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Alva Review-Courier Vol. 121 No. 45

Friday, June 14, 2013 - $1.00

www.alvareviewcourier.com

620 Choctaw, Alva, OK 73717

Charles Nieman fatally shot Page 2 Woods County senior 4-H team wins Northwest District Food Showdown Contest Page 2 Alva Cemetery Board meets Page 3

Railroad crossing on West Edge of Carmen, Oklahoma Photo by Lynn L. Martin


June 14, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Charles Nieman fatally shot Suspect sought in Boise City convenience store shooting

Boise City – Retired Alva plumber Charles Nieman, 77, was fatally shot outside a Boise City convenience store Wednesday afternoon. His wife, Yvonne, 71, was with him but was not injured. The couple was traveling in an RV when they stopped at the Loaf ‘N Jug convenience store for gas. A Hispanic male approached Nieman and demanded his wallet. When Wheat harvest has begun in Woods County. Combines and trucks filled the parking lot of VAP and G&G he did not comply, the suspect fired his weapon. Nieman was taken to a Furniture in Alva on Tuesday. Local harvesting is expected to be in full swing next week, provided the hospital where he later died. weather cooperates. Photo by Marione Martin Law enforcement agencies are on the lookout for a short Hispanic male wearing khaki shorts and a blue shirt. He was seen in a late 90s model GM pickup blue or dark in color. The Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation and the Cimarron County Sheriff’s Office are investigating the shooting. By Marione Martin on Wednesday. Hopeton elevator “Harvest is just beginning,” said Wheat trucks are being seen on had one load but other locations av- Truelock. “It will probably be able their way to county grain elevators, eraged about a dozen loads. Avard to get going real good next week and harvest crews are starting to received none on Wednesday. barring any weather problems.” arrive. After recent frequent rains, Although one field tested really With combines, wheat trucks harvesters are beginning to take light, Truelock said others are aver- and other equipment adding to advantage of this week’s hot dry aging around 58 bushels an acre. the traffic on the roads, motorists weather. “Moisture is plenty dry,” he said should exercise extra caution. Re“Nearly all of our locations took with readings of nine to 12. None member to yield the right of way a little grain yesterday (Wednes- have been over 15. to combines and other agricultural By Lynn L. Martin day),” said Ronnie Truelock, manThere is still some green in the equipment. It’s much easier to back The Woods County Commissioners accepted a bid from Kirby-Smith ager of the Farmers Co-op in Alva. wheat fields. He said some of the up a car than a combine when a for a Komatsu D65-17 dozer with trade-in at their Monday meeting. He said all but one of their locations farmers expect harvest to be a week bridge is too narrow for both to neThe price was $189,884 with a five-year/5,000 hour buy-back warranty. accepted one or more loads of wheat away yet. gotiate. This purchase is financed by BancCentral for 2.45 percent interest with a monthly payment of $3,365.75. The purchase was for District 1. The agenda item to open and organize the six-month bids was tabled until the next meeting. Only one bid was received for pest control services. The two commissioners, Randy McMurphy and Clint Strawn, approved the price of $167 per month submitted by Dan’s Pest Control. Mike Goucher was absent. Repeating a move from last year, the commissioners voted to give incremental longevity raises to all full-time employees. Those having The Oklahoma 4-H Food been employed from one to nine years will receive a 1 percent raise of Showdown Contest is modeled their base salary. Those falling in the range of 10-15 years of service will after such competitions as the receive a 2 percent raise; those employees with 16 or more years service Food Network’s “Iron Chef” or will see a 3 percent raise. “Chopped” TV shows, and it chalThe commissioners approved a raise from $52,000 to $53,112.50 for lenges teams of 4-H members to all county officers using a formula provided by the state. create a dish from only a clue, A bid was let for printing election ballots. The election board recom- with predetermined ingredients, mended the higher of two bids because of excellent past performance. from a common pantry. From A .17 per ballot bid was awarded to Royal Printing Co., Inc. A bid by these ingredients, team members Midwest Printing of Sapulpa was .16 per ballot. must use their food and nutrition Road crossing permits were issued to the following: knowledge, creativity and leader1 15-27-13  BlueRidge    water $1,375.00 ship skills to prepare a dish and 1 4-28-14  Chesapeake Energy    water $   500.00 put together a two-minute presentation for judges. The presentation 1 35-29-15  Chesapeake Energy    water $   500.00 includes information about the 1 3-28-14  BlueRidge    water $   875.00 serving size, nutritional value and 1 9-28-14  Sandridge    water $   500.00 cost of one serving of the dish. The 1 9-28-14  Crescent Services    water $   250.00 4-H Food Showdown allows 4-H 1 8-28-14  Rodco Services    water $   250.00 members to demonstrate their cu1 7-28-15  C & W Construction    water $   750.00 linary and kitchen safety skills to Karen Armbruster, Woods County extension educator, and Senior 1 33-27-13  C & W Construction    water $   250.00 4-H team members Courtney Mapes and Traci Owen. judges and observers. 1 3-26-13  C & W Construction    water $   875.00 The Northwest District 4-H 2 16-27-16  Howard Drilling    water $   500.00 Food Showdown Contest was held ka 4-H Club, competed and won six other teams and won champion 2 5-28-16  Howard Drilling    water $   250.00 on May 24 at the Dewey County champion honors out of seven honors and will now compete on Fairgrounds where the Woods other teams. The senior team, con- the state level at the 92nd State 4-H County junior team, consisting of sisting of Traci Owen and Court- Round-Up, held on the Oklahoma Austin Rankin, Tyson Rose and ney Mapes representing the Alva State Universty campus July 24Payton Delano from the Wayno- 4-H Club, also competed against 26.

Area wheat harvest begins

Commissioners purchase big dozer

Woods County senior 4-H team wins Northwest District Food Showdown Contest

Mosburg appointed dean of student affairs and enrollment management Northwestern Oklahoma State University today announced that Calleb Mosburg has been appointed dean of student affairs and enrollment management. Mosburg will begin his duties July 1. Mosburg will replace Brad Franz, who will resign as the school’s chief student affairs officer on June 30. “We were fortunate that we had a number of internal candidates who were qualified for the position,” said Dr. Janet Cunningham, university president. “Mr. Mosburg offered experience and a successful record in a number of areas that are critical to serving students. I’m confident in his ability to lead the student services team and build upon our success in this important area.” Mosburg joined the student ser-

vices team in 2008 as retention coordinator and then moved to assistant director of recruitment. In January of 2010, Mosburg was named to his current position as director of financial aid and scholarships. “I appreciate the confidence that President Cunningham and other members of the executive team have placed in me to lead the outstanding people in our student services area,” Mosburg said. “I know what Northwestern was able to do for me, and I want more students to be able share in that experience. Northwestern is a great place and I’m proud to call myself an alumnus.” Mosburg played a key role in developing and implementing strategies that have led to near-record enrollment numbers. A native of Beaver, Mosburg

earned a bachelor’s degree in business and marketing from Northwestern in 2007 and later completed a master’s degree in education.

Calleb Mosburg


June 14, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Obituaries CHARLES NIEMAN neral Home of Waynoka, LLC. Funeral services for Charles Ava Zook, daughter of the late Nieman, 77, are pending with Mar- Estel S. and Cecie Maxine (Mcshall Funeral Home of Alva. Cray) Haltom, was born Jan. 25, 1935, and passed away June 12, AVA ZOOK 2013, at her home in Waynoka. Funeral services for Ava Zook She married Richard Allen will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, June Zook in November of 1987. 15, at the Waynoka First Baptist Ava is survived by one son, two Church with Rev. Marion Hadsell daughters and one sister. officiating. Interment will be at Remembrances may be shared the Waynoka Municipal Cemetery with the family at www.marshallunder the direction of Marshall Fu- funeralhomes.com.

Alva Cemetery Board meets By Alex Cole Board members of the Alva Municipal Cemetery held a regular meeting Wednesday morning. After approval of the last meeting’s minutes, Business Manager Joe Don Dunham presented the financial report. Dunham reported that the cemetery has collected $50,866 and expended $49,359 to date. The cemetery has been without a sexton for more than a month, resulting in a minimal amount of expenditures. Dunham expects the budget for next year to be approved at the city council meeting on Monday. He anticipates an amount of $68,667 for expenditures, and $8,067 will be transferred from the general fund. “We’re relying on the general fund to pick up the deficit in expenditures,” he said. Based on the history of the cemetery, Dunham estimates a cost of $53,000 in personnel expenditures, $14,000 for materials and supplies, and $1,000 for other services and charges. Dunham also spoke about the condition of the cemetery grounds, which is a source of concern for many people. Due to understaffing, he relies on inmate workers to keep the grounds. “Here in recent days, we’ve had some difficulties getting all of our inmates … if they get put on lock down, I might not get a full crew of inmates,” he said. The city has recently hired another inmate supervisor and will be adding more inmate crews once they are available. Dunham told the board members he has interviewed two people for the sexton position. One in-

terviewee turned down the job and the other failed to appear for the interview. Mayor Arden Chaffee gave a few examples of why it is a difficult job being a sexton. They must know grave locations and the layout of the cemetery and they will have to be able to interact with unhappy or emotional people. “Sometimes you’ll get yelled at, and they don’t mean to treat you that way, but they’re under a lot of stress,” said Chaffee. It would also be useful for the sexton to have the ability to operate heavy equipment. Another item approved by the board was the decision to purchase a sign that directs patrons to the City of Alva’s website and the library to access grave locations. The sign will be installed outside the cemetery office building. The board also approved a bid from Micky Ferrell for $8,000 to lease the 160 acres of cemetery farm grounds in Alfalfa County. This bid is an increase compared to last year and will go to the cemetery’s general operating fund. The lease if for two years with the option to add a third year. Mayor Chaffee presented the board members with a drawing that showed how the pavilion will look once the rock walls and cement driveway have been added to it. The board had no objections to the presentation. Chaffee said the city inspector has specifications for the driveway and suggested the board go out for bids to get it constructed. The last item approved was a request by Debra Sue Wilson to place a bench on Block C Lot 19.

Woods County Forecast Friday Sunny and hot, with a high near 99. South wind 7 to 12 mph increasing to 16 to 21 mph in the afternoon. Winds could gust as high as 29 mph. Friday Night Mostly clear, with a low around 73. South wind 16 to 21 mph decreasing to 7 to 12 mph after midnight. Winds could gust as high as 29 mph. Saturday A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly after 1pm. Mostly sunny, with a high near 92. South southwest wind 6 to 11 mph increasing to 13 to 18 mph in the afternoon. Winds could gust as high as 25 mph. Saturday Night A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 71. South wind 11 to 16 mph decreasing to 5 to 10 mph after midnight. Winds could gust as high as 23 mph. Sunday A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms.

Partly sunny, with a high near 96. Sunday Night Showers and thunderstorms likely. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 70. Chance of precipitation is 60%. Monday A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 91. Monday Night A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 71. Tuesday A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 89. Tuesday Night A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 70. Wednesday A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly sunny, with a high near 93. Wednesday Night Partly cloudy, with a low around 71. Thursday Mostly sunny, with a high near 95.

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Airport Commission talks Oshkosh, advertising and maintenance issues By Lynn L. Martin The Alva Regional Airport Commission met without its chairman, Bob Baker, at June’s meeting. Vice Chairman Terry Turner ran the meeting. One of the first items on the agenda was to elect a secretary. The position has been vacant since Mary Strickland resigned from the board. Member Paul Kinzie wondered why, since this was the last meeting of the year, an overall election of officers was not on the agenda or the annual evaluation of the manager. The group eventually tabled the agenda item of an election of a secretary. Manager Greg Murray reported that K & K Body Works had picked up the old courtesy car. The firm is to replace the headliner and paint the vehicle. Murray said Stan Kline thought the work could be done by the end of the month. For several months, the airport authority has been talking about a need for carports for the courtesy cars and the fuel trucks. The manager said he gave oral specifications to 66 Construction and Erikson Steel. 66 Construction called with a quote of $32,980. Erikson has not responded with a quote because of being very busy. Some discussion occurred as to whether a rectangular steel specification could be met. If that is specified, 66 Construction doesn’t do that type because it would require an engineering firm to design the carport. Kinzie asked if Murray had supplied written specifications to the potential bidders. He said, “No. I just told them what had been said at the board meetings.” Kinzie suggested that written specifications be developed. Mayor Arden Chaffee in attendance suggested they go a step further and have bid specifications prepared by the city and go through a proper bidding process. He felt that would take some pressure off of Manager Greg Murray having to always bring informal quotes to the board and having them questioned for inconsistencies. The board has expressed concern about birds taking up residence in the proposed carport buildings. Kinzie told Erikson that he would advise putting in standard sheeting as ceiling material so the birds can’t build nests in the crevices of the steel joints. Oshkosh At the May meeting, the airport board agreed that the man-

ager could travel to the Oshkosh air show to help operate a booth that Alva shares with other communities. Alex Mantz told Murray she would like him to be present the first part of the week at least through Wednesday. She will arrive on Thursday. So Murray will have to fly up on Sunday the 28th and return on Wednesday or Thursday. Murray has not yet purchased an airline ticket. Paul Kinzie noted that the current year fiscal budget still had $450 travel funds in that account. Both Kinzie and Terry Turner felt that purchasing tickets earlier would earn better prices. Murray said he hadn’t yet been told how long the board expected him to stay so he couldn’t really buy tickets. On another topic relating to Oshkosh, Murray said he had received several calls from aviation-oriented magazines wanting to sell ads promoting the Alva Regional Airport as a stopping place for pilots to refuel on the way to Oshkosh. One magazine, Aviation Hotline, wanted $900 for a full page ad, or $600 for a half page and $330 for a quarter page ad. However, pilots in attendance agreed they’d never heard of the publication. Kinzie said he wouldn’t be against advertising in publications that might be better read by pilots. “I disagree with Bob (the absent board chairman). I think we should advertise to increase our 100 LL fuel sales. There’s a number of people who go to Oshkosh from New Mexico and Texas who would use 100 LL. I know his hesitation is because he wants to attract jet traffic and is waiting until the GPS approach is complete. Now that the helicopters are gone, our low lead sales are almost the same as our jet fuel sales.” Terry Turner agreed. He said, “Advertising pays, and we’re in a real good spot, particularly for jet traffic. They can get a quick turnaround here; they don’t have a lot of traffic to mess with. If we can ever get our (GPS approach) runway issue solved, we can pick up quite a bit of business if they know we’re here.” Another discussion about attracting jet traffic had to do with

