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Auburn MAGAZINE / SUMMER 2015


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The Light Fantastic The light trails from a passing ambulance speeding down South College Street lend a surrealistic air to a late spring night in Auburn. With camera always at the ready, university photographer Jeff Etheridge was at the right place, right time. (Photograph by Jeff Etheridge.) See more online at www.facebook.com/AuburnUPhoto

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THIS IS

TIGER WALK.

Do you remember when you walked across the stage at your commencement? You weren’t alone. While several thousand others joined you that day, you solidified your place as part of an Auburn Family more than a quarter-million graduates and countless thousands of friends strong. They too were all there, in spirit, which made for quite an extraordinary Tiger Walk. You are, and always will be, a part of something special —something that transcends age and time. You share a connection with an Auburn Family that bridges all 50 states and more than 80 foreign countries.

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And, because of that connection, you may have helped a student the way that someone helped you by funding scholarships or providing internships and mentoring. Your contribution has worked to significantly support the next generation of Auburn alumni. Because you “believe in Auburn and love it,” you are a source of Auburn’s success. You are a part of the reason that Auburn has achieved status as a major land-, sea-, and space-grant university with unlimited potential. Because of you, Auburn fosters one of the richest academic experiences possible. For all your efforts, your Auburn Family says, “Thank You!”


FROM THE PRESIDENT

Join the Vision

THE SUCCESS OF A RESPECTED INSTITUTION of higher learning can rarely be tied to one area. Neither our world-class faculty nor our highly gifted student body can carry that burden alone. Cutting-edge buildings for instruction and research can’t alone achieve that goal. The success we now enjoy has been the result of the combination of those groups and facilities in alliance with our alumni that comprise the Auburn Family. Recent news of Auburn’s ranking as the top public university in Alabama and 52nd overall by The Business Journals is, without doubt, to be attributed to the cooperation of our various on- and off-campus constituencies to make this happen. And now, as a family, we have the opportunity to increase our educational presence and expand our goals and our vision for the future. We are now at the beginning phase of Because This is Auburn: A Campaign for Auburn University to raise $1 billion that will empower students to fulfill their dreams, faculty to push for new discoveries, and the university to partner with others in extraordinary ways. This endeavor will not only highlight our academic excellence, but will also fund thousands of student scholarships and endow more than 100 new chairs and

professorships to ensure that Auburn’s influence will resonate throughout the global community for years to come. For more specifics concerning the campaign’s goals and opportunities and how you can participate, please visit the campaign’s website, because.auburn.edu. We envision a bright future for Auburn University, and the tremendous power that comes from all of you who support our cause with your gifts can advance this institution’s future strength and mission as a major land-, sea- and space-grant institution. It is a task we have achieved together.

War Eagle,

Jay Gogue ’69 President, Auburn University jgogue@auburn.edu

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FROM THE AUBURN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

Spring Fever TODD VAN EMST / OA NEWS

GREETINGS, FELLOW AUBURN ALUMNI AND FRIENDS! Spring has been busy and festive on the plains. The Lifetime Achievement Awards program was a huge success and close to 400 members of the Auburn Family attended for the inductions of Samuel Ginn ’59, Melisa Herkt ’77, David Housel ’69, Mike Warren ’68 and Young Alumni Achievement Award recipient Ben Chappell ’03. We also honored the 2015 Class of Golden Eagles on April 16 and welcomed back numerous participants for the Black Alumni Weekend held April 17-19. A-Day weekend brought many events and parties on campus as well as the launch of the new capital campaign, Because This is Auburn. (The photo above features campaign leaders gathered for the A-Game halftime announcement.) This campaign is well under way and will bring Auburn’s endowment levels and scholarship awards up to par with our SEC peer institutions. As public money continues to decline, it is imperative that members of the Auburn family continue their investment of scholarships, professorships, programs and endowments at the highest levels as we compete for excellence. I hope you agree with me on how important it is for us to “pay forward” our own Auburn experience to this generation of young people wanting to attend Auburn today. Another reason to join this campaign is to improve our standing as one of the top public universities in the United States. Today, only 12 percent of Auburn alumni make contributions to the university on an annual basis. Unfortunately, this negatively affects our rankings and puts us behind many of our SEC peers. If you are

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not currently participating, I invite you to stand up and be counted with your gift of support. Please consider a gift that is meaningful to you and join the campaign by becoming a member of the Auburn Alumni Association, making a gift to your college or the numerous opportunities that make a difference in the life of Auburn University. A special thanks to alumni who are already life members and those who renew their support on an annual basis. It’s easy to become a member with a gift of $50 or a life member for $850. To learn more, please visit www.aualum.org. A-Day also brings Auburn football back into “season.” This spring, Coach Gus Malzahn is visiting seven Auburn Clubs to rally the troops for the 2015-16 season. Thank you, Coach, for your time, investment and support of the Auburn Alumni Association! On behalf of my fellow board members, thank you for your support, engagement and participation in the Auburn Alumni Association. Because This is Auburn, we are working hard to connect all generations of the Auburn family back to the university, so we appreciate your help in this ongoing effort.

War Eagle,

Jack Fite ’85 President, Auburn Alumni Association jfite@fitebuilding.com


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By the Numbers We on the Auburn Magazine staff love the photo of sunrise at Samford Hall on the cover of this issue. It sums up everything we want to say about the main subject of this special issue—Because This is Auburn, the largest fundraising campaign in Auburn University history. With a $1 billion goal, the campaign means nothing less than the future of Auburn. A successful campaign will enable the university to provide more scholarships, ensuring future generations of students the opportunity to enjoy the unique experience that is Auburn. It will help the university build facilities to meet the increasing complexities demanded by today’s research, attract and retain the best faculty and staff, and reach out to the community in ways that make a real difference in the lives of citizens in our state, in our nation and around the world. If you take one thing away from this issue, we hope it is this: your gift matters, no matter the amount. Did you realize, for example, that the number of alumni who give back to their institution is a major factor in many national university rankings? Your gift, and mine, might not be enough to fund a building or endow a scholarship, but each of us counts equally in those participation rates. What does all that have to do with Samford Hall? For most of us, Samford is the iconic face of Auburn University. Its roots reach all the way back to Old Main and the 1856 founding of the East Alabama Male College. Under its clock tower and on its grassy lawn, today’s students relax and study and flirt and throw Frisbees, just as AU students have done for generations. And generations from now, as Auburn University reaps the benefits of the Because This is Auburn

FEATURES

campaign, Samford will still stand sentinel to the vigor of a modern university drawing strength from its past and from its people as it marches forward. Why? Because This is Auburn.

Suzanne Johnson Editor, Auburn Magazine suzannejohnson@auburn.edu

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Mapping Auburn’s Future

The Because This is Auburn fundraising campaign provides a roadmap to the future of Auburn, as the campus community takes a hard look at the resources needed moving forward. Above, Michael O’Neill ‘74 takes the stage at the campaign’s April 17 gala with the young star of the campaign video. Photos from the Friday night campaign preview gala by John Deputy and Steve Sniteman. See video online at because.auburn.edu. BY SUZANNE JOHNSON

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EDITOR

Suzanne Johnson CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Shannon Bryant-Hankes ’84 ART DIRECTOR

Audrey Lowry ’12 UNIVERSITY PHOTOGRAPHER

Jeff Etheridge EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS

Ashtyne Cole ‘15 Nick Hines ‘15 DESIGN ASSISTANTS

Jenna Ritterling ’15, Amanda Jernigan ’18 Madison Wooters ’15 IT SPECIALIST

James Hammond ’13 PRESIDENT, AUBURN UNIVERSITY

Jay Gogue ’69 VICE PRESIDENT FOR ALUMNI AFFAIRS & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, AUBURN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

Gretchen VanValkenburg ’86 PRESIDENT, AUBURN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

Jack Fite ’85 AUBURN MAGAZINE ADVISORY COUNCIL CHAIR

Neal Reynolds ’77

DEPARTMENTS 7 From the Editor

22 Philanthropy

We all can make a difference. Because.

Two pages of photos from the Because This is Auburn campaign celebration and kickoff. Above, David Housel ‘69 (top) and Thomas Gossom Jr. ‘75 talk about Auburn’s future.

CONCOURSE 10 A-Day 2015 Aubie (above, left) was in the celebratory spirit for A-Day weekend in April.

13 Mixed Media Auburn alumni on screen, on stage, on the page and on iTunes.

16 Porter’s Story An Auburn veterinary school researcher and an alumni couple rally around their young son Porter to fund clinical trials for a fatal condition.

20 Tiger Walk In his 10th year as athletics director, Jay Jacobs looks ahead.

THE CLASSES 49 A Million-Dollar Match The Auburn Alumni Association sponsors a $1 million matching program for life members to raise money for endowed scholarships.

50 Class Notes 52 In Memoriam 63 Backchat See what your classmates are talking up on social media and remember to tag us in your Auburn pics with #AuburnAlumni!

ON THE COVER University photographer Jeff Etheridge camped out on a nearby rooftop in order to capture this rare angle of Samford Hall at the breaking dawn of a new day—symbolic of our cover story. And the word “Because” on the cover? It’s in the handwriting of none other than George Petrie.

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AUBURN MAGAZINE ADVISORY COUNCIL

Maria Baugh ’87 John Carvalho ’78 Jon Cole ’88 Christian Flathman ’97 Tom Ford ’67 Kay Fuston ’84 Julie Keith ’90 Mary Lou Foy ’66 Eric Ludgood ’78 Cindy McDaniel ’80 Napo Monasterio ’02 Carol Pappas ’77 Joyce Reynolds Ringer ’59 Allen Vaughan ’75 AUBURN MAGAZINE (ISSN 1077– 8640) is published quarterly; 4X per year; spring, summer, fall, winter, for members of the Auburn Alumni Association. Periodicals-class postage paid in Auburn and additional mailing offices. Editorial offices are located in the Auburn Alumni Center, 317 South College St., Auburn University, AL 36849-5149. Phone 334-844–1164. Fax 334-844–1477. Email: aubmag@auburn.edu. Contents ©2014 by the Auburn Alumni Association, all rights reserved. ADVERTISING INFORMATION Contact Jessica King at 334844–2586 or see our media guide at www.aualum.org/magazine. POSTMASTER Send address changes to AU Records, 317 South College St., Auburn, AL 36849–5149.


AUBURN NEWS & VIEWS

Concourse IN THIS SECTION A-Day 10 Mixed Media 13 GM1 Research 16 Archives 19

Crunch time!

Bugged Out For one Auburn University student, this spring semester was one creepy, crawly, crunchy culinary quest. Read more about Camren Brantley-Rios’ grand experiment in sustainable eating on Page 12 of this issue.

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All In for

A-Day

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WO YEARS AGO, Auburn marked A-Day with a farewell—a final rolling of the old oaks at Toomer’s Corner before the trees were removed. This year, despite an April 18 that threatened rain, tens of thousands of Auburn Family members gathered on campus for a different kind of A-Day: one of new beginnings and eyes fixed on the future. Couldn’t be on the Plains that day? Here are just a few of the things you missed.


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The rollout of the Because This is Auburn comprehensive campaign, with its goal of raising $1 billion to support Auburn University students, faculty and facilities (see more information throughout this issue). In addition to a Friday Night gala and Saturday breakfast, the campaign was officially launched at halftime of the A-Day football game, with recognition for the largest gift in university history, a $57 million donation from John and Rosemary Brown, both class of 1957. Read more about the Browns and their gift on Page 40 of this issue.

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A downtown block party that began at 10 a.m. with children’s activities, an AU Bookstore tent featuring the first product line from the previous Auburn Oaks trees and other merchandise and special offers from area merchants.

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A 5 p.m. ceremony to dedicate Samford Park Plaza and the new Auburn Oaks, with special guests from athletics. Following was a spirit rally featuring the band, Aubie and the AU cheerleaders.

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A free University Program Councilsponsored concert in the Toomer’s Corner intersection lasted from 6 p.m. until late into the evening, featuring pop singer Nick Jonas (right and far left), hiphop artist Nelly (left), and singer-rapper Kesha, drawing thousands of fans to chill out in the drizzle.

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And not to be forgotten: the A-Day game itself, where fans got a chance to see new starting quarterback Jeremy Johnson and defensive coordinator Will Muschamp’s revamped lineup.


