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Auburn MAGAZINE / WINTER 2015

Emotional Rescue MOOSE: A LAB REPORT

FUNNY GIRL JEANNE ROBERTSON

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THE ORIGINS OF WAR EAGLE


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Auburn MAGAZINE / SUMMER 2015

Auburn Sunrise Print Featured on recent Auburn Magazine cover Printed on photographic paper with an archival life of 100 years Available in vertical or horizontal prints:

11x14 –

$30

16x20 – $60 whole_bookSU2015-SJSH.indd 1

Special Book Offer While supplies last, you can own both of Auburn University’s award-winning coffee table books for $49.95 ($39.95 if purchased separately). Echoes Strong and Clear is a photographic compilation depicting the university’s historical transformation.

5/12/15 1:55 PM

For more information or to place an order, contact Photographic Services at 334/844-4560 or visit auburn.edu/photostore. Orders placed after December 11 are not guaranteed to arrive by Christmas. Tax and shipping are not included.

’Neath the Sun-Kissed Sky is a collection of photographs celebrating the university’s 150th anniversary. Get both books for

$49.95

WINTER 2015

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Dogged Determination Bart Rogers, a trainer with AU’s Canine Performance Sciences program through the College of Veterinary Medicine, has worked with Moose since he was a puppy. First, he trained the yellow Lab in explosive and live-virus detection, then re-trained him to qualify as a therapy dog with Auburn’s Student Counseling Services. It takes a special dog to have the right temperament to handle both jobs...and a special trainer to bring out the best in Dr. Moose. See related story on Page 28. (Photograph by Jeff Etheridge.) See more online at www.vetmed.auburn.edu/research/cps/

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Jane B. Moore Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient

Edward Lee Spencer ’52 Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient

James S. Voss ’72 Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient

Walter S. Woltosz ’69 Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient

The Auburn Alumni Association is pleased to announce the 2015 recipients of the Lifetime Achievement Awards, the university’s highest alumni recognition. The recipients are Professor Emerita of Auburn University Dr. Jane B. Moore; Chairman of AuburnBank Mr. Edward Lee “Ed Lee” Spencer ’52; NASA astronaut Col. James Shelton “Jim” Voss ’72; and owner of Simulations Plus Inc. Mr. Walter Stanley “Walt” Woltosz ’69. Registered military nurse Lt. William Joel “Joel” Shumaker ’05 will also be recognized as the recipient of the Young Alumni Achievement Award.

To learn more about this year’s honorees, visit us online at www.aualum.org/LAA. 4

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William Joel Shumaker ’05 Young Alumni Achievement Award Recipient


FROM THE PRESIDENT

Every Gift Counts WITH THE CONTINUING GROWTH of Because This Is Auburn, a campaign to raise $1 billion, the university is coming ever closer to the brink of a major achievement that will have a lasting impact on the future of the institution we love. At the end of this fiscal year, the campaign reached yet another milestone. For the first time in university history, members of the Auburn Family contributed more than $200 million in a 12-month period. Among those who stepped up were more than 5,700 first-time donors. Every gift to the campaign holds tremendous power; every donor empowers Auburn’s schools, colleges and departments. Each gift, regardless of amount, also strengthens our alumni participation rate, a critical measure used to determine national rankings of colleges and universities. Although large donations are essential to establish Auburn initiatives, many smaller gifts help them to flourish. Auburn Alumni Association—Support for scholarships makes a difference in the lives of students, enabling them to gain a valuable education and experience that equip them for success. Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art—Donors provide essential support for our quality exhibitions and programs. Original works of art are enriching and unique educational resources that can be thought-provoking and entertaining. The Littleton-Franklin Lectures—Donors continue what began in 1968 as a lecture series valued and cherished on the Auburn campus that has provided memorable experiences for many.

The Donald E. Davis Arboretum—Donors support the landscape that functions as an outdoor classroom for the university, local schools and community groups. Throughout Auburn’s history, alumni have generously given to Auburn; some selected a particular area within the university that provided them with the education to build a better future, while others wanted to support what they believe makes Auburn great. They are part of the reason Auburn has achieved status as a major land-, sea- and space-grant university with unlimited potential. They are why Auburn now fosters one of the richest academic experiences possible. The final success of the campaign and the goal of strengthening our position as a top-tier university depends on every member of the Auburn Family. I encourage you to consider what you can do to help propel Auburn forward.

War Eagle!

Jay Gogue ’69 President, Auburn University jgogue@auburn.edu

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FROM THE VICE PRESIDENT FOR ALUMNI AFFAIRS

Get Engaged AS THE HOLIDAY SEASON gets into full swing, the mood on the Plains is festive and filled with a spirit of gratitude. This time of year is truly special as it offers families and friends the opportunity to gather together to give thanks, celebrate each other and recognize they are part of something greater than themselves. Because you are a part of the Auburn Family, I hope you will take a moment to reflect on the many great traditions and memories that we have in common, including Auburn’s battle cry. A special thanks to our alumni guest writers Jeremy Henderson ’04 and Michael Strickland ’97 for their entertaining and informative articles about this wonderful legend featured in this issue. Another great tradition includes the selflessness and generous acts of philanthropy that define members of the Auburn Family. Philanthropy (from the Middle French word Philanthropie) means “love of mankind” and “the active effort to promote the happiness and well-being of others [through] practical benevolence.” (Oxford English Dictionary) It is with this definition in mind that I invite you to take a moment to celebrate and applaud the countless ways in which thousands of alumni and friends have impacted Auburn University over the past year through philanthropic endeavors sponsored by the Auburn Alumni Association. The Auburn Alumni Association Board of Directors

continues to provide leadership and make sound decisions that will position the association for a bright future. Last month, current and prior board members attended the 2015 annual meeting to review the 2014-15 fiscal year accomplishments; thank retiring board members Bob Jones ’74, Gaines Thomas ’72, Barbara Wallace Edwards ’79 and Bill Nelson ’72 (posthumously); welcome new directors Charles D. Hart Jr. ’85, LuAnne L. Hart ’80, Kelley Mossburg ’77 and Dewayne T. Scott ’95 (profiles are listed on Page 60 of this issue) and approve an important bylaws change related to Auburn Clubs and affinity alumni groups. This change will strengthen the traditional Auburn Club structure and provide more flexibility to smaller alumni affinity groups to become engaged. As you wrap up this year and look forward to a new one, I invite you to join your fellow Auburn Family members and participate in Tiger Giving Day on Dec. 1. I also encourage each of you to consider ways in which you might become personally engaged with the Auburn Alumni Association in 2016. Please contact the board members or our professional staff if you have questions or need additional information. You can find us at www.aualum.org. Thank you for being a special part of the Auburn Family. I hope each of you has a joyous holiday season and prosperous new year!

Gretchen VanValkenburg ’86 Vice President for Alumni Affairs & Executive Director, Auburn Alumni Association gretchenvan@auburn.edu

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Coincidence or Karma? WHAT WAS THE LIKELIHOOD that two unacquainted Auburn grads—seven class years and two states apart— would embark on the same mission: to learn when, and how, “War Eagle” came to Auburn University? Once and for all. A definitive answer to an enduring mystery. Jeremy Henderson ’04, known to Auburn fans as the founding editor of The War Eagle Reader, has been working on a book about it for years. As his book approached publication, Michael Strickland ’97 reached the end of his own quest. Coincidence or karma? What was the likelihood that, in the end, they’d come to the same conclusion? (Let me insert a warning for those raised on the story of the Civil War veteran and the eagle flying over the first football game in 1892. Prepare yourselves.) In this issue, Jeremy will review the various legends that have reigned throughout the years and how they began. Then, join Michael as he follows up with the investigation that led him to South Carolina. If you don’t know the name Rip Major now, you will. You’ll also know the name of Jeanne Robertson. After building a career as a humorist and motivational speaker through decades of personal appearances, YouTube and Sirius XM Radio have earned the Class of 1967 alumna a whole new generation of fans. Finally, meet our cover model, Moose. After retiring from a career in explosives detection, the 7-year-old Lab has become the only dog to be re-trained by AU’s Canine Performance Sciences staff as a therapy dog. As the newest member of Auburn’s Student Counseling Services staff, “Dr. Moose” is one of only a small handful of certified therapy dogs working at an American university,

FEATURES

where he assists students in individual and group counseling sessions.

30 Suzanne Johnson Editor, Auburn Magazine

Funny Girl

WITH ROUTINES THAT RANGE FROM “DON’T BUNGEE JUMP NAKED” TO “DON’T GIVE AUBURN A ‘SECOND’ CHANCE,” JEANNE ROBERTSON ‘67 FINDS HER CAREER ON OVERDRIVE THANKS TO YOUTUBE AND SIRIUS XM RADIO. EMBRACING THE TECHNOLOGY? YOU BET! BY NICK HINES / PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF ETHERIDGE

suzannejohnson@auburn.edu

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EDITOR

Suzanne Johnson CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Shannon Bryant-Hankes ’84 UNIVERSITY PHOTOGRAPHER

Jeff Etheridge EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Rachael Gamlin ‘16

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DESIGN ASSISTANTS

Jenna Marquardt ’15, Madison Wooters ’16 IT SPECIALIST

James Hammond ’13 PRESIDENT, AUBURN UNIVERSITY

Jay Gogue ’69 VICE PRESIDENT FOR ALUMNI AFFAIRS & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, AUBURN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

Gretchen VanValkenburg ’86 PRESIDENT, AUBURN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

Jack Fite ’85 AUBURN MAGAZINE ADVISORY COUNCIL CHAIR

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Neal Reynolds ’77 AUBURN MAGAZINE ADVISORY COUNCIL

DEPARTMENTS 7 From the Editor

20 Philanthropy

Unraveling the mystery of “War Eagle.”

Participation matters! Join the Auburn Family in being a part of Tiger Giving Day on Dec. 1.

CONCOURSE 10 We are the World Auburn identifies five areas of strategic research to make our world a better place.

13 Mixed Media Auburn alumni on screen, on stage, on the page and in the gallery.

16 The Supper Club’s Last Hurrah? The storied War Eagle Supper Club plans one last party before closing its doors.

18 Sports In a new biography, Ken W. Ringer ‘59 looks at the life and legend of Auburn’s longtime assistant coach Gene Lorendo.

THE CLASSES 54 Family Matters Auburn Alumni Association President Jack Fite ‘85 looks at traditions we all enjoy in the fall, from the excitement of Tiger Walk to the new Alumni Tailgate.

50 Class Notes 52 In Memoriam 64 Backchat See what your classmates are talking up on social media and remember to tag us in your Auburn pics with #AuburnAlumni!

ON THE COVER One of the few licensed therapy dogs working on a university campus, Dr. Moose brings a new dimension to Auburn’s Student Counseling Services. “Glamour shot” by Jeff Etheridge.

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Maria Baugh ’87 John Carvalho ’78 Jon Cole ’88 Christian Flathman ’97 Tom Ford ’67 Kay Fuston ’84 Julie Keith ’90 Mary Lou Foy ’66 Eric Ludgood ’78 Cindy McDaniel ’80 Napo Monasterio ’02 Carol Pappas ’77 Joyce Reynolds Ringer ’59 Allen Vaughan ’75

AUBURN MAGAZINE (ISSN 1077– 8640) is published quarterly; 4X per year; spring, summer, fall, winter, for members of the Auburn Alumni Association. Periodicals-class postage paid in Auburn and additional mailing offices. Editorial offices are located in the Auburn Alumni Center, 317 South College St., Auburn University, AL 36849-5149. Email: aubmag@auburn.edu. Contents ©2015 by the Auburn Alumni Association, all rights reserved. ADVERTISING INFORMATION Contact Jessica King at 334-844–2586 or see our media guide at aualum.org/magazine. POSTMASTER Send address changes to AU Records, 317 South College St., Auburn, AL 36849–5149.


AUBURN NEWS & VIEWS

Concourse IN THIS SECTION

Strategic Research 10 Terrible Ticks 12 Mixed Media 15 War Eagle Supper Club 16

Food

Eating Local (in Italy) The Mediterranean Diet is all the rage these days, and where better for AU nutrition and dietetics students to learn about it than in the heart of southern Italy? Explore their travels on Page 14.

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CONCOURSE > CAMPUS NEWS

Marking History

In front of the marker commemorating the 1964 desegregation of Auburn University, unveiled Sept. 24, are, from left, Ralph Foster, friend of Harold Franklin; Thom Gossom ‘75, Auburn University Foundation Board; Harold Franklin ‘65; Fred Gray, civil rights attorney; Bob Dumas ‘76, member of the Auburn board of trustees; Constance Relihan, associate provost for undergraduate studies; and student Sae’Breon Stiles, president of the Harold Franklin Society.

US News & World Report

rank in 2016 Best Colleges

Auburn University

TOP 50 Public Institution 23rd Consecutive Year since 1992 when computers still used floppy disks!

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UBURN UNIVERSITY IS HIRING 41 new faculty members in five strategic clusters to develop solutions to some of the most pressing challenges facing the world today. “These faculty will work in many disciplines and across colleges to increase the quality and impact of Auburn’s research in five key areas,” Provost Timothy R. Boosinger said. The new Strategic Hire Clusters are: cClimate, Human and Earth System Sciences, focusing on adverse impacts of climate change; c Health Disparities, seeking to improve health care for disadvantaged

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We Are the World segments of the population; c Scalable Energy Conversion Science and Technology, developing underutilized energy sources; c Omics and Informatics, adding to the knowledge base of genetics research through collecting, storing and analyzing data; and c Pharmaceutical Engineering, developing new methods for drug delivery, testing and manufacturing. The clusters are part of Auburn’s Strategic Hiring Initiative, the first in the university’s history. Launched in fall 2014, the initiative is designed to align Auburn’s research efforts with funding

trends while strengthening the research faculty and enhancing the university’s research profile through strategic hiring. “Implementing the Strategic Hiring Initiative is central to the advancement of Auburn’s research mission,” Boosinger said. “By strategically investing in our interdisciplinary efforts, we will recruit top faculty who will not only reinforce many of our existing research programs, but will also advance Auburn’s capacity for discovery, innovation and creative endeavors.” The process of determining the five clusters began with nearly 50 faculty members presenting synopses of their scholarly work with others in Auburn’s intellectual commu-

nity, resulting in the submission of 10 strategic hire proposals. Following a competitive review process, five proposals representing faculty from nearly all of Auburn’s colleges and schools were selected for funding, which will be jointly provided by the Office of the Provost and the colleges and schools. Funds will be used to support faculty startups, equipment, graduate students and facilities. National searches for these positions are currently underway. “The new positions will enhance Auburn’s research collaboration with industries and state and federal agencies,” said John Mason, Auburn University vice president for research and economic development.