the month-after-month excuses by Myers engineering firm of getting the data to the FAA to complete the GPS approach parameters. One month it is an uploading problem. Another month it was an interpreting-the-data problem. Kinzie said, “I know that Joe Don (city manager) has had talks with the two senior members of Myer’s engineering regarding this performance.” Maintenance Both Kinzie and Turner brought up several things that need to be taken care of. Terry Turner asked why the old fuel truck had not been declared surplus. Kinzie inquired about maintenance in the bathroom where the soap dispenser had fallen off the wall and was lying on the sink, and also about a broken electrical outlet near the west door that seemed obvious to him. He mentioned a light fixture in the hall missing its globe. The manager did not seem to be aware of any of these problems. Kinzie suggested that Murray try to be a little more observant about problems regarding upkeep of the building. The crystallized and nearly unreadable LCD on the fuel pump was mentioned. Kinzie said, “Yes, that was brought up about six months ago.” Turner commented, “I’d like to see us a have a fuel pump like the ones at convenience stores where all you have to do is slide your credit card in.” Turner asked Murray to figure out something to take care of the fuel pump LCD problem. Toward the end of the meeting, during the agenda item of hearing public comments, Turner asked the mayor if he had any comments. Chaffee replied that he thought the airport board should get specifications in order for both the hangar work and the carport type projects they are considering instead of just getting oral quotes over the phone. “That will take the pressure off of Greg to obtain those quotes,” he said. Fuel sales for May were as follows: 100 LL - $8,492; Jet A $8867. Counting some minor sales, the total for May was $17,555.71. In May, the figure was $16,776.40.


June 14, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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Legislative look ner with Rep. Nollan to reach out to these students and their parents. Achieving Classroom Excellence legislation requires that all students pass four of seven end-of-instruction exams to graduate high school. Profoundly disabled students are given an alternative form of the exam to accommodate their individual disabilities, but they still must show proficiency. If a student is unsuccessful, he or she has to retake the exam or prove proficiency using an alternative method. This new legislation still requires a first attempt at the exam. If a prodisabled student is unAlva Review-Courier foundly successful, however, the new (USPS 016-180) law allows the local school dis620 Choctaw St. trict working with the IndividAlva, OK 73717-1626 ual Education Plan (IEP) team (580) 327-2200 to determine if the student has Fax: (580) 327-2454 done enough work to meet the graduation requirement withOffice Hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. out further pursuit. Monday - Friday Civil rights law requires Website: that we not exclude any stuwww.alvareviewcourier.com dent from assessments, but this piece of legislation removes a HERE TO HELP YOU burden for our most profoundPublisher.............Lynn L. Martin ly disabled students. For that, I Editor..................Marione Martin am thankful. (marione@alvareviewcourier.net) The second piece of legisAd Sales.............Stacy Sanborn lation ceremonially signed on (sales@alvareviewcourier.net) Monday was House Bill 1989, Colette Baier (colette@alvareviewcourier.net) the Student Data Accessibility, Transparency and AccountReporters...................Alex Cole ability Act of 2013. Bethany Stout This bill is the first of its (news@alvareviewcourier.net) kind in the nation and provides Yvonne Miller Sports.............Roger McKenzie a model for other states in the (roger@alvareviewcourier.net) area of protecting student privacy. Subscriptions & Action Ads..........Linda Toone The law requires the State (manager@alvareviewcourier.net) Board of Education to invenAd Design.............Paula Oakes tory and publicly post what Page Design........Patty Hankey student-specific data the state collects and creates a detailed Legal Notices.....Lisa Wickham (legals@alvareviewcourier.net) data security plan and student privacy policies. It requires The Alva Review-Courier is that we be clear about what we combined with the Woods collect for what purpose and County News, The Alva with whom the information is Advocate and Newsgram, and is published every Sunday and shared. It also gives the public Friday by Martin Broadcasting the ability to comment on the Corp., 620 Choctaw St., Alva, data that is shared and to have OK 73717-1626. Periodical a voice in changing the policy. postage paid at Alva, Oklahoma. Student information, such Annual subscription rates in Woods County, Oklahoma $72. as performance on assessElsewhere in Oklahoma $90, ments, is increasingly imelsewhere in the United States portant as we move toward $108. POSTMASTER: Send teacher and leader evaluation a d d r e s s c h a n g e s t o A l v a systems and greater accountReview-Courier, 620 Choctaw ability systems for schools, St., Alva, OK 73717-1626. such as A-F report cards. Yet, Contents Copyright 2013 Member of the Associated Press, we must ensure the privacy of

On Monday, I attended two ceremonial bill signings at the State Capitol to celebrate legislation I feel is of vital importance to Oklahomans. First, I must thank Rep. Jadine Nollan for championing House Bill 1756, which eases graduation requirements for profoundly disabled students. I became personally involved with this issue after several news reports highlighted the difficulties our most vulnerable students experienced in the first year of Achieving Classroom Excellence implementation. It was a pleasure to part-

Oklahoma Press Association, National Newspaper Association

In My Corner By Arden Chaffee Spring in Oklahoma traditionally means the green carpet of hard red winter wheat heads out and slowly transforms into the waving fields of golden grain awaiting harvest. Lately, the landscape is turning a brilliant yellow, the signs of the blooming canola plant – a new major cash crop for many Oklahoma farmers. Where has it come from and what does it promise in a new economy? It’s a hybrid, developed in Canada as a selectively bred rapeseed, a member of the mustard family. Popularized by steam engines, its oil worked better than petroleum, and after a sharp drop in demand after World War II it gained a new lease on life as a diesel alternative, biodiesel. Unfortunately, the shell and

meal were not well-tolerated as human or animal food because of a high concentration of erucic acid. As a result of genetic engineering, the acid levels have been significantly reduced and the trademarked name stands for “CAnadian Oil, Low Acid,” CANOLA. Don’t you just love acronyms? Additional engineering resulted in strains that could survive cold winter temperatures, so it has become a crop well suited to the Great Plains. According to Tom Peeper at Oklahoma State, canola is “the perfect rotational crop for hard red winter wheat.” Since some fields have been growing wheat for over 100 years, they have become “tired” and the canola taproot helps break up the “plow pan” that forms in some fields. Canola stands out and the yellow blooms are the new gold of northwest Oklahoma.

Random Thoughts

Speed trap revenge – Part 2

By Roger Hardaway Last week I told you about the time in 1990 that I got pulled over for speeding in a small town between Alva and Enid. I didn’t know at the time (although I learned later) that this particular burg has the well-earned reputation of being nothing but a speed trap. The locals have apparently decided to fund their town government by giving speeding tickets to unsuspecting passersby – like me. I had just begun working at Northwestern Oklahoma State University and I was on my way to Enid to teach a class at Vance Air Force Base and to donate some of my books to the library at Phillips University. Anyway, when I got pulled over by the local “police officer” in this speed trap town, he screamed at me for questioning whether I deserved a ticket. See Legislative Page 6 He gave me an envelope and told me to mail

in a check for $53. I asked him if I could go to court to fight the ticket and he said I could. But if I did, he assured me, the “judge” would not be too happy about it and would likely fine me more than $53. The wise course for me, he said, would be to mail in the money. So, I decided not to contest the fine. But I will never forget the way that local cop treated me. It has been nearly 23 years since I got that speeding ticket. I have traveled through this speed trap town a hundred or more times since then. Almost every time I go through the town (very slowly, I might add), I stop at one of the convenience stores. Whether I need to or not, I use the bathroom and make sure to flush the commode. My goal is to someday have flushed $53 worth of the town’s water down the drain – and then to flush some more. And I can assure you that the $53 the ticket cost me is the only money I have ever spent in that town – or ever will!


June 14, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Annie’s Mailbox®

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Click and Clack Talk Cars

Cheating or insecure Which comes first: Dear Annie: My husband and I have been together for five years. For the most part, we have a great relationship. The problem is, my husband is seven years older and had a few bad relationships before we got together. Because of this, he is always telling me I am a cheater and cannot be trusted. Annie, I haven’t done a single thing in my past or present to make him feel this way. It is a constant fight between us. I have suggested that maybe we should get counseling so we can work on this, but he hasn’t been willing. Is there anything else I can do to make this annoying part of our relationship go away? – Irritated Wife Dear Irritated: A person who constantly accuses the spouse of cheating when there is no cause is either cheating himself or too insecure to function in a healthy marriage. It is no way to live. First ask him to see his doctor and find out whether there is a medical reason for his behavior. Then stop “suggesting” and insist that your husband go with you for counseling. If he refuses, go on your own to decide whether this is something you can tolerate or alleviate. Dear Annie: Why do stores think that having sales associates accost you in every aisle will make you enjoy shopping? A simple “Hello, how may I help you?” is all we need. Following us around and asking all sorts of questions is annoying. Knowing this will happen every time I enter the store makes

me want to shop elsewhere. People like to be acknowledged. They do not like to be hounded. If I want to wander around and look, I don’t enjoy being bombarded by five salespeople asking me the same stuff over and over. A customer who wants help will ask for it. Otherwise, please leave us alone. Businesses should train their employees to treat people as valued customers, not idiots. – Toledo Dear Toledo: You make a valid argument, but we have to say, for every person who doesn’t want to be accosted, there are 10 who wish they could find a salesperson altogether. If the store employees work on commission, it would explain why they try so hard to make a sale to every customer. It usually suffices to say, “No, thank you. I’m just looking.” If not, feel free to register your complaint with the store manager and see whether it helps. Dear Annie: Not long ago, you printed a letter from “Too Clean, Too Fearful,” a woman with anxiety about highway travel. She did not want counseling. You suggested relaxation techniques but didn’t specifically mention Tai Chi or Qigong classes, which are available at many community centers, fitness clubs, YMCAs and senior centers. I teach both Tai Chi and Qigong and have been practicing for more than 24 years. It was part of my personal “quit smoking” program in 1988. Tai Chi is “relaxation in

Karen’s Kolumn

motion.” It is a moving meditation that teaches one how to relax in action. It is the only exercise I know that does this. Qigong is a cousin of Tai Chi. These exercises can be done in private or in a park, alone or with a friend. You can share the activity with your spouse to learn how to relax together. They can be learned while seated for those who have difficulty standing. They can be enjoyed for a lifetime and help develop the mind, along with better balance and coordination. Tai Chi and Qigong are dynamic, fun and relaxing, and yes, they relieve anxiety. – Caroline Dear Caroline: Thanks for the additional suggestions. We hope our interested readers will check out these activities. Dear Readers: Today is Flag Day and the 34th Annual Pause for the Pledge of Allegiance at 7 p.m. (Eastern time). For more information, log on to americanflagfoundation.org. Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please email your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. To find out more about Annie’s Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.

By Tom and Ray Magliozzi Dear Tom and Ray: My husband and I are at odds on this issue. We have a 2003 Mini Cooper with an automatic transmission. He applies the hand brake before throwing the car into Park. The car then makes a noticeable creak when we get out of the car. I usually put the car in Park, then apply the hand brake. If I’m on an incline, the car will roll a little, then stop – but no nasty creak. Hubbie’s logic is that it’s better to be hard on the hand brake than to be hard on the transmission. The creak just makes me uneasy! Any advice on who’s right? – Cat RAY: Well, we’re glad this is all you’re at odds over. During my brother’s most recent marriage, they were at odds because he would put the car in Park, and she would HIT HIM with the hand brake. TOM: The good news is that neither of you is doing any damage with your respective parking methods. But we prefer Hubbie’s. RAY: When you put the car in Park on a hill, Cat, and it rolls a foot or so, that’s because the parking pawl – the device that locks up the output shaft of the transmission and prohibits the car from rolling – is not a precise instrument. It’s a ratchet with some slop in it, and it can allow the car to roll a bit in either direction before it jams into with fences at least four feet high place and holds the car. and installing self-closing and selflatching gates. Using lockable safety covers on spas, as well as pool alarms, add layers of protection against accidents. Smaller portable pools should be emptied and stored after each use, while larger ones should be covered and access ladders removed when not in use. “Let your neighbors, babysitters and house guests know you have a pool,” Armbruster said. “In the event a child does go missing, be sure to check nearby pools immediately.” When you are enjoying community and commercial pools, pay attention to where life-saving equipment such as life rings and reaching poles is located. Also, look for posted safety rules and the nearest phone.

Be safe while staying cool in the pool By Karen Armbruster With summertime temperatures heating up across Woods County, plenty of families will be hitting the pool to cool off. Keeping a few basic safety guidelines in mind will ensure accidents do not dampen the good times. “Drowning and other poolrelated accidents are preventable in many cases,” said Gina Peek, Oklahoma State University Cooperative Extension housing and consumer specialist. “It’s a matter of staying alert, following some common sense precautions and being prepared in case an emergency occurs.” Two basic safety measures families can take are to make sure everyone knows how to swim and that adults learn how to perform CPR on kids and adults, stated Karen Armbruster, Woods County extension educator. “Be sure to teach kids safe behavior in the water, as well as ways they can help in case of emergency,” Armbruster said. In fact, pools and spas can be especially dangerous for kids. A 2013 U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) report on estimated pool and spa fatalities and injuries shows children younger than 5 years old accounted for more than 75 percent of pool and spa submersion deaths and 78 percent of injuries. “Kids should be monitored constantly while they are in and near pools and spas. Accidents can happen so fast. That’s why it’s a good idea to identify a ‘pool watcher,’ even if you’re at a commercial or public pool with lifeguards on duty,” Armbruster said. Swimmers of all ages should stay away from drains, pipes and other openings – especially if they

are broken, loose or missing – to avoid getting hair, swimwear, jewelry or limbs or other body parts tangled or lodged in a suction opening. Sitting on a drain that is not in working order also can cause serious injury. “The suction from a pool or spa drain could be strong enough to trap an adult underwater,” Armbruster said. “Don’t use any pool or spa with broken or missing drain covers. Immediately report any broken, loose or missing drain covers to the pool operator.” At home, it is a good idea to assemble a pool safety kit that includes a first aid kit, a pair of scissors to cut hair, clothing or a pool cover, a charged portable phone to call for emergency assistance and a flotation device. The CPSC recommends surrounding residential pools and spas

The park or the parking brake?