CONCOURSE > STUDENT LIFE

Gettin’ Buggy with It WHEN BREAKFAST TIME hit on a late January morning in Auburn, Camren Brantley-Rios made his way to the student center. The Auburn senior ordered an omelet with a side of avocado. All good. It didn’t get weird until he returned to his dorm to add one special ingredient to his breakfast: mealworms. He cooked them with some creole seasoning and added them as a garnish. They tasted like popcorn. If you are what you eat, then for the month of January 2015, Brantley-Rios was a bug. “It was about keeping myself accountable,” explains the public relations major, who blogs about sustainable food sources and decided to eat bugs for a month to raise awareness for all things crunchy and crawly and filled with protein. “Bugs are normal to eat across the world, but are seen as weird to Americans. They taste normal and you eat the whole thing and don’t waste any part of it.” Brantley-Rios ordered his bugs and products online but has since begun to raise his own. He used the bugs to supplement his meals. Breakfast consisted of Exo protein bars made with cricket flour and smoothies mixed with mixed bug products. He found that the mixed bugs had a nutty flavor while crickets taste similar to mushrooms. He supplemented Mexican food with crickets as well as pasta, rice, pizza and veggies. Favorite culinary crawler? Waxworms, or the larvae of wax moths. Not because they taste good, but because they absorb other flavors. On BrantleyRios’ blog, “30 Days of Bugs,” he emphasizes the large amount of

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protein insects contain as well as the upside to conserving water and land that would ordinarily go to agriculture. He also likens eating bugs to eating sushi, a once commonly frowned-upon meal. “The big message I wanted to get across was that there are plenty of different ways to eat bugs,” Brantley-Rios said. “There are people who are baking cookies and muffins with cricket powder now and the market is starting to get bigger.” During his month-long bugfest, Brantley-Rios attracted national media attention. He also inspired a few of his friends to incorporate bugs into their diets. “At first, I told him I was never going to try any of those bugs,” said industrial design senior Caroline Anderson. “Now I’ve tried the mealworms, superworms and crickets. I’ve already ordered my own cricket bars to eat on a regular basis, but that’s as far as I think I’ll go.” Simon Gregg, a senior in biosystems engineering, became interested enough to start his own mealworm “farm.” As for what’s next, BrantleyRios has a special shipment on the way that fills even him with a sense of trepidation. “Someone is sending me cockroaches,” he said. “I’m not sure about those yet.” —Ashtyne Cole


MIXED MEDIA Now Playing ON CD & ITUNES Now That I Have Love, a new recording from husband and wife recording artists Greg ‘08 and Lizzy ‘09 Boudreaux. Features nine new tracks, and is the followup to their 2013 recording, “In the Dust.”

BOOKSHELF Genius in America: The Story of C. Harry Knowles, Inventor, by Mary Ellen Hendrix ‘84 (The Donnell Group, 2015). With more than 400 patents, Knowles ‘51 is one of the nation’s most prolific inventors. He spent the better part of 40 years as head of global bar code scanner company Metrologic Instruments, which he founded in 1968. His life’s journey provides a personal view of the influence of good teaching and inventive collaboration, along with critical insights into the challenges of founding and growing a business.

William Baggett ‘68 (American, b. 1946), Interiors, 1990, Egg tempera on hardboard panel, Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art, Auburn University; gift of Steven and Jadwiga Markoff

Meet Albert J. Smith, Jr., a classic example of a creative entrepreneur – driven by the need to find a better way, gifted with courage to accept risk, and able to recognize when barriers are actually opportunities. He chose the arena of industrial power, where competition was not fostered, and found competitive advantage. He credits good luck as a strong factor during his youth, studies at Auburn, Navy service, and marriage.

Congratulating Jule, Auburn Class of 1999

DNA of a Southern Boy, by Albert J. Smith Jr. ‘47 (2015). A memoir from the founding patron of the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art, recounting his youth, studies at Auburn, family history and career. A creative entrepreneur who financed, built and operated cogeneration power plants that served as a model of conservation during the energy crisis, he currently lives in Auburn. “We picked September 8, 1948, for our wedding… Jule’s mother was happy, but voiced concern that Jule finish her degree. We promised she would do so – but we didn’t say when.”

With Jule, my wife, friend, companion, lover, and “cheerleader”

Albert J. Smith, Jr., Entrepreneur

Albert introduces us to his prominent, but not always lucky forebearers. They faced many challenges: upended economy, global financial crisis, and arson as political revenge, along with ill health, flooding, and boll weevil infestations that would destroy one farm, while neighboring fields were untouched. The families rose, as a one-armed Confederate veteran traded timber and started a bank, an eloquent lawyer was elected governor, and two cousins reformed a fraudulent insurance company. Albert financed, built, and operated cogeneration power plants that produced huge savings by recycling wasted heat. In the wake of the nation’s energy crisis, he advocated conservation and competition. Retired in Houston, he became intrigued by a venture back in Alabama, at Auburn. After getting off to a good start, the project had stalled. Albert saw an opportunity to make a difference for his university, and to celebrate a golden occasion with the woman he met there.

A LBERT J. SMIT H, JR.

“I’ve been asked whether I share Jule’s love of the arts – museums, opera, and symphony. I reply, ‘I R N engineer: I like Jule. Jule likes museums, opera, and symphony. Therefore I like museums, opera, and symphony… And in business, I’m very glad she’s been on my side of the table!’”

DNA of a Southern Boy

Coffee, Tea, and Holy Water: One Woman’s Journey to Experience Christianity Around the Globe, by Amanda Hudson ‘01 (Abingdon Press, 2015). It began with a cup of coffee and led to an international exploration of Christianity around the globe. Somewhere between making cinnamon cappuccinos, coffee frappes and chai smoothies, barista Amanda Hudson started pondering the great diversity of caffeine—and the even greater diversity in life, in the church, and in faith. It led her to travel to five countries in search of what she might have in common with believers around the world.

High blood pressure blocked Albert from the Navy’s prestigious V-12 program

“I wanted very much to belong to this elite group of future officers. Instead, I came into the Navy with the diverse group of ordinary seamen, learning how to pack a sea bag. It taught me self-sufficiency… I’m glad things happened that way.”

A groundbreaking moment with Albert’s bankers to his right and his client to his left

DNA of a Southern Boy

“The PSE philosophy had three points: One, make a fair profit through innovation. Two, have fun. Three, leave the world a better place to live.”

A L B ERT J . S MI TH , J R .

The Jule Collins Smith Fine Arts Museum at Auburn University

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CONCOURSE > CAMPUS NEWS

NO ONE QUITE KNOWS what to make of drones, which have the potential to make life both easier and more complex. Convenience, practical applications and security are just a few of the considerations in the growing use of drones. In April, Auburn University received the nation’s first Fed-

Game of Drones

eral Aviation Administration approval to operate a new Unmanned Aircraft Systems Flight School as part of the Auburn University Aviation Center. “This is an honor for Auburn University,” said Bill Hutto ’90, director of the aviation center. “We will conduct commercial flight training for operators of unmanned aircraft systems outdoors and untethered. We will have the ability to offer training courses at different locations here and around the state

for Auburn students, faculty, members of other public agencies and the general public.” Unmanned aircraft systems, or drones, are expected to be a key component of the state’s and nation’s economy as opportunities to use them continue to rise in business and industry, as well as in research areas such as engineering, building science and agriculture. “It’s a major win for the state,” added Alabama Lt. Gov. Kay Ivey ’67. “We’re building off Alabama’s already-rich history and robust industry in aerospace and aviation.” Auburn has offered aviation education for 80-plus years.

ocm.auburn.edu/aviation_center/

Mell Classroom Building Scoop

2 160 12 4

lecture halls

seats each

Mell Classrooms

Ralph Brown Draughon Library

70,000 ft2 $25 million estimated cost paid by unrestricted university funds

classrooms

4

floors + basement

that are EASL classrooms (Engaged Active Student Learning)

Construction begins in summer 2015 Slated for completion by the 2016 or 2017 academic year

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Next phase of the project’s construction, beginning July 2017, will be the demolition of Allison Laboratory and Parker Hall and the construction of two buildings on the site as lab & classroom replacements. They will cost approximately $75 million.


CONCOURSE > CAMPUS NEWS

MATTERS OF INTEREST Payday lending has been in the news lately as lawmakers and financial experts look at Alabama’s practices. The maximum annual percentage rate for a $100 loan through payday lenders in Alabama is more than 456 percent. Some states allow rates that are even higher. WITH SUCH HIGH INTEREST RATES, those seeking short-term “payday loans” easily fall into a cycle of borrowing and repayment that sinks them into more desperate financial situations than those causing them to seek the loans in the first place. Yet individuals needing financial relief are often choosing the high-interest lenders over local banks offering lower interest rates and more comprehensive services. Three Harbert College of Business professors in finance explore the reasons why in their paper, “Banks and Payday Lenders: Friends or Foes?” James Barth, John Jahera and Jitka Hilliard examined payday lending regulations nationwide, compared them state-to-state, and cross-referenced this information with state demographics, including income and education. Payday lending is prohibited in 13 states and the District of Columbia. (The photo at right shows President Barack Obama at a recent meeting in Birmingham to discuss payday-lending practices.) “Some people say they (payday lenders) provide a service. Yet, some states outlaw them,” said Barth, Lowder Eminent Scholar in Finance and a Milken Institute Senior Fellow. “It’s an issue—an important public policy issue—whether the rates they charge should be allowed because it’s typically not rich people who use payday lenders. That’s why we’re motivated to better understand where payday lenders locate.” Barth, Hilliard and Jahera discovered

that the South—Mississippi, Louisiana, South Carolina, Oklahoma, Alabama and Tennessee, in particular—has the most payday lender stores per 10,000 people. They also reported that payday lending stores correlate to a community’s population of African-Americans under 15, as well as the education level of its citizens. “The correlations between the number of payday lending stores and the percentages of the population that have high school and bachelor’s degrees are significantly negative,” the researchers wrote. Payday loan regulations vary from state to state. For instance, six states (Delaware, Idaho, Nevada, South Dakota, Utah and Wisconsin) set no limit on the interest rate that may be charged. In 28 states, including Alabama, lenders must “explicitly specify that triple-digit rates may be charged.”

Instead of paying high rates at a payday lender, Barth suggested the regulatory environment be changed so that some customers are afforded the opportunity to obtain the same services at local banks. By comparison, Alabama has 1,035 payday lending branches but 1,571 bank branches. “People who borrow money from payday lenders are not people who are unbanked because to borrow from a payday lender, one needs verification that one has income and also that one has a bank account,” he said. “Regulating payday lenders more strictly is not the issue, but rather determining if one can impose fewer regulations on banks so that banks can provide similar services at lower prices.”

harbert.auburn.edu/news/Payday.php

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CONCOURSE > RESEARCH

Hope for a Breakthrough When Sara ’08 and Michael Heatherly ’08 welcomed their son, Porter, into the world they were as thrilled as any young couple would be. Porter was “the perfect baby,” according to Sara. He had bright blue eyes, a head of thick blond hair, slept through the night, rarely cried and giggled at everything. AT AROUND FOUR MONTHS, Sara (in photo, bottom left) noticed a red spot on Porter’s eyes, which were beginning to twitch back and forth. The couple, who live in Auburn, took Porter to an ophthalmologist in Birmingham and received the last diagnosis they expected—and one that would alter their lives forever. Porter was diagnosed with GM1 gangliosidosis, an inherited disorder that progressively destroys nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. One in every 100,000-200,000 infants are diagnosed. “They told us that Porter had the infantile form of GM1, which is more aggressive than Tay-Sachs disease,” said Michael (in photo, standing at left) of the more common type of gangliosidosis. “They just printed out the Genetics Home Reference page on GM1 and gave it to us. We left the office knowing there was no cure, there was no treatment and the life expectancy was 2 years.” After the diagnosis, the Heatherlys decided to make the most of the time they had left with Porter. They celebrate birthdays every month and their home is filled with photos of the family taking numerous adventures together.

