’s lecture I attended at the mansion, Dorsey was tripped up when a Scottish bookkeeper was heard to say, “I just bought that one-horned cow for the third and last time.” But according to the account in “Rogue!” a lop-horned cow named “Old Buck” (who had one horn turned upwards, and one downward) was trained to walk in a circular pattern by himself, leading the other cattle around the hill again and again. According to legend, for years afterwards, he could be seen wandering slowly around the hill by himself. This cattle payment scheme, if true, would certainly not have endeared Dorsey to his creditors or associates. Next week, the final installment about the Dorsey mansion.

is going to bring his Falcon convertible to the car show, so that will be cool. Once in a while something is put on Facebook that makes me proud. This was posted on 9-11 by my son: “Twelve years ago today I was on my way to my store when I heard the news about the towers being hit by the planes. After that I reenlisted in the Army National Guard. Since then I have been deployed twice in support of the war on terror. If asked, I would do it all over again, and still stand ready to go wherever the nation deems us to go. Shall we never forget the people who took down the plane in Pennsylvania, the firefighters and policemen who went into the towers and never came out, the soldiers who have lost their lives or are wounded, the soldiers who have answered the call, and all the people who lost their lives that September day.” Amen.

By Tom and Ray Magliozzi Dear Tom and Ray: With talk about the potential (though unlikely) event of a large solar flare directly hitting Earth, some high-tech engineering types are discussing the merits of using homemade Faraday cages to protect electronics and power-generating equipment and vehicle computers. Rather than place in the garage a large, galvanized steel container that’s large enough to park a car in after the container has been lined with insulation and add a conductive layer around the car, I’m thinking it would be more practical to just buy a spare car and maintain it, albeit one that does not have any electronic controls. I’m thinking a carbureted vehicle built before the ‘80s would do the trick. The question I have is, Would a car with a carburetor built prior to 1980 continue to run (assuming that it can run OK prior to this potential event) after Earth has been hit with a large solar flare, similar to the Carrington Event of 1859, which was strong enough to cause electrical shocks to telegraph operators? Also, what would be a suggested vehicle to keep for such an event? -- Larry RAY: Well, we all remember what chaos the world was cast into after the 1859 Carrington Event, Larry. Life, as we knew it, was extinguished. I mean, try finding a telegraph operator today! Where are they? You think it’s a coincidence that you can’t find a telegraph operator anymore? TOM: Doesn’t anybody screen these letters? RAY: Actually, I think it’s a very reasonable question, Larry. We’ll do our best to help you out. TOM: OK. In order to avoid being automotively stranded by some sort of major, Earth-wide electrical disturbance, you need to go back to before computers were used to manage engines, and before electronic ignition. That would put you in the early 1970s. RAY: I think the car for you is a 1972 Dodge Dart, Larry. It’s proven pretty reliable. Since it has a nerdy cult following, there

are lots of parts still available for these cars. It has a one-barrel Holley carburetor and no important electronics that would be affected by electromagnetic radiation. In fact, it doesn’t have any electronics at all. TOM: Or, here’s another idea: How about a nice, 1971 Chevy Kingswood Estate Wagon? That’s got a nice, simple, carbureted V-8 engine, and the fake wood paneling should survive any electrical event. Plus, a full-size station wagon will give you plenty of room to carry around the provisions you’ll need for the next 50 years. RAY: But whatever car you get, just to be on the safe side, you might want to take the radio out and wrap it in tinfoil. TOM: But don’t use all of your tinfoil. You’ll need to have enough left over to make your hat, Larry. Godspeed. *** Stop the madness! You can stop driving like a knucklehead, and you’ll help your car in the process. Learn how your driving habits can harm your car in Tom and Ray’s pamphlet “Ten Ways You May Be Ruining Your Car Without Even Knowing It!” Send $4.75 (check or money order) to Ruin, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. *** Get more Click and Clack in their new book, “Ask Click and Clack: Answers from Car Talk.” Got a question about cars? Write to Click and Clack in care of this newspaper, or email them by visiting the Car Talk website at www.cartalk.com.


September 15, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 6

Alva Research Club holds Senior citizen report annual coffee meeting The Alva Research Club had its annual coffee meeting Aug. 9 at the Homestead. Hostess Marilyn Brown and Carolyn Gasaway served delicious refreshments. President Betty Benson called the meeting to order. The club collect was read by the group. Ten members were present: Betty Benson, Rose Elmore, Marilyn Brown, Carolyn Gasaway, Elma McMurphy, Joyce Bender, Jo Ann Pruitt, Linda Peterman, Charla Parker and Shelly Martin. A short business meeting followed. The program was presented by Charla Parker on the Northwestern singers’ trip to China in March. The 25 students, along with 10 sponsors, performed at various universities in China. They were met with a very good attendance –

Sept. 16 to Sept. 20, 2013 Breakfast Menu for Alva Public Schools Monday – Cheese toast, pears, milk Tuesday – Scrambled eggs, whole grain biscuit, rosy applesauce, milk Wednesday – Whole Grain Apple Jacks, buttered toast, mandarin oranges, apple juice, skim milk Thursday – Sausage gravy, biscuit, fruit cocktail, milk Friday – Whole Grain Frosted Flakes, cinnamon toast, banana, grape juice, milk Lunch Menu for Alva Public Schools Monday – Chicken strips, potato wedges, green beans, peaches, garlic bread, milk Tuesday – Pigs in a blanket, Happy Coins, pears, oatmeal cookies, milk

standing room only – and treated courteously at their performances. The students were asked to take small gifts to exchange with some of the Chinese students. They rode the bullet train (one of the fastest trains in the world) to one of their performance. The group also got to see some great sites in China. Charla said the streets were packed with pedestrians, who were not too courteous. The traffic was also very heavy, with six- and four-lane highways, and lots of bicycles and motorcycles. The bigger cities, like Hong Kong and Beijing, have 20 to 30 million people living there. Many of the Chinese like our western culture, especially the dress and the food – just the American lifestyle.

Wednesday – Chicken fried steak, mashed potatoes, gravy, green beans, fruit cocktail, bread sticks, milk Thursday – Chicken pot pie, seasoned beans, cheese sticks, banana, milk Friday – Pancakes, sausage patty, maple syrup, hash browns, milk Menu for Woods County Senior Citizens Monday – Pork patty, au gratin potatoes, sliced lettuce, tomato, wheat bread, rosy applesauce Tuesday – Oven fried chicken, Harvard beets, corn, wheat bread Wednesday – BBQ riblet, mac and cheese, carrots, wheat bread, lime Jello with fruit Thursday – Chili, mixed vegetables, hominy, crackers Friday – Beef stew, cauliflower, crackers, white cake with frosting

By Betty Riggins Friday, Sept. 6, was a warm day and the count was low. We had a great weekend, as it was the county fair and many seniors and younger people attended this event as many things for everyone were going on. The one thing missing is a nice carnival with popcorn and cotton candy, everyone loves that. Monday, Sept. 9, was a nice breezy day still in need of a good rain. We had a low attendance again, as so many complain of the menu. Our people who make up our menus are going to have to get on the ball and do something to improve them so they will bring in a big attendance. Alan and Pam smith are enjoying a visit with their

children and playing with their granddaughter. They are having a great time. Tuesday was a nice summer day and we had a good attendance, as the meal was ham and beans. This does bring in a good attendance even if it is a winter meal, as it is always good. We had several at the bingo table. I think we are lacking on prizes, as I think we need some new ones. Wednesday was a nice sunny day with a great breakfast for lunch plus great attendance. Jerry and Wanda Cox are away for a few days again; they are a busy couple. Earlene Evans is coming back to the center after several weeks of illness.

On Thursday there was not much news, as the attendance is still very low. I need exciting news, as so many have said they enjoy the senior write-up. I did not go visiting the rest home, as I have been under the weather also, so haven’t been out and around much. Next week we make noodles on Monday, Sept. 16. On Tuesday, Sept. 17, Kuykendall Hearing will be at the center. On Wednesday, Sept. 18, Mallory Seevers is supposed to entertain for us if he isn’t working. On Thursday, Sept. 19, the Red Hat Scarlet ladies will be gone to their monthly outing. Don’t forget the Big Cruise and Car Show! Thanks for reading my notes.

