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Alva Review-Courier Vol. 121 No. 69

Friday, August 30, 2013 - $1.00

www.alvareviewcourier.com

620 Choctaw, Alva, OK 73717

Pickup collides with

Alva August sales tax

SUV collides with pickup

two parked cars

down eight percent

on Oklahoma Boulevard

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August 30, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Pickup collides with two parked cars

By Marione Martin A Broken Arrow man drove his pickup into two parked vehicles before being taken to the hospital. The wreck occurred Saturday, Aug. 17, at 10:46 p.m. on 10th Street south of Maple Street in Alva. According to police, Peter M. Taylor, 37, of Broken Arrow was driving a 2010 blue Dodge 150 northbound on 10th Street when he struck a parked 2008 black Chevrolet owned by Allyson Diel of 929 Maple in Alva. Diel’s vehicle was

parked south of a private driveway and was pushed into a 2011 white Nissan owned by Carolyn Hoskins, also of 929 Maple. The Hoskins vehicle was parked north of the driveway. The Diel vehicle was pushed into the driveway. The Hoskins vehicle continued to travel north before coming to rest near a southbound stop sign at 10th and Maple. Taylor was taken to Share Medical Center by the Alva EMS. Alva Police Officer Jade Cardenas investigated the collision.

Alva August sales tax down eight percent Compared to August 2012 collections

By Marione Martin The Oklahoma Tax Commission has released information on the August 2013 distribution of sales tax collections for cities and counties. The taxes primarily represent local tax receipts from June business. Alva’s sales tax collections continued a downward trend compared to 2012, dropping by 8.5 percent from the August 2012 level. The amount is still 37.7 percent above Alva’s August 2011 collections of $297,415.47. Freedom’s sales tax was down 56 percent from August of last year. Waynoka sales tax was down 56.6 percent. Woods County sales tax collections for the month were down about 16 percent from the same time period last year. Information comes from the Oklahoma Tax Commission at www. oktax.state.ok.us. CITY SALES TAX City Tax Rate Aug. 2013 Tax Rate Aug. 2012 Aline .0300 4,843.12 .0300 1,671.92 Alva .0425 409,430.06 .0425 447,543.49 Burlington .0100 4,674.94 .0100 6,770.46 Byron .0200 8,429.23 .0200 1,666.80 Carmen .0300 7,535.88 .0300 8,879.31 Cherokee .0325 178,636.50 .0325 138,922.61 Cleo Springs .0300 6,489.07 .0300 5,783.57 Freedom .0200 4,482.04 .0200 10,192.37 Goltry .0300 2,106.14 .0300 3,951.10 Helena .0300 15,005.97 .0300 23,041.26 Waynoka .0400 39,043.58 .0400 89,918.65 Woodward .0350 1,100,883.43 .0350 1,077,209.58 COUNTY SALES TAX County Tax Rate Aug. 2013 Tax Rate Aug. 2012 Alfalfa .0200 720,323.38 .0200 758,884.10 Woods .0050 234,594.81 .0050 279,261.64 CITY USE TAX City Tax Rate Aug. 2013 Tax Rate Aug. 2012 Aline .0300 157.18 .0300 109.06 Alva .0425 14,061.72 .0425 22,209.72 Carmen .0300 297.30 .0300 301.02 Cherokee .0325 6,279.70 .0325 15,084.67 Goltry .0300 102.82 .0300 126.72 Helena .0300 1,778.42 .0300 600.54 Waynoka .0400 4,362.31 .0400 5,771.37 Woodward .0350 55,790.19 .0350 85,955.65 COUNTY USE TAX County Tax Rate Aug. 2013 Tax Rate Aug. 2012 Alfalfa .0200 88,975.88 .0200 100,023.68 Woods .0050 26,538.18 .0050 41,059.31

The silver Tahoe at left driven by Weston Dicks struck the rear of the white pickup driven by Ashlee Kilgore that was waiting for another vehicle to make a left turn. The collision was Saturday, Aug. 10, on Oklahoma Boulevard in Alva. Photo by Lynn L. Martin

SUV collides with pickup on Oklahoma Boulevard By Marione Martin An Alva resident was taken to the hospital following a collision Saturday, Aug. 10. The wreck occurred at 4:15 p.m. on Oklahoma Boulevard at Fifth Street in Alva. According to the police report, Ashlee Kilgore, 21, of Alva was driving a 2006 white Chevrolet pickup east in the inside lane of Oklahoma Boulevard. She started to slow as she approached a vehicle in front of

her waiting to make a left turn onto Fifth. Weston Dicks, 18, of Spring Branch, Texas, was driving a 2000 silver Chevrolet Tahoe east behind her in the inside lane. Dicks did not see that Kilgore had stopped and hit the rear of Kilgore’s truck. Kilgore was taken to Share Medical Center by Alva EMS for neck pain. Alva Assistant Police Chief Ben Orcutt investigated the collision.

Alva EMS Director and former Air Evac member Chad Campbell approaches a passenger of the Air Evac Lifeteam helicopter after landing. Once on the ground, members on the helicopter gave landing safety tips and facts to Alva EMS. Photo by Alex Cole

Air Evac Lifeteam member Shane Cooper inspects the 250-pound helicopter engine after landing. He said this helicopter in particular has about 1,600 hours on it and has been flown for two years. Photo by Alex Cole


August 30, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Justice reforms: a tale of two states

Obituaries JACK HENRY BEEBE Jack Henry Beebe, 62, died Tuesday, Aug. 27. He was born to the late Francis and Bessie McCartney Beebe on June 28, 1951, in Hennessey. He married Cathy Sue Goodwin in 1970 in Hennessey, and they renewed their vows in 1992. Jack is survived by his wife, Cathy Beebe; three children; four grandchildren and four sisters. Funeral services will be held at Sanders Funeral Home in Kingfisher at 2 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 30, 2013, with burial to follow at the Cimarron Valley Cemetery in Lacey. Sanders Funeral Service, Inc., 124 E. Broadway, Kingfisher, OK, 73750 is in charge of arrangements. LARRY G. JAMES Larry G. James was born March 1, 1943, in Alva to Albert William James and Fleta Frieze James and passed from this life Aug. 23, 2013, in Shawnee at the age of 70. Mr. James was born in Alva and attended school there. He attended Northwest Oklahoma State University where he studied criminal justice. As a young man he entered the United States

Navy where he honorably served his country from 1960 to 1966. Following his discharge he worked for the Alva Police Department before becoming an air marshall in the early 1970’s. He finally found a home with the United States Customs service. He relocated to Alaska where he worked with the department in Anchorage before becoming port director at the Fairbanks International Airport. He retired as port director in Frontier, Wash., on the U.S./Canada border in 1999 after some thirty-four years of service. Following retirement he returned to his hometown of Alva where he remained until ill health caused him to relocate to Shawnee to be near family. When he was able he enjoyed fishing and traveling. Survivors include ten children: Terri Ahlum and husband Billy, Heidi James, Larry James Jr. and wife Dianna, Jennifer James, Rebecca and husband Jackie Lee, Susan James, Timothy James, Zachary James, Austin James, and William James; eight grandchildren; ten great grandchildren; several nieces, nephews, other relatives, and many friends. Graveside rites with full military honors will be held Saturday, Aug. 31, at 3 p.m. at the Little Cemetery north of Seminole with Rev. Larry Chesser Jr. officiating. Interment will follow under the direction of Williamson-Spradlin Funeral Home of Wetumka.

Northwestern to close for Labor Day

Employees and students at Northwestern Oklahoma State University will be able to enjoy an extended weekend as the university will close for Labor Day on Monday, Sept. 2. Northwestern’s offices will be closed and no classes will be held that day. Classes will resume and all university offices will open with regular business hours on Tuesday, Sept. 3.

Grant writing seminar to be held in Alva The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva will host a seminar on grant writing geared toward non-profit agencies, municipalities, tribes, schools, libraries, museums and faith-based organizations. “Research and Writing Winning Grants - Level I” will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 18, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the museum, located at 901 14th Street. The seminar will teach participants the basics of planning a project, writing a grant proposal and researching and accessing funding

sources. A funding resource list will be provided, detailing the latest available funders and invitations for proposals. The seminar will be taught by Lu Kindblade of Lu Kindblade and Associates, LLC, a planning firm that assists communities, schools, non-profit organizations and businesses in developing and funding sustainable programs. Kindblade has devoted the past 26 years to

See Seminar Page 5

Woods County Forecast Friday Sunny and hot, with a high near 101. South wind 5 to 10 mph. Friday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 71. South southeast wind 6 to 10 mph. Saturday Sunny and hot, with a high near 102. South wind 5 to 10 mph. Saturday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 71. Southeast wind 5 to 9 mph. Sunday A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms after 8am. Mostly sunny and hot, with a high near 98. Sunday Night A 20 percent chance of showers and

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thunderstorms. Partly cloudy, with a low around 68. Labor Day A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 91. Monday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 66. Tuesday Sunny, with a high near 91. Tuesday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 67. Wednesday Sunny, with a high near 93. Wednesday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 69. Thursday Sunny, with a high near 96.

By Shaun Hittle Oklahoma Watch Several years ago, legislators in both Oklahoma and North Carolina began taking steps to address rising incarceration rates. The number of incarcerated offenders in Oklahoma had increased by a few thousand inmates in the past decade, giving the state one of the highest rates of imprisonment in the nation. The prison population was growing at a similar pace in North Carolina, and officials were expecting an additional 10 percent increase by 2020. Both states analyzed criminal justice data that highlighted systematic reasons, such as tougher sentencing laws, that explained why more people were being locked up. With help from the Council on State Governments in crafting legislation, each state passed a series of reforms, known as Justice Reinvestment Initiatives (JRI), designed to cut down on rising incarceration. North Carolina approved its law in 2011, Oklahoma in 2012. The results: Oklahoma’s prison population continued to rise, climbing by about 800 inmates to nearly 27,000. The corrections system remains overcrowded and has been forced to contract with private prisons to house more inmates. State officials say more funds are needed to relieve overcrowding. In North Carolina, the prison population declined by about 4,000 inmates over two years, which allowed the state to close five prisons this year. David Guice, adult corrections director of the North Carolina Department of Public Safety, said the decline has saved the state about $34 million so far in 2013. “It’s actually going great,” said Guice, referring to the state’s JRI program, of which he was an early proponent. North Carolina was one of several states mentioned in a recent Urban Institute report that highlighted the successes of JRI programs across the country. The report outlined millions of dollars in savings for states such as South Carolina, Ohio and Texas. Unfinished Work Some prison and state officials have said the main reason Oklahoma has not seen results from its justice initiative is that it has not fully funded or implemented the program. For instance, the JRI bill called for the creation of intermediate sanctions facilities where parole violators could be sent as an alternative to prison. Those facilities have not yet been created; officials say they’re using current prison space for the program. However, officials were not able to say how many offenders are housed in such programs. Another provision called for

an increase in parole officers to ensure all offenders leaving prison receive some form of supervision. By early July, prison officials said only 15 parolees had received the supervision. Former Speaker of the House Kris Steele, who worked on Oklahoma’s JRI, said the measure has failed because Gov. Mary Fallin’s office never really supported the reforms, despite expressing public support. The program called for more than $6 million in funding for this fiscal year, but only $3.5 million was allocated. Earlier this year, Fallin also rejected nearly $400,000 in federal funding, which partly caused Steele and Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater to abruptly quit the group as co-chairmen in March. About $2 million of the $3.5 million was to be awarded as public safety grants by the state Attorney General’s Office. On Wednesday, the first annual recipients of those grants were announced and include the Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Lawton and Ada police departments, as well as the Oklahoma and Tulsa County Sheriff’s Offices. A news release from Attorney General Scott Pruitt

said the money is targeted toward areas with high violent crime rates and will go toward staffing, technology, training and crime analysis. Steele also pointed to efforts by the governor to replace the JRI’s original nonpartisan working committee, which spearheaded the reforms, with a legislative body. Those efforts failed, but in the process, the only group supervising the program’s implementation was basically dismantled. Alex Weintz, press secretary for Fallin, disagreed with Steele’s assessment that the governor doesn’t support the justice initiative. “The governor supports the goals” of the initiative, Weintz said. “We are making progress.” However, Weintz cautioned that the measure has only been in effect since November, and measurable decreases in prison population will take time. “I think it’s way too early to be judging this,” he said. Reaping Savings Guice, the corrections director from North Carolina, said his state has been fortunate, with a supportive