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“We took him to football games, basketball games and baseball games,” Sara said. “We even went to the beach twice, but Porter hated it because of all the sunscreen. We were able to take him everywhere until it got too hard on his body.” After a few months the Heatherlys joined the National Tay-Sachs & Allied Diseases Association and were shocked to discover that someone was researching GM1 in Auburn. Doug Martin ’89, associate professor of anatomy, physiology and pharmacy in veterinary medicine (seated in the photo, along with a feline patient), has been doing research on the disease for years. He and the Heatherlys had even seen each other. “It was such a weird coincidence,” Sara said. “We go to the same church as Doug. He even sits a few pews in front of us. I gave him a call and told him we were coming to meet him.” Martin and his team work with cats diagnosed with GM1 and Tay-Sachs, using gene therapy to correct the disease through the nervous system. They have had positive results since 2006. To Martin, getting to know the Heatherly family has helped him and his team feel


CONCOURSE > RESEARCH

a heightened sense of urgency. “My lab group had never met a child with GM1 and they were able to see what a cruel disease it is,” Martin said. “It’s horrible because the parents don’t realize they’re carriers and don’t even know what is happening to their child until 6 to 8 months.” Although Martin’s team had positive results with gene therapy, getting a treatment to human use is costly. The Heatherlys have been working with Martin to raise funds for clinical trials, which average around $500,000. In conjunction with the Auburn University Foundation, they began a crowd-sourcing campaign through crowdrise.com to raise the money. Meanwhile, Martin has signed with a company in Paris to have a clinical trial ready by early 2017. Any treatment developed will not come in time to help Porter, but his parents hope to save others from going through the same thing. “We know at this point that the treatment will not help Porter,” Sara said. “But it could save so many others.” Now 31 months old, Porter Heatherly is able to stay at home most of the time, in a special beanbag chair Michael put together to help his breathing issues. “We used to wonder why this happened to us,” Michael said. “But because of our faith, we know Porter is going to be okay. He’s brought so many amazing people into our lives, and we’re just happy he’s had such an impact.” —Ashtyne Cole

THIS IS COMMUNITY. THIS IS YOUR MUSEUM. THIS IS AUBURN.

JCSM.AUBURN.EDU

crowdrise.org/offerporterhopecureg/

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CONCOURSE > RESEARCH

NOT A DROP TO DRINK RESEARCH BY AN AUBURN University assistant professor suggests that more than half of the global land area could experience water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Shufen “Susan” Pan, of Auburn’s International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and the School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, found that in low and high climate-change scenarios, global warming would result in a large increase of surface evapotranspiration at the end of the 21st century, a measure of the amount of water lost from the land surface.

“One billion people lack reliable access to safe drinking water, two to three million children die each year from water-related diseases and 171 million children are suffering from chronic malnutrition,” she said. These numbers are not only numbers to Pan, and she speaks passionately about the devastation vulnerable populations sum of evaporation & plant transpiration from the Earth's surface to the atmosphere could experience when changing climate Pan and her team found that the ratio of evapotranspiration to precipitation would greatly intensifies already stressed water increase across about 60 percent of the global land area. The ratio of evapotranspiration and food sources. However, she to precipitation is a measure for the potential evaporative demand—in the simplest terms, believes pursuing solutions to potential water scarcity. one problem at a time will prove “Regions like Africa would face the largest increase in evapotranspiration, a problem insufficient. compounded in this area, for example, where at least 44 percent of the population already “These problems must be lacks access to clean, reliable water sources,” Pan said. considered as they relate to Her research, published in Earth’s Future, is part of a broader focus on the nexus of each other, or they will prove interdependency between water, food, energy and changing climate. Pan is interested in the unmanageable,” said Pan, ways that water, food and energy security are interdependent with multiple ways of mutual who admits that it’s a tough influence, and how those three factors in turn hinge on climate. problem. “One person cannot solve “Both energy and food production depend on readily available water, which requires energy this issue.” in turn for purification and transport, but is also affected by pollution from both energy and But what she can do is provide food production,” she said. science-based information for For Pan, who has a broad interdisciplinary background including ecology, economics and mitigation and adaptation related geographic information systems, this research means a lot to her personally. She says that the especially to food and water information available on how many people in the world are already suffering from water and security. food insecurity is distressing to her, and the indications are that it will only get worse.

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The Auburn University College of Education celebrates its centennial in 2015.

THE ARCHIVES Found in “Auburn’s Attic”

IN 1915, the board of trustees established the education department, with more than 50 students registering the first year. Zebulon Judd served as the first dean of education during his 40-year career at Auburn. diglib.auburn.edu/

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Auburn Magazine

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CONCOURSE > TIGER WALK

A

A WINNING ATTITUDE

YOUNG JAY JACOBS wasn’t just frustrated. He was mad. His Little League friends in tiny LaFayette were hitting the baseball better than he was. “I couldn’t stand it,” Jacobs said. So his dad, John Jacobs, balled up a dime-sized piece of paper, attached it to a string and hung it from the back deck. Jacobs swung away at the spitball until he got better. “I swung at that thing daily,” he said. “I got better because the ball looked like a watermelon coming in there after swinging at that paper ball all day. I had to work at it harder.” It was no different when he walked on the football team at Auburn. He showed up and told the coaches he wanted to play on the offensive line. At 205 pounds. “I’ve always been an overachiever,” said Jacobs, who earned a bachelor’s and master’s degree from Auburn in 1985 and 1988, respectively, and recently marked 10 years as the university’s athletics director. “Part of the way I’m built is I like to try to outwork people.” Just like the LaFayette Little Leaguer who wanted to improve his swing, Jacobs wakes up every day thinking of ways to make Auburn Athletics better and vowing to work harder to make it happen. One way he’s done that is to hire a string of championship-caliber coaches who might not have come to Auburn in days past. Of all the wide-ranging responsibilities an athletics director has, few are more crucial than hiring head coaches. Jacobs’ last several

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Jay Jacobs

hires have perhaps provided some insight into the man only those closest to him really know. He’s friendly but fearless. Calm but tenacious. And when he sets his mind on something, it’s best to help. Or get out of the way. The recent success of Auburn softball is a feel-good story that shows Jacobs’ burning desire to get better—and his ability to close on a candidate he likes. Jacobs got a phone call that Coach Clint Myers, who had won two national championships and been to the Women’s College World Series seven times in eight years at Arizona State, might be willing to listen if an opportunity arose. He jumped at the chance to interview Myers.

“When you go through tough times and the waves are pretty high, you learn to focus on what’s important,” Jacobs said. When he saw an opening to make an offer, he knocked the door down to get to the man that he already knew would be his next coach. “We had a couple other great softball candidates, but when Angie and I sat down for lunch with Clint and Katie, I knew he was my guy,” Jacobs said. The search was over. Just as this issue of the magazine went to press, the Auburn softball team won the school’s first-ever SEC Tournament title and was seeded fourth nationally in the NCAAs.


CONCOURSE > TIGER WALK

Auburn Tigers Football Schedule Sept. 5 vs. Louisville Sept. 12 vs. Jacksonville State Sept. 19 AT LSU Sept. 26 vs. Mississippi State Oct. 3 vs. San Jose State (homecoming) Oct. 15 AT Kentucky Oct. 24 AT Arkansas Oct. 31 vs. Ole Miss Nov. 7 AT Texas A&M Nov. 14 vs. Georgia Nov. 21 vs. Idaho Nov. 28 vs. Alabama w w w. a u b u r n t i g e r s.com

TODD VAN EMST / OA NEWS

Reflecting on his first 10 years, Jacobs says the darkest times shaped him more than any other. The times when Auburn tragically lost staff members or former student-athletes, incidents that overshadowed all others, broke his heart. They challenged his ability to lead during the storms of life. But they only made him stronger. “When you go through tough times and the waves are pretty high, you learn to focus on what’s important,” Jacobs said. The adversity he has experienced caused him to re-think why he’s in the position he’s in in the first place. His mantra became clear: “We are going to have the best student-athlete experience in the nation.” With rising coaches’ salaries, an influx of new television revenue and a race to build world-class facilities, the competitiveness of the conference many already consider the best in the nation isn’t changing. Neither is Jacobs’ appetite to win. “A lot of things play into your ability to continue to compete in this league,” Jacobs said. “It’s facilities, it’s support, it’s coaches, it’s all of those things. But you also have to have a unified athletic department. You have to have everybody on the same page as far as what creates that culture of success. We’ve been able to do that here, and I’m committed to keeping it.” —Jack Smith

Big Grad on Campus!

Never mind the NFL career with the Carolina Panthers. Heisman Trophy-winner Cam Newton has been attending classes each off-season to complete his degree. On May 9-10, he joined the official ranks of AU graduates.

SUMMER 2015

Auburn Magazine

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CONCOURSE > PHILANTHROPY

Because This is Auburn THIS SPRING MARKED A HISTORIC chapter in the life of Auburn University. During an A-Day weekend filled with events that showcased the Auburn Family’s spirit and connections, we publicly launched the $1 billion Because This is Auburn campaign—our most ambitious fundraising effort to date. In conjunction with the launch of the campaign, Auburn received the largest single gift in its history—a $57 million commitment from John and Rosemary Brown, both 1957 Auburn graduates. This gift will be used to support the construction of a new performing arts center, as well as a new engineering student achievement center. And although these facilities may seem worlds apart in their purpose and function, both have the power to transform Auburn University in significant ways. Each will bring a measure of prestige and recognition to Auburn as it increases our capacity to offer a well-rounded educational experience. These facilities represent a new benchmark in our ability to provide the level and quality of learning and cultural experience for which Auburn wishes to be known. For some students, like John Thornton, the presence of these two buildings is as natural as his concurrent majors in wireless software

22

AUBURNMAGAZINE.AUBURN.EDU

engineering and music. As a freshman with an interest in both engineering and trumpet performance, John knows these facilities will enhance his Auburn experience in ways he never imagined. He noted that he will benefit from them in both of his courses of study, and he believes that the new performing arts center will encourage students from all majors to participate in music ensembles and theater productions. Thousands of other members of the Auburn Family have made gifts of all sizes to support this campaign, proving that we stand together for something greater. This edition of the Auburn Magazine outlines the many areas and initiatives that you can support to inspire our students, serve our faculty and enrich our programs. I encourage you to be part of this campaign as we celebrate the spirit that connects us and the belief in a better Auburn that drives us.

Photos

Jane DiFolco Parker Vice President for Development President, Auburn University Foundation Learn more online and make your campaign gift at because.auburn.edu

Scenes from campaign kickoff festivities, including development VP Jane DiFolco Parker (above, left) with John and Rosemary Brown ’57.


SUMMER 2015

Auburn Magazine

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Why are we compelled

TO DO MORE?

Because John and Rosemary Brown, both 1957 graduates, believe the Auburn experience is worth preserving for the next generation. That’s why they made a $57 million gift — the largest in Auburn’s history — to fund two new facilities: a performing arts center and a student achievement center in engineering. The Browns’ generosity will impact not only Auburn University, but also the community that surrounds it. John and Rosemary Brown, your generosity is transformational. The entire Auburn Family thanks you. The Loveliest Village thanks you.

TH E R E’S A STO RY B E H I N D E VE RY G I FT. FI N D OUT MO R E AT B EC AUS E . AU BU R N. E DU.

SUMMER 2015

Auburn Magazine

25


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SUMMER 2015

Auburn Magazine

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Auburn University launches the largest fundraising campaign in its history with a $1 billion goal, a solid plan for the university’s future and a name that says it all: Because This is Auburn.

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ILLUSTRATION BY RICK PETERSON | STORY BY SUZANNE JOHNSON

SUMMER 2015

Auburn Magazine

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MAPPING AUBURN’S FUTURE

AN

AIR OF ANTICIPATION permeated Beard-Eaves-Memorial Coliseum on the night of Friday, April 17. All around the city, members of the Auburn Family, young and old, had gathered in preparation for Saturday’s A-Day game, street party, and dedication of the new oaks at Toomer’s Corner and the reimagined Samford Park. But on that Friday night, the old coliseum had been transformed into a wonderland of draped fabrics, dramatic lighting and oversized video screens. The black-tie affair marked an auspicious occasion. The night already had seen its share of excitement. Auburn President Jay Gogue had begun the evening onstage with Heisman Trophy winner and graduating AU senior Cam Newton to announce that the official kickoff of the largest comprehensive fundraising effort in Auburn University history, the $1 billion Because This is Auburn campaign, would take place at halftime during the A-Day game. Campaign co-chairs Raymond ’82 and Kathryn ’81 Harbert had taken the stage to announce that in the years leading up to Saturday’s public launch, Auburn had already received gifts and pledges totaling more than $718 million. But there was a special announcement to come. University officials thought they knew what it was: John and Rosemary Brown, both 1957 graduates, would be announcing a $55 million gift to the university, the largest in AU history and one of the largest ever in the state of Alabama. The Browns took the stage, and then John Brown went off-script, taking officials by surprise. In honor of his and his wife’s graduating year and 57 years of marriage, he announced a $57 million gift instead, funding two projects—a performing arts center and a student achievement center in the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering. Why the gift, and why the last-minute increase? “Because Auburn was a transformative educational experience for us,” explains Brown, former CEO and chairman of the board of Stryker Corp., a leading medical device company. Rosemary Brown is a retired teacher. (See related story on Page 40 of this issue.)