TOM: There’s nothing dangerous about that – unless you just parked six inches up the hill from Leadpipe Louie’s new Cadillac. RAY: We’ve never seen a parking pawl break from rolling, so that’s not a concern. But if the car rolls and jams the parking pawl, it can make it hard for you to get OUT of Park when you try to drive away. TOM: Applying the parking brake BEFORE you put it in Park eliminates that problem. The brake holds the car in place and doesn’t let the car roll until the parking pawl jams up. You just have to remember – when you come back – to take the transmission out of Park first before releasing the parking brake. RAY: The creak you’re hearing is just the parking brake grabbing. That’s nothing to worry about. TOM: No. My brother creaks when he grabs now, too. *** Changing your oil regularly is the cheapest insurance you can buy for your car, but how often should you change it? Find out by ordering Tom and Ray’s pamphlet “Ten Ways You May Be Ruining Your Car Without Even Knowing It!” Send $4.75 (check or money order) to Ruin, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. *** Get more Click and Clack in their new book, “Ask Click and Clack: Answers from Car Talk.” Got a question about cars? Write to Click and Clack in care of this newspaper, or email them by visiting the Car Talk website at www. cartalk.com.


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Alva Review-Courier

Page 6

Area student candidates Lawrence man gets life for undergraduate degrees sentence for child rape at Emporia State University Two area students were candidates for undergraduate degrees during the May 18 commencement ceremony in White Auditorium in Emporia. Students from this area were Derek Lohmann of Alva, bachelor of science degree in biology; and Melissa Simpson of Kiowa, Kan., bachelor of science degree in information resource studies. Commencement speakers included Tim Emert, chair of the Kansas Board of Regents. The commencement address was delivered by Dale Cushinberry, a member of the 2012 Emporia State University Distinguished Alumni class.

LAWRENCE, Kan. (AP) — A Kansas man will spend at least 25 years in prison for the rape of a young girl who told police she was repeatedly abused over a period of years. The Lawrence Journal-World reports (http://bit.ly/11WI9XX ) a Douglas County judge on Wednesday gave Robert Leo Hill two life

sentences — one for rape, the other for aggravated indecent liberties. The 42-year-old Lawrence man pleaded no contest to the charges last month. Prosecutors dropped eight other counts in exchange for Hill’s acceptance of the life sentences. The sentences will run together, and Hill will be eligible for parole

after 25 years. Hill told the judge Wednesday he was “very, very, very sorry” and never meant to harm the victim, who is now 12 years old and has moved out of Kansas. *** Information from: Lawrence (Kan.) Journal-World, http://www. ljworld.com

Family surprised by Federal grant will help birth of 6-legged calf Topeka school be bilingual By Bree Steffen ANADARKO, Okla. — A ranching family near Anadarko hit a strange sort of jackpot and it’s drawing the attention of Ripley’s Believe It Or Not. The Myers family has owned their ranch for 5 generations, so they’re used to calves being born. However, a few weeks ago they found a newborn calf with six legs. His name, Spiderman. “My neighbor called,” Justin Myers said. “And it was actually on a place that his dad owns that I rent. And he said ‘I was down south of the pond and you have a six-legged calf.’ And I thought he was crazy.” It sounded crazy but it was true. It’s a rare condition called Polymelia, a birth defect of the limbs. “I’ve been a vet for 22 years and I’ve seen this calf and a lamb with extra limbs and I’ve had two calves born with extra heads,” Dr. Wesley Booth said. “So that makes four of them, which is probably more than my share.” The extra legs are not hurting Spiderman. He’s happy and healthy and certainly gives the community a lot to talk about. Josey Myers said, “My friend shows sheep and she was like ‘wow that’s weird.’” Weird pets are one thing this family knows all about. They currently have a gentle two-ton Brahma bull named Gus that roams around the property looking for affection. When asked about the future of Spiderman and his extra legs, the family says they might have them removed as long as it won’t hurt him at all. “If it’s something that’s going to endanger his life we’ll probably just keep him as a novelty, kind of like Gus here,” Myers said. A little guy with a lot of legs that’s getting a lot of attention. “We were just lucky,” Kim Myers said. “We were just blessed to get him and the fact that he’s healthy.” In addition to becoming part of the family, Spiderman also shares a birthday with the Myers’ daughter Lacey.

Wichita boy wounded by shots fired outside home

WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — Wichita police believe the shooter who fired on a home and struck a sleeping 4-year-old boy targeted the wrong address. The shooting happened around 3 a.m. Thursday. Police say the boy and his mother were asleep in a bedroom of a duplex at the time. The 4-year-old was taken to St. Francis Hospital with a gunshot wound in his back. Police said he was in stable condition after surgery and is expected to recover. Police said five shots were fired from outside the home. A search for suspects continued Thursday afternoon.

By Celia Llopis-Jepsen, The Topeka Capital-Journal Publishable Editors Notes: An AP Member Exchange TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — When librarian Ethel Edwards looks around the media center at Scott Dual-Language Magnet, she sees about 14,000 books — a solid collection of award-winning literature and other reading — but not nearly enough material in Spanish. “The books are interfiled,” said Edwards, walking along the shelves and pointing out the titles. “Hogares de los seres vivos,” a nature book, is filed in the animal section. And in the section on the beloved children’s character Clifford, “Clifford’s Puppy Days” and “Las buenas acciones de Clifford” stand side-by-side. Edwards’ best guess is that less than 5 percent of the library’s books are in Spanish. Ideally, about half should be. That is because the school is transitioning into a fully bilingual program, with everything from science to social studies taught in both languages. Thanks to a federal grant, Scott will now receive tens of thousands of dollars for Spanish-language materials, including books for its library, providing a much-needed boost. “We’re very excited,” said Sarah Lucero, the school’s incoming principal. “That’s been a challenge — giving equity in both languages.” Scott is one of three Topeka Uni-

From Page 4

fied School District 501 schools that received word this week of more than $2.5 million in federal grants for the coming school year. Scott will receive $878,731, while Ross Elementary is getting $922,865 and Quincy Elementary $716,702, The Topeka Capital-Journal reported (http://bit.ly/140Bxen ). The schools will receive additional infusions the following two academic years depending on funding from Congress. Deborah Perbeck, a district administrator who helped write the applications for all three schools, said the money will pay for everything from new hires to iPads. “It’s great news,” Perbeck said. “Absolutely wonderful.” The district planned to spend about 40 percent of the first-year funding on new staff members, 30 percent on technology, 15 percent on professional development and 10 percent on supplies, she said. But that could change because the district received 88 percent of the total funding it had sought. Later this week, administrators will start tweaking their spending plan. Under the original budget, about $64,000 is earmarked for Spanish-language materials, including $10,000 for library books, $10,000 for science materials, and $44,000 for items ranging from maps and posters to signs and classroom reading materials. The money also will pay for a new coordinator for the bilingual program, a counselor specializing

in behavioral issues, and a bilingual mathematics and reading specialist. “The possibilities are endless,” said teacher Melisha Colon, who says she joined USD 501 from the Blue Valley district after hearing about the dual-language program. “There’s nothing better than to know we have support.” At Ross and Quincy, spending will help the district introduce its AVID program. AVID targets children who may need extra help getting to college, including many who would be first-generation college students. The district has middle school and high school AVID programs and will now train teachers at Ross and Quincy in many of the same techniques. The grant also will pay for family liaisons at all three schools, with the goal of boosting parental involvement, a factor that has been linked to academic success. “To have someone dedicated to that is really exciting,” said Annette Kenoly, principal at Ross. Kenoly also is looking forward to a bigger budget for field trips, something many schools have reduced in response to budget cuts. “Field trips extend learning outside the classroom,” she said. Other expenses the grant will cover include iPads for all three schools, with a goal of having one device per student. *** Information from: The Topeka (Kan.) Capital-Journal, http://www. cjonline.com

Legislative

our students. According to the new law, this department will share only aggregate data that does not show individual student information. This law further empowers us to restrict access to student information that previously was subject to open records requests. In addition to these two bills, several other laws came from this year’s legislative session that have an impact beginning this coming school year. House Bill 1658 also will have an affect in the coming year. The bill changes the way the A-F school re-

port card is calculated. The changes made by the bill’s authors increase the focus of student performance on state assessments and lessen the impact of other measures such as advanced coursework, graduation rates and attendance. After the initial report cards were issued last fall, we worked with school administrators and members of the public to address concerns regarding how the report cards were calculated. This bill takes many of those concerns into account. One final bill I would draw attention to is House Bill 1233. This

bill creates a process to allow provisional certificates to be given in the area of special education to alleviate the shortage of teachers in this area. Interested candidates would go through a boot camp to obtain this certification. We appreciate this effort to address a shortage in this challenging but critical area. Our special education students deserve teachers who are equipped to meet their specific needs. This session was busy and productive for all our lawmakers. I appreciate their concern for students, parents and educators and the effect that a great educational system has on all of society.


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Beat the heat at the Alva City Pool The Alva City Pool kicked off its summer season on June 3. People of all ages have flocked to the pool since its opening day. They can be found going down one of the two twisted water slides, lying out by the pool, bouncing off the diving board and relaxing in the wading pool. The pool is open from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. It closes at 5 p.m. on Wednesday. Its weekend hours are 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Daily passes can be purchased for $1 for children 12 and under, $1.50 for people 13 to 17 years old and $2.50 for adults 18 years and older. Season passes are only $10 for kids age 12 and under, $15 for 13 to 17 year olds and $20 for adults. A family pass can be purchased for a family of four at $25. An additional $10 is required for every family member added. The pool also offers swimming lessons for all ages, and pool parties can be booked during the week Masses of kids lined up at the diving board on Wednesday afternoon. Many residents are escaping the heat at the Alva City Pool. Brandy from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. and after 6 Meadow Lapinski is shown preparing to spring into the water. Photo Nelson and daughter Kinley Nelson are pictured here enjoying the wading pool. Photo by Alex Cole by Alex Cole p.m. on the weekends.

There’s no better place to go than the pool when visiting Alva during the summer. These Texas residents enjoyed the cool water on Wednesday. Pictured from left to right are Amanda Haynes, Shelby Duarte, Austin Williams, Abby Duarte and Emma Duarte. Photo by Alex Cole

Pictured in mid-air, Rylee Hansel makes a splash in the deep end of the pool with a cannonball. Photo by Alex Cole

Jan Hamlin and Steffanie Nichols soaked up the sun on Wednesday at the Alva City Pool. Photo by Alex Cole


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2013 Women’s Soccer schedule announced A tough nonconference schedule, eight home dates and a full Great American Conference slate highlight the 2013 Northwestern Oklahoma State women’s soccer schedule. “Overall, the strength of our schedule is pretty high,” said Northwestern coach Kasey Mahaffey, who begins her second season leading the women’s soccer program. “We are playing all NCAA Division II teams and each game will provide great competition.”

Sept. 6, 2013 Sept. 8, 2013 Sept. 10, 2013 Sept. 13, 2013 Sept. 15, 2013 Sept. 19, 2013 Sept. 22, 2013 Sept. 24, 2013 Sept. 27, 2013 Sept. 29, 2013 Oct. 4, 2013 Oct. 6, 2013 Oct. 11, 2013 Oct. 18, 2013 Oct. 20, 2013 Oct. 25, 2013 Oct. 27, 2013 Nov. 1, 2013

Six of the eight nonconference contests are against teams from the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MIAA). “I’m really excited that we are playing quite a few MIAA teams,” Mahaffey said. “It’s going to be great competition for our team before we play a tough Great American Conference schedule.” The Rangers kick off their season with a pair of games in St. Louis, Mo. Northwestern opens Sept. 6 at Lindenwood followed by a Sept. 8 neutral-site tilt with Em-

poria State. Northwestern then returns home for a three-game stretch, which begins with the home opener Sept. 10 against Fort Hays State. NebraskaKearney pays a Sept. 13 visit and Newman comes to town Sept. 15. Northwestern opens conference play Sept. 27 at East Central, while the conference home opener is Oct. 4 against Ouachita Baptist. Northwestern hosts Southwestern Oklahoma State University (SWOSU) Oct. 11 and concludes its season Nov. 1 at SWOSU.