See Justice Page 6


August 30, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Pleased but not satisfied

Looking at the ACT results that were released this week was a mixed blessing On one hand, I celebrate progress. ACT’s 2013 Condition of College and Career Readiness report shows that more Oklahoma graduating seniors are ready for college and careers than in previous years. The percentage of the state’s 2013 graduates who met all four benchmarks in English, reading, science and math rose to 23 percent from 17 percent

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The Alva Review-Courier is combined with the Woods County News, The Alva Advocate and Newsgram, and is published every Sunday and Friday by Martin Broadcasting Corp., 620 Choctaw St., Alva, OK 73717-1626. Periodical postage paid at Alva, Oklahoma. Annual subscription rates in Woods County, Oklahoma $72. Elsewhere in Oklahoma $90, elsewhere in the United States $108. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Alva Review-Courier, 620 Choctaw St., Alva, OK 73717-1626. Contents Copyright 2013 Member of the Associated Press, Oklahoma Press Association, National Newspaper Association

in 2008. Other bright spots on the report are the percent of students meeting the reading and English benchmarks exceeds the national average: 45 percent vs. 44 percent and 66 percent vs. 64 percent, respectively. In addition, composite scores among minority students in Oklahoma were higher than those of their national counterparts. This is all good news, and I applaud the work of the students who took these tests, their teachers who helped them prepare and their parents and other family and community members who offered support. Then there’s the other hand. Only 23 percent of our seniors met benchmark scores in the four subjects tested; 29 percent of those who took the test met no benchmarks. Only 37 percent of Oklahoma students met the math benchmarks, and 35 percent met the science benchmarks, compared with the national 44 percent and 36 percent figures, respectively. So, while I’m pleased with the progress we’ve made, I’m not satisfied. We simply must have more of our students prepared for the rigors of college, workforce training and careers by the time they graduate high school. Achieving a benchmark score indicates that a student has a 50 percent chance of earning a B in a college level course and a 75 percent chance of earning a C. If students are not prepared for college coursework, they will be forced to take remedial courses, which cost money and earn no credit. If they opt to go straight to the workforce unprepared, they risk being stuck in low-paying jobs. Preparing students for college, careers and citizenship means we give them every opportunity to succeed and lead the life they want to live. During my time as state superintendent I’m doing a great deal to ensure that we’re preparing our students for the road

In My Corner By Arden Chaffee Two years ago, Marisa, our older daughter, and her friend Kelly entered the “Muddy Buddy” race in Dallas. It consisted of a foot race, bike race and low crawl through mud at the end. Now the courses are tougher and triathlons are for wimps – enter the obstacle course race, where just finishing is winning. They have already attracted a crazed following who endure, among other things, submersion in a vat of ice, the mud crawl and the electric eel, which has live wires dangling waist-high above more mud. The “Mudder Madness” races have names like “Tough Mudder,” “Warrior Dash” and “Spartan Race” and this year events will be held

in 47 cities. Billed as “not a race, but a challenge,” the contestants repeat the tough mudder pledge: “I do not whine. I help my fellow Mudders complete the course.” The courses are 12 miles long and the obstacles are spaced far enough apart to add anxiety to exhaustion. Sounds a little like my basic Army training. I recall the “Close Combat Course” and the “Live Fire Range,” both of which included their share of mud. While most people dread leaving their comfort zone, this race is ideal for those who delight in doing so. Eleanor Roosevelt said you should do something that scares you every day. After the Charles Nieman tragedy in Boise City, just getting out is intimidating and anxiety in America is rampant but, in case you’re adventurous, find a “Muddy Buddy” and Google the next event.

Random Thoughts

Lewis and Clark – Part 1

By Roger Hardaway A few weeks ago, I wrote about how the United States bought Louisiana from France in 1803. The Louisiana Purchase doubled the size of U.S. territory and was the greatest achievement of Thomas Jefferson’s tenure as president. Louisiana extended from the Gulf of Mexico to the Canadian border and from the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains. Jefferson wanted to know more about the land we had acquired including whether or not it was suitable for agricultural purposes. The president asked his personal secretary, Meriwether Lewis, to put together a group of adventurers to explore Louisiana. The explorers would make special note of things like rainfall, climate, soil, vegetation, wildlife and Indian inhabitants. In fact, Lewis visited with several professors at the University of Pennsylvania who gave him some pointers on what natural wonders to make note of in his journals. See Pleased Page 6 Lewis suggested to Jefferson that William

Clark be appointed co-leader of the exploring party. At 33 years of age, Clark was four years older than Lewis. Moreover, he was a major in the U.S. Army and had much more experience living on the isolated frontier than Lewis did. Jefferson then decided to grant Lewis the rank of army major, too, and turn the venture into a military one. This would help the two leaders control the men they would recruit to go with them; anyone refusing to obey orders would be at the mercy of military justice. Thus was set in motion the famous Lewis and Clark Expedition that explored the American West from May 1804 to September 1806. One interesting thing about the adventure is that Jefferson instructed Lewis and Clark to go beyond the borders of Louisiana and explore all the way to the Pacific Ocean. Consequently, the Lewis and Clark Expedition made the United States the fourth country to lay claim to the so-called Oregon Country – parts of western Montana and Wyoming plus Idaho, Washington and what became the State of Oregon. We will look at some of the explorers’ adventures in part 2 next week.


August 30, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Annie’s Mailbox®

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Click and Clack Talk Cars

Try to be accommodating Dad is wrong about turbocharged engines Dear Annie: My grandchildren are 6 and 3. My brother has a step-grandson, also age 6, from his wife’s daughter. Two years ago, at my eldest grandchild’s birthday party, my brother and his wife brought this step-grandson along. He was not invited because he is an unruly child. He has a mild form of autism. Then his grandmother became upset when my daughter didn’t provide a goody bag for him. My daughter had made enough only for those kids who were invited. My brother’s wife then said, “Make sure to have enough for next year.” The following year, my daughter, a kind person, prepared an extra goody bag, even though the boy was not invited. He showed up anyway. This year, when my granddaughter had her birthday party, she did not invite any extended family members in order to avoid having this boy in attendance. The younger child’s birthday is coming up. Is there any way to stop my brother and his wife from bringing this 6-year-old with them? We know the boy has problems, and we’ve tried the “open arms” approach, but it always backfires. The boy acts out and ruins the party for the rest of the children. Any advice? – Not Unsympathetic Dear Not: We understand that you don’t want a disruptive child coming to these parties uninvited. But a 6-year-old boy on the autism

spectrum can be a handful, and his grandmother undoubtedly doesn’t want him excluded from family functions. The boy is 6. It will take some time before he can learn to socialize in a more acceptable manner. We know it’s asking a lot for you to be accommodating, but please try. Perhaps your daughter would consider having a party for her child’s friends, followed later by a cake-and-ice-cream celebration for family members. The family will tolerate the boy’s behavior better, and the schedule of events will allow the boy to arrive after the other children have left. Dear Annie: My parents have decided that for their 40th wedding anniversary, they should have a professional photo taken of all of their children and grandchildren. That’s fine. But Mom also insists that we all wear blue jeans and white sweatshirts. I said no. I’d be happy to wear a suit and tie, but no white sweatshirt. I do not look good in white and don’t want to end up in “Awkward Family Photos.” Mom calls me day and night begging, badgering and asking why I can’t swallow my so-called dignity and “just grin and bear it.” My father moans about how families do things to make each other happy. My parents and I have always had a stormy relationship. I am 30 years old and don’t want to take orders from them. If I tell them to give up, they will be dis-

Dear Margo

appointed. How do I get them to leave me alone? – Unwilling Son Dear Unwilling: Your parents have a point about going along for the sake of family harmony. After all, it’s their 40th anniversary, and this is a gift to them. You all sound amazingly pigheaded, but there is no reason for such a fuss over a white sweatshirt. Be conciliatory rather than stubborn. Enlist the help of a sibling. Ask your folks to work with you on a compromise. Maybe a beige sweatshirt would do the trick. Or you could all wear holiday scarves to add color. See what you can come up with. Dear Annie: This is in response to “Need Help,” the 16-year-old who has mood swings, painful headaches and often feels weak. Please advise her to get tested for Lyme disease. This disease can easily go undetected, as the symptoms can be attributed to other causes. The good news is, it can be treated. – Concerned Reader Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annie’s Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.

By Tom and Ray Magliozzi Dear Tom and Ray: My dad and I are looking for new cars. I testdrove a car, and then I testdrove the same car with a turbo engine. It had more power and got better gas mileage. I liked it. My dad said no to the turbo model. He said turbo-charging an engine takes the life out of it. He says it will not last as long as the non-turbo-charged engine. Do you agree with my dad? Who should buy a turbo? – Hayley TOM: You should buy a turbo, Hayley. And so should most people. RAY: In the early days of turbo-charging, it was common for turbos to fail at less than 100,000 miles. The failure often was catastrophic, leading to thousands of dollars in engine repairs. TOM: Ask anyone who owned an ‘80s-era Saab turbo about this phenomenon. But first, be prepared for them to start weeping. RAY: Unlike those devices, today’s turbos are very reliable, partly because we have a lot more experience in designing them, but also because today’s motor oils do a far superior job of keeping them cooled and lubricated. TOM: The advantage of a turbo is that it allows you to use a reasons that he’s with me and not smaller, more fuel-efficient engine her, etc. (He says I’m funnier and while having the turbo on standby more down-to-earth.) But I can’t for when you do need some extra help but feel insecure. How can I stop feeling like I’m in competition with someone who’s no longer even in his life? – Lacking Confidence Dear Lack: Of course it registers when one’s predecessor was outstanding in either looks or accomplishments, but you have to remind By Karen Armbruster Do you love the taste of dairy yourself that she’s out and you’re in. And in your case, he dumped her. foods, but sometimes feel uncomfortable or Make it your mantra that your fella bloated after extricated himself from Miss Beauhaving milk, tiful and Successful and then chose cheese or yoyou. (Sometimes these women are gurt? If so, a vaso self-involved that their attributes riety of tips may no longer matter.) help you enjoy I happen to think the funny and the recommenddown-to-earth girls win every time. ed three servLooks fade, people become used to ings of low-fat them, but personality is where it’s or fat-free dairy at. – Margo, self-assuredly Dear Margo is written by Margo foods every day without experiencHoward, Ann Landers’ daughter. To ing discomfort. This is good news learn more about Margo Howard because the 2010 Dietary Guideor to read features by other writers, lines for Americans recognizes dairy foods as an important source visit creators.com. of nutrients, such as calcium, potassium and vitamin D, for those with lactose intolerance. Enjoy Dairy Again With These Tips Sip it: Start with a small amount Alva to a museum that preserves our of milk daily and increase slowly early and ongoing Oklahoma history,” said Kindblade. The Cherokee Strip Museum is the perfect place to hold a seminar teaching our communities how to keep both the legacies of the past and hopes for the future alive through funding. Grant-writing skills are especially important during the current economic climate. I am excited at the opportunity to teach participants how to find the funding that can help their organizations have a positive impact on our communities.”