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Brown’s answer—his “because”—was important. At the beginning of any fundraising campaign, the question “why” is asked a lot. Why do we need a campaign? Why do we need it now? Why does a public university need so much private support? Why should I bother to give if I can only give a little? The answer always begins: Because. It was no accident that those who attended the April 17 gala saw the word “because” in their programs a lot—drawn from the university’s rich history and scanned from archival documents in the handwriting of George Petrie, Katharine Cooper Cater, Ralph “Shug” Jordan and James E. Foy. Names known by everyone who attended Auburn. Names from the university’s past, answering the question of why people should give to its future: Because This is Auburn.


MAPPING AUBURN’S FUTURE

Why Now? Because the Needs are Pressing improvement and building financial resources,” Gogue says. “After five years, Auburn had achieved several important milestones. They included establishment of 100 new professorships, substantially increasing the academic strength of Auburn’s incoming students (the average ACT score increased from 24.9 in 2007 to 26.9 in 2012), and establishing the Auburn Research and Technology Foundation in 2010 to enhance research activities.” Now, as the university looks at what the institution might become as it goes forward, Gogue calls the updated document (at ocm.auburn.edu/strategic_plan/) “a living strategy that will evolve and grow as we implement

AUBURN UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT Jay Gogue knows better than most the changes a successful fundraising campaign can bring to an institution. He became president of Auburn about a year before the end of the last campaign, and he’s been able to see the results as the university succeeded through the first half of an ambitious strategic planning process that included input from alumni, faculty, administrators and students. “The outcome of those efforts was a plan that outlined 59 key objectives across six major priorities: elevating academics, building the research foundation, expanding extension impact, developing our people, committing to continuous Highlights of Campaign Focus Areas & Goals

$252.9 M

Students

$488.1 M

$51.4

M

Programs

50

Universitywide

$80.8 M Faculty

$178.2 M Facilities

3 William D. Batchelor - Dean & Director

College of Agriculture

Percent more scholarship students

$26

College of Architecture, Design & Construction

M

7

New scholarships

New academic facilities

13

Endowed professorships

Endowed professorships

12

70

Million for service learning, innovation and outreach programs

150 Dean’s Club members

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Auburn Magazine

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MAPPING AUBURN’S FUTURE

thropic support for Auburn and manage the university’s combined endowment and gift funds. The foundation board members have been joined by hundreds of volunteers to bring the Because This is Auburn campaign to life. Although the university’s overall goal is $1 billion, each school and college, as well as several other units, has its own goal, and together they make up that $1 billion. Individual alumni or corporate and foundation donors can easily find an area of personal interest to support. At a time when Alabama’s public universities have experienced a precipitous decline in the amount of state funding (in 2013-14, only 26 percent of Auburn’s unrestricted operating revenue came from state appropriations), universities must rely on individual and organizational donors to move forward. Auburn is primed to move forward, says Jane DiFolco Parker, vice president for development and president of the Auburn University Foundation. “Auburn’s reputation today probably is as strong as it’s ever been,” she says. “Our alumni and friends understand that it will require a significant investment to keep Auburn at the forefront in recruiting and educating students, developing solutions to major societal problems, and touching our communities in important ways. “As a result of this campaign, we expect to see a renewed and strengthened Auburn that is known the world over for its academic, research and outreach excellence. Who we are tomorrow, of course, will depend on what we do—and how hard we’re willing to push — today.” Because This is Auburn has the capacity to undergird student scholarship opportunities at the university, college and school levels, Gogue says. “As a result, it helps alleviate the risks that come with student loan borrowing for both the student and the institution.” The campaign also has the ability to strengthen Auburn’s endowment. “That would provide the university with reliable, long-term support and, as designated by the donor, specific funds to respond to urgent funding situations or emerging opportunities,” adds Gogue. “Because This is Auburn can, and will, have countless positive outcomes for Auburn.”

its specific, measurable action items to strengthen our university. This is an exciting time for Auburn.” Taking a leading role in the campaign is Thomas Gossom Jr. ’75, whose face is familiar to generations of the Auburn Family, both from his football career with the Tigers and his acting, writing and production career after graduation. He’s taken the reins as board chair of the Auburn University Foundation at the perfect time to shape Auburn’s future. “Auburn is a global university, and this comprehensive campaign will allow us to plan today for tomorrow,” he says. “Through this campaign, we can continue on the cutting edge by attracting top professors, administrators and students, and providing them with 21st-century facilities.” The Auburn University Foundation, Gossom says, is an independent tax-exempt charitable organization that works with university development officers to generate philan-

$100

Endowed funds for excellence

M

8

New professorships

New endowed funds 100 for excellence

Raymond J. Harbert College of Business

32

13

Endowed chairs

AUBURNMAGAZINE.AUBURN.EDU

College of Education

1

Endowed professorship

5 1

New building

40

15

Endowed graduate fellowships

$19

M

New endowed professorships/chairs

70

New endowed 250 scholarships/fellowships

Million for excellence for program support

$200

M

Christopher Roberts, Dean

Samuel Ginn College of Engineering

Million for student achievement center

30


MAPPING AUBURN’S FUTURE

Why These Goals? Because They Benefit Students, Address Social Needs, & Increase the Value of the Auburn Degree AS ONE LOOKS THROUGH the campaign goals for the different schools, colleges and university-level units (see the chart at the bottom of these pages), quite a few refer to potential centers for success, for professorships and for endowed scholarships. That flexibility is intentional; donors can support areas about which they are most passionate. “We subscribe to the philosophy of being ‘donorcentered’ which, for our fundraising professionals, means working with donors to identify their areas of interest, not ours,” says Rob Wellbaum ’93, who as senior associate vice president for development also serves as campaign director. “To that end, we first build relationships with our donors by getting to know their giving interests and goals. Then, it’s up to us to bring to them only the opportunities that best align with those interests, which in many cases involves a multi-

faceted proposal benefiting areas throughout Auburn. With so many academic, cultural, research, outreach and athletic programs, we can’t assume a donor wants to support only the college or school from which he or she earned a degree.” One thing all the goals have in common, however, is the student experience at Auburn. Whether it’s a new building with state-of-the-art classrooms, a performing arts center, a scholarship, or an endowed professorship that brings an important teaching and research resource to the university, Auburn University students are the ultimate beneficiaries. “Nearly two-thirds of our campaign goal is designated to support the priorities of our colleges and schools, with the remainder including university priorities such as additional scholarships, study spaces and programming for our students; greater research and outreach infrastructure for

Research

Geosciences grad student Rezaul Huq measures groundwater parameters in Bangladesh.

$.5

School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences

$19.8

M

M

New scholarships

20

4

Additional faculty positions

Million to establish fund for excellence

1.5

Graduate School

40

Million to programs

1

$30

M

Honors College

10

Percent increase in travel funds

50

Percent increase in research funds

New scholarships/ fellowships

30

New graduate fellowships

$2.8

New endowed scholarships

funds for excellence

35

2.9 Million in professorships /chairs/externships

M June Henton, Professor & Dean

College of Human Sciences

SUMMER 2015

9.3 Million in

Room renovations in Spidle Hall

Auburn Magazine

14

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MAPPING AUBURN’S FUTURE

faculty; and expanded funding for studentathletes,” Wellbaum says. “As a result, this campaign will provide a well-rounded Auburn experience for all students, increase access to the Auburn experience for fans, and increase Auburn’s impact to communities locally and globally.” Universities have the intellectual resources and responsibility of helping find solutions to issues around the state and around the world, Gogue says. “Auburn has great potential for growth through instructional, research and outreach partnerships that serve to enhance student learning

opportunities as well as activities that address pressing social needs, particularly in underserved communities throughout Alabama.” Toward that end, the university partners with companies and encourages research that collaborates across disciplines in six key areas, he says: Energy and the environment; Health sciences; Cyber intelligence and security; Transportation; Gulf of Mexico research and restoration; and Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education. “We see another growth area in the demand for eLearning opportunities, including distance education,” Gogue adds. “Carefully planned hybrid or distance-education programs at the undergraduate and professional master’s level may expand Auburn’s reach and provide a new source of net revenue, particularly in nontraditional and international markets.”

Making a Difference

Students Damien Waits and Stephanie Hoffman collect sediment following the BP oil spill.

300 Total Dean’s

Club memberships

58

New endowed study-abroad scholarships

$22.9

M

Joe Aistrup, Dean

College of Liberal Arts

34

3

Million for a 4.5 new band practice facility

New endowed professorships

AUBURNMAGAZINE.AUBURN.EDU

$13.6

M

Million for a new facility

4.8

New endowed professorships

School of Nursing

25

Million in funds for excellence

2

Million for

2.9 undergraduate scholarships Thousand for 100 graduate student support

Percent increase in annual donor support

Harrison School of Pharmacy

2

$10

Million toward construction of new research building

1.5

M

15

New scholarships


MAPPING AUBURN’S FUTURE

I Can’t Give Much. Why Would my Small Gift Matter? Because Participation Rates are Vital EACH YEAR, INFLUENTIAL PUBLICATIONS such as U.S. News and World Report and Forbes release rankings of universities that often are used by high school students, their parents and their guidance counselors to consider potential places to continue their educations. Prospective corporate donors look at the rankings when considering potential research partners and institutions they are considering for philanthropic support.

“There are acting and supporting roles, ‘big’ parts and ‘small’ parts, jobs in the spotlight and in the shadows. But, everyone has a part to play in making the production a success.” A big factor in how those rankings are computed is the “alumni participation rate.” That means, Parker notes, the donor making a $25 gift counts just as much in the participation rate as the donor giving $25 million. “Charitable giving is much like a stage production,” she says. “There are acting and supporting roles, ‘big’ parts and ‘small’ parts, jobs in the spotlight and in the shadows. But, everyone has a part to play in making the production a success. Likewise, there is tremendous power in every gift,

$30

5

M

New scholarships

2 Nicholas Giordano, Dean

Million in new scholarships

50

Endowed chairs

10

College of Sciences and Mathematics

Million toward construction of new building

New endowed professorships

College of Veterinary Medicine

$69

M

5

$9.4

M

1

50 5

Auburn Alumni Association

New and reimagined facilities

Thousand new members Million to enhance Auburn Alumni Association 4.4 Scholars Endowment

10

SUMMER 2015

New scholarships

New Auburn Clubs

Auburn Magazine

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MAPPING AUBURN’S FUTURE

and within everyone who supports our cause.” The collective impact of thousands of gifts of every amount shouldn’t be underestimated. “With the entire Auburn Family working together, taking action and showing their support, we know we can reach our goal.” Speaking at the A-Day game, Gossom translated it to football terms: “Now we’re in the fourth quarter and still need a touchdown to win the game. We need every member of the Auburn Family to suit up with us to reach the end zone. Sometimes we close that gap with a touchdown. Sometimes it takes a few field goals. The same is true with this campaign. We all believe in Auburn, and it’s that commitment that drives us to do more. It will take every gift and the support of everyone to succeed.”

Auburn’s current participation rate is 12 percent—higher than the national average for public institutions but among the lowest among Southeastern Conference schools. The giving rate has been growing, however. “We believe the Auburn Family is committed to creating opportunities for Auburn and its students, and giving to Auburn is proof of that,” Parker says. “During a time when the 2014 Voluntary Support of Education survey revealed alumni giving nationally dropped by four-tenths of a percent to 8.3 percent, Auburn’s alumni giving increased by that same margin. Along those lines, Auburn’s average gift per alumnus was $1,622—nearly $100 higher than the national average. “That certainly bodes well for the success of this campaign and promises an exciting future for Auburn.”

Why are Scholarships such an Important Part of the Campaign? Because Rising Costs are Inhibiting many Students’ Abilities to Attend research enhancement will make their degree more valuable not just upon graduation but throughout their lives. “Scholarships are just the beginning,” Gogue says. “Once our students arrive, they will learn and grow from faculty who will benefit from the endowment of 100 new chairs and professorships to ensure that Auburn continues to attract and retain best-in-their-field educators and researchers.” New facilities and programs will add to their experience. “These students will have opportunities to connect with faculty and their fellow students through new academic programs and in new or reimagined campus facilities that better foster learning and collaboration,” Gogue says. “Opportunities will exist for learning through expanded, innovative research and outreach initiatives in every college and school and across every discipline.”