The Arndt descendants statewide gather for reunion The descendants of Lawrence Perry and Zelma Leatha (Arb) Arndt held their annual family reunion in Alva Sept. 1. Of the 11 children of Lawrence and Zelma, nine were present. Two Arb cousins from Stillwater were in attendance: Kay (Arb) Firth and Larry Arb. In attendance from the following cities were: • Alva: Georgia Ann Arndt; Lyle and Dorothy Arndt; Rod, Andrea and Elijah Herren; Lynell, Xavier and Aleana Johnston; Darla and Frank Utterback; Megan Stephens; Carla Smart; Zeona McKinley. • Crestone, Colorado: Larry and Sandie Arndt. • Dacoma: Dean, Charleen, and Dennis Herren. • Fairview: Denny and Nadine Painton; Myron and Pam Merrill; Amber, Saigen and Ryder Edwards; Myron, Jenny, Jaden, Kamrynn and Ashton Merrill. • Helena: Jo, Laurie, Will, Pete and Lars Gwinn. • Newkirk: Juanita Neuenschwander; Mike and Bernita Wathor; Tamara and Brett Donaldson.

• Oklahoma City: Glenda Yar- Arndt. • Willmar, Minn.: Lowell and berry; Michael Menser; Lewis Sharon Arndt. Menser; Debra Lemmerman. The next reunion will be at noon • Waureka: Darrell Arndt. • Waynoka: Willie and Mary on Sunday, Aug. 31, 2014, in Alva.

Pictured on the front row are the Arndt girls: Glenda, Nadine, Charleen and Juanita. On the back row are Larry, Lyle, Willie, Darrell and Lowell.

Golbek-Shearer family gathers for annual reunion begun in 1954 By Betty Riggins The 2013 Golbek and Shearer reunion was held Saturday evening at the Moose Lodge and Sunday at the Alva Senior Citizen building. This annual reunion started back in 1954 as a 50th wedding anniversary for Ernest and Elsie Shearer. Seventeen children were born to this couple. Three of the Shearer young ladies – Irene, Hazel and Thelma – married three Golbek young men – Edd, Otto and Reuben. These Golbek men came from a family of 12 children. The couples contributed 14 children to all the other family members, who decided a reunion would be the only way they could all get acquainted. As a result, the yearly reunion was started. It has survived the loss of the elder Shearers as well as many others, but it has been a blast to get reacquainted with so many loved ones. The Shearer ladies carried on the reunion for 25 years. Then granddaughters Elsie Shipley and Betty Riggins took over for 40 years. Fred and Sherry Riggins, Jeannie Smith and Catherine Valencia have

organized the reunion for the last four years now. Betty has resigned, but the younger generation’s families will carry on with Betty’s help. There have been so many beautiful memories over the years. I am sure those who have gone on before are smiling at the fun we are having that balances the crying at heartaches. Life is a long struggle for everyone. We will see all of you next year about the same time. God bless all of our families. May you have a blessed year. Those attending the 2013 reunion from Kansas were : • Clyde, Kan.: Lois Golbek, Terry Golbek • Concordia, Kan.: Linda (Golbek) Russell • Manhatten, Kan.: Kimberly and Brettlyn Golbek, and Jered Underwood • Arkansas City, Kan.: Catherine Valencia • Fredonia, Kan.: Reegan Golbek Those attending the 2013 reunion from Oklahoma were : • Carmen: Kristen Golbek, Jo-

seph Hubbard, Forrest Golbek Jr., and Della Golbek • Woodward: Johnny Golbek and Ricky • Waynoka: Lorene Crabb, Lynetta and Verl Phillips • Buffalo: Justin and Lauran Sellers, Chester, Bill, Sarah and Dary Triss • Okmulgee: Cody, Mandy, River and Braxton Weller • Oklahoma City: Maurice, Blanca McRee • Yukon: Aaron and Christy McRee, Eva and John McRee • Newkirk: Mike Newman • Balko: guest Susan Schneider Those attending from Alva were: Fred; Sherry Riggins; Larry Shipley; Jeannie Smith; Shane, Alicia, Trinidy and Olivia Smith; Betty Riggins; Derick, April, Sylus, Clyce and Myah Graves; Misty, Mike, Wyatt, Bridgette and Weston Smith; Jennifer, Makennah, Garrett and Miles Tyree; Ed Golbek Jr.;, Elsie; Marvin Shipley; Jerry, Tonya, Carolyn and Gerald Brown; Forrest Golbek Sr.; Tisha Shipley;

See Reunion Page 7


September 15, 2013

From Page 2

Page 7

Insurance

Medicare takes over at age 65. Another variable is tobacco use. Smokers will pay 10 percent more than non-smokers for Aetna’s policies, 20 percent more for Coventry’s policies and anywhere from 10 percent to more than 30 percent for Blue Cross Blue Shield’s plans. Geographic location is a factor, too. Under Obamacare, Oklahoma has been divided into five regions. Insurers are allowed to charge different rates in different regions based on their claim histories and projected costs. Aetna’s lowest rates will be offered in the Oklahoma City metro area. Rates are five percent higher in Le Flore and Sequoyah counties, 13 percent higher in the sevencounty Tulsa metro area, 34 percent higher in Comanche County and 23 percent higher in the rest of the state. Other companies have different geographic rate formulas. In most cases, marketplace customers will wind up paying considerably less than the companies’ policy rates because they will receive federal tax credits to offset the cost. The amount of the credits will vary, depending mainly on income, and will be calculated on a person-byperson basis. The tax credits will be available to individuals with incomes between $11,490 and $45,960 a year, and four-person families between $23,440 and $94,200. People with higher incomes can purchase insurance in the federal marketplace, but they will pay the full posted rate for

From Page 4

Alva Review-Courier

their plans. Oklahomans with lower incomes below 100 percent of the federal poverty level are not eligible to receive subsidized plans through the marketplace because the Affordable Care Act originally contained a nationwide expansion of Medicaid to cover everyone below the poverty line. That provision of the law was struck down by the U.S. Supreme Court. Oklahoma declined to expand its Medicaid program voluntarily. As a result, as many as 150,000 uninsured Oklahomans are expected to remain stuck in a coverage crater, ineligible for either subsidized program. About 337,000 uninsured Oklahomans will be eligible to participate in the health care marketplace and receive federal tax subsidies, according to one recent study. The marketplace is open to anyone who can’t participate in an affordable employer-provided plan and who doesn’t qualify for other forms of public insurance such as Medicare. The marketplace will begin accepting applications on Oct. 1 for coverage that begins on Jan. 1, 2014. The federal government already is pre-registering applicants through its marketplace website, http:// www.healthcare.gov. The toll-free help line is 1-800-318-2596. The federal government is operating the marketplace in Oklahoma. Private insurance companies will issue the policies. Because the marketplace will offer a wide range of

plans with different rates and tax credit calculations, it is expected that many people will need one-onone guidance. Individual counseling will be provided by the federal government, by health clinics and other nonprofit organizations, and by licensed health insurance agents. Five companies are planning to offer insurance policies to Oklahomans through the health care marketplace. Three of them — Aetna, Blue Cross Blue Shield and Coventry — are offering preferred provider plans that allow policy holders to pay less if they use “network” doctors and services, but let them go outside the network if they choose and still receive some insurance reimbursement. The other two companies — GlobalHealth Inc., and Community Care — operate health maintenance organizations that require policy holders to use only network doctors and health facilities. If they go outside the network, they pay the entire cost themselves. All five companies have posted their rates with the Oklahoma Department of Insurance. But the department released the information only for the three PPO companies. It said state law does not allow it to release rate information for HMOs. Aetna acquired Coventry earlier this year. But the two companies made separate rate filings listing different plans and rates for the policies they plan to issue in Oklahoma. The three companies’ rate schedules are voluminous. Blue

York

somewhere, maybe 15 percent to 25 percent might be in one group or another who are what we would deem to be bad guys.” McCaul would not accept Kerry’s numbers. “The briefings I’ve received, unless I’ve gotten different ones or inaccurate briefings, are 50 percent and rising,” he said. “These fighters coming globally are not coming in as moderates. They are coming in as jihadists.” McCaul later said he was “stunned” by Kerry’s assertion. When it comes to how many Syrian rebels are good and how many are bad, the U.S. government cannot come to agreement with itself. Kerry explained that he has met several times with opposi-

From Page 6

Reunion Steve Golbek; Lethy and Heather Lee; Jeffrey, Lee and Nancy West; Leslie Bradt; Audrey, Shay, Jessie, Lacy and Gavin Chrisman; I am sure I have missed some, but when they do not sign in I cannot remember all. Prizes were given to the eldest, John McRee of Yukon; the youngest, Braxton Wella; and the fartherest traveled, the Cody Weller family from Okmulgee. First-time attendees were Christy McRee, and Terry Golbek and family. Married the longest were Marvin and Elsie Shipley. This reunion will be held next year at approximately the same time and place, unless the new crew changes things. If you read this and are a relative or good friend, you are welcome to come.