2013 Women’s Soccer Schedule

at Lindenwood vs. Emporia State Fort Hays State Nebraska-Kearney Newman at Northeastern State at Texas Woman’s at Lubbock Christian at East Central* at Southern Nazarene* Ouachita Baptist* Harding* Southwestern Oklahoma State* East Central* Southern Nazarene* at Ouachita Baptist* at Harding* at Southwestern Oklahoma State*

St. Louis, Mo St. Louis, Mo. ALVA ALVA ALVA Tahlequah Denton, Texas Lubbock, Texas Ada Bethany ALVA ALVA ALVA ALVA ALVA Arkadelphia, Ark. Searcy, Ark. Weatherford

8 p.m. 11:30 a.m. 4 p.m. 5 p.m. 1 p.m. 7 p.m. 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 4 p.m. 2 p.m. 3 p.m. 1 p.m. 3 p.m. 4 p.m. 1 p.m. 3 p.m. 1 p.m. 3 p.m

3H Cattle and Hughes Cattle faced each other in a game of T-ball at the Alva Recreation Complex on Tuesday. Endy Barraza of the 3H Cattle team is pictured tossing the ball back to home plate. This game was not scored. Photo by Alex Cole

Registration underway for Dugout Club’s 2013 golf tournament

Northwestern Oklahoma State baseball’s Ranger Dugout Club will host its fifth annual golf tournament on Aug. 3 at the Alva Golf and Country Club. Proceeds will

support the Northwestern baseball program. The 18-hole tournament will feature a two-person, best-ball scramble format. The shotgun start

is scheduled for 9 a.m., and lunch – including drinks – will be provided to all participants on a firstcome-first-served basis. The top three teams in each of three flights will be honored at an awards presentation immediately following the tournament. Prizes will also be awarded for closest to the pin, longest drive and as part of the Casino Hole. Champs Sports and Spirits will be open as a 19th hole destination at the completion of the awards ceremony. In addition, participants can take advantage of discounted room rates for the tournament at the Holiday Motel in Alva. Please call 580-327-3333 and ask about the “Ranger Rate.” Cost to enter is $90 for individuals and $180 for a two-person team. This includes entry fee, green fee, lunch, beverages, cart rental, complimentary gifts and team photo. Registration will be taken the morning of the event, but early sign up is recommended as the field will be limited to the first 36 teams. Individuals or teams may pre-register by filling out the registration form attached to the event flier. Those can be found on the baseball page at www.riderangersride.com. For questions, contact Ryan Bay, head baseball coach, at 580327-8124 or rjbay@nwosu.edu.

Bethany Towns drops the bat after hitting the ball during Tuesday’s match between the Alva Elks and Lyn’s teams. This game was not scored. Photo by Alex Cole

The Alva Elk’s and Lyn’s team played at Alva Recreation Complex on Tuesday. Keegan Frizzell is shown making his way to the home plate safely. Photo by Alex Cole


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Alva Review-Courier

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‘It’s been a wild ride’ By Helen Barrett After 25 years of teaching, Marsha Smith decided she no longer wanted to go to school every day. As the bell rang the final day of school, Smith started a new chapter in her life as a retiree. “I’ll go ahead and sub some,” Smith said. “I have some quilting projects that have been started for a while that I need to finish.” Future Plans She also hopes to travel and

Ed Sutter, chair, tells the Avard Rail Authority the he wishes to step down as chair after serving two years in that position. He resisted efforts to re-elect him and instead proposed that everybody move up one position, which would make Stan Bixler, right, the new chair. The motion passed unanimously. Video frame by Lynn Martin

Bixler elected chairman of Avard Regional Rail Authority By Lynn L. Martin Shortly after opening the Tuesday meeting and approving the previous meeting’s minutes, the Avard Rail Authority entered into executive session to discuss possible tenants for the rail park. After about ten minutes, they reconvened to open session with no need for a vote. The next item was to approve Kimberly Mayer of Blackwell to perform the annual audit. Sonja Williams only had an oral quote, saying Mayer said the price would be less than $2500, but she won’t

be able to give an actual price until she sees the bookkeeping method specified in the bylaws. Ed Sutter clarified that it would still be less than $2500, and if it is more it would have to come back to the board. A motion was made by Todd Holder and a second by Joe Royster to approve the auditor. Todd Holder presented the financial report. He said the only payments were insurance for park improvement, rock for the rail park and a Clearspan payment (the

See Avard Rail Page 15

spend more time with her family, especially her four grandchildren. Her husband is retired from the Oklahoma Highway Department, so by her retiring they’ll be free to spend more time with their two sons and daughters-in-law and their grandchildren, who range in age from 3 years to a seventh-grade student. “It was a hard decision to make, but now that I’ve made it, it’s like a load lifted.”

She enjoys reading, so now she will have time for that and for sewing. “I like to go to auctions,” she said. “My hobby job is helping with auctions.” She and her husband can be found most every Monday night attending Alva City Council meetings. “We try to keep up on things,” she said. During her career, her assignments included teaching first grade, Title I programs and, lately, fifth grade. Her greatest enjoyment comes from those moments when she sees a light come on in a student’s eyes and she knows they understand the concept. “And the stories they tell,” she said. Too Much Paperwork She dislikes the fact that teaching has become more about fulfilling government mandates than educating children. The amount of paperwork involved for teachers and the administrations is staggering. “I’ve had good administrators to work for,” she said. She wishes people better understood that every child is different. “There’s no cookie cutter mold for education,” Smith said. Some of her recent students are the third generation of one family. “When you grow up here, you know everybody anyway,” Smith said. “It’s like we’re one big family.” She admitted sometimes that has its drawbacks. “It’s been a wild ride, but it’s Marsha Smith retires from her career as a teacher in Alva Public been a good ride,” she said. “It helps Schools. Photo by Helen Barrett when you work with good people”


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Alva Review-Courier

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From a son to fathers By Andrew Stauffer, Intern at Alva Wesleyan Church This week everyone is thinking of their fathers. I am definitely thinking of my dad, who I will not get to see because he is 2,000 miles away in another country. He has been a model of fatherhood to my brother and me and to many other men back home. I consider my father a great blessing in my life. I know that there are many who do not have fathers. Those of you who do have a father are blessed and those who are fathers are also blessed. I have learned many things from my earthly father that will influence me when I have kids one day. I have also learned many things from my Heavenly Father about being a dad. I have gone through the Scriptures and found that the Bible has a lot to say about fatherhood and how men should emulate their Heavenly Father. There are three qualities of God I find that resurface over and over in Scripture, especially in the Psalms. These are that He is always present in our lives, He protects us

and He provides for us. You can see all three of these qualities in Psalm 23. “The Lord is my shepherd, I lack nothing. He makes me lie down in green pastures, he leads me beside quiet waters, He refreshes my soul. He guides me along the right paths for his name’s sake.” (vs. 1-3) In verses one through three we can see that God leads and guides the psalmist in all that he does. God is always there investing and guiding. As fathers, you can do this, too, by being around your kids. They will become like those they spend their time with, so they will watch your character and integrity in your own life. You can show your sons what a real man looks like and how he behaves so they will grow up to be real men and also show your daughters what to look for in a husband so they will marry men who will always love and respect them. You can always be involved in your kids’ lives by taking part in their interests and pursuits. It is good to find out what their talents are and

Alva Friends Church

Alva Church of God Sunday, June 16: Sunday school is at 9:30 a.m. and worship will begin at 10:30 a.m., where Pastor Brown will preach the sermon “Just Like Dad.” This evening at 6 p.m., we will continue our mini series called “Trying to Be Like Jesus.” Alva Friends Church Sunday, June 16: We would love to have you and your family join us here as together we worship and serve the Lord. Sunday school will be at 9:30 a.m., and worship will be at 10:30 a.m. Pastor Mark will share with the “Little Friends” and preach the message “Motives of the Sheep” from Matthew 26:3146. Fathers will be recognized for Father’s Day. Trent Goss will lead the worship. Sherry Williams will lead the singing. Sally Byrd will play the organ, and Judy Throckmorton will play the piano. Wednesday, June 19: An adult Bible study will be held in the See Fathers Page 11 church at 6 p.m. All are welcome.

Area Church Directory

College & Center, Alva 327-2524

Alva Wesleyan Church Third & Church, Alva 327-2636

Barnes Street Church of Christ 1024 Barnes Street, Alva

Bible Baptist Church 402 Choctaw, Alva 327-1582 www.BBCalva.com

Capron United Methodist Church 580-829-4416

Cedar Grove Wesleyan Church

First Assembly of God

Our Mother of Mercy Catholic Church

First Baptist Church

Sacred Heart Catholic Church

Fifth & Maple, Alva 327-0894

210 S. Main, Waynoka

Twelfth & Church, Alva 327-0339

College & Church, Alva 327-2623 alvafbc@yahoo.com

St. Cornelius Catholic Church 404 S. Massachusetts, Cherokee

First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

Seventh Day Adventist Tenth & Church, Alva 327-4752

College & Maple, Alva 327-0194

Town & Country Christian Church

First Presbyterian Church

Ninth & Church, Alva 327-0811

Seventh & Church 327-3895

Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church

7 mi W on Hwy 64, 10 mi N, 2 mi W 430-9026

First United Methodist Church

Ninth & Center, Alva 327-2846

Freedom United Methodist Church

Church of God

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints

1407 Thunderbird Rd., Alva 327-2993

Church of the Nazarene College & Locust, Alva 327-2566 www.alvanaz.org

College Hill Church of Christ 1102 College Blvd., Alva 327-0130 www.alvaok.net/collegehill

Community of Christ First & Church, Alva 327-0719

Dacoma Church of God 505 Broadway, Dacoma

Church Calendar

help them build up their skills. Be a guide to them and point them in the right direction by being an example of faith and love. In verse four the psalmist talks of God protecting him in the darkest valley. “Even though I walk through the darkest valley, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me.” He fears nothing because God is with him. You can protect your kids from all kinds of evil whether it is physical or emotional. This can be done by establishing proper rules and boundaries for them with appropriate consequences. Disciplining your children is really showing them love. Help them understand that these boundaries are for their protection and wellbeing. Help them to be able to anticipate the consequences of their actions. Teach them to be aware of the places they go, the people they spend time with and what they do with their time. Proper instruction and boundaries go a long way in

College & Church, Alva 327-2571

Third & Maple, Alva 327-0510 zlcalva@cneconnect.com

800 Eagle Pass, Freedom 580-621-3580

Campus Ministries

Park & Church, Alva 327-4210 (327-0817) www.freewebs.com/graceandfaith

1020 College, Alva - 580-371-5957 bsu1933nw@yahoo.com

Grace & Faith Fellowship

Baptist Student Union

Green Valley Free Methodist Church South of Alva on Hwy 45 580-871-2456

Hopeton Wesleyan Church

Chi Alpha Student Fellowship

(Upstairs at First Assembly of God) 904 Fifth, Alva - 327-0894

Church of Christ Bible Chair 1108 College, Alva - 327-4511

8 miles S of Alva on Hwy 281 580-435-2400 hwc@hopetonchurch.org

College & Barnes, Alva - 327-5433 extreme@hopetonchurch.org

1.6 miles E on Hwy 64, Alva

1027 Eighth, Alva - 327-2046 wesleyhousenwosu@yahoo.com

Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witness

The eXtreme

Wesley House

Marshall Funeral Home www.marshallfuneralhomes.com

PO Box 804 230 Flynn • Alva, OK 327-2311

1-800-656-2311

PO Box 178 1872 Cecil • Waynoka, OK 824-2311

If you’d like to know more about Alva Friends Church, please email Pastor Mark at markmc3@ suddenlink.net. Alva Wesleyan Church Sunday, June 16: Sunday worship is at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., with Sunday school at 9:30 a.m. Evening Bible study is held at 6 p.m. Alva Wesleyan Church is on the corner of Third and Church streets, Alva, 580-327-2636. Wednesday, June 19: Awana for kids three years through eighth grade meets at 6 p.m. Youth – grades nine through 12 – also meet at 6 p.m. If you have any questions, call 580-327-2636. Avard Christian Church Sunday, June 16: Sunday school is at 10 a.m, Worship begins at 11 a.m. Avard Christian Church is 7 miles west of Alva on Highway 64 and 7 miles south on County Road 370, or 6 miles south on Highway 281 and 7 miles west on Garvin Rd. Avard Christian Church, Rt. 2 Box 92, Alva, OK 73717. Pastor Neal Gordon, 580-431- 2646; cell 580430-8464. Barnes Street Church of Christ Sunday, June 16: Sunday worship services will be at 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m. (7 p.m. during daylight savings time). Wednesday, June 19: Evening services will be at 6 p.m. (7 p.m. during daylight savings time). Visitors are most welcome to attend the worship services. For more information, contact Landis Trekell (327-0865), Andrew Rhodes (327-3368), Brian Gaddy (327-5130) or Gray Fields (3276676). Bible Baptist Church Sunday, June 16: All services will be held at Fourth and Choctow in the fellowship hall of our church building. Come and celebrate Father’s Day with us this Sunday! Sunday school starts at 10 a.m. There are graded classes for children, a teen class, a college and career class and an adult class. Our worship service starts at 11 a.m. Today we will be celebrating our camp services from this past week. Evening service begins at 6 p.m. in the church fellowship hall. Teen Impact also meets at this time and is open to all teens from sixth to 12th grade. Wise Guys also starts at 6 p.m. Wise Guys is a Bible-based character development program for pre-K through fifth grade. Tuesday, June 11: Celebrate Recovery meets in the church fellowship hall at 7 p.m. This is a Christ-based recovery program to help provide a safe place to discover a Savior who can give freedom from hang ups, hurts and habits. Everyone is invited to attend. Wednesday, June 12: Prayer meeting and Bible study is at 7 p.m. in the church fellowship hall. Teen Impact will also meet at 7 p.m. for Bible study time. As always, transportation and nurseries are available for all services. We look forward to having you and your family visit us this Sunday! Capron United Methodist Church Saturday, June 15: Southern Gospel Quartet “Forgiven” will be returning for another great concert June 15 at 7 p.m. Admission is free. A love offering will be taken. Following the concert, finger foods and refreshments will be served in the church basement. Sunday, June 16: If you don’t have a church home, we would love