WHEN THE AUBURN ALUMNI Association Board of Directors announced that it was making $1 million in matching funds available to association life members who would endow a scholarship (see story on Page 49), it was with an eye toward making sure everyone who wanted an Auburn University education had the opportunity to achieve it. That desire is echoed in the goals of every academic unit. “New scholarships at the university level and in every college and school will help more qualified students realize the dream of obtaining an Auburn degree and prepare them for a lifetime of learning,” Gogue says. “Many of these scholarships, such as the Provost Leadership Undergraduate Scholarship (PLUS) program, are devoted to at-risk, underrepresented and first-generation students.” Scholarships help make Auburn a reality for prospective students. Once they arrive, the campaign’s goal of faculty and

$237

M

6 Department of Intercollegiate Athletics

36

200

Student-athletes on All-SEC Academic Honor Roll (2013-2014)

1 Office of Diversity & Multicultural Affairs

Consecutive years with a student-athlete as a Rhodes Scholar finalist

Percent of teams achieving Academic Progress Rate score requirements

AUBURNMAGAZINE.AUBURN.EDU

100

$2.1

M

New endowed professorship

Thousand for five graduate fellowships

50

Auburn University Libraries

150

2

Million visitors per year

$4.55

M

Million ebooks

Thousand for research fund for excellence

3.6

Million volumes

1


MAPPING AUBURN’S FUTURE

Why Give to Auburn? Because Auburn is Family

Learning

New and updated classroom facilities will increase the impact of the Auburn education learning outcomes.

EVEN THOUGH THE CAMPAIGN is about three-quarters of the way toward its goal, those last dollars generally prove the hardest to attract. But Auburn people love Auburn University, and the scores of volunteers behind the Because This is Auburn campaign are banking on that love translating into a groundswell of support, large and small, now that the campaign has entered its public phase. “Auburn was where I learned to learn,” says Mike Rowe ’78, who along with his wife Leann Rowe ’78, are campaign donors and volunteers supporting the College of Agriculture, College of Human Sciences and Auburn Alumni Association. “It’s where I learned to communicate with others, and it’s where I met my wife, Leann. We’ve been fortunate in our lives—we’ve made more good decisions than bad ones, and we believe Auburn is a great learning institution for every

person who wants an education. We want to enable all students who have a desire and ability to succeed, regardless of need or merit.” Rowe, president and CEO of Precision Kia of Wesley Chapel, Fla., and president and CEO of Gulf Coast Turf & Tractor in Lutz, Fla., says he was an average student at

“These students are this country’s future, and we need to provide them with every chance to succeed. That’s why we believe it is so important for entrepreneurs to give back.”

30 Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art

$7.5

M

Thousand visitors annually

Thousand pieces in permanent collection

Auburn. “Yet average students are the people who are the entrepreneurs and gamblers of tomorrow,” he says. “They are the ones who are going to make this country better and

VP for Research & Economic Development

2

$17.1

Division of Student Affairs

$6.3

M

Staff members for health promotion and wellness services

M

200

Plus free public programs

For support of interdisciplinary research and business/economic partnerships

60

50

Additional Leader Shape participants

SUMMER 2015

6

Additional students served by Student Success Fund

2

Endowed awards for Alternative Student Breaks

Auburn Magazine

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MAPPING AUBURN’S FUTURE

Leading the Way Thomas Gossom Jr. ’75, chair, Auburn University Foundation The Auburn University Foundation officers and members of the board

CAMPAIGN CO-CHAIRS Joe W. ’71 & Gayle ’70 Forehand Jr. Raymond J. ’82 & Kathryn ’81 Harbert Wayne T. ’68 & Cheryl ’68 Smith Beth Thorne Stukes ’81

CAMPAIGN EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE (representing the board of trustees, foundation, the Auburn Alumni Association, Tigers Unlimited Foundation and university administration.)

CONSTITUENCY CAMPAIGN COMMITTEES (20 volunteer groups formed to support the efforts of the colleges, schools and university-level units).

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future jobs. These students are this country’s future, and we need to provide them with every chance to succeed. That’s why we believe it is so important for entrepreneurs to give back.” Parents are making a contribution, too, such as Lou Bifano of Austin, Texas, a senior business development executive for K&R Negotiations. His daughter, Megan, is a junior in marketing at the Harbert College of Business, and he is excited by Auburn’s commitment to international education; he himself has enrolled in the Executive MBA Program in the Harbert College of Business. “We’re supportive of international opportunities because technology has enabled commerce and business to evolve to the point where the economies of countries in today’s world interact on a global scale. Auburn, like other universities, recognizes the need for international study as an important element in today’s business education.” He hopes his family’s gift will enable more Harbert business students to appreciate the cultural and economic diversity of today’s economy. Like the Rowes and the Bifanos, other donors—alumni, corporations, foundations and friends—are following their passions in how they participate in the campaign. In the end, all of Auburn University wins. “Thousands of new scholarships, hundreds of new endowed professorships and chairs, enhanced and newly created academic programs, and new and reimagined campus spaces will enrich the academic landscape and the Auburn experience for generations of Auburn students,” Parker says. “And those outcomes will significantly increase the value of an Auburn degree for our 239,000-plus current alumni.”


MAPPING AUBURN’S FUTURE

Why Give to Auburn? Because We Believe in Auburn, and Love it THE BECAUSE THIS IS AUBURN campaign will provide tomorrow’s students with the Auburn experience so many alumni enjoyed. It will ensure that the university is ranked highly so that the Auburn degree grows in value even after graduation. It will ensure that the best faculty and staff are here to teach those students, to help them learn to think critically and develop a responsibility toward their communities and their world. It will help mold them into good students, good alumni, good AU ambassadors and even good citizens. “I envision a very bright future for Auburn University,”

Gossom says. “From this tiny geographic corner in East Alabama, the university will continue to serve as a global leader and an example of outstanding performance and effectiveness in higher education. We will continue on our course for futuristic learning, groundbreaking research, and turning out top student graduates who go on to make A Acommunities, A A in A A their positive contributions across the nation and throughout A A A A AtheAworld. “We will do this while maintaining those unique A A A A A A qualities that make our university special, and our belief A A A A in The Auburn Creed.”

The Future is Now

The Because This is Auburn campaign will determine the university’s future course.

SUMMER 2015

Auburn Magazine

39


TRUE BLUE (& ORANGE)

by Suzanne Johnson

True Blue (& Orange) When John and Rosemary Brown announced their gift of $57 million to Auburn—the largest in university history—they did so with an eye toward preserving the special relationship between town and gown.

THERE’S NEVER BEEN much of a “townie” mentality in Auburn. With the university sprawling from one corner of the city’s main intersection, the “Loveliest Village” is as closely tied to the Auburn University physically as it is emotionally. John and Rosemary Brown want to see that connection continue to thrive, which is one reason they chose to designate part of their record-setting $57 million gift to kick off the public phase of the $1 billion Because This is Auburn campaign to a performing arts center that will benefit the entire community. The remainder will go to a student achievement center in the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering. “We are very happy to give back to Auburn,” said John Brown ’57. “Auburn was a transformative educational experience for us, preparing Rosemary for her career in teaching and laying the foundation for my various roles in industry.” “We wanted to do something that not only impacted Auburn students, but also something that would impact the entire community,” said Rosemary Brown, also a 1957 graduate. “That is why we decided to do both the student center and the performing arts center.” The Browns, who split their time between their home in Portage, Mich., and a spot near their two daughters and four grandchildren in Atlanta, traveled a winding road to reach Auburn in the first place. “I grew up on a red clay farm in Tennessee with no electricity,” Brown says. It was near the small town of Paris, near the Kentucky state line. A soft-spoken man with an easy smile, he recalls the primitive lifestyle of his childhood, the three-room schoolhouse he attended for six years, the long bus ride to attend high school, and the backbreaking work of farming without a touch of regret. “It gave me the initiative to become an engineer,” he says. “I knew I didn’t want to live that way my entire life.”

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Rosemary Brown smiles as she describes her childhood in Glasgow, Ky., as more conventional. “We had electricity,” she says. The two met not at Auburn, but at Freed-Hardeman University in Henderson, Tenn., where one of their classmates was a native of Jasper, Alabama. “He decided to transfer to Auburn and, even though we’d never been here, there were four of us who decided to transfer with him,” John Brown says. “I like to say we chose Auburn because my friend who was transferring was the only one of the five of us who had a car.” As junior transfers, John and Rosemary Brown didn’t have the typical Auburn undergraduate experience. “I was so focused on my degree that I didn’t spend a lot of time in student activities,” he says. “I didn’t attend many football games, although I do remember watching the first game of the ’57 season in the rain in Knoxville.” Rosemary Brown majored in chemistry and recalls working with Professor Salmon in the College of Agriculture who was doing atherosclerosis research with white rats. “He said if I learned one thing from the job, it should be not to be afraid of rats,” she laughs. “I’m sorry to say I never learned that.” The Browns married in June of 1957, and John found himself in a position today’s students would envy: he was the recipient of 12 job offers. “Back then, everybody came to campus to interview job candidates,” he recalls. “Graduates were going with companies like Du Pont, Eastman-Kodak, oil companies, as well steel and aluminum companies.” He took a job as an engineer for Ormet Corp., a joint venture of Olin Mathieson and Revere Copper and Brass. One thing Rosemary Brown never thought she’d want to do was teach, but after tutoring Auburn students in math while pursuing her chemistry degree, she realized she had an aptitude for it. So when


TRUE BLUE (& ORANGE)

John W. Brown Career Highlights her husband later worked for Squibb Corp., Rosemary Brown pursued a graduate degree from Rutgers University in math education and began a 30-year career teaching high school mathematics and advanced-placement calculus. The Browns eventually ended up in Kalamazoo, Mich., when Brown took a position with Stryker Corp., becoming president and CEO of the medical devices and equipment company in 1977. Now retired, and with two granddaughters (sophomore Nicole and freshman Natalie) attending Auburn, the Browns make it to the Plains a bit more often—not to mention because of special events such as John Brown’s receipt of the Auburn Alumni Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award in 2014 but also due to Brown’s duties as a board member of the Auburn University Foundation. While some things at Auburn have changed— “My sense is that today’s students are smarter,” John Brown says—others have remained the same. “The friendly atmosphere is still here,” Rosemary Brown says. And with a new performA A A A A A added ing arts center being to the community A A A A Asoon, Athat friendly relationship between A A A A A A the university and the city is A A A destined to A grow.

Chairman emeritus of Stryker Corp., retiring in 2010 after a 32-year career as president and CEO of the medical equipment maker. At Stryker, transformed the company from a $17 million hospital bed producer into one of the world’s leading medical technology companies, with $8.7 billion in revenue in 2012. B.S. in chemical engineering, 1957, Auburn; Honorary Doctor of Laws, 1999, Freed-Hardeman University. In 2011, along with his wife, Rosemary ’57, pledged $10 million to the Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine in memory of friends Kate and Wilford Bailey, whom they met at Auburn in 1955. Promotes higher education to young people through Junior Achievement, and annually supports more than a dozen Auburn students through the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering, the College of Sciences and Mathematics and the College of Veterinary Medicine. Funded an AU endowed eminent scholar chair in chemical engineering. Career was documented in Great by Choice; Uncertainty, Chaos, and Luck— Why Some Thrive Despite Them All by Jim Collins and Morten T. Hansen.

SUMMER 2015

Auburn Magazine

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Let us save a spot for you! Auburn Alumni Association Game-Day Scholarship Parking In support of student scholarships

Always have a place to park for home football games! For more information contact Lynn Pauley at lynnpauley@auburn.edu or call (334) 844-2586.

What is your your favorite tailgate recipe? Do you have a special tradition during football season? Auburn Magazine is working on an “Ultimate Tailgating Guide” for an upcoming issue. Be a part of it!

Send us your stories: aubmag@auburn.edu

MANY

75 ns

The staff at Auburn Magazine would like to say thank you to the many generous alumni who have given through our Voluntary Subscription Program. Want to contribute to the ongoing production of Auburn Magazine? You can give online by visiting www.aualum.org/auburnmagazinegift. Your tax-deductible gift is credited as participation in the Because This is Auburn campaign. Don’t forget to share your class notes with us! War Eagle! To find out more about Auburn Magazine visit www.auburnmagazine.auburn.edu or email aubmag@auburn.edu.