CONCOURSE > RESEARCH

Cryptic Crayfish

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UDBUG, CRAWFISH, CRAWDAD—for most people, these names refer to a freshwater crustacean commonly served boiled and spicy. For two Auburn University scientists, however, a crayfish is an enigmatic creature with a genetic heritage that is as much mysterious as it is fascinating. Biological sciences professor Scott Santos, along with Brian Helms, assistant research professor in the Department of Biological Sciences and Auburn University Museum of Natural History, recently completed a study on crayfish in the Tallapoosa River. These particular crayfish are not the kind one traditionally eats, although Helms is quick to point out that even tree bark can be eaten. The crayfish species studied by Santos and Helms, the Tallapoosa Crayfish and the Slackwater Crayfish, are species endemic to the Tallapoosa River, look almost identical, and are genetically related. They represent a snapshot of the enormous aquatic biodiversity present in the Southeast, which includes some 347 recognized species and subspecies of crayfish. With the help of undergraduate student researchers, the pro-

fessors collected crayfish from 30 locations within the upper, little and middle Tallapoosa River. At each site, teams of scientists used dip-nets and kick seines to determine which species were present. Once back in the lab, researchers separated Tallapoosa Crayfish specimens from Slackwater Crayfish. “Morphologically they are almost impossible to tell apart,” said Helms. “We had to have some additional experts come in and verify them because they are so difficult to discern.” “Going into this study, we had ideas on how the two species would be related based on their habitats, but we were surprised to find how unique each individual population is,” said Helms. “We discovered that the two species that seemed outwardly so similar,” said Santos, “actually experienced a very different evolutionary history in the Tallapoosa River Basin.” Even between populations of the same species there were such extreme genetic differences that Helms and Santos believe the Tallapoosa Crayfish and the Slackwater Crayfish may actually have “species” within the “species,” or “cryptic diversity.” —Candis Birchfield

Tiger Dens AU students Alex Swilley

and Avery Henson were the winners of the Community Favorite award in this year’s Room Decorating Contest sponsored by the Office of Residence Life. Students were challenged to be as creative as possible in decorating their rooms, with winners chosen from each of the campus residences. Each of the winners received prizes from the offices or businesses that sponsored their category. Other awards were given for best rooms by male and female students, best Greek room, “greenest” room, room that showed the most spirit and, of course, the Student Alumni Association Favorite.

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CONCOURSE > RESEARCH

Tick...Tick...Tick As most people who spend time in the outdoors know, exposure to ticks is all too common in the South. And a run-in with a tick can be more than annoying; it can be downright dangerous. was a problem with ticks and tick-borne illnesses here, but no one really talked or knew about it.” As she began researching the topic more, she

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HERE ARE SEVERAL tickborne illnesses that can be transmitted by ticks to humans and pets in the Southeast, including Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis, and others. Lyme disease is the most commonly reported vector-borne disease in the United States and is caused by bacteria that is carried and transmitted by blacklegged ticks. According to the Alabama Department of Public Health website, there have been 48 confirmed cases of Lyme disease in Alabama within the last 12 months. Emily Merritt ’15, a recent graduate of the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences and research associate, grew up in New York, a tick-infested part of the country, and is well familiar with the realities of tick-borne illness. “When I moved to Alabama to pursue a master’s degree at Auburn, I realized that there

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found that doctors often misdiagnose and mistreat patients who have tick-borne illnesses because the medical community and the general public are not aware of the scope of the issue in the state. Recognizing a gap in research about the distribution of ticks and prevalence of tick-borne diseases in Alabama, Merritt approached Graeme Lockaby, associate dean of research of the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, about the potential of undertaking a study focused on the issue with the goal of identifying tick habitats and the degree in which ticks carry disease. “While we in the SFWS are not trained medically, we are highly qualified to create precise descriptions

of vegetation, stream, soil, and topographical habitats as well as to assess climate variation,” Lockaby said. “With this expertise, we hope to clarify which habitats different species of ticks occupy and what climatic conditions contribute to the distribution and prevalence of ticks and tick-borne diseases in Alabama. This information will then be used to develop a risk prediction tool that will help us better educate Alabama residents, medical professionals, state and federal agencies, and others on the areas of greatest risk and how to avoid tick contact.” Environmental health is

complex, so Rajesh Sawant and Sarah Zohdy of the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, Derrick Mathias of the AU entomology and plant pathology department, and Navideh Noori of the University of Georgia School of Ecology created a research team to bring together different areas of expertise. Initial conversations with medical professionals and early research funding from the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and the U.S. Forest Service suggests there is strong support for tick-borne disease research in the state. —Jamie Anderson


Tis the Season to

Jingle & Mingle

The Hotel at Auburn University & Dixon Conference Center, Ariccia Trattoria, & Piccolo host a variety of Holiday events for families, children, & adults. Additional information on holiday events can be found online at www.auhcc.com/holidays. THANKSGIVING BRUNCH BUFFET Thursday, November 26 | 10:30am • 1:00pm THANKSGIVING DINNER Thursday, November 26 | 5:00pm-10:00pm HOLLY JOLLY MIXOLOGY CLASS December 16, 21, 22, & 23 | 5:30pm-6:30pm GINGERBREAD UNVEILING Thursday, December 10 | 6:00pm

S’MORE’S AND MORE Every Tuesday, Thursday & Saturday in December (except for December 12) | 5:00pm-6:00pm CHILDREN’S GINGERBREAD CLASS Saturday, December 19 thru Tuesday, December 22 | 2:00pm-4:00pm CHRISTMAS DINNER December 24 & 25 | 5:00pm-9:00pm NEW YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATION December 31 | 5:30pm-1:00am

241 S. College Street | Auburn, AL | 35630 | (334)821-8200 | www.auhcc.com/holidays WINTER 2015

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CONCOURSE > STUDENT LIFE

Auburn’s Office of Institutional Research Posts Record Enrollment

Dieta nel Mediterraneo?

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HE WONDERS OF OLIVE OIL and fresh fish have made the Mediterranean Diet one of the most highly touted American foodways—but how Mediterranean is it? This past summer, Auburn food and nutrition science students got a firsthand look at how people living in those countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea actually eat. Assistant professor Michael Greene and associate professor Patty Marincic, nutrition faculty in the Department of Nutrition, Dietetics and Hospitality Management in the College of Human Sciences, developed the three-week study abroad program as a way of introducing their students “to a dietary approach that is not just in the classroom.” “I wanted them to experience it. Food is a big part of the culture and going over there was a big part of the experience,” explained Greene. The Mediterranean Diet is inspired by the dietary patterns of countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea and focuses on the consumption of fish, olive oil, peas and beans, fruits, vegetables, cheese, yogurt and even wine. To experience this practice firsthand, students went to Rome and Cilento in Southern Italy. A partnership with the Gustolab International Institute for Food Studies in Rome provided students with cooking classes, wine tastings, cheese making and olive oil tastings. “It was cool to learn basic things that you use in other dishes,” said nutrition/dietetics senior Katie Nahay. “People aren’t willing to give up the big things, but as dietitians, if we can get them to give up something small that’s where we can make it work.” Nahay, who said she was impressed with the simplicity of the Mediterranean Diet, referenced a visit to Cooperativa Nuovo Cilento, an agricultural cooperative and Italy’s largest producer of organic olive oil, where they were served a simple white potato with salt and olive oil. “We use spices and cover everything up,” she said. “In Italy, they let the food speak for itself.”—Megan Elliott

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1,375 more than Fall 2014!


MIXED MEDIA Now Playing GALLERY The unique type sculptures of award-winning art director June Corley ’73 have been featured in HOW, Communication Arts and Print design magazine as well as showing throughout the South. Read more about the Loachapoka-based artist on page 57 of this issue.

BOOKSHELF Behind Nazi Lines: My Father’s Heroic Quest to Save 149 World War II POWs, by Andrew Gerow Hodges Jr. ’64 and Denise George (Berkley Caliber, 2015). In 1944, hundreds of Allied soldiers were trapped in POW camps in occupied France. ...Andy Hodges had been excluded from military service due to a shoulder injury from his college football days. He joined the Red Cross, volunteering for the toughest assignments on the most dangerous battlefields. In the fall of 1944, Andy was tapped for what sounded like a suicide mission: a desperate attempt to aid the Allied POWs in occupied France—alone and unarmed, matching his wits against the Nazi war machine. This is his story.

U2 XyloReptile by June Corley. See more at www.junecorley.com.

More Than a Bird, by Liz Huntley ’93 (Salthouse Publishing, 2015). Scared and abused as a child, Elizabeth “Liz” Huntley reveals the perils of a childhood that would lead most to a broken life or premature death. Huntley, now a successful attorney and a member of the AU board of trustees, recounts her journey from darkness to radiance thanks to the intervention of teachers, a pastor and caring people, strategically placed in her life by God.

DISNEY/ABC

Real Native Genius: How an Ex-Slave and a White Mormon Became Famous Indians, by Angela Pulley Hudson ’96 (University of North Carolina Press, 2015). In the mid-1840s, Warner McCary, an ex-slave from Mississippi, claimed a new identity for himself and married Lucy Stanton, a divorced white Mormon woman from New York, who likewise claimed to be an Indian and used the name Laah Ceil. Together, they embarked on a sometimes scandalous journey across the United States and Canada. Along the way, they reflected and shaped popular ideas about what it meant to be an American Indian in the mid-19th century.

ON-SCREEN

“Quantico,” ABC-TV, co-stars Josh Hopkins ’91 as Liam O’Connor, a special agent for the FBI serving under the director of the facility at Quantico, played by Aunjanue Ellis. Episodes began airing in late September and will run through ABC’s 2016 season.

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The Last Supper?

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Ask any Auburn alum to show off his or her most treasured possessions from college, and there’s a decent chance a War Eagle Supper Club membership card (or three) will be among the treasures.

S OF JAN. 1, 2016, however, Supper Club patrons will no longer be able to purchase a card from the “Membership Hut,” as the iconic building will be torn down. The club, which leased the building from its current owners, was notified that its lease would not be continued into 2016. A farewell New Year’s Eve party is in the works. The building has been steeped in a rich history of revelry since it was built in 1937. The location of the lovingly dilapidated building was strategically chosen to promote alcohol consumption. “It wasn’t the War Eagle Supper Club in the very beginning, but [there’s] always been a nightclub here,” said owner John Brandt. “The city and state law both had it where at the time, you could not sell alcohol within one mile of the campus, and we were just beyond one mile.” The War Eagle Supper Club made its name in the late 1950s by supplying college students with the quintessential college snack: pizza. It was the first business in Auburn to sell this cheesy college staple. “We still have alumni call and ask for the recipe,” Brandt said. “It was all very fresh. They made the sauce every day, and they made the dough every day. Nothing was frozen.” By the late 1980s, however, the Supper Club stopped making its famous pizza after chain pizza restaurants became popular. It briefly partnered with former Auburn football player Byron Franklin ’91 to serve wings at the club. Franklin later went on to found the Buffalo Connection in Auburn, and the Supper Club decided to stick to selling liquor and beer. But the Supper Club’s food didn’t elevate the bar to its current “Auburn Tradition” status. It has earned serious bragging rights for the long list of performers it’s been able to bring in over the years. Musicians like Kenny Chesney, Widespread Panic, Drivin’ N Cryin’, Georgia Satellites, Little Feat, Taj Mahal and Drive-By Truckers are just a few big names to grace the Supper Club stage.

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“There’s an old saying for bars like us: ‘We see them on their way up, and we see them on their way down,’” Brandt said. But it’s the recurring musical acts that routinely bring back patrons and make the Supper Club what it is today. Telluride will be performing on War Eagle Supper Club’s final night on New Year’s Eve. Although tickets to this event sold out quickly, Brandt predicts they’ll have enough room for others as people leave the party early into the morning. In the meantime, people can purchase their favorite merchandise from the Supper Club. The bar will host a memorabilia auction after it closes its doors, which will feature the infamous “shot bus.” While there have been discussions about moving the bar to another location, nothing has been finalized. “I hope people will come out and support us because it’s going to be gone,” Brandt said. “I think Auburn is going to have a void. People miss seeing their landmarks.”—Rachael Gamlin


Spend the season with Shug.

THE ARCHIVES Found in “Auburn’s Attic”

A RALPH “SHUG” JORDAN EXHIBIT awaits visitors to the AU library during football season. Also new: former U.S. Rep. Spencer Bachus donated his Congressional papers to Auburn in August. Housed in Special Collections, they provide a unique look behind the scenes in Washington. diglib.auburn.edu

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CONCOURSE > SPORTS

1951 Auburn Coaching Staff

Back Row: “Shot” Senn, Gene Lorendo, Ralph Jordan, Joel Eaves and Dick McGowen. Front Row: Homer Hobbs, Charlie Waller, Buck Bradberry.

Viking of the Plains Longtime AU assistant coach under Ralph “Shug” Jordan, Gene Lorendo’s claim to fame for most AU fans was his play call that won the infamous “Punt, Bama, Punt” game of 1972. But in a new biography, Ken W. Ringer ’59 expands on the larger-than-life man whose story is so closely tied to that of Auburn football. The book’s title says it all: Lorendo.