tion leaders in the last year. “They have evolved ... significantly,” he said. “Are they where they need to be? Not completely. But they have changed markedly over the course of the last few months.” The rebels, many of whom are militantly Islamist, are now inclusive, Kerry claimed. “At our insistence ... they reached out and expanded significantly their base within Syria. They elected new leadership. They brought in a much broader base of Syrian representation, including women, including minorities, Christians, others.” After Kerry spoke, Deputy National Security Adviser Tony Blinken told Fox News the administration is working with the “moderate opposition” and aims to “make sure that not only our assistance but the assistance of other countries goes to them and stays away from the

radical extreme opposition.” In the next moment, Blinken conceded, “It’s not a perfect science.” No, it’s not. Are violent jihadists one-quarter of the rebel forces, or one-half, or something else? No one seems to know. The problem intensified with the circulation of a video showing Syrian rebels summarily executing captured government soldiers. There are other such videos around – the incident was in no way the first example of rebel viciousness – but the pictures seemed to highlight the dilemma as the intervention debate rages on Capitol Hill. The Syrian civil war is a very ugly thing for the U.S. to be involved in, no matter how much vetting goes on first. (Byron York is chief political correspondent for The Washington Examiner.)

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Cross Blue Shield filed a 207-page document containing hundreds of rates; Aetna’s filing listed 35 plan types and filled 151 pages. The companies did not provide information in their filings on how rates for plans being offered under the Affordable Care Act compare to plans on existing policies. Advocates of the law caution that such comparisons are misleading because existing plans often don’t contain the full range of benefits required under the act, and companies can no longer exclude people with pre-existing medical conditions. Oklahoma Insurance Commissioner John Doak, a critic of Obamacare, said the new policies being offered to individuals in the federal health insurance marketplace will cost 30 percent to 100 percent more than pre-Obamacare policies. He said small group insurance plans will be 10 percent to 25 percent higher.

“Our fears have been confirmed,” Doak said in a news bulletin. “For some consumers, the cost of health insurance will increase significantly.” Doak’s assertion was challenged by David Blatt, director of the Oklahoma Policy Institute, a non-government research group that supports the health-care act. “His claims are not based on data, but rather on informal conversations that his staff apparently had with some insurance carriers,” Blatt said. “Commissioner Doak’s statement is in line with his political opposition to the Affordable Care Act.” Oklahoma Insurance Department spokeswoman Calley McGehee Herth said Doak’s rate-increase figures were based on detailed analyses by the insurance carriers providing the policies. Their findings were then communicated to state officials, she said.


September 15, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 8

Goldbugs steamroll Morrison in second half to win 54-20 By Leslie Nation The Alva High School Goldbugs battled with Morrison in their home opener Friday at the Ranger football field. Last week against Thomas-FayCuster, Alva struggled to get yardage and convert some much-needed third downs and even fourth downs to keep the ball in their possession, but tonight was a different story. Senior and starting quarterback Ty Hooper was able to connect with some of his key receivers to record over 300 yards passing for the game. But the Morrison Wildcats showed up Alva’s defense at the start with their 14-play series. Morrison quarterback Jordan Quinata had an impressive running and passing game in their first possession, throwing five passes and connecting on all of them. In the end, it was a one-yard rushing touchdown by Quinata that got Morrison’s first six points on the board, accompanied by an unsuccessful two-point conversion. Alva started their possession at their 21 yard line with over four minutes left in the first quarter. Hooper had trouble connecting with his receivers – often overthrowing – but he quickly found a rhythm, throwing six passes for six completions. Alva’s first big play came when Hooper passed to starting receiver Riley Hess for a 30-yard gain. A holding penalty was called on the Goldbugs, but it was still enough for a first down at Morrison’s 33-yard line. The Goldbugs fought their way back to the 10 after a six-yard run by Hooper and a 17-yard pass to Hess. Hooper handed off to Cody Jones to push up the middle, then found a hole in Morrison’s secondary to cut left for a 10-yard touchdown. A failed extra point attempt tied the Goldbugs with Morrison 6-6. It wasn’t long into the second

Alva’s Rilley Hess (#27) carries the ball as Tanner Burton (#73) clears the way. In the background is the Goldbugs’ Colin Fouts (#70) and Morrison’s Brent Coleman (#63). Photo by Lynn L. Martin quarter and Alva was making a case for their win. From their 14 yard line, Hooper found the open hands of Dalton Manning, who burst down the field after dodging a tackle by Quinata for an 86yard touchdown. After a successful two-point conversion run by Cade Pfleider, the Goldbugs led for the first time this season 14-6 with over nine minutes left in the half. Morrison was able to find similar success on their offense as Alva’s defense struggled to stop the running and passing game. At one point during the Wildcats’ possession it looked like it would be cut short with a third down and 16 yards to go, but a 22-yard pass to sophomore Justin Bearry kept it

alive. Quinata would pass it two more times for starting running back Scotty Vandorn to run it into the end zone for a two-yard touchdown and a two point conversion to tie the game. Less than a minute in Alva’s possession the Wildcats’ offense

was back on the field. Morrison put up three rushing plays to push it down Alva’s throat as Vandorn recorded another rushing touchdown to take the lead. Alva regrouped quickly with four and a half minutes left in the half. The Goldbugs made their

stand to get back the lead when Hooper threw a 23-yard pass over a Morrison defender into the hands of 6’ 4” Hess, his first receiving touchdown of the game. The Goldbugs ended the half in the lead 22-20. In the second half, the Goldbugs were looking to put the game away as Hooper found Hess in the end zone for his second receiving touchdown of over 20 yards. The Wildcats tried to retaliate, but ended their possession on an unsuccessful fourth-down conversion on Alva’s 30 yard line. Alva got their chance to extend their lead on a handoff to starting running back Cody Jones, who spun away from a defender and broke a tackle for the open backfield and a 70-yard touchdown. With the score 38-20, Alva leading, Hooper recorded his fourth passing touchdown, finding Trevor Johnson wide open at Morrison’s 35 yard line, and ran it the rest of the way to the end zone. Hooper got his fifth passing touchdown of the night to find Hess for a third time, who gave the Goldbugs a huge lead of 54-20. By that time, Alva’s defense was able to put on the pressure to stop some potential big plays by Morrison and slow their offense. The game ended with the Goldbugs’ first win of the season. The Alva Goldbugs are now 1-1. They will face Hobart in another home game on Sept. 20 at 7:30 p.m.

The Goldbugs’ Brandon Ellis (#55) tackles Morrison’s Jordan Quinata (#5) from behind in Friday night’s victory for the Goldbugs. Coming up to help is Dalton Manning (#26). Photo by Lynn L. Martin

Hennessey Eagles shut out AMS Goldbugs’ offense By Leslie Nation The Alva Middle School football team had an uphill battle against Hennessey on Monday, losing ground early for a shutout loss. It didn’t take long for the Eagles to establish a lead over the Goldbugs. Within the last three and a half minutes of the first quarter Riley Hess (#27) of Alva pulls in a pass for a touchdown late in the Hennessey got three touchdowns, game against Morrison. Following is Alva’s Cade Pfleider (#35) and two of them rushing and one off the Morrison’s Justin Bearry (37). Photo by Lynn L. Martin Eagles’ defense. Hennessey contin-

ued to beat down the Goldbugs’ defense with two more rushing touchdowns. Even the Eagles’ defense capitalized on Alva’s errors after a deflected pass fell in the hands of an Eagles’ linebacker, who ran it back for a 49-yard touchdown. At the end of the half Hennessey led the Goldbugs 44-0, and the Goldbugs attempted to regroup for the second half. Having a huge lead going into the third quarter, Hennessey stuck

with their running back for the rest of the game. Alva was finally able to slow down the Eagles’ offense and get some yardage of their own. But it was too late; with only two possession changes in the entire second half and Hennessey winding down the clock, the Goldbugs lost their first game at home 44-0. The Goldbugs are now 1-1 for the season and will face Enid at Alva High School on Tuesday, Sept. 17, at 6 p.m.