Tall tales and lap dances Dear Margo: My husband, “Sean,” and I have been married for eight and a half years and have known each other for nine. Almost two years ago, my husband was on a business trip a few states away from where we live. He and a few friends went to a strip club to drink and watch the strippers strut their stuff. Now, in the state we live in, they are only allowed to show off their bikinis after stripping off their clothes, but in the state where he was, they took everything off. Anyway, as most guys do, he got a lap dance, which I guess is a common thing with the type he hangs out with. Then another thing occurred that has me a bit riled up. He paid to go into the back room and get a private “strip/lap dance.” The problem I have is that my husband claims that while this stripper was on his lap, all they did was talk about their families. For some reason, I doubt a man would pay $100 for a private lap dance just to talk about his family with a stripper. That night, he called me and told me about what transpired and swore that nothing happened other than a naked woman who was not me sat on his lap. Am I overreacting, or should I threaten him that if I find out from his “friends” that there was more going on than talking, there will be some serious consequences? – Desperate To Get Over My Frustration Dear Des: What is it with these lap dances? Yours is not the first letter I’ve received from a furious wife. I think it is highly unlikely any of his “friends” will rat him out, but

I would tell him that you don’t for a minute believe his version, and for his sake, you hope there are no more outings involving naked ladies and his lap. I do not know exactly how this happened, but it is becoming common for businessmen to entertain clients and each other in strip clubs. I find it tacky and declasse. – Margo, traditionally Dear Margo: Usually I’m comfortable with my appearance and my accomplishments. I have a master’s degree from an Ivy League university, a challenging job in a creative field and an above-average body, which I work out to maintain. Compared to my boyfriend’s ex-girlfriend, however, I feel like a schlub. He doesn’t talk about her much, but I know she was a corporate lawyer with a high position and a salary to match. Plus, she modeled on the side. I’ve seen photos. She’s gorgeous in ways that even plastic surgery couldn’t make me. My boyfriend was the one who ended their relationship, and I know there are reasons for its dissolution,

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Seminar

serving communities in the areas of strategic planning, management and grants and fundraising and is a past recipient of the Community Service Award through the Association of South Central Oklahoma Governments (ASCOG) RC&D for her efforts. The fee is $95 per person and pre-registration is required due to space limitations. Those interested may contact Lu Kindblade and Associates by phone at 580-304-3761 or by email at Lkindblade@aol.com. “I am thrilled to be coming to

oomph. RAY: The truth is, a smaller engine is all you need most of the time. Then, once in a while, when you need to pass a truck, enter a highway or peel away from a boyfriend’s house after he says those shoes make your feet look fat, you step on the gas, and the turbo adds all the extra power you need. TOM: Your dad does make a fair point – that a turbo can be harder on the engine if it’s abused. So if you drive like an animal and stomp on the gas all the time, a turbo is not for you. Traffic court is for you. RAY: But for all reasonable drivers, a turbo does exactly what you say it does, Hayley: It allows a smaller engine to provide additional power when it’s needed, and better mileage the rest of the time. Enjoy your new car. *** It’s NEVER cheaper in the long run to buy a new car. Want proof? Order Tom and Ray’s pamphlet “How to Buy a Great Used Car: Secrets Only Your Mechanic Knows.” Send $4.75 (check or money order) to Used Car, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 328536475. *** Get more Click and Clack in their new book, “Ask Click and Clack: Answers from Car Talk.” Got a question about cars? Write to Click and Clack in care of this newspaper, or email them by visiting the Car Talk website at www.cartalk.com.

Karen’s Kolumn

Enjoy dairy again! over several days or weeks to find the amount that works with your tolerance. Try it: Opt for lactose-free milk and milk products. These real milk products have lower amounts of or zero lactose and provide the same nutrients as regular dairy foods. They also taste great. Stir it: Mix milk with other food, such as soup or cereal, blend with fruit, or drink with meals. Solid foods help slow digestion and allow the body more time to digest lactose. Slice it: Top sandwiches or crackers with natural cheese such as cheddar, colby, queso blanco, Monterey Jack, mozzarella and swiss. These cheeses contain less than 0.1 grams of lactose per serving. Spoon it: Enjoy yogurt. Traditional yogurt and Greek-style yogurt that contain live and active cultures help digest lactose.


August 30, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Wheatland Republican Red Cross issues safety tips for Labor Day weekend Women to hold planning meeting Many people view Labor Day as the end of summer and their last chance to travel, hit the beach and fire up the grill. The American Red Cross offers safety tips to help everyone have a safe and enjoyable holiday. “While many people will spend the Labor Day weekend traveling and spending time with family and friends, no one should take a vacation from safety,” said Janienne Bella, Central and Western Oklahoma regional chief executive officer. “It’s still important that people work to remain vigilant on the road, at the beach and at cookouts.” Tips for Safe Travel • Carry an emergency supply kit in your trunk. • Let someone know your destination, your route and when you

expect to arrive. • Buckle up and observe speed limits. • Don’t drink and drive. Tips for Safe Swimming • Check weather and water conditions beforehand and throughout the day. • Always swim with a buddy in a designated swimming area supervised by a lifeguard. • Provide constant supervision to children in or near the water and always stay within arm’s reach of young children and inexperienced swimmers while they are in the water. • Young children and inexperienced swimmers should wear U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jackets. Tips for Safe Grilling • Keep the grill away from the

house, tree branches or anything that could catch fire. • Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions. • Keep children and pets away from the grill. • Never add charcoal starter fluid when coals have already been ignited. The American Red Cross First Aid App for smart phones and tablets provides users with expert advice on what to do in case of an emergency. This free app is available on the Apple iTunes or Google Play stores and at redcross.org/mobileapps. For more information on emergency preparedness, go to redcross.org. Additional water safety tips are located at redcross.org/ watersafety.

Conditioning grain sorghum for harvest By Roger Don Gribble, OCES NW area agronomist and greg Highfill, Woods County Extension educator, agriculture Producers with maturing spring-planted grain sorghum who desire to transition to planting wheat this fall will want to strongly consider conditioning their grain sorghum for harvest. Conditioning is the process of applying the product glyphosate to the grain sorghum field, which stops plant growth and causes the plant to complete maturity. Producers will want to consider a conditioning application this year because of the effects of the excellent rainfall Woods County received during the months of July and August. In many cases, the moisture received has initiated additional tillering of the grain sorghum plant and at this time those additional tillers will add to grain yield if a producer is willing to wait until a

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frost to kill the grain sorghum plant. For full season grain sorghum the additional yield is welcome, but if a producer is hoping to rotate to a small grain fall crop like wheat, then those tillers are a problem and need to be dealt with. These additional tillers increase moisture in the harvested crop and can cause good ripe grain to pass right over the combine sieves and be dropped out the back of a combine. This loss in yield is unacceptable and can be prevented with conditioning. Conditioning the grain sorghum crop for harvest involves the timely application of a glyphosate product to the crop and then the ensuing harvest following the crop ripening. The application is made to the crop when the biggest share of desired harvest area is at 30 percent moisture or less. Do note that your glyphosate label restriction will indicate See Harvest Page 11

Justice

governor and a legislature that stepped up funding significantly for justice reforms. Because of early success, Guice said the program received $18 million this year to implement more of the reforms. North Carolina’s program is expected to save a total of $560 million by 2017. In Oklahoma the corrections

system is nearly maxed out. In July, prison officials contracted for 300 more private prison beds as a stopgap measure for a system that’s at 98 percent capacity. At the Board of Corrections meeting in July, officials said the state is already short by about $10 million to $15 million to handle the increasing population this year.

“It’s going to cost us,” said Rep. Gus Blackwell, R-Laverne, who’s heading a House study on how the state should handle the growing inmate population. Blackwell estimates the state will need an additional $25 to $30 million in next year’s budget just to address overcrowding at corrections facilities. Guice said while he couldn’t speak to Oklahoma’s corrections problems, a national roadmap for reducing prison populations is forming quickly based on the success of the JRI in his state and others. “Look at what’s happening across the country,” he said. Oklahoma Watch is a nonprofit organization that produces indepth and investigative journalism on important public-policy issues facing the state. For more Oklahoma Watch content, go to www.oklahomawatch.org.

Leta Guinn, president of Wheatland Republican Women, invites all members and their guests to attend a luncheon at noon on Wednesday, Sept. 4, at The Runnymede in Alva. This will be an opportunity to participate in making plans for the coming year, including sponsoring a booth at the Woods County Fair. Please call Linda Tutwiler at 580-327-3526 by Aug. 31 if you are planning to attend the luncheon.

Annual school election tips, polling places Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 10, for the annual school election for the City of Alva. Wylodean Linder, secretary of the Woods County Election Board, offered voters some tips on how to make their votes count. Linder said that a valid marking – fill in the box – is shown on posters at the polling place and inside the voting booths. If voters make mistakes marking their ballots, they should not try to correct those errors. Instead, voters should return the spoiled ballots to the precinct officials, who will destroy them and issue a new ballot to the voter. Linder also urged voters to take their voter identification cards with them to the polls. Voters who have no identification, whose names are not found in the precinct registry, or a voter who disagrees with the information shown in the registry, may need to cast a provisional ballot. A provisional ballot is sealed in a special envelope and counted after Election Day if the voter’s information can be verified by the County Election Board. Linder said that voters who want to get through the line quickly should vote at mid-morning or mid-afternoon, because those usually are the two slowest periods for voting during the day. “Anyone who is eligible and in line at the polling place at 7 p.m. on Tuesday will be entitled to vote,” she added. Following is a list of the precinct polling places open in the annual school election. Precinct 760001 – Northwest Technology Center Precinct 760003 – College Hill Church of Christ Precinct 760005 – Alva City Hall Only registered voters who reside within the limits of the municipality of the City of Alva are eligible to vote. It is a crime for a person to knowingly vote in an election in which they are not eligible.

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Pleased

ahead of them. I’ve hired literacy coaches to travel throughout the state providing job-embedded reading instruction to classroom teachers. I’ve partnered with Think Through Math to boost Algebra-readiness by eighth grade. I’ve sent teams from my office of instruction to hold free professional development sessions for teachers and administrators throughout the state. I hosted the Vision 2020 conference this summer, offering even more professional development. I’ve welcomed a partnership with the non-profit National Math and Science Initiative and their corporate sponsors to provide additional advanced placement coursework and advanced placement professional development to teachers in select Oklahoma high schools.