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N 1951 GENE LORENDO was finishing his first year on the coaching staff of Presbyterian College in Clinton, S.C., where he served as an assistant football coach and head coach of the Blue Hose basketball team. His family—wife, Jane, and 2-year-old son, Cam—enjoyed living in Clinton as cherished citizens of the community. But on a Saturday morning in March, Lorendo received an unexpected phone call that changed the lives of the family. The call was from Ralph “Shug” Jordan, who had been offensive line coach in football and head basketball coach at the University of Georgia when Lorendo was a student-athlete there. Jordan was now the new football coach at Auburn and he wanted Gene to join his staff... Lorendo’s initial salary at Auburn was $5,000 per annum. He received free housing in the Graves Center complex, which he moved into upon his arrival in late March. Jane remained in Clinton, as she was eight months pregnant with their second child. On May 9, 1951, MacLean “Mac” Lorendo ’73 was born, and Gene was there for the birth. A week

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later, the family made the journey from Clinton to Auburn and their new home in Graves Center, a community of cottages that, at the time, housed Auburn’s scholarship athletes. In the springs and falls of the 1950s, students walking across the Auburn campus or in class often heard a booming voice coming from the Drake football practice field east of the stadium. Gene Lorendo, the offensive end coach of the Tigers, was often heard yelling one-liners or cursing at his players. He spewed profanity like a machine gun and yelled constantly. His favorite rebuke was, “If it had been a biscuit, I bet you would have caught it.” Or he might have screamed, “You can’t catch a cold” to a player after he dropped a pass. To one receiver, an outstanding track sprinter, he yelled, “You might have ten-flat speed, but you have fourteen-flat hands.” One player characterized Lorendo as looking like a real Viking. He stood six-three and weighed 250 pounds. He could have been Paul Bunyan, the mythical giant lumberjack from Minnesota who performed superhuman feats. Lorendo, like Bunyan, hailed from northern Minnesota and both were French Canadian. Aside from coaching, there was another reason Jordan wanted Lorendo. When Jordan


CONCOURSE > SPORTS

was at the University of Georgia, Coach Wally Butts had a large assistant, Quinton Lumpkin, in charge of the player dorm and dining hall. Coach Lumpkin’s responsibility was to maintain control and discipline. When Jordan began to recruit his Auburn staff, the first person he thought of for this similar position was Gene Lorendo. ... On school nights, Lorendo emerged from his Graves Center cottage about 30 minutes before nightly curfew. He sat on the steps and lit his pipe or cigar. Cabin noises, music, conversations, and card games dwindled to whispers by curfew, at which time total silence prevailed. Tommy Lorino ’59, a star tailback from 1956 to 1958, said Lorendo often caught players coming in after curfew. He filed away the information until the next day, when those miscreants were rousted out of bed early to run laps, sprints, or do pushups. Lorendo also supervised the dining hall. The dietitian was “Hoot” Gibson, known for her

heavy makeup and even heavier perfume. Jim Dozier ’62, now a retired Delta pilot, was a member of the track team and lived in Graves Center, where he waited on tables in the dining hall. Jim said Gibson, a lady in her 50s, was a true character but she, along with her two cooks, Jessie and James, ran an efficient dining facility with plenty of good Southern soul food. Some athletes made a point of staying in Hoot’s good graces. They pampered her with compliments like, “Hoot, you look great today.” Her favorites received second helpings of food and desserts. Jimmy “Red” Phillips ’58, an All-American end, admitted to being one of Hoot’s pets. Red claimed she made special pies just for him. At evening meals, Lorendo always tapped on a glass with a metal spoon to get everyone’s attention. Players feared he would call on them to give thanks. Paul Susce ’58, a freshman baseball pitcher from Pennsylvania, was one of them. One day Lorendo intoned, “Susce, would you say the

blessing for us today?” Susce, a Catholic, knew only one blessing. “Bless us, O Lord, for the gifts we’re about to receive from thy bounty through Christ our Lord.” Then he added, “And, Lord, let Auburn win a lot of football games this year.” Lorendo loved it, said Susce. “He knew if Auburn won a lot of games that fall, they Gene Lorendo on LST-789 in the Pacific Theater in WWII. would be eating good.” According to one former player, if Lorendo thought someone wasn’t giving and cussing at you in past 100 percent, he would be on his seasons, it is only because you ass. His coaching method was had a chance to help our team.” old school. ... Richard Guthrie ’62, who Sports editor of the Glomerata, played for Lorendo from 1958 Ken Ringer ’59 had a successful to 1962 and later became career with 3M before he and his dean of agriculture at Auburn, wife, Joyce Reynolds Ringer ’59, recalled his days on the field moved back to Auburn in 2003. with Lorendo. He remembered Ringer and some football stars of Coach yelling and cursing at past teams will be signing copies Mark Helms, himself, and other of Lorendo at the AU Bookstore ends. One day, though, Gene on the day of the Iron Bowl. For called over a number of seniors info, call (334) 844-4241. and said, “If I’ve been yelling

PHOTO BY WADE RACKLEY

Batter Up

Butch Thompson has been named Auburn’s new head baseball coach following the late-September dismissal of former coach Sunny Golloway. Thompson, who spent three seasons as an assistant coach and recruiting coordinator at Auburn from 2006-08, returns to the Plains after seven seasons at Mississippi State as both associate head coach and pitching coach. The baseball team will throw the first pitch in February.

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CONCOURSE > PHILANTHROPY

TIGER GIVING DAY: Join the Movement! Since 2012, the first Tuesday following Thanksgiving Day has been known in the U.S. as “Giving Tuesday,” on which charities attempt to shift national focus away from the consumerism of “Black Friday” and “Cyber Monday” and onto the power of philanthropy. On Tuesday, Dec. 1, Auburn will join in this intensive, 24-hour charitable giving effort by hosting

Let’s Rise as One THE MOMENTUM AUBURN HAS EXPERIENCED since launching the public phase of Because This is Auburn—A Campaign for Auburn University during A-Day weekend has been astounding. In just the seven months since the public launch of the campaign, we have celebrated the largest gift in Auburn’s history from John and Rosemary Brown and, including their support, received gifts of more than $153 million. We concluded our fiscal year on Sept. 30 having raised $202 million in new gifts and commitments—an amount that surpasses last year’s $150 million record. Our success is unprecedented, and can be attributed to the dedication of so many making gifts of all sizes. The campaign’s public phase is our appeal to Auburn’s faithful to rise as one through their personal philanthropy to help prepare our students, equip our faculty, build our programs, and create exceptional facilities—those things that shape a better Auburn. It inspires moments of transformational giving, such as the $5 million commitment from Huntsville’s Dorothy Davidson to advance the Samuel Ginn College of

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its first “Tiger Giving Day.” Beginning at midnight, donors can make online donations through Engineering’s vision of creating the best student-centered engineering experience in the country. It also helps gauge excitement for, and engage the entire Auburn Family in, an initiative that truly depends on each one of us. It allows us to share the compelling story of philanthropic impact at Auburn across a variety of platforms. One of those platforms will take place on “Giving Tuesday” (Dec. 1) with our special “Tiger Giving Day” fundraising initiative, which will highlight specific projects across campus. I encourage you to take part in this public phase by sharing the news of our efforts with others and considering how your own philanthropy, joined with the generosity of others, can have a positive impact on our university—your university. In doing so, you will help us tell the Auburn story—a story we all can claim as our own.

Jane DiFolco Parker Vice President for Development President, Auburn University Foundation Learn more online and make your campaign gift at because.auburn.edu

TigerGiving.org to support more than 20 projects based in Auburn’s colleges, schools and units. The projects range from $2,500 to $50,000 and include a variety of initiatives, including Auburn Alumni Association’s endowment to benefit veterans returning to campus life, a new telescope for the astronomy program in the College of Sciences and Mathematics, and new white boards for student use in the Ralph B. Draughon Library. Another project is the School of Nursing’s therapy dog program, an animalassisted therapeutic program for nursing home and mental health facility residents, for which Tiger Giving Day donors can support the special care and grooming required of dogs entering these medical environments. On Dec. 1, TigerGiving.org will feature all giving opportunities, as well as real-time reports throughout the day on the progress made toward each project’s goal. Gifts of all sizes are welcome and encouraged—every gift makes a difference.


CONCOURSE > PHILANTHROPY

ON SATURDAY, OCT. 31, the Auburn

Lasting Legacy

Dorothy Davidson’s $5 million gift to engineering honors her late husband, Julian.

AN ENHANCED STUDENT EXPERIENCE A $5 MILLION PHILANTHROPIC INVESTMENT by Huntsville, Ala., aerospace and missile defense industry executive Dorothy Davidson will advance the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering’s vision of providing the best student-centered engineering experience in America. Davidson announced her gift on Oct. 22 at a gathering of Auburn alumni and friends. Her gift honors her late husband, Julian Davidson, a 1950 Auburn electrical engineering graduate and defense industry pioneer. “Julian would agree that the renovation of Broun Hall will provide an environment that will inspire the next generation of engineers through spaces that are conducive to study and collaboration,” Davidson said. The Broun Hall renovation will provide students with an improved learning environment by incorporating the latest instructional technologies. “Mrs. Davidson’s gift will do more than just renovate a building; it will remodel parts of the structure to transform the areas most used by students,” said Christopher B. Roberts, dean of the college. “This will in turn invite collaboration and teamwork, enhancements that appeal to Dorothy as well. Her desire has always been that this generous gift would create the most immediate impact on the student experience at Auburn.” Julian, the first to use systems engineering to fit missile defense requirements, co-founded Davidson Technologies with Dorothy in 1996 and led the company until his passing in 2013. Dorothy’s current leadership of Davidson Technologies, like this gift, honors Julian’s remarkable career, his impact on national defense, and his service to and support of Auburn University.

The gift will transform the areas most used by engineering students.

University Foundation hosted its inaugural membership celebration for members of the Katharine Cooper Cater Circle of the James E. Foy Loyalty Society, with more than 200 in attendance. The Foy Society honors donors for the same loyalty and commitment for which Dean Foy was known. Donors automatically become members after donating for five consecutive years, with subsequent milestones for 10, 15, and 20 consecutive years of giving. Donors giving for 25 or more consecutive years become members of its Cater Circle. because.auburn.edu/societies

$871 MILLION

87.1% of the $1 billion goal as of October 31, 2015

LEARN MORE, TAKE ACTION & GIVE ONLINE For campaign information, news, and resources, visit because.auburn.edu

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BMOC (Big Moose on Campus)

A former high-risk virus detector with a maximum security clearance retrains for a second career helping Auburn students work through emotional issues. You can just call him Dr. Moose. By Alec Harvey ’84

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BMOC (BIG MOOSE ON CAMPUS)

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF ETHERIDGE

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BMOC (BIG MOOSE ON CAMPUS)

T

HE NEWEST STAFF MEMBER of Auburn

University’s Student Counseling Services (SCS) is a lot like his colleagues in many ways. He’s come to the crew with a number of years of training under his belt and a couple of advanced degrees. His colleagues have nothing but praise for him, and students all over campus know him by his first name. He’s also rocking an Auburn tie in his staff directory photo. But a few things set him apart from the others: His sense of smell is superhuman, he never speaks to his clients, and he’s covered in fur from head to toe. Oh, and those feet? He has four of them. Meet Dr. Moose, the yellow Labrador retriever who is Auburn’s first therapy dog. He’s a full-fledged member of the center’s staff, participating in group and one-on-one therapy sessions when needed. He has been on the job only since August, and he’s already getting rave reviews. “He’s already had some amazing breakthroughs with some difficult clients,” says Doug Hankes, director of SCS and Moose’s boss. “So far, this has worked out really, really well.”

‘A Dream Dog’ HANKES AND HIS STAFF had talked about the possibility of

therapy dogs for a while, but it wasn’t until Katie Werner joined SCS as a staff psychologist in 2014 that the ball really began rolling. “I’ve had pet dogs since I was 7, and I know they have healing properties,” Werner says. “I was interested in this from Day 1.” But Werner had more than enthusiasm to offer. Despite having two other dogs, she and her husband, Matt, could give SCS’s therapy dog a home. “You’ve got to have one staff member who really wants to take it on, because the dog has to live with one of the staff,” Hankes says. “She was willing to take on the

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job of primary handler. All of us here are trained to use the dog, but when he’s finished working at the counseling center, he goes home with Katie and is just a regular dog at home.” Once a home was found, the bigger question loomed: Where were they going to find a dog? “We explored a lot of options, including using retired greyhounds— some of them can be really good therapy dogs,” Hankes says. “We were considering that, but I also started thinking of options on campus and at the vet school. I started thinking about Canine Performance Sciences (CPS).” CPS, a program in Auburn’s College of Veterinary Medicine, began as a research project in 1990. Today, CPS has more than 100 dogs that it trains to detect explosives, narcotics and biological and ecological threats. “They were really excited about the idea of working with us,” Hankes says. Specifically, Jim Floyd, DVM, then the interim director of CPS, knew of a couple of dogs that were nearing retirement. “We decided we wanted to try to help them out, but it was unusual for us because our retired dogs would normally become pets for an individual or a family,” says Floyd, now CPS program advisor. “Another unusual thing is that our dogs are not selected for being the type of dog you’d think would be great pets. They are working dogs while they’re here—high-drive, high-energy and reward-oriented.” Enter Moose, who had all of the qualities above and more, says Bart Rogers, the canine instructor who had trained Moose since puppyhood and also took on the task of re-training him for his new life. “He’s very special in that he’s not super high-energy,” Rogers says of Moose. “He’s work, work, work all the time, but he’s also calm, cool, collected and focused. He likes to please. He’s a dream dog.” For a few years, Rogers trained that dream dog for the most by Ashtyne Coledetection. & Suzanne Johnson dangerous of tasks, including explosives Some of these projects were of a sensitive nature, involving national security issues and how dogs could best be employed to defend against various threats.


BMOC (BIG MOOSE ON CAMPUS)

Team Moose

Moose joins (L-R) trainer Bart Rogers, SCS director Doug Hankes and handler-psychologist Katie Werner.

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BMOC (BIG MOOSE ON CAMPUS)

“We joke that we had to get Moose to sign a non-disclosure agreement before we let him retire and start his second career as ‘Dr. Moose’ at Student Counseling Services,” Floyd says. Moose and his colleague Baxter were the only two dogs— anywhere—able to sniff out particular viruses. “They are two of the most famous dogs in the world,” Floyd says. “It’s just that no one knows about them.” By 2014, both dogs had put in their time. “It came time for them to retire, because they had done plenty of projects,” Rogers says. “At that time, Doug and Katie came in, and I said, ‘I have two dogs for you to look at. I think one of them might work.’”

Inauspicious Beginning MOOSE AND WERNER got off to a rocky start. “He was trained to

ignore people and sniff everything else,” she says with a laugh. “When I first met him, I said, ‘Hi, Moose,’ and he walked right by me and sniffed my purse and my shoes.” Still, Moose has a sweet demeanor, and Rogers was sure he could re-train him. All it really took was a tennis ball. “He’ll do anything for that tennis ball,” he says. “He knows, ‘I find this stuff, and I get the tennis ball.’ He finds the explosive, he gets the tennis ball. He took to the new training well. Once he realized he wasn’t searching all day and he could get his reward for doing something else, he transitioned straight to it. … A lot of detection dogs just want the reward, but Moose also wants to please. That makes him perfect for this job.” Rogers worked with Moose for six weeks before turning him over to Werner for more training. “You don’t want to have the confusion of the dog not knowing who he is working for,” he explains. “It does me no good if he works spectacularly well with me and not for her, so I trained the dog and helped with the transition of the dog working with her. The next time I saw that dog he was not my dog anymore. He was her dog. That kind of made me a little sad.”

Let Loose with Moose

Werner takes Moose on a weekly meetand-greet at the Student Center.