September 15, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Rangers lose their second game in a blowout against Harding

The Ranger’s Josh Robinson (#1) makes a stop on Harding’s Jason Oller (#3) in the Ranger’s loss at Searcy, Arkansas Saturday evening. Photo courtesy of Searcy, Arkansas newspaper, The Citizen. By Leslie Nation Northwestern’s defense struggled to slow down Harding’s offense on Saturday losing in a 69-0 shutout in Searcy, Ark. After losing their season opener against Arkansas Tech at home 38-10, the Rangers faced Harding University for the first time in 25 years. Harding got underway with first possession, inching their way down the field from their 25yard line for a three-yard rushing touchdown by starting quarterback Jacob Moore. The Rangers started their first possession to respond with Ranger starting quarterback and red-shirt freshman, Reid Miller. Miller threw 17 passes for only six completions Ranger running back Zachary Doyle (#31) escapes one pursuer while and fewer than 70 yards against the Ranger’s Kyle Morin (#47) fends off a blocker from Harding, Arkansas Tech and was looking at Patrick Bingham (#75). Photo courtesy of the Citizen newspaper. a clean slate for Saturday.

AMS Ladybugs get a four-run rally to win By Leslie Nation The Alva Middle School (AMS) softball team got a late four-run rally to win 6-2 over Fairview Thursday at the Alva Recreation Com-

plex. After going three-up and threedown on defense, the Ladybugs scored their first two runs off a fly ball to left field smashed by Cam-

ryn Wren for a two-run homerun. Fairview was able to cut that lead in half in the second inning with a sacrifice ground ball to get the runner in at third. Alva’s inability to get their bats going in the bottom of the second gave Fairview a chance to come back in the third to tie the game at 2-2. Though the Ladybugs could not get anything past Fairview’s defense, they were able to hold the Lady Jackets to two runs for the rest of the game. In the top of the fourth, Alva’s field made two big plays for three outs and a chance to get in the lead. Hannah O’Neil got their first out of the inning after a fly ball came to right field for an easy catch. With a runner on first, a pop fly put first baseman Tatum Hughes in a position to make a double play after catching it in the air and tagging her base to get both runners out. The Ladybugs took full advantage of the situation. With a runner on third, Kaleigh Henke hit a fly ball to left field for an RBI single to score Hughes and take the lead. A hard ground ball to right field by Alva’s leadoff, O’Neil, allowed Henke to come home for another score. The Ladybugs got two more runs from O’Neil with a steal to home and another hard ground ball from Wren to score Dru Byrant. Eighth-grader Wren pitched Kaleigh Henke hits a fly ball to left field to score Tatum Hughes in the the entire game and ended the fourth inning against Fairview. Photo by Leslie Nation game in the top of the fifth allowing only one hit in the last inning and striking out three Fairview batters. The Ladybugs are now 8-8 for the season and will go on the road to face Mooreland on Monday, Sept. 16, at 4:30 p.m.

The Rangers struggled early on offense after Miller came out from a concussion injury after a huge first down run. Second string quarterback Jake Streck came in to continue the series but fumbled on his third play of the drive. Harding recovered at their own 21-yard line. In their next possession Harding showed the Rangers they would not make it easy on them, moving down the field in four plays as Moore recorded another rushing touchdown for 26 yards. With the score 14-0, Northwestern was back in possession and Miller took position again behind the center to start the drive at the 27. After one third down conversion, the Rangers had to punt the ball away to Harding. The Bison’s started their fresh possession on their own 15-yard line, but this was little challenge for them. After an eight-yard run from Romo Westbrook and a 12yard run from Jason Oller, Moore passed the ball to Alex Rachal for a 66-yard touchdown to put Harding up by 21. Just over two minutes left in the first quarter, Streck came in for Miller after his injury sidelined him for the rest of the game. The Rangers attempted to find the end zone on this drive, but after six plays they punted the ball to Harding to come back on defense in the second quarter. Harding continued to bulldoze through Northwestern’s defense for three more touchdowns before the end of the half leading the Rangers 41-0. The break between halves wasn’t enough for the Rangers to regroup as Harding continued to shut down their offense. The Ranger’s third string quarterback and freshman, L.T. Pfaff had to come in for Streck after he suffered an injury similar to Miller’s that sidelined him for the rest of the game. Harding built a substantial lead

against Northwestern before the half and the Bison began to put in their reserves to finish the game. The Bison went on to score four more touchdowns to effectively end the game 69-0 against Northwestern. Harding recorded over 700 total yards on offense; over 500 of those yards came from their running game. The Rangers are now 0-2 for the season and will continue on the road to go up against ArkansasMonticello on Saturday, Sep. 21, at 6 p.m. Last year, the Rangers beat Arkansas-Monticello 38-35 in their last game of the regular season. Team Totals NW FIRST DOWNS 14 Rushing 6 Passing 5 Penalty 3 NET YARDS RUSHING 73 Rushing Attempts 46 Average Per Rush 1.6 Rushing Touchdowns 0 Yds Gained Rushing 143 Yds Lost Rushing 70 NET YARDS PASSING 94 Compl.-Attpt-Int 8-15-0 Average Per Attempt 6.3 Average Per Compl. 11.8 Passing Touchdowns 0 TOTAL OFFENSE YARDS 167 Total offense plays 61 Ave Gain Per Play 2.7 Fumbles: Number-Lost 4-1 Penalties: Number-Yds 5-35 PUNTS-YARDS 9-321 Ave Yds Per Punt 35.7 Net Yards Per Punt 35.6 Inside 20 3 50+ Yards 1 Touchbacks 0 Fair catch 0 KICKOFFS-YARDS 1-65 Ave Yds Per Kickoff 65.0 Net Yds Per Kickoff 45.0 Touchbacks 1 Punt returns: Number-Yards-TD 0-0-0 Average Per Return 0.0 Kickoff returns: Number-Yds-TD 8-139-0 Average Per Return 17.4 Interceptions: Number-Yds-TD 0-0-0 Fumble Returns: Number-Yds-TD 0-0-0 Miscellaneous Yards 0

HU 27 21 6 0 454 56 8.1 8 465 11 238 7-9-0 26.4 34.0 2 692 65 10.6 0-0 4-40 1-40 40.0 40.0 0 0 0 1 11-642 58.4 43.5 1 1-1-0 1.0 0-0-0 0.0 0-0-0 0-0-0 0

Ladybugs push past Waukomis to advance in the Northwest Shootout By Leslie Nation The Alva High School Ladybugs softball team got an early lead to roll right past Waukomis and into the next round at the Northwest Shootout Tournament in Fairview on Thursday. The Ladybugs got their first run when Katlin Ramy hit an RBI ground ball to left field scoring Natalie Seevers. While that was Alva’s only run of the inning they got another chance to extend their lead after going three-up and threedown on defense. In the second inning, Tatum Honer was first to help Alva rack up the runs on the scoreboard after an RBI line drive single to center field brought in Kally Gordon from third and Patricia Beeler from second. With the score 3-0 and the Ladybugs with two outs, Ally Riley was able to keep things alive after a dropped third strike by Waukomis’ catcher allowed her to reach first and Honer to sneak in for another run. Alva got two more runs after Ramy put up another RBI to the outfield to score Riley and Darian Carothers. With the score 6-0 in the bottom of the second, Waukomis was

finally able to get a run on Alva’s defense. The Ladybugs answered back with a run of their own in the third, and Waukomis didn’t get their second and final run until the bottom of the fourth. In the top of the fifth, the Ladybugs had another 5-0 rally to put the game away at 12-2. N. Seevers pitched a strong game for all but one batter in the bottom of the fifth, allowing only two hits and two runs and striking out seven. Sabrina Hughbanks pitched for the last batter with no trouble to end the game for another win. Sophomore Honer had a big game at bat, getting two hits and two runs to go with four RBIs to help the Ladybugs extend their lead. Ramy added to those RBIs with three of her own. The Ladybugs have recorded 18 wins with only four losses thus far in the season and are currently ranked number 12 in the Oklahoma Secondary Schools Activities Association (OSSAA). Alva was scheduled to play Friday at 11:30 a.m. against the Fairview Lady Yellow Jackets in the tournament, but their game was delayed due to rain. They were rescheduled to play them on Saturday at 10 a.m.


September 15, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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2013 AHS Band King and Queen Alyssa Brewer and Kelan McKnight give each other high-fives after their names are announced as the AHS Band King and Queen of 2013

The crown and flower bearers, from left to right: Emma Eckhardt, Fern and Frankie Jo Evans.

Alyssa Brewer

Morgan Collier

Emily Seal

Collin Fouts

Matthew Martin & Kelan McKnight

Alyssa Brewer crowns the King first. Then Kelan McKnight crowns the queen.