See Calendar Page 11


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June 14, 2013

From Page 10

Alva Review-Courier

Calendar

for you to worship with us. Service starts at 9:15 a.m. through singing and preaching of the Word. Pastor Clark’s sermon title is “Joseph,” based on Matthew 1:19 and 25. Sunday school begins at 10:30 a.m. For more information about our church, activities or if you have a need, please call 580-216-4787. Cedar Grove Wesleyan Church Sunday, June 16: Pastor Harold Henson and the entire Cedar Grove family desire to get to know you and your family when you join our loving and caring congregation of all ages, as we discover the truths of Jesus Christ are love, grace, forgiveness, joy and fellowship through Sunday school at 10 a.m. and at 11 a.m. the morning worship. Church of the Nazarene Sunday, June 16: If what you drink does not satisfy, come drink from the well that will never run dry. AlvaNaz – a church for all – where people are experiencing God together. Bible study will begin at 9:30 a.m. Worship will start at 10:45 a.m. You are welcome to join us. AlvaNaz – A Church For All People – 728 College – 580-3272566 – www.AlvaNaz.org Email address: worshipgod@ alvanaz.org. Email Pastor Gregg at pg@alvanaz.org. Find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ www.alvanaz.org. College Hill Church of Christ Sunday, June 16: Sunday Bible class for all ages begins at 9:30 a.m. and worship begins at 10:30 a.m. The lesson, brought by Ray Hull, will be “The Four Most Important Lessons a Father Can Teach,” from Psalms 34:11-14. Following the weekly fellowship lunch, the afternoon service will begin at 12:45 p.m. Don’t miss a Sunday with our great Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ! Wednesday, June 19: Bible classes for adults, college age and children will be held at 7 p.m. From our family to yours, we sincerely invite you to worship God with us this coming Sunday. Be encouraged and lifted up as we sing songs of praise, lift up our prayers to God, observe the Lord’s Supper, and hear a portion of His eternal word. You will be sure to enjoy our “no visitor left behind” policy which means that, as a visitor, you will be greeted and we would love the opportunity to get to know you more. Dacoma United Methodist Church Sunday, June 16: Fellowship coffee and donuts: 8:30 a.m. Worship service: 9 a.m. Wednesday, June 19: Bible study Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. Eagle Pass Baptist Church Sunday, June 16: At 9:40 a.m., join us for a friendly visit and have some coffee. 10 a.m. – Bible Explorers: getting you into the Bible and the Bible into you. Groups: Young Explorers ages 5-11, Young Teen Explorers ages 12-16 and Adult Explorers ages 17 and older. 11 a.m. – Praise and worship. 3 p.m. – Discipleship. When you walk in, you will be our guest, but you will walk out family! Meeting at the Senior Citizens Building, 941 Eagle Pass, Freedom. Contact Pastor Dale at 580-4309079. Jeans and children are welcome! First Assembly of God Sunday, June 16: Morning worship will be at 10:45 a.m. Evening worship will begin at 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 19: Adult Bible study, youth ministry for grades 6-12, and children’s

activities at 7 p.m. At 9 p.m. will be Fuel (College and Young Adult Ministry). Nursery is available for all services except for Fuel. For more information please contact us at 580-327-0894. First Baptist Church Sunday, June 16: Sunday school will begin at 9:30 a.m. and at 10:35 a.m. the worship service will begin. The worship choir will rehearse at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 18: The Beadles Bible study will begin at 10 a.m. At noon will be Brown Bag Bible Study. Wednesday, June 19: The Share Bible study will begin at 3 p.m. The Worship Band will rehearse at 5:15 p.m. Youth will meet at 6 p.m. First Christian Church Sunday, June 16: At 9:30 a.m. will be Sunday school. At 10:30 a.m., morning worship will begin. From 2 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. a wedding shower will be held for Devon Cushenbery and Danielle Litzenberger. Wednesday, June 19: Young Adult Bible Study (nursery provided) will begin at 6 p.m. The children’s choir will also rehearse at 6 p.m. The regular choir will practice at 6:30 p.m. Check us out on the web at fccalva.net. First Presbyterian Church Sunday, June 16: Sunday school will be at 9:50 a.m., followed by the worship service at 11 a.m. The ushers will be Mary Jo Martin, Dr. Martha Evans, John Evans and Liz Parkhurst. The Rev. Dr. Judye Pistole will preach the sermon, “How Do I Love Thee,” based on Luke 7:36-8:3. Tuesday, June 18: Book discussion group will meet at 6:30 p.m. The book is “Forest People” by Colin Turnbull. First United Methodist Church Saturday, June 15: Aluminum recycling in church parking lot from 9 a.m. to noon. Please bring aluminum cans in bags to the church parking lot for recycling. Sunday, June 16: Sunday school for infants through adults will begin at 9:30 a.m. Worship service will be at 10:30 a.m. Hopeton Church Hopeton: a non-typical church! You don’t have to dress in a suit to be accepted; you can wear your jeans, get a cup of coffee, and enjoy contemporary music, great videos, and a relevant message. Hopeton Church meets at 10 a.m. at the main campus in Hopeton, just a few short miles south of Alva on 281. Coffee bar begins at 9:30 a.m. in the new children’s wing. A second service is held at the northern campus, The eXtreme, at the corner of College and Barnes Street in Downtown Alva, beginning at 1 p.m. The coffee bar opens at 12:30 p.m. We have something for every age: nursery,

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, June 14, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANTS: CHESAPEAKE OPERATING, INC. AND CHESAPEAKE EXPLORATION, L.L.C. RELIEF SOUGHT: WELL LOCATION EXCEPTION LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 29 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST OF THE IM, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA Cause CD No. 201303576 AMENDED NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly

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From Page 10 children, teens, adults, women’s support groups, and adult small H.O.M.E. groups for fellowship. 19390 County Road 440, PO Box 7, Hopeton, OK 73746. Phone: 580-435-2400, fax: 580-435-2401, email: hwc@hopetonchurch.org, Web site: www.hopetonchurch.org. eXtreme Youth Center All middle and high school students are invited to come to this fun place to hang out after school. Winter hours are Monday through Thursday from 3 p.m. To 5:30 p.m. The eXtreme is under the direction of Hopeton Church youth pastors Jeremy and Melissa Little. For more information, call 327-5433. Town and Country Christian Church Sunday, June 16: Sunday school for all ages will start at 9:30 a.m. The adult Sunday school lesson will be “Worship With Meaning,” from Isaiah 29:9-16. The greeter will be Verna Graybill. At 10:30 a.m. worship service will start. Cherie Lau will play the piano. Song leader will be Kim Foster. Serving communion will be Justin Lau and Arlo Darr. Children’s Church will be held. Pastor Paul Cole’s sermon will be “The Obedient Father,” based on Genesis 22:1-19. Tuesday, June 18: Town and Country Saints will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 19: The youth group will meet from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Zion Lutheran Church Rev. Aaron Wagner is the pastor of Zion Lutheran Church (Missouri Synod) at Third and Maple. Sunday School and Adult Bible Class meet at 9:15 a.m. Fellowship begins at 10 a.m. and Divine Worship starts at 10:30 a.m. with Holy Communion twice monthly. Youth Group meets monthly. Ladies circles include Ruth Circle at noon the first Monday, Mary Martha Guild is 2 p.m. the second Tuesday of the month, Lutheran Women’s Missionary League meets the first Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. Hand bells practice at 5 p.m. on Mondays Seasoned Saints meet at 1 p.m. on the third Tuesday. On Wednesdays, Confirmation Class (for grades 7 and 8) begins at 5 p.m. Weekday School (grades 3-6) meets at 3:30 p.m. Zion holds Wednesday Services during Advent and Lent at 7 p.m. There is a Fellowship Meal at 6 p.m. The Lutheran Early Care and Education Center (327-1318) offers care for children as young as six weeks old, as well as an after school program. For more information concerning Zion Lutheran Church call 327-0510 or e-mail zlcalva@ cneconnect.com. in Woods County, Oklahoma, more particularly the parties set out on the Exhibit “A” attached to the application on file in this cause, and, if any of the named individuals be deceased, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such deceased individual; if any of the named entities is a dissolved partnership, corporation or other association, then the unknown successors, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity; if any of the named parties designated as a trustee is not presently acting in such capacity as trustee, then the unknown successor or successors to such trustee; if any of the named parties designated as an attorney-in-fact is not presently acting in such capacity as attorney-in-fact, then the unknown successor or successors to such attorneyin-fact; and if any of the named entities

Tornado

keeping kids safe. “You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies. You anoint my head with oil; my cup overflows. Surely your goodness and love will follow me all the days of my life, and I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever.” (vs. 5-6) Verses five and six show God’s abundant provision. The psalmist has a room in God’s house and a place at his table where all his needs are met. Children should never have to want for food, clothing or shelter. It is their father’s duty to make sure these things are taken care of. Providing for the physical needs of your kids really is the bare minimum, though. Children have mental, emotional and spiritual needs. Fathers need to make sure their children are getting a proper education and personally teach practical life skills that children need to learn to be successful and able to achieve their goals. Children have emotional needs. You

can provide for these needs by hugging your kids and building them up with words of encouragement and affirmation. Tell them that they are loved. You are also the spiritual leader of your household. It is up to you to lead the family in prayer and devotions. As your kid’s father, you will be the most influential teacher of the love of Jesus and help them grow in their faith in God. You are your children’s earthly father, but they also have a father in heaven who loves them. You are not in this alone. Pray for your kids every day. This is the most important duty of a father. Prayers of fathers are powerful and God can empower you to be the kind of father that your kids need, especially when your children no longer live with you. Once your kids move out, your relationship changes, but you will always be their dad. And always know that you are loved by God no matter what. You are His child. He will always be with you to protect you and provide for you.

are corporations which do not continue to have legal existence, the unknown trustees or assigns of such parties. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicants, Chesapeake Operating, Inc. and Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C., have filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission to enter an order, as follows: (i) authorizing and permitting an exception to the permitted well location tolerances in the proposed 640-acre drilling and spacing unit in Cause CD No. 201303951, comprised of Section 31, Township 29 North, Range 15 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, for the Cherokee common source of supply, so as to allow a well to be drilled as follows: Location of Wellbore at Top of Producing Common Source of Supply: The proposed location of the end points for the completion interval will be no closer than 406 feet from the north line and no closer than 2090 feet from the east line of the unit comprising said Section 31, Township 29 North, Range 15 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma and no closer than 405 feet from the north line and no closer than 2090 feet from the east line of the unit comprising said Section 31, Township 29 North, Range 15 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, and to be completed in and produce hydrocarbons from the above-named common source of supply; (ii) providing for the re-opening of the cause at such time as the bottom hole location of the well proposed hereunder has been determined; and (iii) establishing a proper allowable with no downward adjustment made thereto. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the application in this cause requests that the order be entered in this matter be made effective as of the date of the execution thereof or as of a date prior thereto and that the authorization and permission requested herein run in favor of one or both of the Applicants, including Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C. acting by and through its agent Chesapeake Operating, Inc., or some other party recommended by Applicants. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the legal descriptions for the land sections adjacent to said Section 31 are Sections 29, 30 and 32, Township 29 North, Range 15 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, Sections 25 and 36, Township 29 North, Range 16 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, Section 1, Township 28 North, Range 16 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma and Section 6, Township 28 North, Range 15 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Merits Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 2nd day of July 2013, and that this notice will be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicants and interested parties may

present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. An interested party who wishes to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicants or Applicants’ attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide his or her name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Matt Fleischer, landman, (405) 935-1407, or Emily P. Smith, attorney, OBA No. 20805, (405) 9358203, Chesapeake Operating, Inc., P.O. Box 18496, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73154-0496. Please refer to Cause CD Number. DONE AND PERFORMED THIS 12th day of June 2013. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, June 14, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT WITHIN AND FOR WOODS COUNTY AND STATE OF OKLAHOMA In the Matter of the Estate of Stuart E. Hodges, Deceased. PB-2013-23 NOTICE OF HEARING PETITION FOR LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION, APPOINTMENT OF PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE, AND DETERMINATION OF HEIRS Notice is hereby given that on the 10th day of June, 2013, LeaAnn Miller filed in the District Court of the County of Woods and State of Oklahoma a Petition praying for Letters of Administration to be issued to LeaAnn Miller upon the estate of Stuart E. Hodges, deceased, and that the heirs of the deceased be judicially determined. And pursuant to an Order of said District Court, the 27th day of June, 2013, at the hour of 10:30 o’clock A. M. in the District Courtroom in the County Courthouse in the City of Alva, Woods County, Oklahoma, has been appointed as the time and place for hearing said Petition, when and where any person interested may contest said Petition as provided by law. WITNESS my hand this 10th day of June, 2013. s/ Mickey J. Hadwiger JUDGE OF THE DISTRICT COURT Larry L. Bays P. 0. Box 98 Alva, Oklahoma 73717 Attorney for Petitioner


June 14, 2013 LEGAL NOTICE

LPXLP WHEREAS, in order to become effective, the Ordinance granting the franchise must be approved by a majority of the voters voting on said issue at an election held for that purpose. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the City Council of the City of Alva, Oklahoma, as follows: 1. That the issue of approval of Ordinance No. 2013-039, which grants a franchise to Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company, be submitted to the qualified electors of the City of Alva, Oklahoma, on September 10, 2013. 2. That the Woods County Election Board be and they hereby are requested to hold a special election in the City of Alva, Oklahoma, for submission of the question of the approval of Ordinance No. 2013-039 to the qualified electors in accordance with the applicable laws of the State of Oklahoma and the City ordinances of Alva, Oklahoma. 3. That the Mayor is hereby authorized to issue a proclamation calling the election and giving notice of election as provided by law. The proclamation

Alva Review-Courier shall set forth the proposition to be voted upon in the form of the ballot. 4. That the election shall be conducted city-wide with polls remaining open between 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. 5. All precincts totally or partially contained within the city limits of Alva, Oklahoma, shall be open for the election. Each precinct election board shall be the same as for the state and county elections; provided, however that substitutions, if necessary, shall be made by the County Election Board. 6. That the laws governing state and county elections shall be applicable to this election. The foregoing Resolution was duly adopted and approved by the Mayor and City Council of the City of Alva, Oklahoma, on the 3rd day of June, 2013. SIGNED by the Mayor of the City of Alva, Oklahoma, on the 3rd day of June, 2013. CITY OF ALVA, OKLAHOMA Arden Chaffee, Mayor Attest: Wayne Lane, City Clerk