I’ve also pushed for staying the course on needed education reforms. These include Achieving Classroom Excellence requirements, which helps ensure graduating seniors have mastered necessary coursework; the transition to increasingly rigorous academic standards, which ensure students learn to think on their feet and solve problems; and the A-F School Report Card, which shows parents and community members how students in their local schools are performing. The ACT report shows us we’ve got our work cut out for us, but it also shows progress. We must continue to work together for the benefit of our students. Working together is how we will succeed in building a stronger Oklahoma.


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Alva Fire Department responds to mock fire

New faculty members begin the 2013-14 academic year at Northwestern Oklahoma State University. (Front row, from left) Dr. David Hawkins, Krista Tilley, Robin Roberson, Sandy Nigh, Jave Yoshimoto, Michele Scordato. (Second row, from left) Jason Busche, Leslie Collins, Keenan Meeker, Ken Drobnak, Dr. Mary Riegel. (Third row, from left) Roger Brown, Dr. John Stockmyer, Matt Adair, Tom Pantera, Matt Barnes

New faculty begin their assignments at Northwestern

Members of the Alva Fire Department respond to a mock fire inside Jesse Dunn at Northwestern Oklahoma State University on Monday. Assistant Fire Chief Rick Rhodes said new hoses will allow the department to fight high-rise building fires, and he tested the hose length with this exercise. Photo by Alex Cole

Assistant Fire Chief Rick Rhodes carries a bundle of hose into the Jesse Dunn building at Northwestern Oklahoma State University during a mock fire fight on Monday. Photo by Alex Cole

Northwestern Oklahoma State University recently welcomed 16 new faculty members to campus to begin the 2013-2014 school year. Nine new faculty members have been hired in the School of Arts and Sciences, and the remaining seven will work for the School of Professional Studies. New School of Arts and Sciences Faculty • Matt Adair, instructor of mass communication/public relations. Adair holds a bachelor of science degree in mass communication and a master of education degree in adult education and management from Northwestern. Most recently he has served as director of extended education at Frank Phillips College. • Matt Barnes, instructor of English. Barnes holds a bachelor of science degree in business administration and a master of education degree in adult education and management from Northwestern He has been teaching English as an adjunct for Northwestern and Northern Oklahoma College. • Dr. Kenneth Drobnak, assistant professor of music/director of bands. Drobnak holds a doctorate in performance from Michigan State University, a master of music degree from the University of New Mexico, and two bachelor’s degrees in music from the University of Akron. Most recently he was the director of bands at South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. • Keenan Meeker, instructor of mathematics. Meeker has a bachelor of arts degree in mathematics from The Master’s College and is completing a master’s degree in math at Pittsburg State University. He has been teaching in the Claremore Public Schools. • Dr. Justin Olmstead, assistant professor of social science. Olmstead earned a Ph.D. in history from the University of Sheffield, a master of arts degree in American history from Emporia State University, a bachelor’s degree in history from Southwestern College, and a bachelor’s degree in political science from Washburn University. He has been teaching in the public schools in Winfield, Kan., and as an adjunct instructor at Southwestern College.

• Tom Pantera, instructor of mass communication/journalism. Pantera holds a master of arts degree in journalism from the University of Missouri and a bachelor of arts degree in journalism from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. He has served as a teaching assistant at Missouri and has experience as a professional journalist. • Dr. Mary Riegel, assistant professor of mathematics. Riegel has a doctorate and a master of arts degree in mathematics from the University of Montana and a bachelor’s degree in math from Whitman College. Most recently she has served as a post-doctoral lecturer in mathematics at the University of Montana. • Michele Scordato, assistant professor of social work. Scordato holds a master of social work degree from California State University at Long Beach and will complete a Ph.D. in social work from the University of South Florida this fall. • Jave Yoshimoto, assistant professor of art. Yoshimoto earned a bachelor’s degree in studio art from the University of California at Santa Barbara, a master of art in art therapy from the School of the Art Institute in Chicago, and a master of fine art in painting from Syracuse University. Most recently he has served as an art instructor in Seattle area schools. New School of Professional Studies Faculty • Roger Brown, instructor of business. Brown is completing a Ph.D. in business administration from the University of Texas-Pan American (UTPA). He also has a master’s degree in business administration from UTPA, a master’s degree in accounting from the University of Texas at Austin, and a bachelor of science degree in accounting from the University of the West Indies. Brown was a member of the faculty at UTPA. • Jason Busche, instructor of health and sports science education. Busche has a master’s degree in physical education from Emporia State University and a bachelor’s degree from Northwestern. Jason worked in the public school system in Anthony, Kan., before coming to Northwestern.

• Leslie Collins, instructor of nursing. Collins earned a master’s degree in nursing from the University of Oklahoma and a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Northwestern. She was coordinator of the Ketterman Nursing Laboratory before joining the faculty. • Dr. David Hawkins, assistant professor of business. Hawkins earned a doctorate in business administration marketing from Northcentral University, a master of business administration from Dallas Baptist University and a bachelor’s and master’s degree in theology from Abilene Christian University. He has been an instructor at the University of Phoenix. • Sandy Nigh, instructor of nursing, holds a master’s degree in nursing from the University of Central Oklahoma and a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Oklahoma Baptist University. She has worked as an adjunct instructor in nursing at Northern Oklahoma College and as a professional nurse. • Robin Roberson, instructor of education. Roberson is completing a doctorate in education psychology from the University of Oklahoma. She also has a master of education degree and a bachelor of science degree from East Central University. Roberson previously was the director of the Center for Teaching Excellence at the University of Oklahoma. • John Stockmyer, associate professor of business. Stockmyer holds a Ph.D. in business administration from the University of Missouri. He also holds a master of business administration degree from Rockhurst University and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Missouri. He comes to Northwestern from Eastern New Mexico University.


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Beadles staff, residents give daycare children a day of water-slide fun Water slide, watermelon an expression of gratitude By Leslie Nation Beadles Nursing Home staff set up a water slide Aug. 19 and invited the children from the Lutheran Daycare over to play on it. The water slide and accompanying watermelon and drinks were an effort by Beadles staff and resi-

Sally O’Niel, a resident of Beadles Nursing Home, talks with Bryanna Sidders (back left), Addison Weber (back right) and other students of Lutheran Early Care and Education Center. Photo by Leslie Nation

dents to express their gratitude to the children. Lutheran Daycare kids spent every Monday this past summer with the nursing home residents, playing games and engaging in competitions. The kids and residents alike enjoyed the opportunity to get to know each other.

Raelee Ledoux from Lutheran Early Care and Education Center enjoys a fun time on the water-slide at the Beadles Nursing Home. Photo by Leslie Nation

These two, Kyler Boham (left) and Dillon Esquibel (right), show off their smiles as they eat watermelon and take a break from the waterslide. Photo by Leslie Nation

(Pictured from left to right) Wilhelmine Gum, Neda Ketchner, Lorraine Burk and J.W. Little watch the children from Lutheran Daycare enjoy the water-slide. Photo by Leslie Nation

Raelee Ledoux (right) of Lutheran Early Care and Education Center talks to Daile Sacket, resident at Beadles Nursing Home. Photo by Leslie Nation

Leland Morris (left) and Patty Clements (right) enjoy the company (Pictured from left to right) Addison Weber, Ryan Buehrer and Madison Vaughn eat watermelon after having some fun on the water-slide. Photo by Leslie Nation of Taylor James (middle). Photo by Leslie Nation


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Two injured in collision in front of Champ’s By Marione Martin Two people were injured in a collision Saturday, Aug. 17, on College Boulevard in Alva. The two-vehicle wreck was at 8:25 p.m. near the intersection with Tulip Street. According to the Alva police report, Timmori Ferrell, 24, of Alva was driving a 2013 green Ford and exiting the south driveway at Champ’s parking lot. Cody Weir, 34, of Sharon was driving a 2012 white Ford pickup owned by Hodges Trucking Co. south on College Boulevard in the outside lane. As Ferrell turned northbound onto College, she lost control of the car and went into the southbound lane, striking the Weir pickup head-on. Ferrell’s vehicle then spun 180 degrees and struck Weir’s vehicle again on The pickup at left was driven by Cody Weir of Sharon and the green car at right was driven by Timmori the driver’s side rear before coming to rest. Both Ferrell and a passenger, Erica Hamilton, 24, of Lubbock, Texas, Ferrell of Alva. The vehicles collided on College Boulevard near Tulip on Aug. 17. Ferrell and a passenwere taken to Share Medical Center by the Alva EMS. Weir and a pasger were injured. Photo by Lynn L. Martin senger, James Moore of Woodward, were not injured. The collision was investigated by Alva Police Officer Jade Cardenas.

Two people were injured in a wreck on College Boulevard on Aug. 17. Alva EMS and First Responders secure one of the injured people before transport to Share Medical Center. Photo by Lynn L. Martin


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Church Calendar By John Clapp Pastor, Baptist Bible Church Sin devastates our lives.  It tarnishes every part of our lives. It rips holes into our souls and hearts. It destroys relationships. Sin finally achieves its ultimate goal and we suffer death. We try to diminish our sins by denying that we have sin, dismissing God’s authority over our lives, and redefining what sin is. Try as we may, sin is still sin, and we face certain judgment because of it. We all stand guilty before God, “For all have sinned, and come short of the glory of God;” Romans3:23. Standing guilty before a Holy God, we need to find forgiveness. The Bible tells us that Christ came to pay the penalty of our sins through His death on Calvary: “But

God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.” (Romans 5:8) Through Christ we can find forgiveness. 1 John 1:9 tells us, “If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.” He is faithful, He will respond to our prayer of confession. No repentant sinner has ever found a deaf ear from God. He will forgive as He has promised through the way He provided through Christ. Isaiah 55:7 describes God’s forgiveness: “Let the wicked forsake his way, and the unrighteous man his thoughts: and let him return unto the LORD, and he will have mercy upon him; and to our God, for he will abundantly pardon.” Forgiveness is sweet. There is a wonderful peace to those who have found forgiveness in Christ. But the process is not quite finished yet. I John 1:9 continues with, “and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.” Cleansing is a little differ-

Alva Friends Church

ent than forgiveness. Forgiveness deals with our standing before God; cleansing deals with the condition of our lives. Sin’s damage in our lives needs a touch from a loving God. He not only wants to remove the guilt of sin, He wants to change our lives as well. When an alcoholic comes to Christ for forgiveness, he will be forgiven. Now God desires to cleanse his life by changing him and helping him to abandon alcohol for good. He can find the new life God offers. His relationships can be restored. His desires can be changed. He can be a new man entirely. If forgiveness is sweet, God’s cleansing ability is even sweeter. Come to Christ. Find forgiveness and experience the peace of God in your life. Present your broken life to Him and let Him cleanse your life. The new life is awesome. “Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new.” (2 Corinthians 5:17)