Hit the Ground Running ROGERS’ LOSS, though, was a big gain for Werner, Hankes and

others at SCS. Werner trained Moose to get his accreditation

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BMOC (BIG MOOSE ON CAMPUS)

Walking in Support

Moose joins students during the Active Minds’ Suicide Prevention Walk on campus.

through both TDI (Therapy Dog International) and CGC (AKC Canine Good Citizen), and all of the AU counselors were trained in how to use him in their sessions. Moose began working full-time for SCS about a week before fall semester began, and Auburn Student Counseling Services became one of only a handful of college clinics in the nation with an accredited working therapy dog—as opposed to a dog in the clinic that clients can just pet. Moose hit the ground running in his new job. Confidentiality rules prohibit outsiders from watching Moose at work in a therapy session, but Hankes says it’s interesting to see. “You can bring him into a session, and he can sense changes in emotion,” he says. “He will go over and sit next to the client when he senses this. He doesn’t get in their lap, and he doesn’t whine. He’ll just go over there and sit by them. They’ll usually start petting Moose, and he’ll put his head in their lap or something. We’ve had clients who have never been able to cry or access those types of emotions, but once Moose was in the room they were able to do it.” Hankes says to watch Moose in action, particularly in group therapy, is “awesome.” “He’ll go sit in the middle of the circle, and if he senses something going on emotionally with someone, he’ll get up and go sit by them,” Hankes says. “There are some issues that work better with a therapy dog than others. When you have clients

who are kind of emotionally detached, a lot of times it can be trauma-related, and Moose can help draw them out. Part of the TDI training is that he’s learned to be super-chill in all sorts of situations. He just does not lose his cool. “I tell people that Moose saved lives by sniffing out explosives, and now he’s saving lives working with us,” he adds. Moose is careful not to jump up or impose himself on a client, Werner says. “If someone is angry or crying, he’ll offer his face, and if they’re welcoming, he’ll put his weight on their feet. It’s literally grounding, I think,” she says. When he’s not working with clients, Moose hangs out at the counseling center’s front desk. SCS worked with an animal welfare group to insure that Moose is well taken care of—he gets scheduled nap times and breaks throughout the day, and he has a grooming day once a week. “He’s washed with special shampoo, and his nails are clipped in a certain way,” Hankes says. “He’s just a yellow Labrador retriever, but the treatment he gets is pretty amazing.” As friendly as Moose is, it’s all work for him at SCS. “We’ve got to stick to the commands, because it’s work,” Hankes says. “You can’t really play with him. You can’t be throwing the ball. He’s got to be focused during the day.” Moose is also used for outreach, most notably on Thursdays from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., when he and Werner hang out on the third floor of the Student Center for “Let Loose with Moose.” “He’s not a

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BMOC (BIG MOOSE ON CAMPUS)

therapy dog there,” Hankes says. “Students can come and just pet him and say hello to him.” Werner accompanies Moose on his treks across campus, and she’s noticed something interesting. “Because of confidentiality issues, I was worried how Moose might react if we came across a client he had worked with,” she says. “But that has happened, and Moose hasn’t let on at all.”

Just a Dog—or Not WHEN MOOSE IS DONE for the day, he heads home with Werner,

Students get to say hello to Moose in the Student Center during “Let Loose with Moose,” his weekly meet-and-greet.

where he’s just a normal dog, one of the family’s brood that includes June, a Great Dane, and Olive, a pit bull mix. The other two are aware that Moose goes to work with Katie every morning, but other than that, he’s just one of the gang. “In terms of the pet hierarchy, Moose is very calm,” she says. “He just sits back and takes it all in.” Moose will respond to about 10 commands, and they can come from either of the Werners. “He knows the difference between working and not working because he wears a vest when he’s working,” Katie Werner says. A bonus? The dog will not forget his earlier training, so the Werners are confident their house is clear of explosives and particular viruses. Moose rarely barks and never growls at people. The latter would immediately mean the end of his days as a therapy dog— being temperamental is not permitted. “If Moose growled, I’d be concerned he was in pain because that is so not his personality,” Werner says. Purina has donated food for Moose, who just turned 7, and other care, including pet insurance and regular vet visits, is paid for by SCS. When Moose retires, he’ll continue living with the Werners. “Mostly, my goal is to let him do his thing as long as he enjoys it or can keep doing it, and then let him retire,” she says.

What’s Next? HANKES IS ALREADY hoping that Moose isn’t the only therapy

When Moose is off the clock he hangs out with his adopted Werner siblings June Bug, a Great Dane, and pit bull mix, Olive.

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dog for SCS. “We’re going to see how this goes, but we’d love to work with Canine Performance Sciences in the future and get more dogs,” he says. “These dogs are treated well and are still useful animals.” Floyd says whether CPS decides to train other dogs to be therapy dogs will be up to Paul Waggoner and Craig Angle, who


BMOC (BIG MOOSE ON CAMPUS)

are now co-directors of the program. “The issue with it would be that we’re very mission-oriented,” Floyd says. “Our mission is about canine performance sciences and canine detection. To train a dog to be able to do what Moose did is a pretty different activity than what our trainers usually do. Service dogs are just a different ‘sport,’ so to speak. “We’d like to repeat the success story if we could, but we just have to be real careful that we don’t establish the expectation that we’re a source of service dogs for individuals who want to come to us,” Floyd adds. “We did it with Moose

because it was going to benefit a lot of people at the university, and we just thought it was the right thing to do.” Dr. Moose has already more than earned his advanced title, A A Ain clinical psychology A AherAdoctorate says Werner, who received from the Georgia School Psychology. A A A A A ofAProfessional “He did seven years of research with Canine Performance A A A A A A Sciences, which is more than any of us did,” she says of her SCS A A A colleagues. “So it’s only Afair.” auburn.edu/scs

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By Nick Hines ’15

On the

BALL by Ashtyne Cole & Suzanne Johnson

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In an era when humor is rarely wholesome, Jeanne Robertson takes the stage with nothing but class. Just don’t call her a comedienne.


PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF ETHERIDGE

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FUNNY GIRL

J

eanne Robertson ’67 hadn’t made it 20 feet before a line of fans formed to take pictures and get autographs. One by one, people filed out of the auditorium of the Pope Center in Washington, Ga., to meet the professional speaker and humorist who sold out the largest auditorium in the 4,000-person town. The show was a benefit held by the North Alexander School Association, or NASA as it’s locally known, to raise money to renovate the North Alexander School into a cultural center. Most of those there were happy to contribute to the cause, but really? They were there to see Robertson. Her 6-foot-2-inch frame (sans high heels) towers above most of the people waiting to meet her. Her silver hair, lips that always appeared to be on the edge of a smile, and bright Auburn-orange sweater could be seen over the guests dressed primarily in University of Georgia red. “This is small-town America at its best right here,” Robertson says. “They’ve got a good cause going and they’re thrilled because three-fourths of the people aren’t from here. The hotels are both full!” Small shows like that held by NASA are the “roots” of where Robertson came from, as she likes to say, but her name has filled

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thousand-room auditoriums this past year, including four shows at the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville. Washington, Ga., had the chance to play host to Robertson primarily because of the insistence and planning of Robertson’s Auburn sorority sister Carolyn Reynolds ’65. Robertson and Reynolds met in the Alpha Gamma Delta pledge class of 1962, and have stayed friends since. Reynolds opened her home to Robertson for the show as well as played the part of escorting her friend around town. It doesn’t surprise Reynolds that her friend takes time to personally acknowledge each fan that comes up to her.

From the front row, whispers of people finishing lines to her stories can be heard like the echoes of a classroom filled with students who studied ahead of time. “She is so genuine,” Reynolds says. “That’s the way she’s been since I met her.” Back in the 1960s, Robertson and Reynolds lived on the second floor of Dowdell Hall with the Alpha Gamma


FUNNY GIRL

Delta sorority sisters and had room checks every night, even the two nights a week the sorority girls’ curfew was pushed back to 11 p.m. One weekend in the spring of 1963, Robertson left Auburn and went to her hometown of Graham, N.C., to compete in her first beauty pageant. She won both Miss Congeniality and Miss Graham. Carrying her two trophies on the plane back to Auburn, Robertson joked to the people who asked that she had won the trophies in a bowling tournament. Winning Miss Graham gave Robertson the opportunity to compete in Miss North Carolina, and after she won Miss North Carolina, she had the opportunity to compete in the Miss America pageant. Participants in Miss America were required to drop out of school for a year, and at 19 going on 20 years old, Robertson made more than 500 speeches during her year off. She was awarded Miss Congeniality again at the Miss America pageant, but wasn’t in the Top 10. She jokes that she was the tallest woman to compete in Miss America—and the tallest to lose. Over the years, she’s received many accolades (see righthand column), but that means nothing next to what she hopes her humor-laced performances mean to people. “I’m not saving the world here,” Robertson says. “But when people come up and they say, ‘I lost my husband and I really hadn’t laughed in a while, I really needed this,’ it makes you feel good.”

JEANNE ROBERTSON

’ 67

Résumé Highlights First woman to win the National Speaker’s Association’s Cavett Award

R

obertson is funny, but don’t call her a comedian. By her definition, a comedian will take any stab to get a laugh. Audiences in a comedy show usually need to accept any fun poked their way. Robertson prefers the title “humorist” to describe her work as a public speaker. “For the humorist, you want people to laugh just as much, just as hard, just as long, but you want to weave in a point the whole time,” Robertson said. “When we advertise we say, ‘You can bring your momma or your teenagers, and all y’all can come together.’ ” Despite wishing to avoid the label, comedy tours (most recently the Wild West Comedy Festival in Nashville) book Robertson because she has built a name for herself that sells tickets. And all ages appreciate her work. Her routines are popular on Sirius XM satellite radio, a technology outside the orbit of many of her older listeners. And then there’s YouTube. “When I first got into shows, I was attracting mostly older audiences,” Robertson says. “But because of YouTube, my dynamic is going down and they come in. That’s about it. Going viral, embracing the Internet.”

Selected for the CPAE Speaker Hall of Fame North Carolina Press Association’s 2001 North Carolinian of the Year Auburn University’s Woman Entrepreneur of the Year in 2000 The Miss North Carolina Pageant’s Woman of Achievement in 2003

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D

On stage in Washington, Ga., Robertson asks who in the audience has seen clips of her shows on YouTube. Everyone from the white-haired woman in the back to the 12-year-old birthday girl from Newnan, Ga., raise their hands. They know her characters: her husband Jerry, better known to the audience as Left Brain, her good friend Norma Rose, her manager Toni Meredith and her son, dubbed Beaver. From the front row, whispers of people finishing lines to her stories can be heard like the echoes of a classroom filled with students who studied ahead of time. The effect YouTube has had on Robertson’s career can be described in one word. “That word to me would be ‘wow,’” Meredith says. “It has been a wow moment. Wow because it’s been incredible what it’s done and the name recognition that has come from it.” An “aha moment” of the power of name recognition came in the summer of 2010. Al McCree from Al McCree Entertainment contacted Robertson and told her that her name could sell tickets based off the name recognition from YouTube. Robertson hadn’t thought about the prospect of doing a ticketed show rather than a convention, but McCree set up a show in Dallas and sold out the Lakewood Theater in two weeks. “I have speaker buddies who say, ‘I’m glad I had this career before I had to do all this technology,’” Robertson says. “I go, ‘Are you out of your mind?’ Technology is it.”

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on’t let the funny stuff get away. That is often the point that Robertson weaves into her stories. She writes all of her own material, and since she flies to shows more days of the month than she stays at home, she spends much of her time interacting with strangers. Whether she is at home or traveling the country, Robertson keeps a journal of the funny things that happen to her every day. “She truly does look for humor all the time,” Meredith said. “Which is what she tells people to do when she makes her speeches. But she really does practice what she preaches in that regard.” Her stories’ names show their basis in reality: “Don’t Send a Man to the Grocery Store”; “Don’t Take the Hotel Room Key”; “Don’t go to Vegas without a Baptist.” And don’t forget this one: “Don’t Bungee Jump Naked.” Her journaling method of writing down at least one funny thing that happened to her, known fondly as “Jeanne’s Journal,” is one of the inspirations to the “Don’t let the funny stuff get away” message of her shows. Just days before Robertson performed in Washington, Ga., she put a new clip on YouTube. It was about her son, her husband and a red Porsche that never existed, and it was 29 years in the making. By the time of the show, the clip had more than 150,000 hits on YouTube. As this magazine went to press, “A Mother’s Revenge: Red Porsche” had more than 400,000 YouTube hits. About the same number of hits as the routine called “Don’t Give ‘Auburn’ a Second Chance.” Robertson saved the Porsche story until near the end of the show. She told the background, fast-forwarded 29 years and then told the punchline. The story landed with the audience even stronger than her other stories, and the importance of writing things down and keeping the countless journals paid off. Robertson has been working the speaking circuit for more than 50 years, and she doesn’t plan on slowing down any time


FUNNY GIRL

soon. An emergency knee surgery weeks before a full lineup of shows hasn’t kept her from the stage, although it has allowed her to literally rock with laughter on stage in a rocking chair. Her onewoman show is more popular now than ever. Even in Washington, Ga., a town that responds with “Oh, bless your heart” and “We will try and be nice anyways” when they meet an Auburn graduate, A A Ato see her. A the A farthest people compete for who A drove Whether full-house A shows in Dallas A A A A orA500 people packed into the Washington, Ga., Pope Center, Robertson is an Auburn graduA A A A A A ate who helps people find the humor in everyday life through her A A A A own, inimitable style of funny.

The YouTube Video Top 10 1. “Don’t Send a Man to the Grocery Store!” (7.8 million views) 2. “Don’t Bungee Jump Naked” (4.25 million views) 3. “Don’t Go Rafting w/o a Baptist in the Boat” (3.6 million views) 4. “Mothers vs. Teenage Daughters” (1.96 million views) 5. “Flight Attendant Deals with a Bad Potato” (1.4 million views) 6. “The Golfer’s Christening” (1.25 million views) 7. “Don’t Go to Vegas without a Baptist” (1.1 million views) 8. “Men Don’t Know the Style in NYC” (1.1 million views)

To view Jeanne Robertson’s top-viewed videos, visit YouTube and type the name of the story (see list at right) into the search bar. www.youtube.com/user/JeanneRobertson/videos

9. “Don’t Get Frisky in a Tent” (979,000 views) 10. “Don’t Mess with Broom People” (952,000 views) Bonus: “Don’t Give Auburn a ‘Second’ Chance” (349,000 views)

Auburn Family

Robertson was a member of the Auburn Family from birth, and her ties still run deep. Her family ran the Toomer’s and Rexall drugstores in downtown Auburn, and her parents were among the first to attend an event in the then-new Foy Union Ballroom.

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War Eagle,

Hey!

In which an intrepid alumnus goes on the hunt for the elusive truth about how Auburn University’s battle cry came to the Plains. We’ll call it the “legend of the legend of War Eagle.” by Jeremy Henderson ’04

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W

hen it comes time to get serious about it, former athletic director David Housel’s go-to line is the big quote from the 1962 western The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance. At the end, Jimmy Stewart comes clean: He didn’t shoot the dreaded Liberty Valance. John Wayne did it. John Wayne was the hero. John Wayne should have been governor and senator and ambassador. John Wayne should be the man on the verge of the vice presidency. What a story. What a scoop. So why did the newspaper editor throw his notes in the fire? “This is the West, sir. When the legend becomes fact, print the legend.” Housel was just like all of us. He heard about the legend of War Eagle growing up. “I was 13,” he said, “and when you’re 13, if it was in the media guide it was supposed to be true.” And hey, maybe it was. That’s the attitude Housel took in his

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years as Auburn’s sports information director: Who could really say? That’s the mystery. That’s the fun. That’s the legend of War Eagle: that an eagle rescued from a Civil War battlefield by a Confederate veteran escaped and began circling over Auburn’s first football game in 1892, inspiring a cheering crowd and the team to victory. In the late 1970s, when Housel began editing Auburn Football Illustrated and it was time to put out a quality program people would want to buy, he went back to what he knew and loved. And he made it even better. In 1982, his embellished (and much more vivid) version of what was now officially being called “The Legend of War Eagle” was actually turned into a poster that was framed and hung in hundreds of Auburn dens across the South, mine included. I looked at it all the time as a kid. I’m looking at it right now. An eagle rescued from a Civil War battlefield flying over our first football game and basically dying for Auburn? You get chills. One of “The Legend of War Eagle” final lines begins with a disclaimer: “The facts of this Legend cannot be authenticated…” For more than 20 years now, Housel has known—officially,


WAR EAGLE

100 percent—that the reason the story can’t be authenticated is because it isn’t real. But so what? It felt real. To Housel—to a lot of people—that’s what mattered. “That story is not true,” Housel said at a lecture on Auburn athletics he gave in 2006. “But how many of you remember the old John Wayne movie, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance? What did he say? ‘When a legend becomes fact, print the legend.’ And that’s what Auburn’s been doing. Those folks from ESPN? They don’t have any idea it’s not true. Tell it. They love it. Use it. Promote the school.” These days, Housel still makes sure to couch the story with the words according to legend, but when the cameras roll, he reverts to the legend of Feb. 20, 1892, and that first game. And why wouldn’t he? “We never said the fact of War Eagle,” he said. “Why would you phase out a legend?” The Civil War legend did not begin in 1892. It began in 1959 when Jim Phillips ’61 was sitting on his aunt’s back porch with a typewriter, a six-pack of Falstaff and a looming deadline for The Plainsman.