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, June 14 and 21, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA In the Matter of the Estate of GLORIA ANN GALLIGAN, Deceased. No. PB-2013-21 NOTICE TO CREDITORS All creditors having claims against Gloria Ann Galligan, deceased, are required to present the same, with a description of all security interest and other collateral, if any, held by each creditor with respect to such claim to the named Personal Representative at the office of Rick Cunningham, Attorney at Law, 409 College, P.O. Box 433, Alva, Oklahoma 73717, attorney for said Personal Representative, on or before the following presentment date: August 12, 2013, or the same will be forever barred. Dated this 29th day of May, 2013. Randy Crismore Personal Representative Rick Cunningham, OBA #12629 Attorney at Law LEGAL NOTICE 409 College Ave., P.O. Box 433 (Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, June 14, 2013.) Alva, Oklahoma 73717 Proceedings of the Board of Woods County Commissioners May 30, 2013 (580) 327-0080 The special meeting of the Board of Commissioners was held at 8:00 a.m. on May Attorney for Personal Representative 30, 2013. Due to Equalization Board hearings the time had been changed. As required by Oklahoma Statues 1991, Title 25, Section 311, Notice was given of this meeting by LEGAL NOTICE posting the Agenda on the doors of the Courthouse and in the Commissioners’ Office (Published by the Alva Review-Courier on May 23, 2013 at 3:46 p.m. Chairman Strawn called the meeting to order. Roll was on Friday, June 7 and 14, 2013.) called to determine a quorum. Present and responding were Strawn and McMurphy. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF Also present were Julia Schrock and Christie Kornele, Representatives of DOC, Sean WOODS COUNTY STATE OF Daly Representative for OG&E, Shelley Reed, County Clerk, and Alex Cole of Alva OKLAHOMA Review-Courier. In the Matter of the Estate of Allan McMurphy, seconded by Strawn, moved to approve minutes of regular meeting Leroy Cunningham, Deceased. May 20, 2013. Voting aye: McMurphy and Strawn. Motion carried. McMurphy, Case No. PB-2013-18 seconded by Strawn, moved for approval of Payroll, warrants and claims. Voting AMENDED NOTICE TO aye: McMurphy and Strawn. Motion carried. Goucher arrived at 8:09 a.m. Crossings CREDITORS submitted for approval: Blue Ridge, RockWater, Access, Chesapeake, Rodco All creditors having a claim against Services, Midstate Petroleum, SemGas, Select Energy, and Oklahoma Gas & Electric: Allan Leroy Cunningham, deceased, Road Crossing permits in D#1 were moved for approval by Strawn, seconded by are required to present the same, with a McMurphy. Voting aye: Goucher, McMurphy and Strawn. Motion carried. Road description of all security interest and Crossing permits in D#2 were moved for approval by McMurphy, seconded by other collateral (if any), held by each Strawn. Voting aye: Goucher, McMurphy and Strawn. Motion carried. creditor with respect to such claim, to the Road Crossings permits in D#3 were moved for approval by Goucher, seconded Personal Representative at the office of by McMurphy. Voting aye: Goucher, McMurphy and Strawn. Motion carried. Edward E. Sutter, 401 College Avenue, P. McMurphy, seconded by Goucher, moved for No Action on Road Crossing permits 0. Box 213, Alva, Oklahoma, 73717, on with Oklahoma Gas & Electric and the ROW Clearing Contractor needs to contact or before the presentment date: August 7, the Commissioners. Voting aye: Goucher, McMurphy and Strawn. Motion carried. 2013, or the same will be forever barred. 3 33-26-13 Midstates Petroleum water $500.00 Dated this 3rd day of June, 2013. 1 9-26-13 Midstates Petroleum water $500.00 Edward E. Sutter 1 8-26-13 Midstates Petroleum water $500.00 Attorney for Barbara Ann Cunningham, 1 8-26-13 Midstates Petroleum water $500.00 Personal Representative 1 20-26-13 Midstates Petroleum water $500.00 Edward E. Sutter, OBA #8778 1 21-26-13 Midstates Petroleum water $500.00 Attorney for Personal Representative 1 30-26-13 Midstates Petroleum Electric $500.00 401 College Avenue 1 24-26-14 Midstates Petroleum Electric $500.00 P. O. Box 213 Alva, OK 73717 1 30-26-13 Midstates Petroleum water $500.00 (580) 327-1511 1 24-26-14 Midstates Petroleum water $500.00 1 22-26-13 Rodco Services water $1,000.00 1 21-28-13 BlueRidge water $1,500.00 LEGAL NOTICE 1 9-27-13 Chesapeake Energy Electric $500.00 (Published by the Alva Review-Courier 1 26-28-16 Select Energy water $250.00 on Friday, June 14, 2013.) 1 26-28-16 Select Energy water $250.00 RESOLUTION 2013-059 2 22-28-18 Rockwater water $500.00 A Resolution calling for a special 3 34-26-13 Midstates Petroleum Gas $500.00 election in the City of Alva, Oklahoma, 3 25-16-14 Midstates Petroleum water $500.00 on September 10, 2013, for the purpose 3 25-16-14 Midstates Petroleum Electric $500.00 of submitting to the qualified electors of 3 27-26-13 Rodco Services water $250.00 the City of Alva the question of whether 3 34-26-13 Midstates Petroleum Gas $500.00 an Ordinance granting a franchise to 3 27-26-13 Midstates Petroleum water $500.00 Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company for 3 34-26-13 SemGas Gas $500.00 purposes of producing, transmitting and 3 33-26-13 SemGas Gas $500.00 distributing electricity in the City of Alva 3 27-26-13 Midstates Petroleum Electric $500.00 shall be approved; authorizing the Mayor Goucher, seconded by McMurphy, moved for approval of Resolution #12-13to call the election by proclamation and 72: FY2014 Fixed Rate Service Contract between the DOC, Community Sentencing requesting the Woods County Election Division, on behalf of Alfalfa/Major/Woods Community Sentencing System Planning Board to conduct the election. Council and Woods County Commissioners. Voting aye: Goucher, McMurphy and WHEREAS, on June 3, 2013, Strawn. Motion carried. the City Council of the City of Alva, Strawn, seconded by Goucher, moved to table his decision until the next Oklahoma, approved Ordinance No. meeting on the Dozer Bids. Voting aye: Goucher, McMurphy and Strawn. Motion 2013-039, which grants a franchise to carried. McMurphy, seconded by Goucher, moved for approval of the Transfer of Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company Appropriations for County General accounts to finish out this fiscal year: Capital for purposes of producing, transmitting, Outlay to M & O $15,000, Health Ins. to OPERS $2,000. Voting aye: Goucher, and distributing electricity in the City of McMurphy and Strawn. Motion carried. Goucher, seconded by McMurphy, moved Alva; and, for approval of the Transfer of Appropriations for County General Election Board account to finish out this fiscal year: M & O to Personal Services $1,000. Voting aye: Goucher, McMurphy and Strawn. Motion carried. Blanket purchase orders #4696 to #4700 were moved for approval by Goucher, seconded by McMurphy. Voting aye: Goucher, McMurphy and Strawn. Motion carried. Goucher moved to adjourn seconded by McMurphy. Meeting adjourned. ATTEST: EXHIBIT “A” MAY 30, 2013 2012-2013 RESALE: 22, LEXISNEXIS RISK DATA MGMT INC, 50.00, SUPPLIES; 23, WOODS COUNTY ABSTRACT, 300.00, SUPPLIES; E 911: 267, AT & T, 779.82, UTILITIES; 268, AT & T, 1519.66, UTILITIES; 269, AT & T, 600.14, UTILITIES; COUNTY ASSESSOR FEE: 10, MERRIFIELD OFFICE SUPPLY INC, 163.95, SUPPLIES; 11, MERRIFIELD OFFICE SUPPLY INC, 83.98, SUPPLIES; AVARD MAIN & OPERATION: 39, OKLAHOMA GAS & ELECTRIC, 84.05,