September 15, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 11

Woods County Communication Call Center

September 4, 2013 1:29 p.m. Controlled burn 2 ½ miles south of Freedom ¼ mile west. 2:00 p.m. Non-injury accident across from Garnett, white car. 2:01 p.m. 911 call, accident on Oklahoma Boulevard by exit at college, no injury. 6:33 p.m. Five-year-old boy with red T-shirt blue jeans and sandles home alone on Second Street. 9:09 p.m. Mud truck with no tail lights close to Greensburg, white with black stripes. 9:21 p.m. 911 call, NWOSU Police Department number? 9:43 p.m. 911 call, accident in Lite Nite parking lot, no injuries. 11:19 p.m. 911 call, stolen vehicle from 800 block of Second, black Chevy pickup with cover on back. September 5, 2013 5:01 a.m. Two men on 100 block of Oklahoma Boulevard. 5:56 a.m. Hit ATT box in alley of 1100 block of Locust/Maple. 6:44 a.m. Accident at Sonic. 6:46 a.m. Called helicopter air evac in Cushing, one hour ETA. 6:58 a.m. Witchita, Kan., Eagle, 45 minutes. 7:56 a.m. Two vehicles blocking driveway for buses at Lincoln School, notified officer. 11:26 a.m. Woodward EMS – two-vehicle aqccident on CR 225/412 6 miles west of Bouse Junction, highway closed. 1:17 p.m. Controlled burn 3 miles south 3 miles west of Medford on Harmon/CR 930. 1:48 p.m. Unresponsive person by entrance of cemetery. 4:48 p.m. Residential burglar alarm at 1800 block of Cedar Drive, living room motion. 11:03 p.m. Suspicious van spotted at 1700 block of Cherry, “Water

Solution,” had break-in before. September 6, 2013 11:19 a.m. Semi with a flat tire east of Chesapeake on south side. 11:57 a.m. Three vehicles almost hit on 14th Street, speeding by Alva High School, officer notified. 2:05 p.m. Controlled burn on Hughes and Jackson on CR 350 on east side. 2:30 p.m. Wallet stolen in Waynoka, found but property missing, needs report. 2:34 p.m. Controlled burn 5 miles east 1 mile south 1 mile east of Nash. 4:01 p.m. Barber County – man with finger cut off on Highway 11 and CR 230. 4:46 p.m. Car sitting in middle of road on College/Barnes. 10:23 p.m. Loves – drunk individual walking down Oklahoma Boulevard. September 7, 2013 6:27 a.m. Eagle med 47-50 minutes. 7:28 a.m. Goats out on Flynn. 5:02 p.m. Dog chasing child to house on 1900 block of Elm. 6:24 p.m. Brown and white horse on Highway 14/Second (park). 6:40 p.m. Controlled burn on CR 1030/McClain. 6:54 p.m. 911 call hit and run at 600 block of Linden. 7:19 p.m. Ambulance to 1200 block of Oklahoma Boulevard, individual bleeding, gash on head. 7:47 p.m. College kids hitting golf balls into traffic on Murray Drive, third time. 10:10 p.m. 911 call, five-monthold not breathing on Flynn. September 8, 2013 2:24 a.m. 911 call, fight by Loves or Holiday Motel. 7:44 a.m. Vehicle on railroad

bridge on CR 280 south of Waynoka, metallic colored Suburban. 10:27 a.m. 13-year-old out of control on Flynn, called officer. 3:31 p.m. Pioneer Security reporting silent panic alarm at Freedom State Bank. 3:39 p.m. 911 call, employee cleaning out desk, everything okay at the bank, individual is there they will reset the alarm. 6:52 p.m. Number for court info. 8:47 p.m. 911 call, daughter hit deer south of Manchester, no injury, transferred to Grant County Sheriff’s Office. September 9, 2013 8:25 a.m. 911 call, stray yellow lab at 700 block of Church, animal control notified. 9:52 a.m. Semi vs pole 1 mile west of vet, blocking road, no injury, officer notified. 2:15 p.m. On Highway 11 semi lying in west ditch, possible rock truck, east of Red Hill Road, west of Medford. 4:00 p.m. Needing Waynoka Police Department, will just walk down there. 5:02 p.m. Shoplifter at Walmart. 5:15 p.m. Loud music at 600 block of Mimosa. 9:22 p.m. 911 call, person with gun in Wakita. 10:48 p.m. Oklahoma City transfer to sheriff’s officeto fax warrant. September 10, 2013 7:02 a.m. Needs officer to 1000 block of Church. 8:39 a.m. Erratic driver on 281 south towards Waynoka, pickup with older man, gray Ford. 11:28 a.m. 911 call, wreck on Oklahoma Boulevard. 12:17 p.m. Controlled burn on CR 1100 and Major Road. 1:02 p.m. Disgruntled land own-

er at 920 and Major. 1:56 p.m. DWI last year, transfer to sheriff’s office regarding turning self in. 6:10 p.m. 911 call, ladder in road west on 64 out of Alva. 7:48 p.m. Individual referring advice to get grandfather to stop driving. 9:53 p.m. 911 call, pickup backed into another pickup at 600 block of W. Aspen in Pond Creek. September 11, 2013 9:30 a.m. 911 call, Onstar reporting Ford has been wrecked, gave lat-

itude and longitude, called number and person said he is fine, no injuries and OHP had stopped. 10:24 a.m. Erratic driver on highway going toward Capron, silver Ford pickup Texas plate, severe speeding. The call center also handled the following calls: abandoned calls – 42, accidental calls – 15, pocket dial – 31, wrong number – 9, hang ups – 16, animal control – 3, sheriff – 47, police – 82, general info – 105, fire dept. – 30, ambulance – 17, road conditions – 5.

Woods County Court Filings According to the affidavits and petitions on file, the following individuals have been charged. An individual is innocent of any charges listed below until proven guilty in a court of law. All information is a matter of public record and may be obtained by anyone during regular hours at the Woods County Courthouse. The Alva Review-Courier will not intentionally alter or delete any of this information. If it appears in the courthouse public records, it will appear in this newspaper. Criminal Filings Michelle Denise Jeffries, 42, Alva: (1) Endeavoring to possess CDS; (2) Possession of CDS ($1,065.70). Lawrence Anthony Compo, 32, Alva: (1) Unauthorized use of a motor vehicle; (2) Malicious injury to property ($606). Lawrence Anthony Compo, 32, Alva: Assault and battery with a deadly weapon ($340.50). Ronald Ray Collins, 37, Alva: (1) Unauthorized use of a motor vehicle; (2) Malicious injury to prop-

erty ($606). Misdemeanor Filings Heriberto Guerra, 36, Brooklyn Park, Minn.: DUI ($794.70). Ronald Ray Collins, 37, Alva: Public intoxication ($229). Lawrence Anthony Compo, 32, Alva: Public intoxication ($229). Jason Allen Martyn, 24, Alva: (1) Possession of CDS; (2) Possession of paraphernalia ($541.70). Danary Hernandez, 23, no address listed: (1) Possession of CDS; (2) Possession of paraphernalia ($657.20). Protective Order Filings Jennifer K. Scribner vs. Aaron Joshua Perks ($175.70). Divorce Filings Amy Melton vs. Keith Melton: Dissolution of marriage ($193.70). Danielle Lyndsey Whipple vs. Grant Thomas Whipple: Divorce granted. Traffic Filings The following individuals were cited for speeding: Betty Joyce Stipe, 54, Mutual: 75 in 65 ($188.50).