Another Tale Explains War Eagle’s Origination In the past, there have been numerous attempts to explain the origination of Auburn’s famed “War Eagle” battle-cry. The latest: Back during our Civil War… The Plainsman

P

hillips is now 76 and lives in Mt. Airy, N.C. College was a long time ago, and memory is a funny thing. But he swears he never meant for anyone to take the column he turned in for the March 27, 1959, Plainsman seriously. He thinks it’s possible he actually thought it was going in the following week’s April Fools’ Day issue. Yet they did take it seriously, and for good reason. For starters, the entire thing was reprinted (under the heading “Why… ‘War Eagle’?”) in that year’s student handbook, which Phillips also edited. Plainsman stories published in 1961, the year Phillips was in charge, reference the story as if it were established fact.

“I remember some girls crying about it, a couple of sorority girls that were friends of mine,” Phillips says. “They wanted to know whether it was true or not. They were broken up when I said, ‘Naw, I just made that up.’” An abbreviated version appeared in the 1959 football media

“When you’re 13, if it was in the media guide it was supposed to be true.” guide, thanks to legendary Auburn sports publicist Bill Beckwith. However, the first time Phillips remembers realizing his legend had taken on a life of its own was in September 1964. He was working at the UPI desk in Washington, D.C. He got off work, walked to a magazine stand, and grabbed the latest issue of Sports Illustrated featuring Auburn quarterback Jimmy Sidle ’64 on the cover. He got on the bus for home and flipped to the big profile of the Auburn team the magazine had picked to win it all that year. His eyes bugged out. “It had this story about the origin of War Eagle, and it was my story,” Phillips says. “I had totally forgotten about it.” By the late ’80s he was seeing it everywhere. In football programs. On posters. For a while, he found it kind of amusing. Every now and then he’d tell someone. Maybe they believed him; maybe they didn’t. In 1993, he was going through boxes in his attic and found a yellowed copy of the March 27, 1959, Plainsman. He opened it carefully and there it was. Despite a journalism career that included stops at UPI, Business Insider, The Washington Post, Congressional Quarterly, and even a story or two in The New Republic, it was the most influential thing he’d ever written—and the only thing he’d ever made up. It was time to set the record straight. He took the paper to Kinkos, made a copy of the article, and sent it with a “Look what I found…” letter to David Housel...who thought the legend was worth keeping. “When the legend becomes fact,” Housel wrote him, “Print the legend.” The story we all know and love (and almost feel like we’re taking part in every time we turn our attention to Jordan-Hare’s flagpole) wasn’t always universally accepted. Some of the media guides and programs produced in the 1960s don’t even mention it. Some

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discounted it right off the bat. Some in the 1970s include it, but asterisk it as most likely apocryphal. There are records of Civil War-era ships—including a Mobile blockade runner and a Wisconsin steamship—named War Eagle, but no ties to the university had ever been found. In 1975, Auburn grad Lyn Scarbrough ’69 interviewed an Auburn fan living in Birmingham named T.W. Wareagle who claimed he was the last Osage Indian chief. The retired steelworker swore that “War Eagle” started as a tribute to his grandfather, another Osage chief named Wareagle. “This,” Chief Wareagle said, “is the account that was given to me when I was young by my grandfather—the chief—and I know that it is true.” However, according to the Osage Tribe’s official historians there’s never been an Osage chief named Wareagle. “A lot of people claim to be chief,” they said. “We get that a lot.” Scarbrough’s contribution made the cut on the “War Eagle” page of Auburn’s official website, however, a sort of digital version of the “War Eagle: Fact of Fable?” pamphlets Auburn quietly put out in the 1970s and ’80s, but folks who favor accuracy over a good story typically place their bets on one of two less-mystical theories. One of the big ones: Fans thought Auburn players were shouting “War Eagle” when they were actually shouting “Bald Eagle,” supposedly the name of a Carlisle Indian star, during the Carlisle game. That tale mostly traces to a couple of 1950s newspaper interviews with an Auburn player and assistant coach who were there. Then there’s the story of the 1913 pep rally, where everyone supposedly shouted “War Eagle” after an eagle emblem fell off a student’s cadet cap. That story came a year earlier and has names and details and even a letter written in 1959 by the cap owner. Elements of both stories are true, but they only play a role in how War Eagle spread at Auburn, not how it started. A student drops a metal eagle, one identical to those worn

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on the caps of college cadets across the country, and everyone just decides to start shouting “War Eagle”? Housel looked out at the lecture crowd. “Anybody want to believe that?

L

ost in the War Eagle origin saga—maybe because no one wants to remember it—is a 1944 controversy not just about the origin of the War Eagle battle cry but its ownership. That unthinkable, blasphemous bombshell? War Eagle belonged to Georgia. Sure, Auburn might have taken it and run with it and made it so  “uniquely Auburn” by 1944 that the team was frequently referred to as the War Eagles, but Georgia started it. At least that’s what former Georgia coach Alex Cunningham proclaimed in a letter printed in a popular Atlanta sports column: The first time Auburn players heard “War Eagle” was at the 1913 Auburn-Georgia game— because Georgia players yelled it. Cunningham had details. He had an explanation. It’s complicated, but it involved a former Georgia star turned assistant coach actually nicknamed, yes, War Eagle. “This was the first time Auburn ever heard the cry,” Cunningham wrote, “and I defy any old-timer to speak to the contrary.” Months later, Auburn president Luther Duncan got J.B. Hobdy, a former classmate and colleague, to speak to the contrary in a hazy hypothesis suggesting that “War Eagles” was an old nickname for Auburn’s Phi Delta Theta fraternity brothers, popularized while he was in school in the 1890s. Case closed, Duncan proudly announced at a spring pep rally. The sanctity of Auburn’s greatest tradition had been restored. It didn’t matter that no one else at Auburn during Hobdy’s days (including Duncan) had any recollection of this, or that fellow


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Phi Delts like Auburn legends George Petrie and Cliff Hare never remembered calling each other “War Eagles” then—or ever. What mattered was that Duncan was desperate to un-involve Georgia. When reporters asked him for a quote on the controversy, Petrie—George Petrie, iconic Auburn Man and father of Auburn football himself—actually admitted Cunningham could be right. After all, Auburn grads had been trying to prove Cunningham wrong. It should have been easy, everyone said. It wasn’t. “Frank Boyd, who entered Auburn in 1911, was confident that ‘War Eagle’ was a common football yell even when he was a freshman,” wrote the Alabama Journal, “but when he searched his yearbooks for 1912, 1913, 1914 and 1915, he couldn’t find a single reference to the now famous battle cry...” He didn’t look hard enough.

I

t’s been there for anyone to find for more than 100 years. Right there in the yearbook. Buried, but undeniable. Of course, Kirk Newell probably knew exactly where to turn. He was one of the Glomerata’s editors back in 1912. He and Auburn running back Rip Major were good friends, and Major is the key to it all. “I remember that Rip Major, great Auburn punter and later a referee, used the expression and 1912 was his last year at Auburn,” Newell told The Alabama Journal. “I always figured Rip started ‘War Eagle.’ I couldn’t be positive about it but that’s my belief.” “Referring to Auburn’s yearbook, the Glomerata of 1912, Newell showed that under a section called The Auburn X-Ray, under the subtitle ‘Book Reviews,’ was a fictitious book, The Life and Adventures of War Eagle, by Rip Major,” the Journal wrote. As I researched the origin of War Eagle at Auburn, I’ve always thought the secret lay in how little sense the yell War Eagle

actually made. The origins have been a mystery in part because the expression itself is a mystery. We’ve had to literally make things up to wrap our heads around it. If you think about it, almost everyone else’s battle cry is a command: Go Gators, Hail State, Roll Tide—a verb in front of a noun. Auburn’s is just a noun (or, at best, a noun and an adjective). You could just as easily, and as passionately, have spent your Auburn life shouting Snapdragon! or Lightning Bolt! That’s why every theory to date has been an attempt to trace the battle cry to a specific, singular event that could maybe get close to explaining why and how and when this random term became synonymous with a team called the Auburn Tigers. That, as much as anything, has been what kept Auburn’s “preposterous story,” as Sports Illustrated called it in 1964, aloft. “So that’s why we shout War Eagle,” the legend implies. “Because our forefathers were looking at and smiling at and cheering on a war eagle at a football game.” But they weren’t. They were looking at and smiling at and cheering on a forgotten Auburn legend named Rip Major. He was the most popular athlete in school, arguably the greatest punter in Auburn history—a four-sport star who quarterbacked and captained the Auburn Tigers in 1912. “War Eagle!” he liked to yell, for reasons we might never know. A A A A A was A fictitious. Rip Major’s book mentioned in the 1912 Glom The book I’ve spent two-plus years researching about A A A A writing A A and Auburn’s War Eagle battle cry—about the men behind the myths A A A A A A and the man behind the truth—is not. A When the facts reveal a legend, print the A facts.

A

A

Jeremy Henderson is a 2004 Auburn graduate and the editor of The War Eagle Reader (www.thewareaglereader.com). His new book This Thing

Called War Eagle: The (Finally) True Story of College Football’s Most Mysterious Battle Cry will soon be available on Amazon and The War Eagle Reader website.

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A Major Find: The Origin of “War Eagle” by Michael Strickland ‘97

We all have our “War Eagle” stories.

M

y favorite one is the time my wife, Mary ’98, and I were touring the ancient Roman baths in Bath, England, and we saw the familiar AU logo worn by a nearby tourist. A passing exchange of “War Eagle” spoke volumes, even though we were strangers. “War Eagle” connects us. I never imagined that 10 years later I would uncover the real origins of our beloved battle cry, thanks to some Internet sleuthing and the help of a family hundreds of miles away. In January of this year, I was pleased to discover that all of the old Glomeratas had been diligently scanned and digitized by the AU library, a true service to anyone who desires to do research into Auburn’s history. I thought it would be interesting to see when the phrase “War Eagle” first appeared in the Glom. I was surprised that my first “hit” was from 1912, because many of the legends of the origins of the battle cry place it before that time. However, it was not immediately clear to me what the “War Eagle” from 1912 meant. It appeared in the joke section, a common feature in old Gloms, and was in a column titled “Book Reviews.” Several fictional book titles were included, all referring to inside jokes about faculty and students. For example, one was called, Confessions of a Bachelor Maid by Dr. J.F. Messick, whose bachelor status received

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several lighthearted jibes. The final review was entitled “The Life and Adventures of War Eagle – Rip Major, D.V.M.” Scanning through the 1912 Glom, I discovered that John Perry “Rip” Major ’13 was a big man on campus. He was a five-sport athlete (football, baseball, basketball, soccer and track) from Anderson, S.C., who was captain-elect of the Auburn football team during the 1911 season. He played tackle and guard, and occasionally in the backfield that season, but his specialty was punting. In 1912, he was quarterback and team captain. Of course, my interest was piqued as to why Rip was associated with “War Eagle.” An Internet search for “Rip Major” and “War Eagle” resulted in many superfluous results, with one intriguing exception. Oddly enough, on a South Carolina Gamecock message board, someone mentioned in passing that his uncle, Rip Major, was the one who started the cry of “War Eagle” at Auburn. Unfortunately, this was a closed message board, so I had no way of contacting the pseudonymous author. After a little more digging, I started to get a clearer picture of Rip Major. He graduated in 1913 with a degree in veterinary medicine and returned to Clemson, where he served as an assistant coach for a season. Later, he was head football coach at Wofford College in Spartanburg, S.C. He coached at Wofford in 1919, and again from 1922-26, and then became a respected college football referee all across the South. Rip died in 1934, at the age of 44, from an infection of the blood. I also discovered that Rip Major had a brother, Charles, who was an outstanding football player at Clemson. After more searching, I was able to find living descendants of Charles. I sent a flurry of emails to as many “Majors” in South Carolina as I could find, and patiently waited to hear back.

Debating Origins In the meantime, I found another important source that mentioned Rip Major and “War Eagle.” Back in 1944, the Auburn family began a statewide debate after a former Georgia coach claimed that Georgia gave Auburn its battle cry in the 1913 game. The Birmingham News and Montgomery Advertiser included several columns from various API alumni who claimed to know the origins of “War Eagle.” With help from John Hardin ’93 at the Alabama Department of Archives and History in Montgomery, I was able to find several articles where various theories were discussed. While many spoke with confidence, none offered any tangible evidence of their claims—except for one. Kirk Newell, a decorated war hero from WWI and captain of the great undefeated 1913 Auburn team, wrote to The Birmingham News about the origins of our battle cry. He refuted the claim that the “War Eagle” cry started in Georgia and offered his own recollections. He wrote, “I remember Rip Major, great Auburn punter and later a referee, used the expression, and 1912 was his last year at Auburn. I always figured Rip started War Eagle. I couldn’t be positive about it, but that is my belief.” As evidence for his claim, Newell cited the 1912 Glomerata. I was becoming more confident that Rip Major was the source of “War Eagle,” but it wasn’t until I heard from Rip’s family that I knew that the legacy of Rip Major needed to be shared with the Auburn Family. It turns out that many of Charles Major’s descendants still live in the Clemson area. Perry Major, his grand-nephew, was the first to respond to my emails. His full name is “John Perry Major,” but his brother Charles is nicknamed “little Rip.” Thus, both of these great-nephews are named after Auburn’s Rip Major. It was Perry’s uncle Joseph who


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had written on the Gamecock message board about Rip and “War Eagle.” Perry put me in contact with several other family members, and together they were able to fill in some missing pieces. First, Rip began his college career at Clemson, but transferred to Auburn in 1910. The family suspects that Rip left Clemson in the wake of the famous “April Fool’s Day Prank” in 1908, when 300 young cadets dressed in drag and marched off campus to spend the day in leisure. They were all expelled, though some were later allowed to re-enroll. The Majors think Rip might have been involved in the prank, and decided to seek greener pastures in Auburn, where his brother, Samuel “Monk” Major, had been a student.