Page 12 UTILITIES; 40, OKLAHOMA GAS & ELECTRIC, 56.34, UTILITIES; 41, OKLAHOMA NATURAL GAS CO., 22.43, UTILITIES; 42, RURAL WATER D#3, 60.00, UTILITIES; GENERAL: 1903, BANCCENTRAL, 36.01, SUPPLIES; 1904, BANCCENTRAL, 89.00, SUPPLIES; 1905, BANCCENTRAL, 40.00, SUPPLIES; 1906, BIERIG D.O., KIRT, 46.00, DR VISIT; 1907, FUELMAN, 895.25, BLANKET PO; 1908, FUELMAN, 978.12, BLANKET PO; 1909, LANDERS, LADONNA J., 13.25, REIM. FOR TRAVEL; 1910, MERRIFIELD OFFICE SUPPLY INC, 6.79, SUPPLIES; 1911, MERRIFIELD OFFICE SUPPLY INC, 13.58, SUPPLIES; 1912, MERRIFIELD OFFICE SUPPLY INC, 1079.96, SUPPLIES; 1913, MERRIFIELD OFFICE SUPPLY INC, 12.00, SUPPLIES; 1914, NEW IMAGE DENTAL CARE, 839.00, DENTAL WORK; 1915, NEW IMAGE DENTAL CARE, 233.00, DENTAL WORK; 1916, OKLA DEPT OF PUBLIC SAFETY, 350.00, SUPPLIES; 1917, REDWOOD TOXICOLOGY LAB, 124.00, SUPPLIES; 1918, ROGER S CAR WASH, 45.64, BLANKET PO; 1919, THE FIRE PLACE, 124.00, SUPPLIES; 1920, MERRIFIELD OFFICE SUPPLY INC, 29.88, SUPPLIES; 1921, ARMBRUSTER, KAREN D., 1035.47, REIM. FOR TRAVEL; 1922, HIGHFILL, GREG, 205.10, REIM. FOR TRAVEL; 1923, AT & T MOBILITY, 162.10, UTILITIES; 1924, MERRIFIELD OFFICE SUPPLY INC, 12.58, SUPPLIES; 1926, MERRIFIELD OFFICE SUPPLY INC, 11.00, SUPPLIES; 1926, HOLIDAY INN, 99.00, LODGING; 1927, IAA() LOCKBOX, 500.00, SUPPLIES; 1928, SCHMIDT, MONICA, 169.50, REIM. FOR TRAVEL; 1929, MERRIFIELD OFFICE SUPPLY INC, 37.46, SUPPLIES; 1930; SCHMIDT, MONICA, 72.24, REIMBURSEMENT; 1931, FUELMAN, 254.20, FUEL; 1932, HOLIDAY INN, 99.00, LODGING; 1933, ALVA REVIEW COURIER, 981.80, BLANKET PO; 1934, CENTERPOINT ENERGY SERVICES, INC, 503.42, UTILITIES; 1935, ENID TYPEWRITER CO., 161.73, BLANKET PO; 1936, JENKINS AND PRICE INC., 15.86, BLANKET PO; 1937, JENKINS AND PRICE INC., 797.48, SUPPLIES; 1938, MERRIFIELD OFFICE SUPPLY INC, 164.75, SUPPLIES; 1939, MICROSOFT TECHNET, 249.00, SUBSCRIPTION; 1940, OKLAHOMA GAS & ELECTRIC, 1635.04, UTILITIES; 1941, OKLAHOMA NATURAL GAS CO., 50.56, UTILITIES; 1942, OKLAHOMA NATURAL GAS CO., 180.75, UTILITIES; 1943, PIONEER LONG DISTANCE INC, 1124.99, UTILITIES; 1944, CITY OF WAYNOKA, 400.00, FIRE RUNS; 1945, GARNETT OIL CO INC, 32.94, BLANKET PO; 1946, ALVA REVIEW COURIER, 67.50, SUPPLIES; 1947, NORTHWEST TECHNOLOGY CENTER, 40.00, SUPPLIES; 1948, PIONEER CELLULAR, 31.78, SUPPLIES; 1949, OKLAHOMA NATURAL GAS CO., 419.88, UTILITIES; HIGHWAY: 2286, AIRGAS MID SOUTH INC, 168.80, SUPPLIES; 2287, ALLIED CUSTOM GYPSUM INC, 554.40, SUPPLIES; 2288, ALLIED CUSTOM GYPSUM INC, 415.20, SUPPLIES; 2289, ALLIED CUSTOM GYPSUM INC, 420.30, SUPPLIES; 2290, ALLIED CUSTOM GYPSUM INC, 586.20, SUPPLIES; 2291, ALLIED CUSTOM-GYPSUM INC, 889.20, SUPPLIES; 2292, ALLIED CUSTOM GYPSUM INC, 144.60, SUPPLIES; 2293, ALLIED CUSTOM GYPSUM INC, 435.30, SUPPLIES; 2294, ALLIED CUSTOM GYPSUM INC, 866.70, SUPPLIES; 2295, ALLIED CUSTOM GYPSUM INC, 882.00, SUPPLIES; 2296, ALLIED CUSTOM GYPSUM INC, 578.40, SUPPLIES; 2297, ALLIED CUSTOM GYPSUM INC, 869.10, SUPPLIES; 2298, ALVA CONCRETE MATERIALS CO., 280.00, SUPPLIES; 2299, ALVA REVIEW COURIER, 63.60, SUPPLIES; 2300, ATLAS SPRING & AXLE, 192.14, SUPPLIES; 2301, BENSON, BRYCE, 2000.00, BLANKET PO; 2302, CED #8, 596.00, BLANKET PO; 2303, DACOMA FARMERS COOP, 525.60, BLANKET PO; 2304, DACOMA FARMERS COOP, 108.00, BLANKET PO; 2305, DOUBLE CHECK CO, 481.46, SUPPLIES; 2306, ECI, 352.36, SUPPLIES; 2307, ENID MACK SALES INC., 1501.52, BLANKET PO; 2308, ENID MACK SALES INC., 1335.27, BLANKET PO; 2309, FARM PLAN CORP., 27.99, BLANKET PO; 2310, FEES, SHELLEY, 140.00, BLANKET PO; 2311, FREEDOM HARDWARE, 84.49, BLANKET PO; 2312, GALLS, AN ARAMARK COMPANY, 552.49, SUPPLIES; 2313, GARNETT OIL CO INC, 79.25, BLANKET PO; 2314, GARNETT OIL CO INC, 104.30, SUPPLIES; 2315, GARNETT OIL CO INC, 52.82, SUPPLIES; 2316, GARNETT OIL CO INC, 2937.80, SUPPLIES; 2317, HARGER, NANCY JAMES, 75.00, SUPPLIES; 2318, K & K BODY WORKS INC., 110.00, SUPPLIES; 2319, KIRBY SMITH MACHINERY INC, KSM EXCHANGE LLC, 1134.34, SUPPLIES; 2320, KIRBY SMITH MACHINERY INC, KSM EXCHANGE LLC, 493.24, SUPPLIES; 2321, LEHRS BODY SHOP, 2035.85, SUPPLIES; 2322, MARTIN MARIETTA MATERIALS, 36406.20, SUPPLIES; 2323, MARTIN MARIETTA MATERIALS, 22949.80, SUPPLIES; 2324, MATHIS, CAROLYN, 1832.00, BLANKET PO; 2325, MIKE S VARIETY STORE, 14.98, BLANKET PO; 2326, MUNN SUPPLY INC, 38.55, BLANKET PO; 2327, NORTHWEST BEARING & INDUST. SU, 227.22, SUPPLIES; 2328, NORTHWEST BEARING & INDUST. SU, 55.26, SUPPLIES; 2329, 0 BAR AUTO, 683.32, SUPPLIES; 2330, 0 REILLY AUTO PARTS INC, 241.38, BLANKET PO; 2331, 0 REILLY AUTO PARTS INC, 144.04, BLANKET PO; 2332, 0 REILLY AUTO PARTS INC, 210.51, SUPPLIES; 2333, 0 REILLY AUTO PARTS INC, 160.48, SUPPLIES; 2334, OKLAHOMA GAS & ELECTRIC, 270.35, UTILITIES; 2335, OKLAHOMA NATURAL GAS CO., 188.12, UTILITIES; 2336, OKLAHOMA NATURAL GAS CO., 109.31, UTILITIES; 2337, PERFORMANCE EQUIPMENT INC, 13.05, SUPPLIES; 2338, PIONEER TELEPHONE AR-PTC30, 160.94, UTILITIES; 2339, PRAIRIE FIRE COFFEE ROASTERS INC; 71.70, SUPPLIES; 2340, REED, SHELLEY, 38.50, REIMBURSEMENT; 2341, RICKE HAULING, 292.50, SUPPLIES; 2342, ROSE, BRENDA, 2000.00, BLANKET PO; 2343, TOTAL COM INC, 2935.20, SUPPLIES; 2344, TOTAL COM INC, 552.80, SUPPLIES; 2345, TOTAL COM INC, 977.00, SUPPLIES; 2346, UNIFIRST HOLDINGS INC, 448.33, SUPPLIES; 2347, UNIFIRST HOLDINGS INC, 271.67, SUPPLIES; 2348, UNIFIRST HOLDINGS INC, 271.67, SUPPLIES; 2349, UNITED BRAKE & ELECTRIC, 30.00, SUPPLIES; 2350, UNIVERSAL LUBRICANTS LLC, 2699.40, SUPPLIES; 2351, WAKO INC., 2084.86, SUPPLIES; 2352, WARREN CAT, 9969.50, RENTAL; 2353, WARREN CAT, 1371.04, BLANKET PO; 2354, WARREN CAT, 131.16, BLANKET PO; 2355, WARREN CAT, 57.78, SUPPLIES; 2356, WARREN CAT, 837.30, BLANKET PO; 2357, WARREN CAT, 2051.28, SUPPLIES; 2358, WARREN CAT, 307.51, SUPPLIES; 2359, WAYNOKA HOME SUPPLY INC, 31.47, BLANKET PO; 2360, WELDON PARTS INC, 450.11, BLANKET PO; 2361, WELDON PARTS INC, 226.37, BLANKET PO; 2362, WELDON PARTS INC, 4383.26, SUPPLIES; 2363, WELDON PARTS INC, 614.02, SUPPLIES; 2364, WEST BOUND TRUCKING, 807.50, SUPPLIES; 2365, WEST BOUND TRUCKING, 807.50, SUPPLIES; 2366, WEST BOUND TRUCKING, 760.00, SUPPLIES; 2367, WESTERN EQUIPMENT LLC, 641.08, BLANKET PO; 2368, WESTERN EQUIPMENT LLC, 335.73, BLANKET PO; 2369, WESTERN EQUIPMENT LLC, 6345.84, SUPPLIES; 2370, WOODWARD STEEL INC., 79.40, SUPPLIES; 2371, BANCCENTRAL, 2827.10, LEASE; 2372, BANCCENTRAL, 7925.20, LEASE; 2373, CATERPILLAR FINANCIAL SERVICES CORP, 2901.33, LEASE; 2374, CATERPILLAR FINANCIAL SERVICES CORP, 2996.17, LEASE; 2375, CATERPILLAR FINANCIAL SERVICES CORP, 1854.31, LEASE; 2376, CATERPILLAR FINANCIAL SERVICES CORP, 5981.61, LEASE; 2377, COMMUNITY BANK, 4389.21, LEASE; 2378, COMMUNITY BANK, 1373.01, LEASE; 2379, COMMUNITY BANK, 513.82, LEASE; 2380, COMMUNITY BANK, 1616.90, LEASE; 2381, FIRST STATE BANK, 2458.68, LEASE; 2382, FIRST STATE BANK, 2691.23, LEASE; 2383, FIRST STATE BANK, 1953.01, LEASE; 2384, FREEDOM STATE BANK, 1182.74, LEASE; 2385, FREEDOM STATE BANK, 3351.87, LEASE; 2386, FREEDOM STATE BANK, 1119.40, LEASE; 2387, JOHN DEERE CREDIT, 2000.00, LEASE; 2388, OKLA. DEPT. OF TRANSPORTATION, 9169.45, LEASE; 2389, WELCH STATE BANK, 1748.41, LEASE; 2390, WELCH STATE BANK, 8395.52, LEASE; 2391, WELCH STATE BANK, 2277.45, LEASE; 2392, WELCH STATE BANK, 1380.90, LEASE; HEALTH DEPT: 128, OKLA STATE DEPT OF HEALTH, 10978.38, PAYROLL; 129, OKLA STATE DEPT OF HEALTH, 11521.06, PAYROLL; 130, KILGORE, ASHLEE, 800.00, CUSTODIAL; 131, KIRKPATRICK, DANNY, 60.00, PEST CONTROL; 132, MERRIFIELD OFFICE SUPPLY INC, 29.99, SUPPLIES; 133, NORTHWEST SHREDDERS, 25.00, SHREDDING SERVICE; 134, OKLAHOMA GAS & ELECTRIC, 218.10, UTILITIES; 135, QUILL CORP, 309.96, SUPPLIES; 136, RIALTO, 350.00, SUPPLIES; 137, WAL MART, 105.79, SUPPLIES; SHERIFF SERVICE FEE: 92, OKLAHOMA TAX COMMISSION, 37.50, SUPPLIES; 93, SPEEDY TEES & MORE, 260.88, SUPPLIES; 94, TASER INTERNATIONAL, 302.51, SUPPLIES; 95, ADAMSON INDUSTRIES CORP, 2929.80, SUPPLIES; 96, WASHBURN MOTOR CO., 26521.00, PICKUP; COUNTY CLERK LIEN FEE: 107, REED, SHELLEY, 120.46, REIM. FOR TRAVEL; 108, MERRIFIELD OFFICE SUPPLY INC, 35.28, SUPPLIES;


June 14, 2013

CAXCA

LPXLP

Action Ads For Sale

Help Wanted

2000 Chrysler LHS - $2500. 580- Truck Drivers for Rock & Grain 430-5456. Hauling, 90 Mile Radius of Burlington, OK. Competitive Wages. Computer Repair Harvest Positions Available Too! Networking, PC Repair, Website 620-327-7360 Design, Onsite Repairs, Day or Evening. 405-388-5379 Help Wanted Part-Time Station Help. More hours Bed & Breakfast over the summer. Pick-Up application Now open. Cottage at Tamarack at Garnett’s Conoco. 518 Okla Blvd. Ranch. Conveniently located Alva. 580-327-2691 between Alva & Cherokee. Nightly or weekly rates. 580-596-6997. Help Wanted Depot Bar & Grill. Bartender. PickCrooked Oak B & B Up application at 3 N college. 580580-327-3653. alvacrookedoak.com 327-7011

Need New Sidewalks?

Help Wanted

Driveway perhaps, we do all types Looking for CDL Driver in Alva of concrete work. Stamp and Colors area. 501-499-3338 also avail. Give us a call for estimates. 580-732-1028 Hiring Immediately Smok Shak in Ingersoll, cooks, Clothing Giveway waitresses, dishwasher, full & part Church of the Nazarene. June 15 time. Apply in person. 580-596-3584 8am-1pm. Corner of Locust & College Now Hiring Premier Aerospace Services & CC Construction Technology, Inc. hiring 2 full-time Interior-Exterior improvements. production positions. Competitive Room additions. Plaster Repair & pay & benefits. Flexible work hours. Painting. Handicap. Structural & applications available at 1729 OK Non Structural Concrete. Will also Blvd. EOE accommodate Farm & Ranch. 580307-4598 or 620-825-4285 Farmers Please Help 65 year old looking for hunting lease For Your Const Needs for Deer anywhere from $1000 to From A-Z, New Construction, $30,000 a year. 580-554-0999 Roofing, Additions, Remodeling, Siding, Windows, Int/Ext, Painting, Garage Sale All Work Guaranteed. Improve the 415 Center St. Baby items, womens value of your home. Call 580-732- clothing, shoes and accessories, 1028 housing items, canopy headboard/ footboard, etc. Fri 6-8pm. Sat 8am to Harvest! noon Looking to lease farmland or do custom farming? (Wheat, Corn, Large Benefit Sale Soy Beans, Etc.) Call Specialty 7 in at the Homestead (in the lobby). Burlington, OK at 620-327-7360. 901 Homestead Dr. (just past Share Hospital). Fri, June 14, 4pm-7pm & Double ‘C’ Sat, June 15, 8am-noon. All proceeds Welding and Fencing. Call 580-541go toward improving The Homestead. 3148 or 580-871-2364 Donations are tax deductible and greatly appreciated Computer Plus For all computer repair needs call For Sale Adam Swallow at 580-327-4449 or 520 E 5th St. in Cherokee, OK 3/4 580-748-2349 or come by 1329 Fair. bdrm on 1 acre. $85,000. 580-748Will do local housecalls 1597

Alva Review-Courier

Community Calendar Friday 9 a.m. The Woods County Senior Citizens Center, 625 Barnes, Alva, is open for games and other activities. Exercise is scheduled each day at 11 a.m. Transportation provided upon request. David Shaw will entertain at 12:30 p.m. 1-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. 7 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous meets every Friday at the Senior Citizen Center, 122 1/2 E. Second, Cherokee. Saturday 1-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030. Sunday 1-5 p.m. The Cherokee Strip Museum in Alva is open every day except Monday. For information or arranged tours, call 580-327-2030.

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, June 14, 2013.) BEFORE THE CORPORATION COMMISSION OF THE STATE OF OKLAHOMA APPLICANTS: CHESAPEAKE OPERATING, INC. AND CHESAPEAKE EXPLORATION, L.L.C. RELIEF SOUGHT: SPACING LEGAL DESCRIPTION: SECTION 31, TOWNSHIP 29 NORTH, RANGE 15 WEST OF THE IM, WOODS COUNTY, OKLAHOMA Cause CD No. 201303951 NOTICE OF HEARING STATE OF OKLAHOMA TO: All persons, owners, producers, operators, purchasers and takers of oil and gas, and all other interested persons, particularly in Woods County, Oklahoma, more particularly the parties set out on the Exhibit “A” attached to the application on file in this cause, and, if any of the named individuals be deceased, then the unknown heirs, executors, administrators, devisees, trustees and assigns, both immediate and remote, of such deceased individual; if any of the Help Wanted named entities is a dissolved partnership, For Rent corporation or other association, then General Carpentry Skills Preferred. Normandy Apt. 2 bdrm. 1702 the unknown successors, trustees and 405-401-8205 or 405-317-5243 College. 405-659-4199 assigns, both immediate and remote, of such dissolved entity; if any of the For Rent named parties designated as a trustee 4bdrm, 2bth, No Smoking. No Pets. is not presently acting in such capacity Ref required. $975/Month. Call 580- as trustee, then the unknown successor or successors to such trustee; if any 327-6929 REAL ESTATE & AUCTION of the named parties designated as an 580-327-1998 attorney-in-fact is not presently acting www.murrowlandandhome.com www.murrowrealestateandauction.com in such capacity as attorney-in-fact, then the unknown successor or successors to such attorney-in-fact; and if any of the named entities are corporations which do not continue to have legal existence, the unknown trustees or assigns of such