Woods County Real Estate Transactions Woods County

Beginning book 1164 page 213 Real Estate Transfers Damon A. Sims & Mayrian E. Sims to Stephen A. Fritz & Stacy J. Fritz: Lot 11 in Block 2 of Nickerson’s 3rd Addition to the City of Waynoka: Warranty Deed. Ernest James Detgen, Trustee of the Ernest J. Detgen Trust dated July 12, 2004 to Kingson Christian & Rupal Christian: Lots 11, 12 &13 in Block 6 of the East Hill Addition to the City of Alva, LESS and excepting all of the oil, gas and other minerals and mineral rights in and under said premises, SUBJECT to easements filed of record: Warranty Deed. Philipp E. Ring & LaDonna P. Ring to Trottiers Pipe Handlers USA Ltd: (1) the east 338 feet of Lot 2 of the Ranger Estates Subdivision being a part of the East Half of the Southwest Quarter of Section 5, Township 27 North, Range 13, WIM; AND (2) a tract of land located in said East half of the Southwest Quarter of Section 5, described as follows on page 299 of book 1164, LESS and except the oil, gas and other minerals: Warranty Deed. Craig L. Johnson & Janean R. Johnson to District Disposal LLC: a tract of land in the Southwest Quarter of Section 28, Township 26 North, Range 13, WIM: Warranty Deed. Terrence Earl Turner & Patricia Jo Turner, deceased, Co-Trustees of the Terrence E. Turner Revocable Trust dated March 19, 2007 to Timothy Gene Turner: all my interest in a tract of land situated in the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast

Quarter of Section 2, Township 26 North, Range 18, WIM; LESS and except all oil, gas and other minerals, formerly described as Lots 17 through 32, both inclusive, in Block 31, and all of Block 32, and Lots 1 through 16, both inclusive, in Block 37, all in the Original Town of Freedom: Quit Claim Deed. Mickey E. Dietz & Carolyn Dietz to Mickey E. Dietz & Carolyn Dietz: the SURFACE only of: (1) the North Half of Section 32, Township 23 North, Range 11, WIM; (2) the Southeast Quarter of Section 29, Township 23 North, Range 12, WIM; (3) the Northeast Quarter of Section 19, Township 23 North, Range 12, WIM; (4) the Northeast Quarter of Section 26, Township 23 North, Range 12, WIM; EXCEPT 10 acres and 125 square rods lying in the Northwest Corner thereof West of Eagle Chief Creek; (5) 29 acres in the Northwest Quarter of Section 26, Township 23 North, Range 12, WIM; lying East of Eagle Chief Creek; (6) the South Half of the Northeast Quarter of Section 35, Township 24 North, Range 12, WIM; (7) Lots 5, 6, 7 & 8 in Block 32 in the Town of Cleo Springs; (8) the North Half of the Southeast Quarter of Section 32, Township 23 North, Range 11, WIM; ALL interest in the oil, gas and other minerals owned by grantors in the properties listed on page 406-407 of book 1164: Joint Tenancy Warranty Deed. George Harlow & Gerri Harlow to Randy D. Stewart: (1) a tract of land 120 feet by 600 feet out of the Southwest Quarter of the North-

east Quarter of Section 11, Township 24 North, Range 16, WIM; (2) a tract of land 485.25 feet by 600 feet out of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 11, Township 24 North, Range 16, WIM; (3) a tract of land out of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 11, Township 24 North, Range 16, WIM: Warranty Deed. Mortgages Jerry Lynn Garrison & Connie Sue Garrison to Oklahoma Employees Credit Union: Lots 6 & 7 of Block 2 in Indian Hills Subdivision to the City of Alva: $55,100. Kingson Christian & Rupal Christian to Community Bank: Lots 11, 12 &13 in Block 6 of the East Hill Addition to the City of Alva: maximum obligation limit $38,700. Randy D. Stewart to Community Bank: (1) a tract of land 120 feet by 600 feet out of the Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 11, Township 24 North, Range 16, WIM; (2) a tract of land 485.25 feet by 600 feet out of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 11, Township 24 North, Range 16, WIM; (3) a tract of land out of the Northwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 11, Township 24 North, Range 16, WIM: maximum obligation limit $90,000. Robby L. Inman & Allison K. Inman to BOKF NS, DBA Bank of Oklahoma: a tract of land in the Northeast Quarter of Section 27, Township 28 North, Range 13, WIM: $123,145.

Sheriff’s Report September 5, 2013 8:30 a.m. Caller asking about an inmate. 11:35 a.m. Report of goats out behind Foote’s Farm Supply, owner has been notified. 12:31 p.m. Caller asking about an inmate. 12:56 p.m. OHP in Guymon with a question. 2:10 p.m. Attorney asking if a person was in custody. 2:32 p.m. DHS with a question about fingerprints. 6:11 p.m. Individual called to see what she can bring to her brother. September 6, 2013 8:15 a.m. Caller making report of drug activity. 8:31 a.m. Caller checking on an inmate. 11:24 a.m. Dispatch reporting a motorist assist near 460 and US 64. 12:45 p.m. Call for deputy, caller did not want to leave a message. 1:48 p.m. The parent of an in-

mate called asking questions about the inmate phone system. 1:57 p.m. A person called about an inmate’s bond. 2:07 p.m. Caller asking if someone was in custody. 3:35 p.m. Caller asking for a welfare check. 4:46 p.m. Individual from Dacoma called to request a VIN inspection on a trailer. September 9, 2013 9:30 p.m. Oklahoma City called for warrant on a individual. 10:30 p.m. Oklahoma City called about putting a hold on individual. September 10, 2013 9:27 a.m. Woodward County Sheriff’s Office called to check warrant on individual. 1:40 p.m. Caller reporting drug activity. 1:57 p.m. Caller reporting harassing telephone calls. 2:01 p.m. Caller asking questions about a DUI charge.


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Woods County Court Dispositions

10 Guilty Pleas Four Felonies Neiman Jaray Burch, 34, Charlotte, N.C.: Defendant pleaded guilty on Aug. 19, 2013, on case CF-2012-38 for (1) Taking credit/ debit card and (2) Knowingly concealing stolen property. Count 1 is a sentence of three years with all except the first two years suspended under the custody and control of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections, pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. Count 2 is a term of five years with all except the first two years suspended under the custody and control of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections, pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. These terms to be served concurrent to each other. Defendant to receive credit for time served in Woods County Jail. Defendant shall pay a fine of $250, costs, fees, assessments, restitution, transport fees, court-appointed attorney fee and a $40 monthly supervision fee. Robert Ben Thornburg, 36, Wilburton: Defendant pleaded guilty on Aug 27, 2013, on case CF-201263 for Possession of precursor substances with the intent to manufacture methamphetamine. Sentence is a term of 20 years under the custody and control of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. Defendant shall pay a fine of $500, pay costs, fees, assessments, restitution and a $40 monthly supervision fee. This offender is subject to the Methamphetamine Registry. James Allen Barron, 24, Alva:

Defendant pleaded guilty on Aug. 22, 2013, on case CF-2012-140 for Petit larceny. Defendant shall pay a fine of $10, pay restitution of $250, pay costs, fees and assessments including AFIS, VCA and CLEET. McCelvie Palmer Herrington, 28, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Aug. 27, 2013, on case CF2013-20 for (1) Possession of CDS methamphetamine and (2) Maintaining place for keeping/selling controlled substance. Sentence is a term of five years under the custody and control of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections, all of said term suspended subject to defendant complying with all rules and conditions of probation. Defendant shall pay a fine of $1,000, pay costs, fees, assessments, restitution and a $40 monthly supervision fee. Six Misdemeanors Richard Lynn Foos, 31, Medicine Lodge, Kan.: Defendant pleaded guilty on Aug. 22, 2013, on case CM-2011-78 for three counts of Obtaining cash or merchandise by bogus check. Count 1 sentence is a term of one year under the custody and control of the Woods County Sheriff, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. Count 2 sentence is a term of one year under the custody and control of the Woods County Sheriff, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. These terms to be served consecutive to Count 1. Count 3 sentence is a term of one year under the custody and control of the Woods County Sheriff, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. These

terms to be served consecutive to Count 2. Defendant shall pay costs, fees, assessments and restitution. David Arlice Northcott, 49, Medford: Defendant pleaded guilty on Aug. 29, 2013, on case CM2012-292 for Driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of an intoxicating substance. Sentence is a term of one year under the custody and control of the Woods County Sheriff, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. These terms to be served concurrent to Garfield County case CM-2013-342. Defendant shall pay a fine of $150, pay costs, fees, assessments, restitution and a $40 monthly supervision fee. Forrest Kyle Barfield, 25, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Aug. 29, 2013, on case CM-2013-97 for (1) Possession of marijuana and (2) Possession of drug paraphernalia. Count 1 sentence is a term of one year under the custody and control of the Woods County Sheriff, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. Count 2 sentence is a term of one year under the custody and control