Believe It or Not Rip was a stellar athlete, and after his death, the local paper in Anderson, S.C., reported that Ripley’s Believe It or Not once included an account of Rip punting the ball 100 yards in a game against Georgia Tech. While I couldn’t find any record

of that kick, contemporary news reports claimed that Rip could kick it over 70 yards, and the 1913 Glom remarked about Rip’s reputation as one of the “best college kickers in the South.” At 6’2” and 180 pounds, he played center on the basketball team, and he was a hard hitter in baseball. In 1914, his hometown newspaper asked “Why is he called ‘Rip’?” and answered with, “Ask the third baseman.” Other stories suggested it was because he would rip through the opposing team on the football field. After leaving Auburn when WWI hit, Rip volunteered and was assigned stateside as a service officer at internment camps. The family provided me with all this information, as well as some images not included in the old Gloms. For this, I am greatly indebted to them. But the most important piece of information they could give me was the fact that, for over a century, it had been a Major family belief that it was Rip who started War Eagle at Auburn. Generations of Majors have passed along the story of how Rip would yell “War Eagle” when he ran to the huddle, and possibly when he delivered one of his booming punts. Perry told me that for years he’s been trying to tell every Auburn fan he could find that Rip was the source, but that no one seemed convinced. He even attended an Auburn football game on one occasion and went to the library and looked in old Gloms to see his namesake.

The Weight of Evidence Thus, there is strong evidence that Rip Major brought the cry of “War Eagle” to Auburn football as early as the 1911 season. First, there is documentation of his association with the phrase in the 1912 Glomerata. Second, there is the testimony of the team captain from the great 1913 team, Kirk Newell, that Rip started “War Eagle.” Third, there is the independent, out-of-state, century-old family tradition that Rip Major was the first to cry “War Eagle” on the Plains. The fact that Rip’s story predates many of the legends is evidence that it supersedes them. And those stories from before 1911 bring with them less corroborating information than the three strands in support of Rip Major. I realize that I can only claim it is highly likely that Rip Major started “War Eagle.” Undeniable, definitive proof for its origin will probably always be lacking. There is a chance that “War Eagle” came to Auburn by way of another person, and that Rip brought it to the football field. Thus, Rip’s story might tie in with other narratives about the source. Jeremy Henderson and I started our research independently and unaware of each other, but reached the same conclusion. We agreed to share the spotlight. There are many more fascinating details about Rip Major, and A A A A legends A several “War Eagle” thatAI have not covered here. IAencourage A to A A Ayou A read all about them in Jeremy’s new book. A A A A A A So, Rip Major, the Auburn family A A A A salutes you. War Eagle! Michael Strickland ’97 and ’98 is assistant professor of theology at Amridge University. He and his wife, Mary ’98, live in Murfreesboro, Tenn., with their three children.

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A L U M N I

C E N T E R

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Aaron Allmon II

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Auburn Magazine

For Alumni & Friends of Auburn University

Auburn Magazine

For Alumni & Friends of Auburn University

59

au ua a ll u um m .. o o rr g g Auburn Auburn Magazine Magazine a 59AuburnMag_Fall08.indd 59

59

59 57

7/11/08 5:34:32 PM


Protect Your

Home & Family www.aces.edu/emergency

Download the newest iBook free from Auburn today! The Alabama Cooperative Extension System (Alabama A&M University and Auburn University) is an equal opportunity educator and employer. Š 2015 by the Alabama Cooperative Extension System

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Mark your calendars for May 18 – 20, 2016, when we induct the class of 1966 and honor the classes of 1961, 1956, 1951, and 1946. Enjoy fascinating presentations and deans’ events, catch up with former classmates, and show off your smooth moves on the dance floor. To find out more about this program, contact: 334-844-1150 or goldeneagles@auburn.edu. Find more information at www.aualum.org/GoldenEagles

A L U M N I A S S O C I AT I O N

Births • • Accomplishments Accomplishments • • Marriages Marriages • • Awards Awards • • Retirements Retirements • • Vacations Vacations Births Beenonona agreat greatvacation? vacation?Enjoying Enjoyingretirement? retirement?Have Havea aWar War Been EagleMoment? Moment?Your Yourclassmates classmateswant wanttotoknow! know!Send Sendyour your Eagle classnotesand andother otherupdates updatesto: to: classnotes

aubmag@auburn.edu aubmag@auburn.edu

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ALUMNI CLASSNOTES > IN MEMORIAM

the Classes IN THIS SECTION

From the Association

54 Classnotes

55 In Memoriam

62 Backchat

64

War Eagle Special It’s not just a battle cry. Auburn students boarded the War Eagle Special passenger train in 1939 for the football game at Georgia Tech. Many of the folks in this photo are Delta Sigma Phi fraternity members. Check out the Auburn University Digital Library’s online Loveliest Village Photograph Collection for IDs and more info: diglib.auburn.edu.

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FROM THE AUBURN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

Family Traditions FALL GREETINGS FROM YOUR ALUMNI ASSOCIATION! When you think of Auburn, you think of our traditions and when you think of traditions it all starts with fall, football and the Auburn Family. As we look forward to the last games of the 2015 football season and the excitement of all the traditions that have brought the Auburn Family together on Saturdays this fall, what a great way to finish the regular season than by hosting our oldest rival Georgia and our traditional in-state rival Alabama here on the Plains! Best wishes to this year’s young football team for a strong finish to their season! Fall brings new beginnings on campus. We are pleased to welcome a few new beginnings at your Auburn Alumni Association, welcoming four new association board members as well as several new staff. We are also excited by the positive feedback on our new Alumni Tailgate at the Auburn Alumni Center. Our numbers have been great and the alumni affairs staff has worked very hard to improve our ability to connect and better track more alumni at these tailgates. Not only are our alumni and friends able to enjoy the alumni center, big screen TVs and controlled climate, but we are able to better connect on a personal level and obtain good contact information on our attendees. This will help us connect with our alumni nationally as well as helping connect alumni back to the local clubs. Speaking of connecting, we are now connecting with a group of Auburn alumni in Beijing, China, who hosted a gamewatching party of the Louisville game at 3 a.m. Beijing time! Expect more international groups and clubs soon. This fall, the university welcomed the largest incoming freshman class in AU history—4,600-plus, with an average ACT score of more than 27. Controlled growth with high-quality students has become the norm at Auburn. Growth brings changes: new buildings, a new intersection at Toomer’s and big plans on the books for future projects, including discussions for a new north end zone expansion at Jordan-Hare. As Auburn University and the City of Auburn continue to grow and change, it is our responsibility to not lose our legacy as the “loveliest village on the plains.” Buildings and communities change but Auburn men and women stay grounded in the traditions that make this place

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The new Auburn Hospitality Tailgate at the Auburn Alumni Center offers plenty of family fun—and photo opps. For more tailgate photos, visit www.flickr.com/photos/ auburnalumniassociation/.

so special. Our traditions are arguably the best in the nation. Rolling Toomer’s and the pregame flight of our eagle are always ranked at or near the top in college football traditions. We will continue to preserve our traditions and maybe even improve them along the way. Why are traditions important? BECAUSE THIS IS AUBURN! I encourage you all to partner in our capital campaign and continue the great tradition of giving back to Auburn by participating in our alumni association project on Tiger Giving Day on Dec. 1. You can find more about it at TigerGiving.org. In tradition, WAR EAGLE!

Jack Fite ’85 President, Auburn Alumni Association jfite@fitebuilding.com

S H A R E YO U R N E W S W I T H U S AT AU B M AG @AU B U R N . E D U


THE CLASSES > CLASSNOTES

Send your classnotes and other

East Carolina, required for

LYNN RICHARDSON ’79

updates to Auburn Magazine

engineering majors in their senior

director of safety and

317 S. College St., Auburn

year, and works closely with

process safety at the Alon

University, AL 36849 or

industry partners to ensure that

USA Refinery in Big Spring,

students get real-world work

Texas, received a master’s

experience, leadership and

degree in safety, security

entrepreneurial skills.

and emergency

aubmag@auburn.edu.

e

1970s

GETTIN’ TOOTHY

management from Eastern FRANK CRADDOCK ’79 has

Kentucky University in

GENE DIXON ’75, associate

received the William B. Hicklin

August. His son, JON

professor of engineering at East

Lifetime Achievement Award from

RICHARDSON ’15, received

Carolina University, has been

the Florida Concrete & Products

a master of science in

Auburn alumni members of the Georgia

awarded the Bernard R. Sarchet

Association. He has more than 35

chemical engineering from

Dental Association have participated in

Award from the American Society

years of experience in the

AU in May.

for Engineering Education. The

construction materials business

award is given to an individual who

and is executive vice president for

has made significant contributions

commercial and public affairs for

to the engineering management

CEMEX USA Inc.

profession and to the engineering

Georgia Mission of Mercy services, donating their services to individuals in need of dental care in Georgia. Each year,

1980s

more than 30,000 new cases of oral and pharyngeal cancer are diagnosed, with only a 50 percent survival rate. Participating

BART MASSEY ’83 serves

management division of ASEE.

ANGELA ERLANDSON ’79 retired in

as tax and budget policy

are, from left, Reid Hill ’09, Dave

Dixon has written multiple articles

June from Auburn University, where

advisor to Sen. Mike Enzi

Grovenstein ’10, Henry Benson ’72, Deck

and presented at national and

she was director of employment

(R-WY), the chairman of the

international conferences. He

services in the university’s

Senate Budget Committee

handles all the capstone projects at

Department of Human Resources.

and a member of the Senate

Neisler ’77, Richard Smith ’69, Bruce Camp 80, Donald Brown ’70 and, in front, Brenda Neisler ’77.

Her 32-year career in

Finance Committee. Before

human resources included

his role in the Senate, he

positions as a personnel

worked as a CPA, Capitol

officer in the banking

Hill journalist, and tax

with NASA, beginning his career at

industry and a regional

specialist in a Big 4 Washington

Marshall in 1981 as an engineering

human resources

national tax office. Over the span of

aid and becoming a full-time quality

representative for an

his career, he has worked primarily

engineer in 1983. He has received

international

in Washington, D.C., but also in Asia

numerous awards, including NASA’s

environmental engineering

and the United Kingdom.

Medal for Outstanding Leadership,

firm. At AU, she served as

Slam Dunk

The College of Human Sciences at Auburn University will honor basketball legend Charles Barkley ‘86 at the 22nd annual International Quality of Life Awards at the United Nations on Dec. 7. Barkley will receive the IQLA Lifetime Achievement Award.

NASA’s Exceptional Service Medal, a

a compensation specialist

JAMES E. TURNER ’83 has been

NASA Space Flight Awareness

and as the personnel

named the associate director for

Award, two MSFC Director’s

manager for the Facilities

technical management—engineering

Commendations and two Invention

Division. She was active in

directorate of NASA’s Marshall Space

Awards.

a number of community

Flight Center in Huntsville. He is

organizations, including

responsible for planning, directing

ERIC HALLERMAN ’84, a professor

the East Alabama Society

and coordinating engineering

of fisheries at Virginia Tech

for Human Resources and

project management and integration

University, has been named to the

the Business Advisory

activities in support of the

inaugural class of Fellows for the

Board of Southern Union

directorate’s technical activities. He

American Fisheries Society, the

Community College.

also represents the directorate at

world’s oldest and largest organiza-

Erlandson and her

critical milestone reviews, boards

tion promoting the scientific

husband, Steve, live in

and panels for programs and

management of North American

rural Lee County.

projects executed at MSFC. He has

aquatic resources. Hallerman is a

more than 32 years of experience

nationally recognized expert on

WINTER 2015

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THE CLASSES > CLASSNOTES

fisheries and aquaculture genetics

successfully prosecuted the first

joins fellow Auburn Tiger JOHN

AMY BENTLEY ’97 married Mike

and has testified on Capitol Hill

case of felony elder abuse in the

WHITE IV ’04, owner and operator.

Hulsey on June 6. She is a media

about the environmental safety and

state. She was supported through-

regulatory oversight of genetically

out her campaign by her Auburn

modified salmon. He directed

family, including nephew SAM

Virginia Tech’s Horseshoe Crab

BETHUNE ’17, brother TOM

Research Center, served as head of

BETHUNE ’90, father Jimmy

TAMALA MADDOX ’90, principal of

STRICKLAND ROGERS ’97 and her

the Department of Fish and Wildlife

Bethune (“Tuscaloosa grad but

Bumpus Middle School in

husband, Ty, announce the birth of

Conservation from 2006 to 2013, and

faithful Auburn fan”), husband JIM

Birmingham, has been named

a son, Rhett Eli, on June 6. Rhett

is an affiliate of Virginia Tech’s Fralin

HARRIS ’84, sister-in-law MOLLY

president of the Alabama Associa-

joins older brothers Rhys John and

Life Science Institute. He currently

METZGER BETHUNE ’92 and

tion of Middle School Principals.

Sean Micah at their home in

serves as president of the National

nephew JOSH BETHUNE ’20. As

The association, which is an

Geismar, La. Betsy is now school

Association of University Fisheries

part of her swearing-in ceremony,

affiliate of the Council for Leaders

librarian at Woodlawn High School

and Wildlife Programs and the

fellow alum JASON SALIBA ’92

in Alabama Schools, has more than

in East Baton Rouge, La., where

Virginia Chapter of the American

read the Auburn Creed.

400 members. Maddox began her

she also serves as assistant

Fisheries Society.

specialist at Valley Junior High School in Jasper.

1990s

MARY ELIZABETH “BETSY”

teaching career in 1991 in her

volleyball coach and head girls’

DEBORAH SEALE MCCUNE ’87

hometown of Columbus, Ga., and

track coach.

ANN BETHUNE HARRIS ’84 was

married Steven Braswell on July 18.

eventually became a math teacher

elected Cobb County Superior Court

They live with their combined five

at Hoover High School in 2000,

ELIZABETH FULLER STOLL ’97

judge in metro Atlanta and took

children in Alabaster. She recently

assistant principal at Bumpus in

and her husband, Buck, recently

her seat on the bench on Jan. 1,

completed her 21st year as director

2003 and principal in 2011. She was

adopted Sarah Thornton Stoll from

2015. After earning her law degree

of disability support services at the

the Hoover school system’s first

Bangkok, Thailand. She joins

from Vanderbilt, Harris served as a

University of Montevallo.

black female principal.

brothers Conner and Fuller. The

Cobb County for more than 19

PAM COOK OLDHAM ’89 was

RON HUGHES ’91, a financial

years. During that time, she helped

recently hired as senior director of

advisor and managing director at

MICHELE WALTERS ’97 completed

draft the first human-trafficking

sales and brand growth for

Merrill Lynch in Atlanta, was

the Manhattan Island Marathon

legislation in Georgia and

Chick-fil-A in Durham, N.C. She

recently recognized on Barron’s

Swim in August. It’s a 28.5-mile

America’s Top 1,200 Financial

swim around the island of

Advisors: 2015 State-by-State list. He

Manhattan. Walters was one of 19

joined Merrill Lynch in 2000. Prior

swimmers in the event, and one of

to building the first fully accredited

only four women swimming this

private banking and investment

year. This swim is one of three

group in Merrill Lynch’s Southeast

“triple-crown” events for swim-

region, he spent seven years at

mers, the others being the English

Goldman Sachs advising entrepre-

Channel and Catalina. Walters

neurs experiencing significant

works for the U.S. Department of

liquidity events. Before that, Ron

Health and Human Services in

worked in mergers and acquisitions

Washington, D.C. Thanks to

for an investment partnership,

STEPHANIE BURNETT ’97 for

focusing on consolidation among

sharing the news!

senior assistant district attorney in

family lives in Atlanta.