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What’s Orange and Blue and Green All Over? Answer: Gardening in the South Auburn’s Extension experts bring you Gardening in the South. This iBook series can transform you into a successful Southern gardener. Learn designing, planting, fertilizing, watering, pruning, and more.

The Alabama Cooperative Extension System (Alabama A&M University and Auburn University) is an equal opportunity educator and employer. © 2015 by the Alabama Cooperative Extension System

SUMMER 2015

aces.edu

Auburn Magazine

43


A L U M N I

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U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Aaron Allmon II

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Auburn Magazine

For Alumni & Friends of Auburn University

Auburn Magazine

For Alumni & Friends of Auburn University

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Please consider giving to the Auburn Alumni Association PLUS Scholarship benefiting students • To provide scholarships to deserving students who qualify for a PLUS award • To enhance recruitment, enrollment and retention of underrepresented groups

Courtney Bass 2014 PLUS Scholarship Recipient

“The Auburn Alumni PLUS Scholarship has provided me the opportunity to complete my undergraduate degree at one of the best institutions in the nation. I am blessed to be a part of such a supportive family. War Eagle!”

www.aualum.org/givetoplus Mail checks to: Auburn Alumni Association ATTN: Scholarship · 317 South College Street · Auburn AL 36849

SUMMER 2015

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26059 04/15


the Classes ALUMNI CENTER > CLASSNOTES > IN MEMORIAM

IN THIS SECTION

Match for a Million

49

Classnotes

50

In Memoriam

52

Backchat

63

You Spin Me Round From “Fight ‘Em Tigers” to “Tiger Rag” to “Glory, Glory to Old Auburn,” all the standards made it onto this two-album set, ���Songs of Auburn: The Alabama Polytechnic Institute.” Released by the Auburn Alumni Association, the “unbreakable” records produced by RCA Victor featured the Auburn Band directed by David A. Herbert and glee clubs directed by Walter S. Collins. No year is included on the volume, but at the time of its release, API boasted 5,400 students and 25,000 alumni—as opposed to 25,000 and 200,000-plus.

SUMMER 2015

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THE CLASSES > CLASSNOTES

Home Sweet Home GREETINGS FROM THE PLAINS—time certainly flies when you’re having fun! During my first few weeks, I have been swept up into an orange and blue whirlwind. I never imagined that 30 years after I arrived in Auburn as a newlywed and transfer student from the University of Montevallo, that I would be invited back to serve as your new vice president for alumni affairs. Even though there are new buildings and increased student enrollment since I completed my degree in 1986, campus continues to be a magical place. There is a palatable sense of Southern hospitality and Auburn University pride around every corner. Most speakers open their remarks with a simple War Eagle and, spontaneously, the audience replies in perfect unity, War Eagle. It really is the perfect greeting for fellow Auburn family members. In my role as the executive director of the Auburn Alumni Association, I am fortunate to work with such a dedicated and generous board of directors, led by this year’s president Jack Fite (you can read Jack’s column on Page 6 of this issue). Their commitment and service to the association and university are admirable and much appreciated. I encourage you to connect with them through our website and share your ideas as we work together on establishing a long-range strategic vision for the association. In addition to our volunteers, I also have the privilege of joining a team of professionals in the Office of Alumni Affairs who work tirelessly to provide engaging and meaningful experiences through a variety of alumni programs as well as offer outstanding membership benefits, including this awardwinning magazine. Whether you are a recent graduate or you are celebrating a special milestone, I invite you to reconnect, get engaged and stay in touch.

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As you read this issue of Auburn Magazine, you will discover the many ways in which your involvement and investment in Auburn University make a difference today and assure a bright future. To encourage participation in the Because This is Auburn campaign, your Alumni Association Board of Directors recently allocated up to $1 million in matching funds to all life members of the association who create a scholarship endowment. Life members who make a $12,500 gift will have their funds matched by the association to meet the endowment threshold. This is a firstcome, first-served opportunity to create a lasting gift of support. Please contact Steve Inabinet at steveinabinet@auburn.edu or (334) 844-2995 for additional information. Whether you renew your annual alumni association membership, respond to an annual fund gift appeal, support Tigers Unlimited, or purchase an AU license plate, your participation matters. In fact, annual giving by alumni collectively contributes to Auburn University’s national rankings! On a personal note, my husband, Craig VanValkenburg ’82,

I encourage you to connect with [our board members] through our website and share your ideas. and I are very thankful to the entire Auburn Family for your warm welcome. Over the years, we have proudly proclaimed our allegiance to the Auburn Tigers through thick and thin and look forward to joining you at future athletic competitions and alumni engagements. Thank you for the honor of serving you. War Eagle!

Gretchen VanValkenburg ’86 Vice President for Alumni Affairs & Executive Director, Auburn Alumni Association gretchenvan@auburn.edu

S H A R E YO U R N E W S W I T H U S AT AU B M AG @AU B U R N . E D U


THE CLASSES > CLASSNOTES

CALENDAR

MATCH FOR A MILLION

June 5 SOUTHWEST GEORGIA AUBURN CLUB Golf Tournament and Dinner

Cleve Wester Scholarship Golf Tournament and Dinner with special guest Will Muschamp, defensive coordinator for Auburn Football. Stonebridge Golf Club, Rome, Ga. Registration and details: email southwestgeorgiaauburnclub@gmail.com.

SAVE THE DATES! ALUMNI HOSPITALITY TENT Plan ahead for the 2015 football season by making plans to visit the Alumni Hospitality Tent. Prefer to let us do the work? We offer Exclusive Member Tailgate packages that include everything except the food, drinks—and you. For information on the Alumni Hospitality Tent or the Exclusive Member Tailgates visit aualum.org/tent. WE HAVE A SPOT FOR YOU The Auburn Alumni Association is taking reservations for game-day parking in the gravel lot behind the alumni center, at the corner of Miller and Gay. Proceeds from game-day parking go to benefit the association’s scholarship endowment. To guarantee a spot for the 2015 football season, contact Lynn Pauley at (334) 844-2586 or lynnpauley@auburn.edu.

BOOK AHEAD FOR WAR EAGLE TRAVELERS Check out our website at aualum.org/travel for further information on all our trips! CLASSIC CHRISTMAS MARKETS NOV. 29-DEC. 7, 2015 A holiday tour featuring traditional Christmas markets and historic towns of Europe, including Strasbourg,

ASK

MOST AUBURN ALUMNI what they love about their college years and chances are good the answer will be: the Auburn experience itself. Not just a special class or professor or extracurricular activity, but the sum of all those parts that make up an Auburn University educational experience. The Auburn Alumni Association Board of Directors has created a way for life members of the association to help new generations of students have their own Auburn experience. The board has pledged up to $1 million in matching funds to help life members establish a new scholarship endowment. It takes $25,000 to create a scholarship endowment at Auburn, so the board will match pledges and gifts of at least $12,500 dollar-for-dollar. The match program will remain in effect until Aug. 31, or until the $1 million has been allocated, and is on a first-come, first-served basis. Fully paid life members of the association are eligible to participate. Pledges must be fully funded within five years; all gifts will count toward the Auburn Alumni Association’s scholarship goal for the Because This is Auburn campaign. Auburn Alumni Association President Jack Fite ’85 said that never in Auburn history have scholarships been more urgently needed. “For a lot of students, a college education has fallen out of reach,” he said. “Rising operational expenses and declining public funds have made attending college difficult, and Auburn is no exception. Students who have always dreamed of attending Auburn, even those for whom attending Auburn is a family tradition, are being forced to put their dreams on hold.” The desire to share their Auburn experience as well as honor their three daughters led Rob and Christine Wellbaum, both Class of 1993, to take advantage of the match program to establish the Three Sisters scholarship in honor of their daughters Hannah, 17, Maddie, 15, and Lilli, 11. “Auburn has been central to our lives,” Rob Wellbaum said. “We thought this would be the perfect opportunity to express our love for Auburn and our girls, or as we call them, the Three Sisters.” For more information on the $1 Million Alumni Scholarship Matching Program, contact Steve Inabinet, director of Alumni Scholarship Programs, at steveinabinet@auburn.edu or (334) 844-2995.

Würzburg, Nuremberg, Oberammergau, Munich and Innsbruck.

SUMMER 2015

Auburn Magazine

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THE CLASSES > CLASSNOTES

Send your classnotes and other

professor of finance and econom-

assists in flute clinics with AU

updates to Auburn Magazine

ics. He also served more than

flute professor Karen Garrison

317 S. College Street Auburn

two decades at Stetson Univer-

and volunteers with the Eufaula

University, AL 36849 or

sity in Florida, where he was

Middle School band.

aubmag@auburn.edu.

professor and chair of finance

1990s JEFFREY “JEFF” HOWARD ’91

was recently hired by Firefly

and directed the George

THOMAS EDWARD SPENCER ’89

Consulting, a leading consulting

Investments Institute, which

has joined the University of

firm in Austin, Texas. Howard

included a nationally acclaimed

Missouri faculty in the Division

previously served as the global

program in which students

of Animal Sciences in the College

lead of Lean Transformation with

manage a real stock and bond

of Agriculture, food and natural

Accenture and has 20 years of

L. CRAIG ROBERTS ’75, owner

portfolio worth nearly $3

resources, with a joint appoint-

experience working in manufac-

and president of L. Craig

million. He also led seminars on

ment in the School of Medicine’s

turing and supply chain

Roberts Architects in Mobile,

financial markets for top Disney

Department of Obstetrics,

industries. Howard lives in Villa

has had his work featured in the

executives at Walt Disney World

Gynecology and Women’s Health.

Rica, Ga., with his wife, JENNI-

newly released book, Contempo-

Leadership Conferences

rary Southern Homes. The

in Orlando.

1970s

FER ABBOTT HOWARD ’89. JIMMY WALES ’89 joined

publication showcases four of

Grammy Award-winner and

JONATHAN M. STRANG ’91 was

Roberts’ designs that speak to a

philanthropist Jon Bon Jovi and

recently elected to a director-

actor/director Edward Norton as

ship position in the litigation

modern-day take on classic

1980s

Southern styles—including

a recipient of the 36th Annual

group of the intellectual

Classic Revival, French Colonial/

LISA MARTIN MILLER ’82,

Common Wealth Awards,

property firm Sterne, Kessler,

Greek Revival, French Colonial

manager of communications and

recognizing individuals who

Goldstein, & Fox, P.L.L.C.

and Italianate. His work is

marketing of Alabama Municipal

have enriched modern culture.

Strang lives in Washington, D.C.

featured alongside 19 other

Electric Authority, has been

They were recognized at the

Southern architects specializing

appointed to serve a second term

Common Wealth ceremony on

JEREMY TODD GOBER ’96 was

in residential designs. Roberts

as president of the Alabama

April 25 in Wilmington, Del.

recently named vice president of

has practiced architecture in

Communities of Excellence

Wales is best known as the

business development for Meyer

Mobile for 35 years, specializing

program. Miller lives in Prattville

founder of Wikipedia, an

Vacation Rentals in Gulf Shores.

in high-end residential projects.

with her husband, Mike.

international collaborative free

Meyer is the oldest property

online encyclopedia, and the

management company on the Alabama Gulf Coast.

His work also has appeared in Twenty-First Century Homes:

FRED D. CLARK JR. ’83,

Wikimedia Foundation. His work

Innovative Designs by America’s

president and CEO of Alabama

in online access and the success

Leading Architects, three of his

Municipal Electric Authority,

of Wikipedia led Time Magazine

JENNIFER PAGE ELLER ’97

projects have been featured on

was recently appointed to the

to name him one of its “100 Most

and Stephen Hardin Lightfoot

HGTV, and his work has

American Public Power

Influential People” in 2006.

were married on Dec. 20 in

appeared in numerous maga-

Association board of directors.

The Wikimedia Foundation is

New Orleans.

zines, including Better Homes

Clark is one of 30 elected

a nonprofit charitable organiza-

and Gardens and Southern

members of the APPA board. He

tion dedicated to encouraging

BRIAN WALDEN DANIELS ’99

Living.

lives in Mathews with his wife,

the growth, development and

and ALISHA REYNOLDS DANIELS

Blake.

distribution of free, multilingual

’00 announce the birth of a son,

content, and to providing the

Andrew Walden, on Dec. 18. He

LAWRENCE BELCHER ’79

has been named dean of the

JAN ZIGLAR EUNICE ’86

full content of these wiki-based

joins an older sister, Audrey. The

University of Indianapolis School

of Eufaula is a retired early

projects to the public free

family lives in Huntsville.

of Business. He previously

childhood educator with the

of charge.

worked at Taylor University,

Eufaula City Board of Education.