MURROW

Page 13 parties. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Applicants, Chesapeake Operating, Inc. and Chesapeake Exploration, L.L.C., have filed an application in this cause requesting the Corporation Commission to enter an order, as follows: (i) amending Order No. 81138 of the Commission so as to reform the 320-acre drilling and spacing units previously formed for the Cherokee common source of supply of gas in Section 31, Township 29 North, Range 15 West of the IM, Woods County, Oklahoma, into a proper drilling and spacing unit in such section, which units Applicants request be reformed into a 640-acre drilling and spacing, with the permitted well for the unit to be located not less than 1320 feet from the unit boundary; (ii) granting such other and further relief as may be proper based upon the evidence presented at the hearing herein. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be referred to an Administrative Law Judge for hearing, taking of evidence and reporting to the Corporation Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that this cause will be heard before an Administrative Law Judge on the Conservation Docket at the Corporation Commission, First Floor, Jim Thorpe Building, 2101 North Lincoln Boulevard, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, at 8:30 a.m., on the 2nd day of July 2013, and that this notice will be published as required by law and the rules of the Commission. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Applicants and interested parties may present testimony by telephone. The cost of telephonic communication shall be paid by the person or persons requesting its use. An interested party who wishes to participate by telephone shall contact the Applicants or Applicants’ attorney, prior to the hearing date, and provide his or her name and phone number. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that all interested persons may appear and be heard. For information concerning this action contact Matt Fleischer, landman, (405) 935-1407, or Emily P. Smith, attorney, OBA No. 20805, (405) 9358305, Chesapeake Operating, Inc., P.O. Box 18496, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73154-0496. Please refer to Cause CD Number. CORPORATION COMMISSION OF OKLAHOMA PATRICE DOUGLAS, Chairman BOB ANTHONY, Vice Chairman DANA L. MURPHY, Commissioner DONE AND PERFORMED this 12th day of June, 2013 BY ORDER OF THE COMMISSION: PEGGY MITCHELL, Commission Secretary

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, June 14 and 21, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF WOODS COUNTY STATE OF OKLAHOMA In the Matter of the Estate of Maxine B. Weber, Deceased. Case No. PB-2012-10 NOTICE OF HEARING FINAL ACCOUNT, PETITION FOR DETERMINATION OF HEIRS, DISTRIBUTION AND DISCHARGE Notice is hereby given that Henry Bickerstaff, as Personal Representative of the Estate of Maxine B. Weber, deceased, having filed in this Court his

EdwardJones

The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up 180.85 to CLOSE at 15,176.08. The NASDAQ Composite Index was up 44.94 to CLOSE at 3446.36. The Transportation Average was up 118.23 to CLOSE at 6341.39 and Utilities CLOSED up 6.94 at 484.98. Volume was approx 765 million shares. Gold fell $14.20 to $1,377.80, and Silver CLOSED at $27.80, up 15¢. Crude oil prices rose 81¢ to $96.69 per barrel. Wheat Price was $7.16, up 2¢. Prime Rate is 3.25%

Stocks of Local Interest — Courtesy Pat Harkin

Name Close Change Volume OGE Energy 67.48 +1.00 437,820 ONEOK Inc 44.63 +1.31 1,208,512 Duke Energy 67.49 +0.90 3,297,802 WilliamsCo 33.70 -0.33 20,599,704 Chesapeake Energy 21.00 -0.08 18,230,470 Wal-Mart 75.00 +0.16 7,191,186 ConocoPhillips 61.65 +0.77 5,328,584 SandRidge Energy 4.83 +0.16 6,416,583 30 Yr. U.S. Treasury Bond 3.33% Insured AAA Tax Free Muni. Bond 0.76-3.73% Yield to Maturity 5 Year C/D, Annual Pct Yield 1.35% Money Market - 7 Day Avg Rate 0.01%

Stock Market Report — for June 13, 2013

Final Account of the administration of said Estate and Petition for Order allowing same, determination of heirs, distribution, and for final discharge of said Personal Representative, the hearing of the same has been fixed by the Judge of said Court for Thursday, the 11th day of July, 2013, at 11:00 o’clock A.M., at the Courtroom of said District Court in the Courthouse at Alva, in the County and State aforesaid, and all persons interested in said Estate are notified then and there to appear and show cause, if any they have, why the said Account should not be settled and allowed, the heirs of Maxine B. Weber, deceased, determined, and said Estate distributed and the Personal Representative discharged. Dated this 10th day of June, 2013. Mickey J. Hadwiger JUDGE OF THE DISTRICT COURT Edward E. Sutter, OBA #8778 Attorney for Personal Representative 401 College Avenue P. O. Box 213 Alva, OK 73717 (580) 327-1511

LEGAL NOTICE

(Published by the Alva Review-Courier on Friday, June 14 and 21, 2013.) IN THE DISTRICT COURT WITHIN AND FOR WOODS COUNTY AND STATE OF OKLAHOMA In the Matter of the Estate of Scott Grady Irwin, Deceased. No. PB-2008-15 NOTICE OF HEARING FINAL REPORT AND FINAL ACCOUNT, PETITION FOR ORDER ALLOWING FINAL REPORT AND FINAL ACCOUNT AND DETERMINING HEIRSHIP, AND PETITION FOR FINAL DECREE OF DISTRIBUTION AND DISCHARGE Notice is hereby given that Chris Thomas, Personal Representative of the estate of Scott Grady Irwin, deceased, having filed in this Court his Final Report and Final Account, Petition for Order Allowing Final Report and Final Account and Determining Heirship and Petition for Final Decree of Distribution and Discharge, the hearing of the same has been set by the Court for Thursday, the 11th day of July, 2013, at 9:30 o’clock A. M. at the Courtroom of said District Court in the Courthouse at Alva, in the County and State aforesaid, and all persons interested in said estate are notified then and there to appear and show cause, if any they have, why the said account should not be settled and allowed, the heirs of Scott Grady Irwin, deceased, determined, said estate distributed, and the Personal Representative discharged. Dated this 11th day of June, 2013. s/ Mickey J. Hadwiger JUDGE OF THE DISTRICT COURT Larry L. Bays P. O. Box 98 Alva, Oklahoma 73717 Attorney for Personal Representative


June 14, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

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June 14, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 15

Toby Keith, Garth Brooks New lungs buy time but plan Okla. relief concert don’t cure cystic fibrosis NORMAN, Okla. (AP) — Another star-studded country music concert is planned to benefit victims of the deadly tornadoes in Oklahoma last month. Toby Keith announced Thursday that his Oklahoma Twister Relief Concert will be held July 6 at the University of Oklahoma’s Gay-

lord Family-Oklahoma Memorial Stadium in Norman. Joining Keith is fellow Oklahoman Garth Brooks and his wife, Trisha Yearwood. Other performers include Willie Nelson and Ronnie Dunn. Organizers say the $25 tickets will go on sale June 21. Keith is a native of Moore,

where 24 people were killed in an EF5 tornado on May 20. Brooks, who lives in Owasso, says he’s honored to participate in the concert. A concert last month hosted by Blake Shelton raised more than $6 million for the United Way of Central Oklahoma.

Court sides with Oklahoma in Red River dispute WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Thursday decisively sided with Oklahoma and rejected Texas’ claim that it has a right under a 30-year-old agreement to cross their common border for water to serve the fast-growing Fort Worth area. The justices unanimously said that the Red River Compact “creates no cross-border rights in Texas.” The case concerns a dispute over access to southeastern Oklahoma tributaries of the Red River that separates Oklahoma and Texas. The Tarrant Regional Water District serving an 11-county area in north-central Texas, including Fort Worth and Arlington, wants to buy 150 billion gallons of water and said the four-state compact gives it the right to do so. Arkansas and Louisiana are the other participating states, and they sided with Oklahoma.

From Page

“Obviously, we are disappointed with the Supreme Court’s decision. Securing additional water resources is essential to North Texas’ continued growth and prosperity and will remain one of our top priorities,” water district general manager Jim Oliver said. Justice Sonia Sotomayor’s opinion for the court made plain that the justices did not find this a close case. “We hold that Tarrant’s claims lack merit,” Sotomayor said. The case arose from a federal lawsuit the district filed in 2007 against the Oklahoma Water Resources Board and the Oklahoma Water Conservation Storage Commission that challenged the state’s water laws and sought a court order to prevent the board from enforcing them. Lower courts ruled for Oklahoma, including the Denver-based 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

It found that the Red River Compact protects Oklahoma’s water statutes from the legal challenge. Legislation adopted by the Oklahoma Legislature in 2009 said no out-of-state water permit can prevent Oklahoma from meeting its obligations under compacts with other states. It also requires the Water Resources Board to consider in-state water shortages or needs when considering applications for out-of-state water sales. The Obama administration backed the Texas district at the Supreme Court, saying Oklahoma may not categorically prohibit Texas water users from obtaining water in Oklahoma. But the administration took no position on whether the Texans ultimately should get the water they are seeking in this case. The case is Tarrant Regional Water District v. Herrmann, 11-889.

Avard Rail

finance lease on a building at the rail park). The net income as of May 31, 2013, was $752,254.73. The time period covered by the financial statement was described as “More than a year, but less than two. It is the performance of the Avard Regional Rail Park Authority since its inception.” An audit will be performed after June 30, 2013, to get everything on a fiscal year basis. A motion to approve the financial report was made by Stan Bixler with a second to that motion by Les Kamas. The Meandering Creek A discussion was held to hire Teracon Consulting Engineers to make an environmental impact study and recommendation on moving a small creek that crosses the Avard rail property. If it is not moved, then five or six lots will not be able to be sold. Todd Holder said that Teracon had completed a couple of phases and is now ready to start the third phase which is a study of the amount of water that flows through the creek. Holder said it was his recommendation the Authority approve this part of the study. He said the cost would be between $2500 and $3500 for this phase. He said, “We have to get it to this point before the federal government (Corps of Engineers) can act and say ‘yes we can do it’, or ‘no we can’t.’” Ed Sutter asked, “Is there anything from a time stand-point that requires us to do this right now? Or can we do it a year from now?” Williams replied, “It determines where we will locate people. Everybody we’re talking to is wanting to build track ... and long track. We can only do that so

far and then this creek gets in the way.” Holder added, “We need to get the meander out of it!” Sutter then asked, “If the Corps of Engineers approves this, do we have any idea how much it will cost to re-channel the creek?” Both Holder and Williams replied, “That depends on what the Corps of Engineers says we can do.” Les Kamas asked, “Do you also have to go through the Oklahoma Water Resources Board?” Williams replied that’s what they (Corps of Engineers) will tell us. Todd Holder added, “We’re not damming anything. All we are proposing is to change the meandering on our property and still exit at approximately the same location.” The motion to employ Teracon was approved. New Officers The next agenda item was to nominate officers. Todd Holder immediately said, “I nominate Ed (Sutter) as chairman.” Sutter replied, “I appreciate that, but I announced to the board about 90 days ago that while I still want to be on the board, we have several people who are capable of being chairman and holding other offices.”

A “second” was voiced to Holder’s motion and Sutter said, “I am not willing to serve. I consider it an honor to be able to serve for two years, and I think it is time for someone else to step up. I don’t know if I can make a motion as chairman, but I just think everybody should advance one position up. This means Stan Bixler would be chairman, Joe Royster would be vice-chairman, Les Kamas would be secretary and Todd Holder would remain as treasurer. Ed Sutter would become second secretary. Bixler commented, “But you never want to follow a legend (referring to Sutter)”. Then Royster made a motion and Kamas provided the second to Sutter’s motion. Stan Bixler will be in charge of the July meeting.

By Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — The 10-year-old Pennsylvania girl who fought for a lung transplant has a difficult journey ahead. The transplant isn’t a cure for her cystic fibrosis, and new lungs don’t tend to last as long as other transplanted organs. But it can extend life by years, buying some time. “You’re keeping them alive and hopefully well, hoping that something else will come along that will make the big difference,” said Dr. Anastassios Koumbourlis, pulmonary chief at Children’s National Medical Center in the nation’s capital. Sarah Murnaghan, who is recovering from Wednesday’s operation at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, made headlines as her parents challenged national policy over how children under 12 are placed on the waiting list for donated lungs. Lost in the debate over how to give out scarce organs was this broader question: How well do children with cystic fibrosis fare when they do get a new set of lungs? Fortunately, few children get sick enough anymore to need transplants, said Dr. Stuart Sweet, pediatric lung transplant chief at Washington University in St. Louis. Treatments for the genetic disease have improved so much over the past decade that patients live much longer before their lungs start to wear out. About 30,000 Americans live with cystic fibrosis, which causes sticky mucus to build up in the lungs, leading to life-threatening infections in the lungs and problems in other organs. Only a few decades ago, children with the disease seldom survived elementary school. Now the typical life expectancy is about 37 years and growing. A 2007 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine prompted major controversy over whether lung transplants offered enough survival benefit to be used for cystic fibrosis. Ultimately, doctors decided it did, for the right patient who is out of options. Since then, about 150 to 200 people with the disease, mostly teens and adults, have gotten lung transplants every year, according to a patient registry run by the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Over 80 percent of patients who get new lungs survive a year, and over 50 percent are alive after five years, the regis-

try shows. That’s a sobering statistic, although some people survive much longer. For comparison, well over 90 percent of people who receive a kidney transplant survive five years. “We expect it will be a long road, but we’re not going for easy, we’re going for possible,” Sarah’s family said in a statement after her surgery. Sweet said the issue isn’t the cystic fibrosis but that lungs simply are difficult to transplant, no matter what the underlying disease. “The reality is that lung transplantation is not a perfect solution,” Sweet said. After all, “this is the only organ we transplant that’s in contact with the outside world,” added Dr. Karen McCoy, pulmonology chief at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. For cystic fibrosis patients, the donated lungs don’t contain the defective gene that caused their own lungs to clog — so they won’t fill with mucus again. Cystic fibrosis will continue to damage their pancreas, intestines and other parts of the body, requiring ongoing treatment to deal with nutritional problems and other symptoms. But patients may be at higher risk of post-transplant lung infections for a different reason: Some of the antibiotic-resistant germs that infected their old lungs can still be lurking in their sinuses. They can travel to the new lungs as patients begin taking the immunesuppressing drugs necessary to prevent organ rejection, McCoy said. Eventually, many transplant recipients suffer lung failure as some of the tiniest airways in the lungs break down, in part due to infections. Some qualify for another transplant, but second transplants aren’t as successful. Another threat for lung recipients, regardless of the underlying disease: The teen years. That’s when young patients assume more responsibility for their anti-rejection medicines, and may skip doses to be “normal” like their friends — one reason survival dips for adolescents Stay tuned: Treatments that target the specific gene defect behind most cases of cystic fibrosis are being researched. If they pan out, eventually fewer patients may need transplants. *** Online: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation: http://www.cff.org/


June 14, 2013

Alva Review-Courier

Page 16


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