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, September 15, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: MIDSTATES PETROLEUM COMPANY, L.L.C. RELIEF SOUGHT: WELL LOCATION EXCEPTION CAUSE CD NO. 201304813-T LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP 26 NORTH, RANGE 13 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA AMENDED NOTICE OF HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicant in this cause is requesting that the Commission enter an order (A) amending Order No. 111969, dated March 31, 1975, effective March 19, 1975, for the Mississippi Lime common source of supply, and (B) amending Order No. 287515, dated October 25, 1985, for the Mississippi Chat common source of supply, to permit a well for such common sources of supply at the following location: SURFACE LOCATION: Will be specified in the order to issue in this cause. LOCATION OF WELLBORE AT COMPLETION INTERVAL: The

of the Woods County Sheriff, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. These terms to be served concurrent to Count 1. Defendant shall pay a fine of $150 for Count 1, pay costs, fees, assessments, restitution and a $40 monthly supervision fee. Devin Jacob Coulter, 24, Alva: Defendant pleaded guilty on Aug. 22, 2013, on case CM-2013-131 for (1) Possession of CDS (marijuana) and (2) Public intoxication. Count 1 sentence is a term of one year under the custody and control of the Woods County Sheriff, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. Count 2 sentence is a term of 30 days under the custody and control of the Woods County Sheriff, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. These terms to be served concurrent to Count 1. Defendant shall pay a fine of $150 for Count 1, pay costs, fees, assessments, restitution and a $40 monthly supervision fee. Rene Allen Diaz, 28, Pampa, Texas: Defendant pleaded guilty on Aug. 12, 2013. on case CM-

2013-191 for Driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. Sentence is a term of 90 days under the custody and control of the Woods County Sheriff. Defendant to receive credit for time served in Woods County Jail. Defendant shall pay costs, jail costs, fees and assessments. Tara Dyane Myers, 23, Haskell, Texas: Defendant pleaded guilty on Aug. 30, 2013, on case CM2013-196 for (1) Possession of CDS (marijuana) and (2) Unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia. Count 1 sentence is a term of one year under the custody and control of the Woods County Sheriff, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. Count 2 sentence is a term of one year under the custody and control of the Woods County Sheriff, all of said term suspended pursuant to rules and conditions of probation. These terms to be served consecutive to Count 1. Defendant shall pay costs, fees, assessments, restitution, a $40 monthly supervision fee and court-appointed attorney fee of $150.

proposed location of the end points of the completion interval will be no closer than 165 feet from the North line and no closer than 600 feet from the East line and no closer than 165 feet from the South line and no closer than 600 feet from the East line of the unit comprising said Section 35, Township 26 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. Same to be a well for the unit consisting of said Section 35, a 640acre unit by said orders which require the well to be located not less than 1,320 feet from the unit boundary. The legal descriptions of the land sections adjacent to the area within which the location exception lies are Sections 25, 26, 27, 34 and 36, Township 26 North, Range 13 West, and Sections 1, 2 and 3, Township 25 North, Range 13 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. Applicant further requests that Applicant or some other party be authorized the right to drill said well. Applicant further requests that it be permitted to produce said well at said location from all common sources of supply covered hereby with no downward allowable adjustment. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Initial Hearing Docket at the Corporation Commission Tulsa facility, Kerr State Office Building, 440 S. Houston, Suite

114, Tulsa, OK 74127, at 8:30 a.m., on October 1, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their names and telephone numbers. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Cheryl Edelen, Landman, Midstates Petroleum Company, L.L.C., 321 S. Boston, Suite 600, Tulsa, OK 74103, Telephone: 918/947-8540 and/or Gregory L. Mahaffey, Attorney, 300 N.E. 1st Street, Oklahoma City, OK 731044004, Telephone: 405/236-0478. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice-Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner DONE AND PERFORMED ON SEPTEMBER 13, 2013. BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, September 15 and 22, 2013.) AUCTION THURSDAY OCTOBER 3, 2013, 5:30 PM AT THE WOODS COUNTY COURTHOUSE WOODS COUNTY OFFICES WILL HAVE ITEMS ON DISPLAY DURING REGULAR BUSINESS HOURS. BIDDING WILL START AT 5:30 P.M. ON THURSDAY OCTOBER 3, 2013. ITEMS INCLUDE: DESKS, PRINTERS, COMPUTERS AND MANY MISCELLANEOUS OFFICE EQUIPMENT. ALL ITEMS SOLD “AS-IS”, “WHERE IS”. LOCAL SALES TAX WILL BE CHARGED. BUYER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR HAULING ITEMS OFF COUNTY PROPERTY SAME DAY AS SALE.


September 15, 2013

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Action Ads Remodeling

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Community Calendar Sunday

Vantage Plane Plastics

7:30 p.m. Alva Masonic Lodge 6083 with questions.

2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip #105 will meet. 7 p.m. Celebrate Recovery meets From ceiling to floor, remodeling & Now taking applications. Come by 8 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous every Tuesday at the Bible Baptist more. Accommodate farm & ranch. 3161 College Blvd., Alva, OK to Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or will meet at 1027 8th (Wesley Church, 4th & Choctaw, Alva. The Double B Carpentry. 580-748-1489 pick up an application. Fall Class Schedule Available at Alva Sewing Center. See store for details and samples. Foot class, Adult Sewing Basics, Embroidery Club, Software, and Serger Coverstitch Class. Class size limited, sign up required. Tax Free Month

at G&G. Recliners starting at $299 and Queen Mattresses starting at $399. G&G Home Furnishings, 2107 College Blvd. Alva, OK. 580-3276635

CC Construction

Interior-Exterior improvements. Room additions. Plaster Repair & Painting. Handicap. Structural & Non Structural Concrete. Will also accommodate Farm & Ranch. 580307-4598 or 620-825-4285

Drivers-Competitive Pay

arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. Help Wanted Monday Depot Bar & Grill. Bartender. Pick9 a.m. The Woods County Up application at 3 N college. 580- Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, 327-7011 Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled Help Wanted Hiring waitstaff at El Potrero, Alva. each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. Apply in person. 1 p.m. Alva Duplicate Bridge Help Wanted will meet at the Runnymede Hotel. Truck Drivers for Rock & Grain 3:30 p.m. Storytime will be Hauling, 100 Mile Radius of held at the Alva Public Library for Burlington, OK. Pay is % of Load. children ages 3-5 and their parents. 620-327-7360 6:30 p.m. Alva City Council meets the first and third Mondays of Farmers Please Help the month in the council chambers 65 year old looking for hunting lease for Deer anywhere from $1000 to of City Hall. 7-9 p.m. Alva Autism & Special $30,000 a year. 580-554-0999 Need Support Group will meet the Attention! third Monday of every month at the Quarterback Club Meeting every Alva Public Library. Tuesday at noon at Champs. Come hear the coaches and support your AND FOR FINAL DECREE OF team. DISTRIBUTION

House) in Alva every Monday and Thursday. Tuesday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 5 p.m. Cherokee Library Benefit for the Food Bank with Mike Bone Hip Hop group. Admission is a non-perishable food item or canned goods. 7 p.m. Widows and widowers support group will meet at College Hill Church of Christ. Call 580-430-

purpose is to help people dealing with alcoholism, divorce, sexual abuse, domestic violence, drug addiction, sexual addiction, food addiction, co-dependency, gambling addiction, anger, grief and more. Wednesday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. Noon Alva Kiwanis Club meets at Champs Restaurant. 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 7 p.m. Alva Moose Lodge men’s meeting is held every Wednesday.

No. PB-2012-48

the above Court and cause, their Final Account and Petition for Order Allowing Final Account, Determination of Heirs, Devisees and Legatees and for Final Decree of Distribution, and that Monday, the 7th day of October, 2013, at 11:30 o’clock a.m., in the District Court Room, City of Alva, Woods County, Oklahoma, has been fixed as the time and place for hearing thereof, when any person interested in said estate may appear and contest the same as provided by law. Dated this 12th day of September, 2013. Mickey J. Hadwiger JUDGE OF THE DISTRICT COURT Dal L. Houston, OBA #17065 BENSON & HOUSTON, P.L.L.C. Attorney for Estate P.O. Box 488 Alva, Oklahoma 73717 (580) 327-1197

Estate of Monty Wimmer, Deceased, has returned and presented for confirmation, and filed in said Court, their Return of the sale of the following described real property of said Estate, to-wit: Undivided one-quarter (1/4) in and to Lot Fifteen (15), in Block Fourteen (14) of the Hatfield Addition to the City of Alva, Woods County, Oklahoma. to Chaffee Properties for the sum of $3,000.00. The hearing on the return of sale shall be held on Thursday, the 26th day of September, 2013, at 11:00 a.m., in the District Courtroom at Alva, Woods County, State of Oklahoma, at which time any person interested in said estate may appear and file his exceptions in writing to said Return and contest the same, and are hereby referred to said Return for further particulars. Dated this 12th day of September, 2013. Ss Judge Hadwiger Judge of the District Court Dal L. Houston, OBA #17065 BENSON & HOUSTON, P.L.L.C. Attorney for Petitioner P. 0. Box 488, 615 Barnes Alva, OK 73717 (580) 327-1197