JAMES W. RANE JR. ’99, vice

where he led the undergraduate

She currently performs as a flute

president of manufacturing for

business program since 2011 and

soloist for the community and

Great Southern Wood Preserving

held the Arthur L. Hodson

plays in the Tri-State Community

Inc., has been appointed to the

Endowed Chair in Business as a

Orchestra in Dothan. She also

board of trustees and advisors for

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S H A R E YO U R N E W S W I T H U S AT AU B M AG @AU B U R N . E D U


Strike up the BAND

Y

OU ARE NEVER TOO OLD to play “War Eagle!” Just ask Steve Scott ’65, president of the Auburn Alumni Band, who is busy planning for the band’s 30th reunion, to be held this fall. The Alumni Band is composed of alumni from all areas of the country and even as far as China and Australia—a kaleidoscope of personalities that represents six decades of band experience stretching back to the mid 1950s. The group exists to foster a close relationship with the Auburn University Band, provide support and assistance, and to promote fellowship among band alumni. For almost 23 years the group has gathered for an annual reunion and usually marches 200-300 strong. At the 100th anniversary of the Auburn Band more than 500 alumni showed up. Usually, the band performs at halftime on the field with the student band of 375 members. “The Alumni Band is an integral part of the Auburn Band Family and promotes a closer fellowship among the alumni and student band,” said Rick Good, director of bands at Auburn. “They really help the mission of the Auburn band program. Our alumni encompass every school and major on this campus and create a living connection. Alumni Band support is crucial to the overall success of one of the finest band programs in the country.” Jeffrey Rowser ’80 and Nick Smith ’07, Alumni Band drum majors for this past fall’s reunion, created a fun atmosphere that carried alumni back to their school days. “Reconnecting with the past reminds me we are still in the spirit,” Rowser said. “The AU Band family reunites annually to

rekindle the days of our youth, and remain committed to the Auburn nation.” Smith agrees. “When I think about Auburn band, I am flooded with emotions

“Reconnecting with the past reminds me we are still in the spirit.” of excitement, joy, passion and fond memories of an organization that truly became a part of my life. As alumni, giving back is vitally important, and participating in Alumni Band is a positive way we can do that. I love attending Alumni Band because it helps support a phenomenal program, and it gives me a chance to revisit the memories I shared with fellow band members.” Ages range from clarinet player Leonard Bass ’55 to recent graduates. A younger member, Jay Claybrook ’03, who attended the reunion this year for the first time, said he felt honored by the cheers from the crowd from the stands. “It was refreshing to be back on the Plains and

hear the stories of the band’s history from different members.” According to Vivian Langley, development officer for the College of Liberal Arts, a primary area of need for the bands program is a new practice facility. To date, fundraising efforts have raised more than $3 million of a $4.5 million goal to meet the president’s match. For more information on this project contact the development office, (334) 844-1483. Johnnie Vinson ’65, Auburn band director emeritus and one of the founders of the Alumni Band, is thrilled to see it take off. “When I became director of the Auburn University Marching Band in 1985, I felt tremendously grateful to be the first alumnus of that group and to lead it.”

ALUMNI SNAPSHOT

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THE CLASSES > IN MEMORIAM

The Golden Eagles Reunion Les Kramer ‘55

Members of the Class of 1965 were inducted into Golden Eagles during the Golden Eagles Reunion on April 15-17 and contributed to a scholarship fund on behalf of their class. Betty DeGraffenried Burgess, David Hagan, Harry Hooper and Hariette Mitchell Huggins served on the reunion committee. The classes of 1960, 1955, 1950 and 1945 also were recognized.

the Marion Military Institute. He

Service from the University of

the University of North Alabama’s

GREGORY E. BOUDREAUX ’08

began his term as an MMI trustee

North Alabama’s College of Arts

College of Arts and Sciences,

and LIZZY BOUDREAUX ’09 are a

on March 26.

and Sciences, where she is an

where he is an associate

husband and wife singing duo

assistant professor. She is married

professor. He is married to

who travel the country perform-

to RYAN ZYAC ’05. They have

AMBER PAULK ’03. They live in

ing. The couple released their first

one child, Reese Harper Auburn,

Florence and have one child,

album, “To the Dust,” in Nashville

and live in Florence.

Reese Harper Auburn.

in 2013 and released “Now That I

ANNA LUDLUM KING ’04

MICHELLE D. CARNES ’04,

KYLE MAYO ’06 and JENNA

announce the birth of a son,

currently at Animal Specialty

CRAWFORD MAYO ’06 announce

DENISE DUNCAN ’12 and

William G. IV, on Nov. 14. The

Hospital of Florida, was recently

the birth of a son, Hudson, on

WALLIS SALTERS ’12 were

family lives in Auburn.

among the first group of

Sept. 9. The family lives in

married on Sept. 28, 2013, in Col-

veterinary neurologists to receive

Charlotte, N.C.

linsville. The couple lives in

2000s WILLIAM G. KING III ’01 and

Have Love” on Feb. 23.

JAMES MICHAEL MARBUT JR.

the ACVIM Neurosurgery

’03 and BETHANY BEARD

Certificate of Training. Carnes is

PATRICK R. MCINTYRE ’07 and

MARBUT ’03 announce the birth

one of seven certified with

Jennifer McIntyre of Birmingham

of a son, Tucker Pearson, on

neurosurgical training in the

announce the birth of a son,

March 4. They live in Owens

state of Florida.

Davis Russell, on Dec. 8. This is

JAMES W. “JIMMY” HODGES ’39

their first child.

of Mt. Dora, Fla., died March 5.

Cross Roads.

Warner Robbins, Ga.

In Memoriam

He worked as a pharmacist in

KIMBERLY ANN MACDONALD ’05 BRAD NEIGHBORS ’03 was

of Hoover and Iain Loch of

MELISSA MANLY BONDS ’08 and

Birmingham, becoming senior

recently named partner at Balch

Glasgow, Scotland, were married

her husband, Austin, announce

vice president at Durr Surgical

& Bingham LLP. He works in the

on July 6, 2014. The couple lives

the birth of a daughter, Addie

Supply, and owned mobile home

law firm’s Birmingham office.

in Kyoto, Japan.

Lynn, on May 2, 2014. She joins

parks after moving to Florida.

an older brother, A.J. The family AMBER PAULK ’03 received the

RYAN ZYAC ’05 received the

Early Career Faculty Award for

Outstanding Faculty Award from

52

AUBURNMAGAZINE.AUBURN.EDU

lives in Birmingham.

J. RIVERS “RIP” RUSH JR. ’40

of Birmingham died Feb. 12. A

S H A R E YO U R N E W S W I T H U S AT AU B M AG @AU B U R N . E D U


THE CLASSES > IN MEMORIAM

U.S. Army veteran of World War II,

the advertising departments of

Nuclear Society and director of

clusters, a Purple Heart, Air

he was retired from Mobile Paint

Wolf & Dessaur in Fort Wayne,

Citizens for Nuclear Technology

Medals and Command Pilot

Co. after 35 years.

Ind., for seven years, and for

Awareness.

Wings. He retired from the Air

Bamberger’s in Newark, N.J., for RUBY MORRISON PIERCE ’41 of

33 years.

Mobile died March 18. She worked

Force with the rank of colonel. BENTON T. WHITE ’47 of

Birmingham died Feb. 19. He

GEORGE S. KILLIAN ’48 of Fort

for 30 years as a civic and

MICHAEL N. HOKE JR. ’45 of

served with the Air Force in World

Payne died Feb. 1. He practiced

government teacher at Murphy

Birmingham died Feb. 17. He

War II and reached the rank of

veterinary medicine for 63 years,

High School.

served as a fighter pilot with the

2nd lieutenant. He worked as an

serving DeKalb County and the

Army in World War II and was the

engineer at U.S. Pipe, which later

surrounding areas. He also was a

MARLIN LONG ’43 of Decatur

vice-president of First Southern

became Walter Energy, and was

member and past president of the

died Jan. 22. A basketball player at

Federal Savings and Loan

instrumental in beginning the

Alabama Cattlemen’s Association

AU, he was a retired accountant

Association of Mobile in their

mining division.

and served on the Auburn alumni

and had worked for NASA for

Selma office.

more than 30 years. CHARLES LANGDALE NOWLIN

board. DOT GALLOWAY ’48 of Knoxville,

FRANCES TAYLOR EITSON ’46 of

Tenn., died Jan. 21. She was an

DAN LOPOSER ’48 of Roswell,

Birmingham died Feb. 7.

artist with works in numerous

Ga., died March 15. He served in

private collections and was

the Navy and was a computer

’43 of Pensacola, Fla., died Feb.

20. He served with the Army

MAX MUTCHNICK ’46 of Mobile

past-president of the Tennessee

scientist with IBM and a professor

veterinary service in World War II,

died March 11. He served as a

Watercolor Society and Knoxville

at Jackson State University.

retiring as a lieutenant-colonel. He

lieutenant-colonel in Army ROTC

Watercolor Society.

practiced veterinary medicine in

at Auburn. He was the founder,

Panama City for 40 years.

president and CEO of Air Comfort

FRED HERBERT HENDERSON JR.

Peachtree City, Ga., died March 18.

Company Inc.

’48 of Ocala, Fla., died Jan. 20. He

He played one year on Auburn’s

served 32 years in the Air Force

football, baseball and basketball

WILLODEAN J. AUTREY ’44 of

FRED WESLEY MCCAIN ’48 of

Greenville died March 8. She

WALTER G. ALSMILLER JR. ’47 of

and was a veteran of World War II,

teams before enlisting in the Army

retired as the lab director at L.V.

Birmingham died Feb. 25. He was

where he was a fighter pilot, and

Air Corps in 1941. He rose to the

Stabler Memorial Hospital.

an educator and counselor for the

of Vietnam. He earned numerous

rank of staff sergeant and was

Birmingham Board of Education.

medals, including three Distin-

awarded the Bronze Star. After

guished Flying Crosses with

service and finishing his degree,

WILBUR C. HIGH ’44 of Waverly

died Feb. 7. He was a sales

CLYDE VINCENT ORR JR. ’47 of

representative for Certified

Florence died Feb. 20. He was

Chemical Labs and was a U.S.

president of Sigma Phi Epsilon

Navy veteran of World War II.

fraternity at Auburn and served in the Air Force during World War II.

EMILEE WALTON RUSH ’44 of

He was founder and president of

Dothan died March 4. She was a

Orr Industrial Specialty Co.

retired supervisor with the Alabama Medicaid agency.

THOMAS FRANKLIN PARKINSON ’47 of Charlottesville, Va., died

10 • 03 • 15

Homecoming

MARTHA B. TIMBERLAKE ’44 of

Jan. 19. A U.S. Navy veteran, he

Highland Lake died Jan. 23. A

went on to a successful career in

member of Kappa Delta at

nuclear physics, first in instru-

Auburn, she and her husband

ment development and experi-

AUBURN

owned and operated Timberlake

mental reactor physics for Dupont

VS. SAN JOSE STATE

Hardware in Sheffield for 40 years.

and, later, faculty positions at the University of Florida, University of

NORMA DENHAM ’45 of Sun City,

Missouri and Virginia Tech. He

Ariz., died Jan. 4. She worked in

was a fellow of the American

SUMMER 2015

Auburn Magazine

53


THE CLASSES > IN MEMORIAM

Korean War. He owned Greenlawn

HENRY P. “HANK” STILL JR. ’51 of

Pharmacy in Atmore.

Decatur, Ga., died March 4. He was an entrepreneur with degrees from

LEWIS “LAMAR” STAPLETON ’49

Auburn and Georgia Institute of

of Mobile died Feb. 6. He owned

Technology.

Stapleton Drug Co. for 30 years and served as president of the Alabama

J. W. ANDRESS ’52 of Pensacola,

State Board of Pharmacy for two

Fla., died Feb. 14. He served in the

years. He also led medical missions

Army Air Corps as a weather

to Central and South America.

specialist during World War II and practiced veterinary medicine for

DEMETRIOS C. “JIMMY” LIOLLIO

55 years.