Sigma News More than 300 alumni, collegiate members,

national officers, and special guests of Auburn University’s Beta Theta chapter of Sigma Nu fraternity gathered in Auburn Sept. 18-19 for the chapter’s Quasquicentennial celebration, marking 125 years on the campus. Among those attending were, from left, Joe Gilman, past regent; Robert Durham, past regent; Maury Gaston ’82, vice-regent; Lee Perrett ’75, regent-elect; John Burgess ’70, Medallion of Merit recipient; and Joe Francis, regent. This is the second-largest Sigma Nu chapter in the nation.

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wireless communication properties. TRENT PRIM ’98 and BETH PRIM KATHY FLANN ’95 teaches

’99 founded Prim Construction in

creative writing at Goucher

the Dallas-Ft. Worth area in 2007,

College in Baltimore, Md. Her

with Beth as the CEO and Trent as

story collection, Get a Grip, won

COO—and a logo of navy and burnt

the George Garrett Award and was

orange in honor of their alma

published by Texas Review Press.

mater. The company’s work in DFW

S H A R E YO U R N E W S W I T H U S AT AU B M AG @AU B U R N . E D U


Art

THE CLASSES > CLASSNOTES

What’s in a Word? A Letter? A Number?

F

OR JUNE CORLEY ’73, IT’S ART. The artist has fused the skills

her new home. “When I started getting around to unpacking them and setting them around just everywhere, I started seeing things,” Corley said. “I thought, ‘Well if I put that E over there, it’s a guy or it’s a dog.’” Her career as a sculptor had begun. Because Christmas was right around the corner, she created booklets with pictures of her sculptures to give as gifts. Ultimately, one of these booklets found its way into the hands of an art gallery owner in Auburn. The owner contacted Corley and convinced her to create more work for an art show. Because many of her friends couldn’t attend the show, Corley posted pictures of her pieces onto a Flickr account. An organizer of TypeCon, a conference for those interested in typography, happened to see Corley’s work and invited her to present at the conference, which Atlanta conveniently hosted that year. When people look at her art, Corley hopes that they will gain “a different perspective on things.” “I like them to be surprised,” Corley said. “I like for them to look at something and see an animal and then suddenly go, ‘Oh my gosh! It’s an A!’” As for her success, Corley believes everything just happened to fall into place. “I feel like what I’ve done here has just sort of been serendipity,” Corley said. “I had people tell me, ‘you know June, this just sounds so right. If you go back and look at your life, it just seems perfect!’”—Rachael Gamlin

she developed as an advertising specialist with her passion for working with her hands to create unique type sculptures that will make you do a double-take. Her pieces combine refurbished, vintage letters and numbers, as well as other found objects, to create revamped sculptures of animals and faces. Born and raised near the AU campus, Corley graduated from Auburn with a degree in visual design and began her advertising career first in Boston and then in Atlanta. While redoing her 1906 house in Atlanta, Corley often went to salvage yards to find vintage items. During one of these trips, she found several abandoned large letters and decided to keep them. After all, Corley’s work revolved around playing with type and making letters look appealing, so it seemed only natural that she would decorate her offices and home with objects that fit her design aesthetic. In 2007, as she was preparing for a move from Atlanta to web address here Loachapoka, Corley boxed up her collection to transport to

www.junecorley.com

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THE CLASSES > CLASSNOTES

On the Front Lines

A

N AUBURN UNIVERSITY ALUMNA has been working hard

to protect responders as they tackle the ongoing fight against Ebola in West Africa. A physical scientist for the Center for Disease Control’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Selcen Klinic-Balci ’04 is focusing her research on personal protective equipment, specifically equipment for protecting against infectious diseases exposed by direct contact. “My job is to investigate emerging habits and personal exposures to identify personal protective-technology needs and gaps in the technology,” Klinic-Balci said. Mistakes in the way the equipment is put on and taken off or mistakes in the equipment itself could prove to be deadly for the person wearing it, especially when dealing with the highly contagious and fatal Ebola outbreak. Klinic-Balci researched several different companies’ personal protective gear models to see if the equipment was diligent in its protection against Ebola. She found more than one model failing the tests. The way personal protective equipment is marketed played a part. Clothing can be called fluid-resistant when it passes all the tests to be water-resistant—the difference can mean life or death. Water and the bodily fluids that transmit direct contact

diseases such as Ebola differ highly in size. Ebola is small and can pass through water-resistant clothing. Not only did Klinic-Balci have to worry about the clothing’s protection, she had to focus on the comfort as well. While such a thing may seem trivial when protecting oneself against such a deadly infection, conditions in West Africa can reach more than 100 degrees with nearly 90 percent humidity, and responders work for hours in hot and heavy equipment. “The Ebola treatment units are not air conditioned in any way and temperatures in West Africa are extreme,” said Daniel DeNoon, a senior technical writer for the CDC. “Workers not

My job is to investigate emerging habits and personal exposures to identify personal-protective technology needs and gaps in the technology.

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only have to put on these very complete protective costumes, but they’re dealing with tremendous exposures.” “I can see the impact and I can see what I do protects the people. It makes me feel successful,” Klinic-Balci said. —Megan Barkdull

S H A R E YO U R N E W S W I T H U S AT AU B M AG @AU B U R N . E D U


THE CLASSES > CLASSNOTES

includes working on large-scale high-tech buildings for Oncor Electric, Texas’ largest residential energy supplier. With Beth Prim at the helm, Prim Construction has obtained certification with the Women’s Business Enterprise National Council in a field with one of the lowest percentages of

THIS IS COMMUNITY. THIS IS YOUR MUSEUM. THIS IS AUBURN.

women-owned businesses in the world. You can find them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ primconstructionllc. KENNETH L. “LEE” MILLER III ’99

and ASHLEY DEITCHMAN MILLER ’02 announce the birth of a son,

Daniel Eynon Miller, on July 28. The family lives in Hoboken, N.J. JEFFREY S. NEUMEYER ’99, senior

vice president for investments and wealth-management advisor at Merrill Lynch, was recently recognized on The Financial Times Top 400 Financial Advisors list. He began his career in Detroit and Toronto working as a project engineer in the automotive industry, and has been a financial advisor with Merrill Lynch since 2000, a member of the Global Corporate & Institutional Advisory Services team since 2002 as a senior partner and a member of the firm’s Circle of Excellence Club. A certified financial planner, his area of emphasis is developing long-term wealth-planning models for his roster of clients. He serves the community by working as a volunteer coach and serves on several fundraising committees for Special Olympics Georgia. He lives in Brookhaven, Ga., with his wife, Jane, and the couple’s two children.

JCSM.AUBURN.EDU

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THE CLASSES > CLASSNOTES

2000s

On the Board

BRANDY SPONSLER ’00 and MATT SPONSLER ’01 announce the birth of a

The Auburn Alumni Association elected four new board members at its annual association meeting held on Oct. 3, 2015. Joining the board are: Charles D. Hart Jr. ’85 of Clay; LuAnne Hart ’80 of Eufaula; Kelley Mossburg ’77 of Santa Rosa Beach, Fla.; and Dewayne Scott ’95 of Atlanta.

daughter, Abigail Louise, on May 21. She joins an older brother, Shawn. The family lives in Pike Road. SCOTT FRISHMAN ’01 and MICHAEL

CHARLES D. HART JR. ‘85

CLAY, ALA.

KIRK ’01 in 2008 started Nature’s

Member, Finance & Operations and Scholarship Committees Charles Hart is president and veterinarian at Clay-Chalkville Animal Clinic in Clay, a suburb northwest of Birmingham. He earned a bachelor’s degree from Auburn in 1982 and his doctorate in veterinary medicine from Auburn in 1985. At Auburn, he is a life member of the Auburn Alumni Association, a member of the Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine Alumni Advisory Council and a former president of the Greater Birmingham Auburn Club.

Garden Express, an organic e-grocer based in Atlanta. They currently service thousands of homes and offices in the Atlanta area and are expanding their operations to serve most of the Southeastern U.S. They also have recently launched a cold-pressed juice line and are about to open a juice bar

LUANNE L. HART ‘80

EUFAULA, ALA.

and organic grocery store in Atlanta’s

Member, Communications & Marketing and Scholarship Committees LuAnne Hart, a native of Eufaula, graduated from Auburn in 1980 with a bachelor’s degree in psychology. She currently serves as senior vice president, human resources, and marketing director for MidSouth Bank, a community bank headquartered in Dothan. A life member of the Auburn Alumni Association, Hart has been involved with the Barbour County Auburn Club for more than 15 years, serving as a director, secretary-treasurer and treasurer. She was recognized by the alumni association as the 2013 Club Officer of the Year.

Krog St. market. AMANDA LITTLE HARRIS ’01 AND JEFF HARRIS ’01 recently launched

Magically Ever After Travel, a company specializing in planning Disney vacations. Destinations include the Walt Disney World Resort, Disneyland Resort, Disney Cruise Line

KELLEY P. MOSSBURG ‘77

SANTA ROSA BEACH, FLA.

and Aulani—A Disney Resort located

Member, Special Events & Programs and Membership Committees Kelley Mossburg graduated from Auburn in 1977 with a bachelor’s degree in business. He has had a successful career in several large Fortune 100 companies such as PepsiCo, privately held founder-led organizations such as CNL Financial Group and Pilot Travel Centers, and, most recently, owning and/or assisting founders in building successful startups. At Auburn, he is a life member of the Auburn Alumni Association and a member of the Samford Society. DEWAYNE T. SCOTT ‘95

ATLANTA, GA.

in Ko Olina, Hawaii. While at Auburn, Amanda worked at the Walt Disney World Resort as a member of the College Program team. She also is thrilled to have welcomed HILARY DAVIS MACISAAC ’03 to the Magically

Ever After team. WILL AVANT ’03 has been named by

Member, Communications & Marketing and Special Events & Programs Dewayne Scott, who graduated from Auburn in 1995 with a bachelor’s degree in management information systems, has spent 20 years in information technology with 14 years at his current employer, Accenture, a Big 5 information technology consulting firm. He is an associate manager working on several federal and state technology efforts. At Auburn, he is a life member of the Auburn Alumni Association and a member of several giving societies as well as serving as a member of the leadership council for the Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs. He also is a founder of the War Eagle Society, for which he serves as president.

Fidelity National Title Group as associate area counsel for Alabama, Arkansas and Mississippi. He spent six years as a partner in a Huntsville law firm and the past three years as in-house counsel for a worldwide corporation. He has experience in compliance, residential and commercial transactions, management and training. He and his wife, Leslie, have

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THE CLASSES > IN MEMORIAM

two children. The family lives in

consultants and clients to manage

Birmingham.

remediation projects.

JOHN AMARI ’03 and his wife,

AARON and KATHRYN CHASTAIN

Amber, announce the birth of a

’07 announce the birth of a

daughter, Mila Viviana Amari, on

daughter, Nora Mae, on Jan. 29,

June 2. She joins two brothers and a

2015, and the adoption of a son,

sister. The family lives in Trussville.

Jacob Everett, on March 10, 2015. Jacob and Nora join sisters Annie

JONATHAN NEW ’04 was promoted

and Sophie.

to lieutenant-commander on Sept. 1. He has served for 10 years in the

DREW MCCRACKEN ’07 and

U.S. Navy and is the combat

Lindsey Parda were married in

systems officer on the USS Lake

Cocoa Beach, Fla., on May 24.

Erie, a guided missile cruiser stationed in San Diego. He lives

KELLY ORAVET RILEY ’07 and

with his wife, JILL BEATTY NEW

her husband, Brett, announce the

’03, and their sons Spencer, 3, and

birth of a son, Kolton Marshall

Robert, 19 months.

Riley, on Jan. 18, 2015. He joins a big brother, Brooks. The family

TIFFANY GOLDEN ’05 married

lives in Northport.

Isaiah Morris on March 21 in Huntsville. They currently live in

ROBERT JACKSON “JAY” DUNCAN

Trinity. Serving in the wedding

JR. ’08 and AMY YOUNG DUNCAN

party were NICOLE KLEIN ’05,

’11 announce the birth of a son,

CLARISSA STEPHENS MCCLAIN

Robert Jackson “Jack” Duncan III,

’05, PHILIP BRADLEY TILLERY

on July 2. The family lives in

’05, and LAUREN SANTORO

Birmingham.

AlumniWalk

Mary Crane ‘78, Matthew Crane ‘15 and R. David Crane ‘78 with their Alumni Walk paver and class rings displayed. KEITH MAYS ’09 has been selected

special education students in

NATHAN PAYNE ’08 and CHELSEA

by the Principal Financial Group to

Oregon. Reid, who has served the

LINDSAY JOHNSON ’05 married

PAYNE ’09 welcomed their second

lead its North Carolina Business

past year as a law clerk at

Matthew Parriott on July 11 in

child, a son, Oakes Lami Payne, on

Center. He will serve as regional

Wiscarson Law, received her J.D. at

Nashville, Tenn.

May 4. The family lives in Fort

managing director, responsible for

Lewis & Clark Law School in 2015,

Wayne, Ind.

the growth and development of the

graduating cum laude.

WILKINS ’06.

financial professional sales force in

R. WILLIAM GARDNER ’06 has

joined Taft Stettinius & Hollister’s

LINDSAY PHARIS THOMPSON ’08

the Charlotte, Winston-Salem,

KEVIN MICHAEL THOMAS ’09

Indianapolis, Ind., office as an

and her husband, Brian, announce

Greensboro and Western North

and TAYLOR MICHELLE ARNOLD

associate in the environmental

the birth of a son, James Paul

Carolina areas. Mays entered the

’11 were married in Birmingham

group. His experience includes

Thompson, on Aug. 30. The family

financial industry in 2000 and

on April 18. They live in

representing clients in environ-

lives in Pensacola, Fla.

joined The Principal in 2014 as the

Kingwood, Texas.

managing director of the North

mental matters before administrative agencies and in court,

SHEA ROSS ’09 and RICHARD

advising the regulated community

CLOTHIER ’09 were married July

regarding their legal obligations

18 in Oakland, Calif. They live in

AMY REID ’09 has been named

integrated marketing communica-

under a variety of environmental

Oakland, where he is a technical

associate attorney at Wiscarson

tions agency based in Denver, Colo.

laws, helping clients evaluate

architect with GT Nexus and she is

Law, Oregon’s only law firm solely

She began her career in New York,

environmental liabilities in real

an event-management and design

focused on special education law

where she worked in sales and

estate and business transactions,

professional.

for families. Reid’s practice will

marketing for the consumer

focus on assisting families of

insights division of Guideposts, a

and working with environmental

Carolina Business Center.