Area Church Directory

College & Center, Alva 327-2524

Alva Wesleyan Church Third & Church, Alva 327-2636

Barnes Street Church of Christ 1024 Barnes Street, Alva

Bible Baptist Church 402 Choctaw, Alva 327-1582 www.BBCalva.com

Capron United Methodist Church 580-829-4416

Cedar Grove Wesleyan Church

First Assembly of God

Our Mother of Mercy Catholic Church

First Baptist Church

Sacred Heart Catholic Church

Fifth & Maple, Alva 327-0894

210 S. Main, Waynoka

Twelfth & Church, Alva 327-0339

College & Church, Alva 327-2623 alvafbc@yahoo.com

St. Cornelius Catholic Church 404 S. Massachusetts, Cherokee

First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

Seventh Day Adventist Tenth & Church, Alva 327-4752

College & Maple, Alva 327-0194

Town & Country Christian Church

First Presbyterian Church

Ninth & Church, Alva 327-0811

Seventh & Church 327-3895

Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church

7 mi W on Hwy 64, 10 mi N, 2 mi W 430-9026

First United Methodist Church

Ninth & Center, Alva 327-2846

Freedom United Methodist Church

Church of God

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

1407 Thunderbird Rd., Alva 327-2993

Church of the Nazarene College & Locust, Alva 327-2566 www.alvanaz.org

College Hill Church of Christ 1102 College Blvd., Alva 327-0130 www.alvaok.net/collegehill

Community of Christ First & Church, Alva 327-0719

Dacoma Church of God 505 Broadway, Dacoma

Alva Church of God Sunday, September 1: Sunday school is at 9:30 a.m. and worship will begin at 10:30 a.m. Pastor Robert Brown will deliver the sermon. We will have Bible study at 6 p.m. Alva Friends Church Sunday, September 1: We would love for you and your family to join us as together we worship and serve the Lord. Sunday school for all ages will begin at 9:30 a.m. The worship hour begins at 10:30 a.m. Pastor Mark will lead the woship, share with the Little Friends and preach the message “Remember Who You Are” from Colossians 3:5. Bobbie Powers will lead the singing. Accompanists will be Sherry Williams playing the organ and Cindy Goss playing the piano. Alva Wesleyan Church Sunday, September 1: Sunday worship is at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., with Sunday school at 9:30 a.m. Evening Bible study is held

College & Church, Alva 327-2571

Third & Maple, Alva 327-0510 zlcalva@cneconnect.com

800 Eagle Pass, Freedom 580-621-3580

Campus Ministries

Park & Church, Alva 327-4210 (327-0817) www.freewebs.com/graceandfaith

1020 College, Alva - 580-371-5957 bsu1933nw@yahoo.com

Grace & Faith Fellowship

Baptist Student Union

Green Valley Free Methodist Church South of Alva on Hwy 45 580-871-2456

Hopeton Wesleyan Church

Chi Alpha Student Fellowship

(Upstairs at First Assembly of God) 904 Fifth, Alva - 327-0894

Church of Christ Bible Chair 1108 College, Alva - 327-4511

8 miles S of Alva on Hwy 281 580-435-2400 hwc@hopetonchurch.org

College & Barnes, Alva - 327-5433 extreme@hopetonchurch.org

1.6 miles E on Hwy 64, Alva

1027 Eighth, Alva - 327-2046 wesleyhousenwosu@yahoo.com

Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witness

The eXtreme

Wesley House

Marshall Funeral Home www.marshallfuneralhomes.com

PO Box 804 230 Flynn • Alva, OK 327-2311

1-800-656-2311

PO Box 178 1872 Cecil • Waynoka, OK 824-2311

at 6 p.m. Alva Wesleyan Church is on the corner of Third and Church streets, Alva, 580-327-2636. Wednesday, September 4: Awana for kids three years through eighth grade meets at 6 p.m. Youth – grades nine through 12 – also meet at 6 p.m. If you have any questions, call 580-327-2636. Avard Christian Church Sunday, September 1: Sunday school is at 10 a.m, Worship begins at 11 a.m. Avard Christian Church is 7 miles west of Alva on Highway 64 and 7 miles south on County Road 370, or 6 miles south on Highway 281 and 7 miles west on Garvin Rd. Avard Christian Church, Rt. 2 Box 92, Alva, OK 73717. Pastor Neal Gordon, 580-431- 2646; cell 580430-8464. Barnes Street Church of Christ Sunday, September 1: Sunday worship services will be at 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. (7 p.m. during daylight savings time). Wednesday, September 4: Evening services will be at 6 p.m. (7 p.m. during daylight savings time). Visitors are most welcome to attend the worship services. For more information, contact Landis Trekell (327-0865), Andrew Rhodes (327-3368), Brian Gaddy (327-5130) or Gray Fields (3276676). Bible Baptist Church All services will be held at Fourth and Choctow in the fellowship hall of our church building Saturday, August 31: Women’s Bible study will continue at 9:30 a.m. in the back of the fellowship hall. Sunday, September 1: Sunday school starts at 10 a.m. There are graded classes for children, a teen class, a college and career class and an adult class. Morning worship service will start at 11 a.m. Evening service will begin at 6 p.m. in the church fellowship hall. Teen Impact will also meet at this time and is open to all teens from sixth to 12th grade. Tuesday, September 3: Celebrate Recovery will meet in the church fellowship hall at 7 p.m. This is a Christ-based recovery program to help provide a safe place to discover a Savior who can give freedom from hang ups, hurts and habits. Everyone is invited to attend. Wednesday, September 4: Prayer meeting and Bible study will be at 7 p.m. in the church fellowship hall. Teen Impact will also meet at 7 p.m. for Bible study time. As always, transportation and nurseries are available for all services. We look forward to having you and your family visit us this Sunday! Capron United Methodist Church Sunday, September 1: If you don’t have a church home, we would love for you to worship with us. Service starts at 9:15 a.m. with singing and preaching of the Word. Pastor Clark’s sermon is entitled “Do We Want Victory?” based on 1 John 3:23. We will also partake of Holy Communion. For more information about our church, activities or if you have a need, please call 580-216-4787. Cedar Grove Wesleyan Church Sunday, September 1: Pastor Harold Henson and the entire Cedar Grove family desire to get to know you and your family when you join

See Calendar Page 11


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Calendar

our loving and caring congregation of all ages, as we discover the truths of Jesus Christ are love, grace, forgiveness, joy and fellowship through Sunday school at 10 a.m. and at 11 a.m. the morning worship. Church of the Nazarene Sunday, September 1: Experience AlvaNaz! Are you looking for a church to call home? We want to welcome you to our services as you experience God’s love with our church family! Pastor Gregg will be speaking this Sunday from Philippians 2:19-30: “But God Had Mercy.” Be our guest @ AlvaNaz! If you don’t have family here, come join ours. Need a ride? We can pick you up for breakfast, Bible study and/or morning worship. Please call 3272566 or 327-7751 to reserve your chariot today. Don’t be left behind. God wants you to spend eternity with him. We have a great time at AlvaNaz! Free continental breakfast @ 9 a.m. Bible study @ 9:30 a.m. and worship @ 10:45 a.m. (Continental breakfast begins in June.) Prayer for the week: Dear Lord, thank you for having mercy on us. We know that you are always with us both day and night. Your care and love sustains us at all ties. Amen. If you have a prayer request, please email it to WorshipGod@ AlvaNaz.org. We want to pray for you! AlvaNaz – A Church For All People – 728 College – 580-3272566 – www.AlvaNaz.org Email address: worshipgod@ alvanaz.org Email Pastor Gregg at pg@alvanaz.org. Find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ www.alvanaz.org. College Hill Church of Christ Sunday, September 1: Sunday Bible class for all ages begins at 9:30 a.m. and worship begins at 10:30 a.m. Following the weekly fellowship lunch, the afternoon service will begin at 12:45 p.m. Don’t miss a Sunday with our great Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ! Wednesday, September 4: Bible classes for adults, college age and children will be held at 7 p.m. From our family to yours, we sincerely invite you to worship God with us this coming Sunday. Be encouraged and lifted up as we sing songs of praise, lift up our prayers to God, observe the Lord’s Supper, and hear a portion of His eternal word. You will be sure to enjoy our “no visitor left behind” policy

which means that, as a visitor, you will be greeted and we would love the opportunity to get to know you more. Dacoma United Methodist Church Sunday, September 1: Fellowship coffee and donuts: 8:30 a.m. Worship service: 9 a.m. Wednesday, September 4: Bible study Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. Eagle Pass Baptist Church Sunday, September 1: At 9:40 a.m., join us for a friendly visit and have some coffee. 10 a.m. – Bible Explorers: getting you into the Bible and the Bible into you. Groups: Young Explorers ages 5-11, Young Teen Explorers ages 12-16 and Adult Explorers ages 17 and older. 11 a.m. – Praise and worship. 3 p.m. – Discipleship. When you walk in, you will be our guest, but you will walk out family! Meeting at the Senior Citizens Building, 941 Eagle Pass, Freedom. Contact Pastor Dale at 580-4309079. Jeans and children are welcome! First Assembly of God Sunday, September 1: Morning worship will be at 10:45 a.m. Evening worship will begin at 6 p.m. Wednesday, September 4: Adult Bible study, youth ministry for grades 6-12, and children’s activities at 7 p.m. At 9 p.m. will be Fuel (College and Young Adult Ministry). Nursery is available for all services except for Fuel. For more information please contact us at 580-327-0894. First Baptist Church Sunday, September 1: Prayer time starts at 9 a.m. Sunday school will begin at 9:30 a.m. and at 10:35 a.m. the worship service will begin. Sunday, September 8: Immediately following the morning worship time in Fellowship Hall will be a meeting of the Wednesday night cooks. Tonight at The Furnace at 7 p.m We will take part in the Lord’s Supper. Wednesday, September 11: Wednesday night study groups will begin tonight. Sign-up sheets are in the welcome center. TeamKID will also begin today. Sunday, September 15: Today is Friends and Family Day. We will only be having a worship gathering at 10 a.m.; no Sunday school will be held. Lunch and games for all ages will take place. Put it on your calendars. Monday, October 6, through

ACLU, Baptist minister seek removal of OKC monument By Kathleen Lourde A Baptist minister is the lead plaintiff of a recent lawsuit that seeks to remove the Ten Commandment monument from its position in front of the Oklahoma State Capitol. The lawsuit, filed by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), claims that the monument violates the constitution, which prohibits using government property to promote a particular religion. The bill to erect the six-foot monument was proposed by Rep. Mike Ritze, a Republican from Tulsa. The bill was approved by the Republican-led state legislature in 2009 and signed into law by Democratic Gov Brad Henry. Ritze and his family covered the cost of the $10,000 monument. “[T]he Ten Commandments are an important component of the foundation of the laws and legal system of the United States of America and of the State of Oklahoma,” states the bill authorizing the monument. “[T] he courts of the United States of America and of various states frequently cite the Ten Commandments in published decisions, and acknowledgements of the role played by the Ten Commandments in our nation’s heritage are common throughout America.” “When the government literally puts one faith on a pedestal, it sends a strong message to Oklahomans of other faiths that they are less than equal,” Ryan Kiesel, the executive director of ACLU of Oklahoma, told reporters.