Sober, Personal Representative of the Estate of Marna Finney, Deceased, has returned and presented for confirmation, and filed in said Court, their Return of the sale of the following described real property of said Estate, to-wit: Undivided one-quarter (1/4) in and to Lot Fifteen (15), in Block Fourteen (14) of the Hatfield Addition to the City of Alva, Woods County, Oklahoma. to Chaffee Properties for the sum of $3,000.00. The hearing on the return of sale shall be held on Thursday, the 26th day of September, 2013, at 11:00 a.m., in the District Courtroom at Alva, Woods County, State of Oklahoma, at which time any person interested in said estate may appear and file his exceptions in writing to said Return and contest the same, and are hereby referred to said Return for further particulars. Dated this 12th day of September, 2013. Ss Judge Hadwiger Judge of the District Court Dal L. Houston, OBA #17065 BENSON & HOUSTON, P.L.L.C. Attorney for Petitioner P. 0. Box 488, 615 Barnes Alva, OK 73717 (580) 327-1197

Local-Home often. Vacations/ NOTICE OF HEARING RETURN NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That OF SALE OF PROPERTY SOLD AT Benefits. CDL-A, 2 yrs & 200K mi For Rent PUBLIC AUCTION exp. Walk Ins Welcome. Hodges Nice clean 2 bdrm apt. Rent includes Kyle Stauffer and Kelly Stauffer, CoPersonal Representatives of the estate NOTICE is hereby given that Elma Trucking 855-CHK-HAUL utilities. $875. 327-2554 of Kurt Stauffer, deceased, have filed in McMurphy Personal Representative of the

For Sale

2013 Solitaire 18x80 home. 3bdrm, 2bth, 1360 sqft, open floor plan. Price includes decks & Washer/Dryer. 49K. House located in Alva. 402-639-1595

Cherokee Strip Museum

currently has office space avail. The space includes two office areas, a common waiting room and a break room. If anyone is interested contact the museum at 580-327-2030

LEGAL NOTICE

MURROW

REAL ESTATE & AUCTION

580-327-1998

www.murrowlandandhome.com www.murrowrealestateandauction.com

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, September 15 and 22, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT IN AND FOR WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA In the Matter of the Estate of Kurt Stauffer, Deceased No. PB-2012-34 NOTICE OF HEARING FINAL ACCOUNT, AND PETITION FOR ORDER ALLOWING FINAL ACCOUNT, DETERMINATION OF HEIRS, DEVISEES AND LEGATEES

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LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, September 15, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT IN AND FOR WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA In the Matter of the Estate of Monty Wimmer, Deceased

HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATOR TRAINING! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible. 1-866-362-6497 Lics:OBPVS

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CAREER TRAINING/EDUCATION

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LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, September 15, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT IN AND FOR WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA In the Matter of the Estate of Mama Finney, Deceased No. PB-2012-49 NOTICE OF HEARING RETURN OF SALE OF PROPERTY SOLD AT PUBLIC AUCTION NOTICE is hereby given that Debra

EdwardJones

The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up 75.42 to close at 15,376.06. The NASDAQ Composite Index was up 6.22 to close at 3,722.18. The Transportation Average was up 6.98 to close at 6,523.42 and Utilities CLOSED up 4.25 at 476.89. Volume was approx. 519.59 million shares. Gold rose $2.97 to $1,324.63, and Silver CLOSED at $22.22 up 48¢. Crude oil prices fell 10¢ to $108.50 per barrel. Wheat Price was $6.68, dn 10¢. Prime Rate is 3.25%

Stocks of Local Interest — Courtesy Pat Harkin

Name OGE Energy ONEOK Inc Duke Energy WilliamsCo Chesapeake Energy Wal-Mart ConocoPhillips SandRidge Energy

Close 35.00 51.13 65.55 35.92 26.66 74.36 69.19 5.50

Change +0.16 -0.16 +0.35 +0.43 -0.02 +0.14 +0.36 +0.02

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3.83% 2.99-4.59% 2.05% 0.01%

Stock Market Report — for September 13, 2013


September 15, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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September 15, 2013

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Lady Rangers soccer team take second home loss against Nebraska-Kearney By Leslie Nation The Lady Rangers’ soccer team went head-to-head in an intense matchup at the Alva Recreation Complex against the University of Nebraska-Kearney (UNK) Lopers – another opponent from the MidAmerican Intercollegiate Athletics Association (MIAA) conference. While the Rangers played with more intensity in their game on Friday than they did against the Lopers’ fellow conference opponent, Fort Hays State, they still came up short for a 3-0 loss. The Lady Rangers’ intensity showed through the amount of pressure they put on the Lopers’ side of the field. While the Rangers were able to retain possession of the ball, they were not as aggres-

sive in taking shots, being out shot by the Lopers 24-15, six of those on goal. Pressure on both sides of the field kept the teams scoreless for the first 32 minutes of the first half. Northwestern’s Alyssa Williams came close to breaking this drought at the 27-minute mark, kicking the ball from 35 feet out to hit the crossbar of the Lopers’ goal. But the Lopers were the ones to finally break through the Rangers’ defense just over 33 minutes into the half when UNK’s Montanna Hosterman scored their first goal off a corner kick by Breezy Jahnke. Eleven minutes later, UNK extended their lead to 2-0 before going into the second half. The Lopers recorded their third and final goal

just under the 75-minute mark by Delanie Phillips with the assist from Holly Brown. Of the Rangers, Melissa Hamrick led with three shots on goal, and Erica Hostetter and Kaitlyn O’Toole had four shots of their own. Both teams were given three yellow cards in the game as a caution to Arlet Polack, Chelsie Wood and Gabriella Hernandez of Northwestern and Sarah Talcott, Kristyn Otter and Meaghan Pasbrig of UNK. With the Lady Rangers 0-3 for the season, they will play another home game against Newman on Sunday, Sept. 15, at 1 p.m. They will then face Northeastern State – ranked number 3 in the MIAA – on Thursday in Tahlequah at 7 p.m.

Kaitlyn O’Toole tries to make a break past a Nebraska-Kearney defender. Photo by Leslie Nation

Chelsie Wood kicks the ball to the other end of the field away from Northwestern’s goal. Photo by Leslie Nation

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Sunday, September 15, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANTS: CHESAPEAKE OPERATING, INC. AND CHESAPEAKE EXPLORATION, L.L.C. RELIEF SOUGHT: WELL LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 28 NORTH, RANGE 14 WEST OF THE IM, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA Cause CD No. 201306056 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, more particularly the parties set out on the Exhibit “A” attached to the application on file in this cause, and, if any of the named individuals be deceased, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such deceased individual; if any of the named entities is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity; if any of the named parties designated as a trustee is not presently acting in such capacity as trustee, then the unknown successor or successors to such trustee; if any of the named parties designated as an attorney-in-fact is not presently acting in such capacity as attorney-in-fact, then the unknown successor or successors to such attorney-in-fact; and if any of the named entities are corporations which do not continue to have legal existence, the unknown trustees or assigns of such

parties. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicants, Chesapeake Operating, Inc. and Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C., have filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission to enter an order, as follows: (i) authorizing and permitting an exception to the permitted well location tolerances in the 640-acre drilling and spacing unit comprised of Section 24, Township 28 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, for the Mississippi Lime common source of supply, so as to allow a well to be drilled as follows: Location of Wellbore at Completion Interval: The location of the point of entry is 107 feet from the north line and 676 feet from the east line of the unit comprising said Section 24, Township 28 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, and the terminus point is 216 feet from the south line and 660 feet from the east line of the unit comprising said Section 24, Township 28 North, Range 14 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, and to be completed in and produce hydrocarbons from the abovenamed common source of supply; (ii) establishing a proper allowable with no downward adjustment made thereto. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that the order be entered in this matter be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and that the authorization and permission requested herein run in favor of one or both of the Applicants, including Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C. acting by and through its agent Chesapeake Operating, Inc., or some other party recommended by Applicants. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the legal descriptions for the land sections adjacent to said Section 24 are Sections 13, 14, 23, 25 and 26, Township

28 North, Range 14 West of the IM and Sections 18, 19 and 30, Township 28 North, Range 13 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Merits Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 1st day of October 2013, and that this notice will be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicants and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. An interested party who wishes to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicants or Applicants’ attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide his or her name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Matt Fleischer, landman, (405) 935-1407, or Emily P. Smith, attorney, OBA No. 20805, (405) 9358203, Chesapeake Operating, Inc., P.O. Box 18496, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73154-0496. Please refer to Cause CD Number. DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 12th day of September 2013. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary


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