ALYSSA STRAZZA ’11 is working

for The Bawmann Group, an

WINTER 2015

Auburn Magazine

61


THE CLASSES > IN MEMORIAM

nonprofit inspirational publishing

died on July 26.

July 28.

Winston-Salem, N.C.

firm. Upon moving to Colorado in

ZELDA SELLERS MAIN ’47 of

ROBERT DEWEY “BOB” SANSOM

JAMES R. ANGEL ’59 of Florence,

2013, she continued her work in

Lebanon, Tenn., died on July 15.

JR. ’52 of Southside died on Aug. 8.

Ky., died on Aug. 15.

brand development as a senior

WILLIAM BRYAN LAND ’48 of

CARRIE JEAN “TUT” BRYARS

DONALD GENE LEITHAUSER SR.

brand manager at Brand Iron

Cottonton died on July 8.

SMITH ’52 of Mobile died on

’59 of Birmingham died on July 21.

Marketing Inc.

ANN LYON MANGELS ’48 of St.

Aug. 14.

GERALD D. “PERKY” MYRICK ’59

Augustine, Fla., died on July 19.

WALLACE CALVIN WEAVER ’52 of

of Florence died on Aug. 16.

LAURA HUDDLESTON ’15 has

RAYMOND WIGGINGTON TERRY

Huntsville died on July 26.

EDWARD GENE PENDLETON ’59 of

joined MP&F Public Relations in

JR. ’48 of Birmingham died on

EDWARD ANTHONY ZAGAR ’52 of

Montgomery died on Aug. 17.

Nashville, Tenn., as an associate.

July 15.

Mobile died on Aug. 5.

DONALD P. WILLIAMS ’59 of Valley

While at Auburn, she was involved

MARJORIE LAWING TOMLIN ’48 of

JANE JONES SENTELL ’53 of

died on Aug. 10.

in the AU Marching Band and the

Gainesville, Fla., died on Aug. 3.

Little Rock, Ark., died on Feb. 20 at

LOREN HALL ’60 of Rome, Ga., died

Auburn Wesley Foundation, where

DOROTHY G. PATTERSON ’49 of

the age of 101.

on July 23.

she worked as the assistant of

Fayetteville, Ark., died on Nov. 19,

MARGARET FORNARA BAR-

TERENCE HAMM MURPHREE ’60 of

alumni, data and development. She

2014.

THOLOMEW ’54 of Atlanta died on

Houston, Texas, died on July 22.

interned with MP&F in spring 2015.

WILEY BRENT PETTY JR. ’49 of

July 19, 2015.

BOBBY HEAD ’61 of Montgomery

Hoover died on July 29.

FRED HAROLD ALLEN SR. ’55 of

died on Aug. 8.

MAXWELL L. “ABLE” STEWART

Cantonment, Fla., died on June 23.

WILLIAM “BILL” MARTIN JR. ’61

IN MEMORIAM

’49 of Montgomery died on May 26.

PEGGIE WEBSTER ’55 of Auburn

of Orlando, Fla., died on Aug. 11.

For more complete obituaries, visit

SARA AMELIA CARPENTER

died on July 7.

SELBY ARNOLD “TUG” TUGGLE

auburnmagazine.auburn.edu.

TURNER ’49 of Wedowee died on

GEORGE “CHIP” HAIRSTON III ’56

’61 of Statesboro, Ga., died on July 7.

July 25.

of Mobile died on Aug. 7.

WILLIE CARL JENKINS ’62 of

LEWIE ROSS CRISMAN ’40 of

PRESTON RANDOLPH BUSH II

JULIA “PEGGY” PENTON

Salem died on July 30.

Montgomery died on July 17.

’50 of Monroeville died on Nov.

PARKS ’56 of Birmingham died

WILLIAM MICHAEL REED ’62 of

EDWARD GORDON KEITH ’40 of

16, 2014.

on July 12.

Mountain Brook died on July 7.

Greensboro, N.C., died on June 18.

CHARLES W. CAMPBELL JR. ’50

ROBERT L. RAWLINSON ’56 of

JOE E. BAILEY ’63 of Soddy-Daisy,

EDWARD “DICK” WADDELL ’41 of

of Birmingham died on July 17.

North Augusta, S.C., died on Aug. 7.

Tenn., died on Aug. 13.

Rogersville died on Aug. 11.

LEWIS S. MASON ’50 of Foley died

NANCY KELLY SCOTT ’56 of

RONALD LEE DEAR ’63 of

THOMAS JEWEL WHATLEY ’41 of

on July 22.

Fairhope died on Aug. 16.

Alabaster died on July 28.

Knoxville, Tenn., died on July 26.

HENRY “HANK” LAFAYETTE

EDNA FRANCES SNOW ’56 of

WILLIAM ROY HICKMAN ’63 of

MIKE THOMAS BLEVINS ’43 of

MOORE ’50 of Clearwater, Fla., died

Birmingham died on Aug. 12.

Homewood died on July 19.

Birmingham died on July 10.

on July 23.

HARRY LEROY EDWARDS ’57 of

DAVID HOLK SR. ’63 of Foley died

TANDY D. LITTLE JR. ’43 of Fort

WILLIAM “BILL” BYRON

East Bend, N.C., died on July 7.

on Aug. 2.

Myers, Fla., died on July 11.

STARLING ’50 of Abbeville died

VERNON WALLACE GIBSON JR.

NELDA YOUNG EDWARDS ’63 of

JAMES “FRANK” WYATT JR. ’43 of

on Aug. 9.

’57 of Birmingham died on July 28.

Newnan, Ga., died on July 17.

Elmhurt, Ill., died on July 26.

WAYNE TEAGUE ’50 of Auburn

PATRICIA J. GILCHRIST ’57 of Rome,

RABUN “BUD” ATHON CHAMB-

WILLIAM BUCK TAYLOR JR. ’44 of

died on July 26.

Ga., died on June 24.

LESS JR. ’64 of Fort Walton Beach,

Montrose died on July 29.

JOHN WILLIAM PEMBERTON ’51 of

DAVID HOWELL REGAN ’57 of

Fla., died on July 10.

MARY SUSAN BLACK ’45 of Stouts

Montgomery died on July 22.

Reno, Nev., died on July 16.

ARTIE LEE DAVIS ’64 of Pensacola,

Mills, W.Va., died on Aug. 9.

WILLIAM EDWARD STONE JR. ’51

CLAYTON DALE ANDREWS ’58 of

Fla., died on Aug. 11.

GUY PARKER HATCHETT JR. ’45

of Pine Apple died on July 28.

Venice, Calif., died on Aug. 1.

MARY CECIL FORBUS ’64 of

of Salisbury, N.C., died on July 16.

THOMAS “TOM” EDWARD JONES

ARTHUR BONNER PATRICK JR.

Gulfport, Miss., died on Aug. 11.

KIRBY KNOX JOHNSON SR. ’46 of

SR. ’51 of Palatka, Fla., died on

’58 of Montgomery died on July 18.

NINA MARGARET COLLINGS

Fairburn, Ga., died on Aug. 8.

July 17.

WILLIAM “BILLY” BROUGHTON

FRADY ’64 of Atlanta died on July 7.

TERRY “TED” DAVID BRYSON

RONALD TYRE ’51 of Satellite

HOWELL ’58 of Cartersville, Ga., died

HERBERT “HERB” V. MILLER ’64

JR. ’47 of Tuscumbia died on

Beach, Fla., died on Aug. 10.

on Jan. 7, 2015.

of Simpsonville, S.C., died on July 14.

July 21.

ELIZABETH ANNE SEGREST

WILLIAM SAMUEL “SAM”

HARRY LENAR WIGGINS JR. ’64

JOE GAY BURNS ’47 of Auburn

MEEKS ’52 of Auburn died on

SIMMONS ’58 died on July 10 in

of Beaufort, S.C., died on July 7.

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AUBURNMAGAZINE.AUBURN.EDU

S H A R E YO U R N E W S W I T H U S AT AU B M AG @AU B U R N . E D U


THE CLASSES > IN MEMORIAM

JOHN RICHARDSON WRIGHT ’64

Mobile died on July 15.

of Jacksonville Beach, Fla., died

EDDIE T. LINDSEY SR. ’78 of

on Aug. 2.

Columbus, Ga., died on Aug. 12.

CHARLES MOREHEAD ALLEN ’65

JAMES E. REYNOLDS ’78 of La

of Longmont, Colo., died on July 21.

Canada, Calif., died on Aug. 1.

JOHN “JOHNNY” BAGGETTE ’65

AUREA ESTELA JONES PROPST

of Decatur died on July 27.

’79 of Jonesboro, Ga., died on

ROBERTA CHAMBERLAIN BILLIE

July 18.

’65 of Spanish Fort died on July 18.

RAWDON ALLEN DOWNS ’80 of

THEODORE ISHMAEL JOCKISCH

Montgomery died on July 20.

’65 of Atlanta died on Aug. 13.

MATTHEW BAKER ’82 of Jackson-

RAYMOND LEE SHEPHERD SR. ’65

ville, Fla., died on July 23.

of Auburn died on Aug. 3.

STEVEN T. POWERS ’83 of

JOHN WEBB BRASWELL ’67 of

Fairborn, Ohio, died on Feb. 27,

Birmingham died on July 29.

2013.

HUNTER VAUGHAN POPE ’67 of

CAROLE DOREEN SKONEKI CLARK

Pinson died on Aug. 5.

’84 of Montgomery died on July 8.

SARA SUDDUTH HOLTON DINIUS

TONDA ALESIA BARLOW ’85 of

’68 of Auburn died on Aug. 11.

Montgomery died on July 11.

CHARLES D. MAGILL ’68 of Crystal

DARYL WAYNE FINCHER ’85 of

River, Fla., died on July 16.

Buford, Ga., died on July 2.

CATHERINE CUMMINS HAYES ’69

MARY ANN CAMPAGNA ’88 of

of Mobile died on July 16.

Auburn died on Aug. 15.

JOHN TRUMAN SHEFFIELD ’69 of

STEPHANIE ROOP MATER ’86 of

Greenwood, S.C., died on Aug. 11.

Centennial, Colo., died on April 6.

PATRICIA JUSTICE KAY ’71 of

BEACHER BERT LEWIS ’90 of

Douglasville, Ga., died on July 27.

Deatsville died on Aug. 9.

PAUL JAMES LIOY ’71 of Cranford,

HAROLD “HAL” PRESTON TURK

N.J., died on July 8.

’91 of Glencoe, Ky., died on July 29.

HENRY LEE COLVIN ’72 of

CAROLYN PRICE WILLIAMSON ’94

Springhill, La., died on July 30.

of Auburn died on Aug. 9.

DAVID GRIFFIES ’73 of Montgom-

JON CHRISTOPHER COCHRAN ’01

ery died on July 30.

of Auburn died on Aug. 15.

CATHERINE J. MAHONY ’73 of

JAMES STEPHEN “STEVE”

Royal Oak, Mich., died on July 23.

FULLER ’02 of Cusseta died on

ROGER ALAN ARROWOOD ’74 of

Aug. 4.

Edenton, N.C., died on July 27.

LEON “BUDDY” KELLY III ’02 of

KENNETH “COACH” LEGRANDE

Columbiana died on July 22.

’74 of Madison died on Aug. 15.

JAMES STANLEY JOHNS ’03 of

JOHN REED “JACK” PORTERFIELD

Wetumpka died on Aug. 15.

’75 of Edgewater, Md., died July 7.

KRISTOPHER CHARLES BALL ’05

JAMES ROGER REEHL ’75 of

of Montgomery died on July 18.

Montgomery died on Aug. 1.

KEVIN M. WELDON ’05 of Houston,

JACK KENNETH SWINEHART ’75

Texas, died on Aug. 14.

of Ozark died on Aug. 3.

MIKEY HELEN MAHONE ’09 of

ELLIS EUGENE JONES ’77 of

Arlington, Va., died on July 25.

Bryson City, N.C., died on Aug. 12.

WILL CARTER MCCRACKEN ’11 of

JAMES FOX METCALF ’77 of

Atlanta died on July 8.

Garden of Memory

A

T ITS JUNE 2015 MEETING, the Auburn University Board of Trustees approved initiation of a Garden of Memory project, a memorial site advocated by the SGA to expand on the memorial on campus created in the 1950s to honor Alabama veterans. The Auburn Memorial, for which the SGA has already raised more than $1 million of the $1.25 million required for the project, would serve as a memorial for all members of the Auburn community, including students, faculty, staff and alumni, as well as veterans. The project has been a major focus for previous and current SGA presidents Logan Powell ’15 and Walker Byrd ’16, who are working with the Office of Development and the support of campus partners, including the Auburn Alumni Association, to raise the rest of the funding. “Auburn students and the Auburn Family need a place that will allow peaceful remembrance of the lives of fellow members of the Auburn Family that have passed away,” said Byrd. “Currently, there is no peaceful place for people to gather to remember a loved one. Students have few options of where they could hold a service or memorial in a peaceful setting. The Auburn Memorial would serve to be that place.” The memorial plaza, which would include enlarged lawn space for memorial events, and pond and stream enhancement, will be located on a 4.25-acre green space across Samford from the President’s Home. Plans call for it to contain seven pillars depicting traits of the Auburn Creed: hard work; education; honesty; mind, body and spirit; obedience to law; the human touch; and service. An open forum on the project, hosted by the provost’s office, was held on campus on Oct. 21. develop.auburn.edu/ways/units/student-affairs/memorial

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Auburn Magazine

63


BACKCHAT Online Speak

TWEET TWEET re: free Oct. 9 Brad Paisley concert. FACEBOOK SOARS when Southern Living goes glam with a photo shoot of the Raptor Center program. GAME-WATCHING PARTY IN CHINA...at 3 a.m. Auburn time!

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WAR EAGLE SHOUT OUT with Don Little ‘95 and friends from Acadia National Park in Bar Harbor, Maine. STRIKE UP THE BAND with a homecoming parade the weekend of Oct. 3.


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SHAPING A BETTER WORLD?

Because our actions impact future generations. Because This is Auburn — A Campaign for Auburn University is a $1 billion fundraising effort that will enhance and expand programs at Auburn. Why? To ensure our students have access to a world-class education, modern technology, and a curriculum that prepares them to meet the challenges of today and tomorrow. There is tremendous power in every gift — and within everyone who supports this cause. Each gift tells a different story. Now is the time to tell yours.

THERE’S A STORY BEHIND EVERY GIFT. GIVE TODAY AT BECAUSE.AUBURN.EDU.


Auburn Alumni Center 317 South College Street Auburn, AL 36849-5149 www.aualum.org

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Auburn Magazine Winter 2015