Tuesday, October 8: We are starting a bi-annual conference called Foundations: The Doctrine of God that will look at the foundations of our faith. We will have Dr. Stan Norman, provost of OBU, leaading us. First Christian Church Sunday, September 1: At 9:30 a.m. will be Sunday school. At 10:30 a.m., morning worship will begin. Elders will meet. Wednesday, September 4: College fellowship dinner for all college students will be at 5 p.m. The young adult Bible study will be held at 6 p.m. (nursery provided). The children’s choir will rehearse at 6 p.m. First Presbyterian Church Sunday, September 1: Sunday school will be at 9:50 a.m. The adult class is studying “A Life of Meaning” by Kathleen Norris. Worship is at 11 a.m. The sermon by Rev. Dr. Judye Pistole is entitled “Entertaining Angels,” based on Hebrews 13:1-8. The Lord’s Supper will be celebrated. The worship leader will be Dr. Cynthia PfeiferHill. The ushers for the month of September will be Gregg Glass, Cindy and Phil Self, and Martha and John Evans. Tuesday, September 3: Free vegetables will be available at the church from the Green Hope Community Garden. Wednesday, September 4: Choir practice will be at 5:30 p.m. Our regular fellowship dinner will begin at 6:30 p.m. Delicious homemade food is free and the dinner is open to everyone. First United Methodist Church Sunday, September 1: Coem to church dressed casually and celebrate the work of our hands. Sunday school for infants through adults will begin at 9:30 a.m. Labor Day worship service will be at 10:30 a.m. Rev. Terry Martindale’s sermon, “Tending the New Creation: LOL (Living Out Loud!),” is from 2 Corinthians 6:113. The liturgist will be Steve Gale. September ushers will be Troy and Liz Smith, May Hamilton, Karleen White and Sheila Lehr. Nursing home services will be held at Beadles at 3 p.m. and Share at 3:45 p.m.

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Monday, September 2: Labor Day. Church office closed. Tuesday, September 3: United Methodist Women luncheon meeting hosted by Mary-Martha Circle will be at 11:30 a.. the program will be the annual Pledge Service. Wednesday, September 4: The Chancel Choir will rehearse at 5:30 p.m. Youth will meet at Corr Youth Center from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. The Leap Into Health weight loss support group led by Dr. Elizabeth Kinzie will meet in the Church Parlor at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, September 7: The Methodist Men breakfast meeting will be at 8 a.m. Hopeton Church Hopeton: a non-typical church! You don’t have to dress in a suit to be accepted; you can wear your jeans, get a cup of coffee, and enjoy contemporary music, great videos, and a relevant message. Hopeton Church meets at 10 a.m. at the main campus in Hopeton, just a few short miles south of Alva on 281. Coffee bar begins at 9:30 a.m. in the new children’s wing. A second service is held at the northern campus, The eXtreme, at the corner of College and Barnes Street in Downtown Alva, beginning at 1 p.m. The coffee bar opens at 12:30 p.m. We have something for every age: nursery, children, teens, adults, women’s support groups, and adult small H.O.M.E. groups for fellowship. 19390 County Road 440, PO Box 7, Hopeton, OK 73746. Phone: 580-435-2400, fax: 580-435-2401, email: hwc@hopetonchurch.org, Web site: www.hopetonchurch.org. eXtreme Youth Center All middle and high school students are invited to come to this fun place to hang out after school. Winter hours are Monday through Thursday from 3 p.m. To 5:30 p.m. The eXtreme is under the direction of Hopeton Church youth pastors Jeremy and Melissa Little. For more information, call 327-5433. Town and Country Christian Church Sunday, September 1: Sunday school for all ages will start at 9:30 a.m. The adult Sunday school lesson will be “God Creates,” from

Psalm 104:5-9, 24-30. The greeter will be Fayetta Accord. At 10:30 a.m. worship service will start. Cherie Lau will play the piano. Song leader will be Kim Foster. Serving communion will be Paul Cole and Justin Lau. Children’s Church will be held. Pastor Cole will bring the message “Thankful for Godly Leadership,” based on Psalm 72:1-20. Resthome services will be this afternoon: Beadles from 3 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. and Share fromm 3:45 p.m. to 4:15 p.m. Tuesday, September 3: Town and Country Saints will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, September 4: Youth group will meet from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Sunday, September 8: The fellowship meal will be today after the morning worship service. Zion Lutheran Church Rev. Aaron Wagner is the pastor of Zion Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod) at Third and Maple. Sunday School and Adult Bible Class meet at 9:15 a.m. Fellowship begins at 10 a.m. and Divine Worship starts at 10:30 a.m. with Holy Communion twice monthly. Youth Group meets monthly. Ladies circles include Ruth Circle at noon the first Monday, Mary Martha Guild is 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of the month, Lutheran Women’s Missionary League meets the first Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. Hand bells practice at 5 p.m. on Mondays Seasoned Saints meet at 1 p.m. on the third Tuesday. On Wednesdays, Confirmation Class (for grades 7 and 8) begins at 5 p.m. Weekday School (grades 3-6) meets at 3:30 p.m. Zion holds Wednesday Services during Advent and Lent at 7 p.m. There is a Fellowship Meal at 6 p.m. The Lutheran Early Care and Education Center (327-1318) offers care for children as young as six weeks old, as well as an after school program. For more information concerning Zion Lutheran Church call 327-0510 or e-mail zlcalva@ cneconnect.com.

Harvest

a harvest restriction of seven days. The biggest question for producers would be to know when the crop they want to harvest is at 30 percent moisture. The plant gives us several opportunities to know when this moisture level is obtained. The first one is the drying of the glumes that protect the seed and hold it in place. As those glumes mature they dry out and separate from the seed. That is an early indication that you are at 30 percent moisture or less. Another timing signal is when grain sorghum reaches “black layer.” As you remove a seed from the plant, look closely at the point

of attachment on the grain. If you see a black dot at that point of attachment, you are at the “black layer” stage of growth. This is a point where there is no more water being moved into the seed. At this point, the seed is simply at its dry-down stage and harvest will begin as soon as moisture levels in the grain will be accepted at your grain handling facility. Kansas state has done the most recent research on this topic. Jennings and Roozeboom indicated that this production technique did reduce harvested grain sorghum yields by roughly two percent

compared to the non-treated check treatment. The wheat yields behind the treated grain sorghum increased by 13 percent or five to six bushels per acre compared to the non-treated grain sorghum/wheat rotation. If a producer chooses to utilize this production technique, be prepared for harvest after that sevenday glyphosate treatment. This technique will damage the stalks of treated plants and the chance for lodging increases significantly. Contact the Woods County OSU Extension Center at 580327-2786 for more information.


August 30, 2013

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Chaparral Energy, L.L.C., 701 Cedar Lake Boulevard, Oklahoma City, OK (Published by the Alva Review-Courier 73114, Telephone No. 405/426-4509 on Friday, August 23 and 30 and and/or Gregory L. Mahaffey, Attorney, September 6, 2013.) 300 N.E. 1st Street, Oklahoma City, OK Anyone having legal or financial 73104-4004, Telephone: 405/236-0478. interest in a 1971 Volkswagen VIN# CORPORATION COMMISSION OF 1112015057 Call Regina 405-213-7928 OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice-Chairman LEGAL NOTICE DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner (Published by the Alva Review-Courier DONE AND PERFORMED ON on Friday, August 30, 2013.) AUGUST 26, 2013. BEFORE THE CORPORATION BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission OKLAHOMA Secretary APPLICANT: CHAPARRAL ENERGY, L.L.C. LEGAL NOTICE RELIEF REQUESTED: WELL (Published by the Alva Review-Courier LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION on Friday, August 16, 23 and 30, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF 6, TOWNSHIP 27 NORTH, RANGE WOODS COUNTY, STATE OF 16 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OKLAHOMA Creditors Recovery Corp. CAUSE CD NO. 201305220 Plaintiff, AMENDED NOTICE OF HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that v. Applicant in this cause is requesting that Aaron Miller Defendant. the Commission enter an order amending Case No. CS-12-0054 Order No. 196837, dated August 24, PUBLICATION NOTICE 1981, effective March 4, 1981, for the THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO Mississippi common source of supply, to permit a well for such common sources THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT You will take notice that you have of supply at the following location: SURFACE LOCATION: Will be been sued in the above named Court by specified in the order to issue in this the above Plaintiff, for an indebtedness on an open account. You must answer cause. LOCATION OF WELLBORE the petition filed by this Plaintiff in said AT COMPLETION INTERVAL: The court by September 30, 2013. If you fail proposed location of the end points of the to answer, the said petition will be taken completion interval will be no closer than as true and judgment will be granted 165 feet from the South line and no closer to the Plaintiff for the amount alleged than 560 feet from the West line and no in the principal amount of $760.34, closer than 165 feet from the North line prejudgment interest in addition to and no closer than 560 feet from the West interest from the date of Judgment as line of the unit comprising said Section specified per Okla. Stat. tit. 12, § 727, 6, Township 27 North, Range 16 West, court costs and a possible attorney fee. WITNESS my hand and the seal of Woods County, Oklahoma. Same to be a well for the unit said Court this 12th day of August, 2013. consisting of said Section 6, a 640-acre Malcom P. Hammond, (OBA# 3780) unit by said order which requires the well Attorney for the Plaintiff to be located not less than 1,320 feet from 10159 E 11th St, Suite 501 the unit boundary. The legal descriptions Tulsa, OK 74128 of the land sections adjacent to the area (918) 296-1650 within which the location exception Della Dunnigan, Court Clerk lies are Section 36, Township 28 North, Melina Briggs, Deputy Court Clerk Range 17 West, Sections 31 and 32, August 16, 2013, First Publication Township 28 North, Range 16 West, Sections 1 and 12, Township 27 North, LEGAL NOTICE Range 17 West, and Sections 5, 7 and 8, Township 27 North, Range 16 West, (Published by the Alva Review-Courier Woods County, Oklahoma. Applicant on Friday, August 30, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION further requests that Applicant or some other party be authorized the right to drill COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA said well. Applicant further requests that APPLICANT: SANDRIDGE it be permitted to produce said well at EXPLORATION AND said location from all common sources of PRODUCTION, LLC supply covered hereby with no downward RELIEF SOUGHT: EXCEPTION OR allowable adjustment. VARIANCE TO OCCGR 165:10-3NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN 28(C)(2)(B) that this cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Initial LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION Hearing Docket at the Corporation 23, TOWNSHIP 28 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, Commission Oklahoma City facility, Jim OKLAHOMA Thorpe Building, 2101 North Lincoln CAUSE CD NO. 201305735 Boulevard, Oklahoma City, OK 73105, NOTICE OF HEARING at 8:30 a.m., on September 16, 2013, and STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All that this notice be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. persons, owners, producers, operators, NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and Applicant and interested parties may all other interested persons, particularly present testimony by telephone. The cost in Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting that the Applicant in this Cause is its use. Interested parties who wish to requesting the Commission enter an participate by telephone shall contact order granting an exception or variance Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the terms, provision and restrictions to the hearing date, and provide their of OCCGR 165:10-3-28(C)(2)(B) for a proposed horizontal Mississippian well’s names and telephone numbers. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that completion interval to be located not all interested persons may appear and be closer than 375 feet from the VIP Ranch heard. For information concerning this 1-23 Well. IT IS ORDERED that this Cause action contact Bailey Benham, Landman, be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. IT IS ORDERED AND NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that this Cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Merits Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 17th day of September, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the Rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Luke Hayes, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Avenue, Oklahoma City,

LEGAL NOTICE

Alva Review-Courier

Page 12

NOC summer graduates announced

OK 73102-6406, (405) 429-6660 or CHARLES L. HELM, Attorney, 105 North Hudson, Suite 700, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 73102, (405) 232-9000. Please refer to Cause CD Number. DONE AND PERFORMED this 28th day of August, 2013. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner ATTEST: Amy Grimsley and Miranda NOC is ranked in the top ten PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Rebarchik of Alva were among percent of community colleges in Secretary

111 Northern Oklahoma College (NOC) graduates completing reLEGAL NOTICE quirements for their degrees at the (Published by the Alva Review-Courier close of the summer session. on Friday, August 30 and September 6, Grimsley graduated summa 2013.) cum laude with an associate in IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF applied science (AAS) degree. WOODS COUNTY STATE OF Summa cum laude (with very high OKLAHOMA IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE distinction) graduates maintained OF BETTY LEE GERBER PFLEIDER a grade-point average of 3.75 to PRIGMORE, 4.00. Deceased. Rebarchik graduated magna Case No. PB-20208-10\ AMENDED NOTICE OF HEARING cum laude, also with an AAS deFINAL ACCOUNT AND PETITION gree. Magna cum laude (with high FOR DETERMINATION OF distinction) graduates maintained a HEIRSHIP AND DISTRIBUTION grade-point average of 3.50 to 3.74.

Notice is hereby given that Nancy Lee Pfleider Horner and Monty Pfleider, Co-Personal Representatives of the estate of Betty Lee Gerber Pfleider Prigmore, deceased have filed in the above Court and cause their Final Account, Petition for Final Settlement, Determination of Heirship and Distribution, and that, the 20th day of September 2013, at 2:00 O’clock p.m. in the District Courtroom, Alva, Woods County, Oklahoma, has been fixed as the time and place for hearing thereof, when any person interested in said estate may appear and contest the same as provided by law. Done this 23rd day of August, 2013. Mickey J. Hadwiger JUDGE OF THE DISTRICT COURT Nancy L. Prigmore, OBA #11156 P.O. Box 491 Alva, Oklahoma 73717 (580) 27-2071 Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, August 23 and 30, 2013.) NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO USE GROUNDWATER Richard C. & Phyllis J. Brown c/o James R. Barnett, 201 Robert S. Kerr Ave., Suite 700, Oklahoma City, OK 73102 have filed an application, #2013592, with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board (Board) for a permit to use 320 acre-feet of groundwater per year. The groundwater is proposed to be used for irrigation and taken from 160 acres located in the NE of Section 26, T28N, R13WIM, Woods County. The water is to be withdrawn from one well located in same Section 26, and used in Woods County, Oklahoma, as more specifically described in the application. Use of groundwater is governed by Sections 1020.1 and following of Title 82 of the Oklahoma Statutes and rules of the Board, Oklahoma Administrative Code (OAC), Title 785, Chapter 30. Protests to the application must be in writing and received by the Board at the address listed below and by the applicant at the address listed above no later than September 16, 2013, and contain the following: (1) name, address, and telephone number of the interested person; (2) the particular application number to which the protest relates; (3) specific information to show how approval of the application proposed may directly and adversely affect legally protected interests of the person filing the protest; and (4) a statement of the relief sought by the interested person. A person who sends a letter containing only a general objection or comment will not be deemed to be a party, but the letter will be made part of the permanent record. If a protest that meets the requirements listed in the paragraph above is filed with both the applicant and Board, a hearing on this application will be scheduled and the applicant and protestant(s) will be advised of the hearing date. Protestants or their representatives must appear at the hearing and present the protest to be considered. Hearings are governed by Section 309 of Title 75 and Section 1020.8 of Title 82 of the Oklahoma Statutes, and the rules of Board, OAC Title 785, chapters 4 and 30. If you have any questions, please contact Mary Nell Brueggen at (405) 530-8800. Board mailing address: Oklahoma Water Resources Board, Planning & Management Division, 3800 N. Classen Blvd., Oklahoma City, OK 73118-2881. Board fax number: (405) 530-8900.

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, August 30 and September 6, 2013.) In the Matter of the Guardianship of, SUMMER DAWN BECK and, KRYSTAL LASHAY McCOLLUM, minor children. PG-2013AMENDED NOTICE OF PUBLICATION TO; Tom Beck PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the following pleadings have been filed in the above captioned and numbered cause of action in the District Court of Woods County, State of Oklahoma: Petitioner’s PETITION FOR APPOINTMENT OF GUARDIANSHIP. The nature of these Petitions against you is for PETITION FOR APPOINTMENT OF GUARDIANSHIP OF A MINOR CHILD NAMED Summer Dawn Beck. Unless you respond to these Petitions on or before the 20th of September, 2013, judgment may be entered against you for the relief sought by the Petitioner. Denis Cote, OBA# 30366 42142 Harper RD. Alva, Oklahoma 73717 (580) 327-1753 telephone (580) 327-6965 facsimile Attorney for Petitioner William Hawkins

the United States by the Aspen Institute based in Washington, D.C. The accredited public two-year liberal arts college offers more than 70 associate degrees in arts, science and applied science. Articulation agreements with universities allow Northern’s associate degrees in arts and in science to transfer to all state four-year institutions. Students can enroll in and attend classes in Tonkawa, Enid or Stillwater through the NOC/OSU Gateway program. For more information, visit the college website at www. noc.edu.

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, August 30 and September 6, 2013.) In the Matter of the Guardianship of, SUMMER DAWN BECK and, KRYSTAL LASHAY McCOLLUM, minor children. Case No. PG-2013-3 AMENDED NOTICE OF PUBLICATION TO; Ron McCollum PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the following pleadings have been filed in the above captioned and numbered cause of action in the District Court of Woods County, State of Oklahoma: Petitioner’s PETITION FOR APPOINTMENT OF GUARDIANSHIP. The nature of these Petitions against you is for PETITION FOR APPOINTMENT OF GUARDIANSHIP OF A MINOR CHILD NAMED Krystal Lashay McCollum. Unless you respond to these Petitions on or before the 20th of September, 2013, judgment May be entered against you for the relief sought by the Petitioner. Denis Cote, OBA# 30366 42142 Harper RD. Alva, Oklahoma 73717 (580) 327-1753 telephone (580) 327-6965 facsimile Attorney for Petitioner William Hawkins

LEGAL NOTICE July 02, 2013 Unless otherwise noted in the proposal, all bids must be submitted over the Internet via Bid Express. When written bids are allowed, sealed proposals sent by registered mail will be received through the ODOT Office Engineer Division until 30 minutes prior to the scheduled bid opening. From 30 minutes prior to the bid opening until the time of the bid opening, bid proposals must be turned in directly to the ODOT Commission Room located on the east side of the lobby. The scheduled bid opening is 10:30 A.M., September 19, 2013 for the work listed below. No Proposal for construction or maintenance work of the department will be issued to any contractor after 10:30 A.M. on the working day preceding opening of bids for any contract. Each bid shall be accompanied by a Certified or Cashier’s Check or Bid Bond equal to 5% of the bid made payable to the State of Oklahoma, Department of Transportation, as a proposal guaranty. Proposal checks will be held or returned by the Department as per Section 103.04 of the State Standard Specifications. The minimum wage to be paid laborers and mechanics employed on this project shall be included in the proposal. Bids must be prepared as directed by the State Standard Specifications. Plans, proposals, and specifications may be examined in the plan room or in the Office Engineer Division at the Oklahoma Department of Transportation central office in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. This work will be done under the Oklahoma Department of Transportation applicable specifications for highway construction as depicted on the lower left corner of the plan’s title sheet. Plans and proposal forms may be ordered from the Office Engineer Division, Oklahoma Department of Transportation Building, 200 N.E. 21st Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73105. Cost of Bidding Documents is $50.00 + tax for each Bidding Proposal. State Standard Specifications may be purchased for $55.00 + tax. (Oklahoma tax is 8.375%). Plans (Reduced Size Complete) $10.84, X-SEC $0.00 + postage/handling. Make checks payable to Oklahoma Department of Transportation. No refunds will be made for bidding documents or Specification books purchased. Unless otherwise noted in the proposal, upon award of the contract to the successful bidder, the contract will be completely and correctly executed by the contractor and returned to the Department within ten (10) working days from the date of award. The Department will have fourteen (14) working days from the date of award to complete it’s execution of the contract. The Oklahoma Department of Transportation (ODOT) ensures that no person or groups of persons shall, on the grounds of race, color, sex, age, national origin, disability/handicap, or in income status, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be otherwise subjected to discrimination under any and all programs, services, or activities administered by ODOT, it’s recipients, sub-recipients, and contractors Description of work and location of project: Job Piece No. STPY-276C(007)3B US-283/SH-13 WOODS/ELLIS 3028404 JOINT SEAL/REPAIR US-283/SH-13: AT MULTIPLE LOCATIONS IN DIVISION VI. STATE OF OKLAHOMA, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION By: Mike Patterson, Director.

ALVA REVIEW 2 col, 24p


August 30, 2013

CAXCA

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Action Ads For Your Const Needs

From A-Z, New Construction, Roofing, Additions, Remodeling, Siding, Windows, Int/Ext, Painting, All Work Guaranteed. Improve the value of your home. Call 580-7321028

Help Wanted

Depot Bar & Grill. Bartender. PickUp application at 3 N college. 580327-7011

Help Wanted

Elston Enterprises LLC in Waynoka, OK. is looking for CDL Drivers. CC Construction For more information contact Elston Interior-Exterior improvements. Enterprises office at 580-824-0400. Room additions. Plaster Repair & Apply within Painting. Handicap. Structural & Membership Dues Non Structural Concrete. Will also Thursday Sept 5, 4-6pm. Join accommodate Farm & Ranch. 580Nescatunga Arts Council, ($10 307-4598 or 620-825-4285 single, $15 couple). Art work by Need New Sidewalks? artist Beau Hague of Woodward will Driveway perhaps, we do all types be on display. We Want You! of concrete work. Stamp and Colors For Rent also avail. Give us a call for estimates. Nice 3bdr, 2bth House. Water & 580-732-1028 Trash paid. $1250/Month. Call 580Crooked Oak B & B 732-0014 580-327-3653. alvacrookedoak.com

Part-Time Help Needed with Hunting Property. Must have 4WD pickup, 10 to 20hrs/month during season. Please fax response to 772-221-8502 or email contact info to westcodev@comcast.net Champs

Home for Sale in Alva

Alva Review-Courier

Community Calendar Friday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 7 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets every Friday at the Senior Citizen Center, 122 1/2 E. Second, Cherokee. Saturday 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. Sunday 2-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030.

1016 2nd Street. 2000sqft, 3bdrm/2bth, 1/2 basement, geothermal H & A, huge master suite with huge walk in closet, large deck, double lot, privacy fence back yard, 25 x 50 metal bldg. $198,500. Call purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and 580-748-1915 for more info or to all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, and all schedule a tour!

Sports and Spirits is seeking quality kitchen help! Please apply within New Metal Homes at 1705 College Avenue. No Phone Starting at $72/sqft. (On your land) Calls Please! Call for more details 580-977-6642

Tutors $15-$17/Hour

Club Z! In home Tutoring Services is actively recruiting p/t tutors for the 2013-14 school year. We are looking for highly qualified tutors who have a 4-year degree or are nearing completion of a 4-year degree. Certified teachers are a plus! Email jschroeder@clubztutoring.com or call 580-327-6929

parties listed as respondents on Exhibit “A”, attached to the Application on file herein, and more particularly: HEIRS OF EARL W. CORN; JOHN P. RYAN, JR. AND LEE A. MCCONNEL, SUCCESSOR CO-TRUSTEES OF JOHN’S TRUST; JOHN P. RYAN, LEGAL NOTICE JR. AND LEE A. MCCONNEL, (Published by the Alva Review-Courier SUCCESSOR CO-TRUSTEES OF THE on Friday, August 30, 2013.) JOHN PAUL RYAN REVOCABLE BEFORE THE CORPORATION TRUST & EDUCATIONAL TRUST; COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF THE THOMAS M., HELEN MCKEE & OKLAHOMA JOHN P. RYAN FOUNDATION, INC.; APPLICANT: SANDRIDGE L.N. RYAN; ESTATE OF THOMAS EXPLORATION AND J. MCCREEDY, JR.; and ESTATE OF PRODUCTION, LLC MARY LUCILLE MCCREEDY, if RELIEF SOUGHT: INCREASED living, or if deceased, the known and DENSITY unknown heirs, devisees, executors, LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION administrators, successors, trustees and/ 23, TOWNSHIP 28 NORTH, RANGE or assigns, immediate and remote, of the 16 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, above named parties. OKLAHOMA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that CAUSE CD NO. 201305640 the Applicant in this Cause is requesting NOTICE OF HEARING an exception to Order No. 100039 to STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All allow three (3) Increased Density Wells persons, owners, producers, operators, to be drilled and produced from the Mississippi common source of supply on the drilling and spacing unit described

MURROW

REAL ESTATE & AUCTION

580-327-1998

www.murrowlandandhome.com www.murrowrealestateandauction.com

EdwardJones The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up 16.44 to CLOSE at 14,840.95. The NASDAQ Composite Index was up 26.95 to CLOSE at 3620.30. The Transportation Average was up 16.36 to CLOSE at 6322.14 and Utilities CLOSED dn 3.04 at 477.83. Volume was approx 507 million shares. Gold fell $10.65 to $1,406.87, and Silver CLOSED at $23.87, dn 49¢. Crude oil prices fell $2.20 to $107.90 per barrel. Wheat Price was $6.77, dn 5¢. Prime Rate is 3.25%

Stocks of Local Interest — Courtesy Pat Harkin

Name Close Change Volume OGE Energy 35.63 -0.23 345,425 ONEOK Inc 52.09 +0.21 870,819 Duke Energy 65.66 -0.39 1,601,220 WilliamsCo 36.23 +0.02 2,421,971 Chesapeake Energy 25.95 -0.39 9,601,121 Wal-Mart 72.43 +0.05 3,972,800 ConocoPhillips 66.19 -0.58 4,285,854 SandRidge Energy 5.17 -0.03 5,101,719 3.54% 30 Yr. U.S. Treasury Bond Insured AAA Tax Free Muni. Bond 0.33-4.85% Yield to Maturity 5 Year C/D, Annual Pct Yield 2.05% Money Market - 7 Day Avg Rate 0.01%

Stock Market Report — for August 29, 2013

Page 13 in the caption, and to designate the Applicant or some other party as operator of the additional wells. IT IS ORDERED that this Cause be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. IT IS ORDERED AND NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that this Cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Merits Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 17th day of September, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the Rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Luke Hayes, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73102-6406, (405) 429-6660 or CHARLES L. HELM, Attorney, 105 North Hudson, Suite 700, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 73102, (405) 232-9000. Please refer to Cause CD Number. DONE AND PERFORMED this 23rd day of August, 2013. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner ATTEST: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, August 30, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: SANDRIDGE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION, LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP 28 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA CAUSE CD NO. 201305641 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Applicant in this Cause is requesting that this Commission grant a well location for a well to be drilled and produced from the Mississippi common source of supply underlying Section 23, Township 28 North, Range 16 West, Woods County, Oklahoma, at a location as follows: Completion Interval: To be located within the subsurface location tolerance area as set forth below: Not closer than 200 feet from the North line and not closer than 200 feet from the South line and not closer than 500 feet from the East line of Section 23, Township 28 North, Range 16 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. as exception to Order No. 100039. A request will be made to designate the Applicant or some other party as the operator of the proposed well. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the drilling and spacing unit described in the caption hereof underlies Section 23, Township 28 North, Range 16 West, and the sections adjacent are Sections 13, 14, 15, 22, 24, 25, 26 and 27, Township 28 North, Range 16 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. IT IS ORDERED that this Cause be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. IT IS ORDERED AND NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that this Cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Merits Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 17th day of September, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the Rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact the

Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Luke Hayes, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73102-6406, (405) 429-6660 or CHARLES L. HELM, Attorney, 105 North Hudson, Suite 700, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 73102, (405) 232-9000. Please refer to Cause CD Number. DONE AND PERFORMED this 23rd day of August, 2013. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner ATTEST: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, August 30, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANT: SANDRIDGE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION, LLC RELIEF SOUGHT: LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 23, TOWNSHIP 28 NORTH, RANGE 16 WEST, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA CAUSE CD NO. 201305642 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Applicant in this Cause is requesting that this Commission grant a well location for a well to be drilled and produced from the Mississippi common source of supply underlying Section 23, Township 28 North, Range 16 West, Woods County, Oklahoma, at a location as follows: Completion Interval: To be located within the subsurface location tolerance area as set forth below: Not closer than 200 feet from the North line and not closer than 200 feet from the South line and not closer than 560 feet from the West line of Section 23, Township 28 North, Range 16 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. as exception to Order No. 100039. A request will be made to designate the Applicant or some other party as the operator of the proposed well. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the drilling and spacing unit described in the caption hereof underlies Section 23, Township 28 North, Range 16 West, and the sections adjacent are Sections 13, 14, 15, 22, 24, 25, 26 and 27, Township 28 North, Range 16 West, Woods County, Oklahoma. IT IS ORDERED that this Cause be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Commission. IT IS ORDERED AND NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that this Cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Merits Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 17th day of September, 2013, and that this notice be published as required by law and the Rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicant and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. Interested parties who wish to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicant or Applicant’s attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide their name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Luke Hayes, SandRidge Exploration and Production, LLC, 123 Robert S. Kerr Avenue, Oklahoma City, OK 73102-6406, (405) 429-6660 or CHARLES L. HELM, Attorney, 105 North Hudson, Suite 700, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, 73102, (405) 232-9000. Please refer to Cause CD Number. DONE AND PERFORMED this 23rd day of August, 2013. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner ATTEST: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary


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Pat White Realty welcomes new sales associate

Cowboy poet Baxter Black entertains folks at the Northwestern Foundation’s annual donor dinner

Northwestern Foundation hosted annual donor dinner The Northwestern Oklahoma State University Foundation, Inc., held its invitation-only donor appreciation dinner featuring Baxter Black, cowboy poet, on Aug. 22 in the Student Center Ballroom at 6:30 p.m. The dinner is held by the foundation to say “thank you” to all donors for investing in Northwestern and its students during the past year. This year, donors were treated to a western-style dinner and a humorous presentation by Western Horseman writer, Baxter Black. A photo booth was also available for guests to capture the moment, with several different Rangers and western props. For over 25 years Baxter Black has traveled the United States and Canada scattering his wit and lefthanded observations. He has sold over one million books and audios and writes a weekly column, along with writing for weekly radio and

By Leslie Nation A two-car collision occurred on Eighth Street near the Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU) campus on Wednesday at 11:15 a.m. K9 officer Patrick Hawley, the investigating officer of the accident, reported that Janelle Przybylski, 22, and Mattie Butler, 21,

television programs. Black has been on National Public Radio, public television, Johnny Carson’s Tonight Show, Random House and USA Today. Black says his life has been blessed and he enjoys what he does. He resides in Benson, Ariz., and can be reached through his website www.baxterblack.com. Northwestern student Patrick Driskill also spoke at the dinner. Originally from Pauls Valley, Driskill is a senior pursuing a bachelors of science degree in agriculture education. He plans to graduate in the spring of 2014. Driskill is the president of the Aggie Club and also serves in the Student Government Association. For more information, contact Susan J. Holliday, Northwestern Foundation relationship manager, at sjholliday@nwosu.edu or 580-3278592.

were the two drivers in the accident. Butler was driving a 2011 red Ford and was pulling out of a private drive on the west side of Eighth Street near Shockley Hall of the Northwestern campus. Butler said that she was unable to see Przybylski – driving a 1999 red Mazda – traveling southbound on

By Alex Cole Alva real estate broker Pat White of Pat White Realty is happy to welcome Cris Campbell as the new real estate sales associate. Campbell recently moved back to Alva with his wife, Lydia, and two children who are currently enrolled at Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU). He said he moved back to his home town to be closer to family. Campbell is a graduate of NWOSU and has a master’s degree from Oklahoma State University (OSU). He worked in the Tulsa metropolitan area for 18 years and then worked with OSU as the site manager for several multi-county grant programs designed to reduce substance abuse and addiction. During this time, he presented instructional workshops at local, state and national level conferences and was named Oklahoma’s Preventionist of the Year in 2004. He was recognized by former First Lady Laura Bush’s Helping America’s Youth program in 2008, and the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services commemorated him this past spring for his contributions Real estate broker Pat White of Pat White Realty has welcomed Cris to the field of prevention. Campbell brings a wealth of Campbell as the newest real estate sales associate. Photo by Alex Cole experience in working with families and community groups to create fulfilling lives and is excited to bring that passion to the table at Pat White Realty. Campbell said he chose to work in the real estate field because his father was a broker for 40 years, and it grew on him. He hopes to increase listings and sales while at Pat White Realty and is looking forward to moving families into their homes. Pat White Realty has been working in real estate since 1980 and can be found on the Square at 519 ½ Barnes. People interested in buying or selling property can visit Pat White or Cris Campbell to review their options.

Eighth Street due to the parked vehicles on the street blocking her view. Butler proceeded to pull out of the private drive turning right to head south, and Przybylski’s vehicle struck the left front fender and driver’s side door. Both drivers complained about neck pains, but refused medical treatment from Alva EMS.

A two-car collision occurred between a red Mazda and Ford near Shockley Hall of Northwester Oklahoma State campus. Photo by Leslie Nation

Northwest Technology Center’s practical nursing faculty are preparing for the first group of practical nursing students who will begin their program in early November. Testing must be completed by Aug. 30 and final application packets are due by Sept. 15. Please call 580-327-0344 for more information. Pictured are (left to right) Alicia Smith, Tara Thomas, Brooke Meyer, Debra Button and Diane Duffy. Thomas and Duffy are instructors for the practical nursing program. Button, Smith and Meyer do a variety of training for area healthcare facilities.


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