’50 of Charleston, S.C., died Feb. 28.

He served with the Air Force as a

JAMES R. “JIM” FARRIS ’52 of

turret gunner and navigator in

Dothan died Feb. 11. A member of

World War II and received two

Kappa Sigma at Auburn, he was a

Bronze Stars, the Good Conduct

Korean War veteran and afterwards

Medal and the Air Medal. Founder

worked as a pharmaceutical

of his own architectural practice in

representative for Eli Lilly & Co.,

Charleston, his projects included

retiring after 30 years.

Bank in the Oaks on James Island and the Folly Beach Ocean Plaza.

HELEN MCCLAIN GARRETT ’52 of

Leeds died March 13. She was a CHARLES EUGENE SKINNER ’50

member of Zeta Tau Alpha sorority

of Birmingham died March 10. He

and was an educator at three different high schools.

he taught at Lineville High School

THOMAS M. LOWE JR. ’49 of

served with the Navy as a utilities

while maintaining his family farm.

Atlanta died March 6. He was a

officer during the Korean War. He

captain in the Army, a civil engineer

was an insurance agent at the

KENNETH RANDALL MCRAE ’52 of

FRANCIS T. PAYNE ’48 of Dallas,

and was active in the Republican

Crawford Skinner Insurance

Thorsby died Dec. 7. He worked in

Texas, died Dec. 30. He worked at

Party. He served 40 years on the

Agency for 45 years.

the environmental health field for

Boeing during World War II,

Fulton County Commission, the

helping to design the B-17, and

longest-serving commissioner in

CLAIRE FRAZIER JONES ’51 of

served as a field service engineer in

Georgia history.

Auburn died Feb. 17.

consulting businesses and the

TOM P. OLLINGER ’49 of Mobile

FRED OSBORNE KELLEY ’51 of

He served in the Navy and Navy

family Angus operation.

died Feb. 5. A decorated U.S. Army

Birmingham died Jan. 14. A U.S.

Reserves for 18 years and was a

veteran of World War II, he founded

Army veteran of Korea, he was a

veteran of the Korean War. He

NORMAN R. WALLNER ’48 of

Tom P. Ollinger Construction Inc.,

retired partner of the international

worked a number of years at

Clemmons, N.C., died Jan. 20. A

which operated continuously for

accounting firm of Deloitte and

Owens-Corning Fiberglass and

U.S. Army veteran of World War II,

more than 50 years doing building

Touche. He also served on Auburn’s

retired as co-owner of Tab & Label

he worked as a licensed profes-

projects across the Southeastern

Accounting Advisory Board.

Corp.

sional engineer for more than 50

U.S. He also was active in commu-

years, including 36 years with the

nity service.

VIRGINIA R. SMALLEY ’51 of

SARAH COLVIN PERRY ’53 of

Jefferson County. WILLIAM R. “PETE” MASTERS JR.

the Navy. He later ran successful

’53 of Anderson, S.C., died March 2.

DuPont Co.

Birmingham died Feb. 28. She was

Wedowee died March 1. She was the

EDWIN W. RAY ’49 of Atmore died

a member of Delta Zeta sorority

home economics teacher with the

W. HOWARD GIDDENS ’49 of

Feb. 26. He served in the Navy

and spent more than 30 years as an

Randolph County Board of

Leesville, S.C., died Jan. 25. He

during World War II as a pharma-

educator.

Education and established the

practiced veterinary medicine for

cist’s mate, and in the Army as a

Perryland Deli at their family

50 years.

second lieutenant during the

grocery story, Perryland Foods.

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THE CLASSES > IN MEMORIAM

EDGAR NICHOLAS “NICK” MOON

the NFL with the Detroit Lions and

letterman at Auburn, he was a

CHLO GRATIGNY HUBBARD ’56 of

’54 of Huntsville died Feb. 22. He

for 16 years coached the offensive

member of the Auburn Football Let-

Rabun Gap, Ga., died Jan. 9.

worked for the U.S. Army Corps of

line at Auburn under Coach Ralph

termen’s Club.

Engineers for 33 years.

Jordan. After working in Birming-

ROBERT J. MALONEY ’56 of

ham for a decade, he returned to

JACK L. BLACKWOOD ’56 of

Morehead City, N.C., died Feb. 3. A

ARVID L. WAHLQUIST ’54 of

AU in 1982 to work in university

Birmingham died Feb. 9. A U.S. Air

U.S. Navy veteran of the Korean

Stafford, Va., died Jan. 25. He retired

development, retiring from Auburn

Force veteran, he practiced

War, he was retired from Westing-

from Lockheed after a 40-year career

in 1995.

architecture for 40 years, designing

house Electric Corp.

of work in aviation, space exploration

many schools as well as the area’s

and national security, and is

GWENDOLYN CARTER SWINGLE ’55

recognized on the National Air and

of Jacksonville, Fla., died Jan. 22.

Space Museum Wall of Honor.

first Milo’s restaurant.

LUTHER C. MURPHY ’56 of Hoover

died Feb. 8. A U.S. Air Force KENNETH C. COSTON ’56 of

veteran, he started his career at U.S.

BARBARA M. THOMPSON ’55 of

Hueytown died Feb. 24. He served

Steel and then U.S. Pipe, and retired

JACK D. WILLIAMS ’54 of

Birmingham died March 12. She

as a pilot in the Navy and started a

from Southeastern Bolt & Screw

Alpharetta, Ga., died Jan 16. A Delta

was a member of Alpha Gamma

construction company, which he

after 25 years.

Chi at Auburn, he served in the U.S.

Delta sorority and worked as a

owned for 50 years.

Army before going to work for

teacher and counselor with

Thomasville Furniture in North

Alabama’s Department of Educa-

CHARLES J. HARPER ’56 of

Airy, Md., died March 10. He was an

Carolina, where he remained until

tion, specializing in drug and rehab

Albany, Ga., died March 1. He

Air Force veteran of the Korean War

his retirement.

counseling. She also was a prolific

earned a Purple Heart during the

and worked as a quality control

author.

Korean War during his service with

engineer for Westinghouse Electric

the Marine Corps, and later taught

for 35 years.

GEORGE A. ATKINS ’55 of Hoover

GEORGE J. PESTO ’56 of Mount

died Jan. 21. A three-year letterman

JOHN L. ADAMS ’56 of Fairfield

high school and coached football

at Auburn, he went on to play in

died March 14. A four-year

in Albany.

STORYTELLERS JEAN ’54 AND DAVID MUSSLEMAN ’58 have been married for 63 years. They have five grandchildren and 11 grandchildren and eventually moved to live in Florence, where they grew up. It was the menagerie of animals that have moved in and out of their lives over the years, however, that inspired their recent book, a compendium of personal essays and veterinary history with the tongue-twisting title of Cantankerous Bulldogs, Unherdable Cats, Hummingbirds, Jackasses, Raccoons and Bats. The co-authored book combines Jean’s love of storytelling with David’s knowledge as a longtime veterinarian. “Our publisher gave us a booklet that was co-written by a husband who was an engineer and a wife who was a naturalist and it just flowed,” David explained. “It got me thinking that a book full of Jean’s stories of our family pets would work well with my 53-year experience in the veterinary world.” The Musslemans used the relationship with their family pets and intertwined the stories with sidebars full of information concerning real-life veterinary practices.

“We only included our favorite family stories in the book,” Jean said. “It was hard to choose because we had dozens more. Living on a creek for the last 60 years, we’ve had many animals around us and in our lives.” For Jean, the first story in the book, “Spike and Everybody Else,” is her favorite while David enjoys the sidebar, “Veterinarians in the Military.” When asked about the title of the book, Jean said she sat up in bed one night and yelled that she knew what the title of the book was going to be, scaring a sleeping David in the process. “We wanted to write about things we both love,” Jean said. “We get excited about our love for our family, animals and David’s profession and want others to get excited also.” —Ashtyne Cole

SUMMER 2015

Auburn Magazine

55


THE CLASSES > IN MEMORIAM

KATHRYN MILNER SHEHANE ’56

Maxwell Air

of Tifton, Ga., died Jan. 24. She

Force Base.

enjoyed a 44-year career in education and was the last elected

LOUIE LETLOW

superintendent in Douglas County.

’58 of Salem

died Jan. 25. An JACK C. AWBREY ’57 of Alabaster

Army veteran of

died Sept. 21. A U.S. Air Force

the Korean War,

veteran, he was an engineer.

he spent 32 years working for

ROBERT B. COULTER ’57 of

Ampex Corp.

Waycross, Ga., died Feb. 16. He

and, later,

served in the Army, and worked

Diversified

with the Uniroyal Tire Co., from

Products Corp.

which he retired in 1987, and for

in Opelika,

Auburn University.

retiring in 1992.

PEGGY FOSHEE DAVIS ’57 of

EDITH HELEN

Athens, Ga., died March 16.

WADE MEDLEY ’58 of Mountain

CHARLES KENNETH “TINK”

Brook died Feb.

GORHAM ’57 of Bowling Green, Ky.,

22. She was a

died Jan. 23. A U.S. Air Force

realtor with Ray

veteran, he was a retired quality

& Poynor for

control engineer from Westing-

more than 35

house Electric.

years.

PATSY K. HINES ’57 of German-

RICHARD

town, Tenn., died Feb. 28. She sold

VANCE MILES III

designer clothing for Gus Meyers,

’58 of Alexander

Wolfe Brothers and Boston’s For

City died May 17, 2014.

Senior Send-Off Hundreds of seniors flocked to the Auburn Alumni Center on

April 22 for the first Senior Send-Off. Free food, pictures with Aubie, portfolios and post-grad

Women.

resources: What’s not to love? TOMMY E. DEMING ’59 of Mobile

JOSEPH W. NICHOLS ’59 of

died Feb. 22. He worked with the

Knoxville, Tenn., died Jan. 12. A U.S.

JERRY L. PARKER ’58 of Sheffield

Army Corps of Engineers as a civil

Navy veteran, in 1971 he took over

WILLIAM LESLIE “LES” MARTZ

died Jan. 13. He was employed for

engineer.

the insurance agency founded by

’57 of Laurel, Miss., died Jan. 30. A

32 years as a county agent with the

U.S. Navy veteran of the Korean

Alabama Cooperative Extension

SAMUEL R. FOWLER ’59 of

War, he was retired from Howard

System, serving in Barbour and

Anderson, S.C., died March 14. He

Industries.

Morgan counties and in Colbert

served in the Korean War with the

JANICE HAM SAIDLA ’59 of

County from 1976 until his

Navy and worked as an engineer for

Auburn died Feb. 28. She worked at

retirement in 1992.

Pratt Whitney and the Florida

Headstart in Opelika and was the

Department of Environmental

administrator of the Auburn

Protection.

Veterinary Hospital. She also

SIMPSON E. “S.E.” VAUGHN III ’57

of Montgomery died Feb. 14. He loved golf and his Auburn Tigers.

DONALD LEVERNE SAPP ’58 of

his grandfather in the 1920s and

Gainesville, Ga., died March 16. He

ran it until retirement in 2009.

developed the Auburn Association

JERALD L. BARRETT II ’58 of

served with the Marine Corps in the

WILLIAM T. MCCOLLISTER JR. ’59

of Parents of Children with

Merritt Island, Fla., died Feb. 18. He

Korean War and was retired from

of Atlanta died Jan. 31. A member

Learning Disabilities.

was a member of Phi Kappa Tau

General Services Administration in

of Pi Kappa Alpha at Auburn, he

fraternity and Army ROTC. He

building management.

built homes in the Atlanta area and

HORACE D. STALNAKER ’59 of

opened his own business in 1973.

Columbus, Ga., died Feb. 21. He

worked for 10 years at Tennessee Valley Authority and 25 years at

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served in the Air Force, and retired

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TROBO TAKEOVER Alumnus Chris Harden ’98 of Columbia, S.C., and Jeremy Scheinberg, are changing the world with the help of an unlikely teaching aide.

H

ARDEN AND SCHEINBERG met while working at the Orlando, Fla.-based Alcorn McBride, a national manufacturer of audio and controller products for theme parks—Harden’s first job out of college. “Attending Auburn changed my life,” he said. “Auburn gave me my engineering degree and helped develop my passion for learning. The positive experience I enjoyed there makes me want to share that with my child and other children out there.” He got his chance when he and Scheinberg attended Startup Weekend, a retreat sponsored by Google where attendants are given one minute to produce a pitch and then break off into teams based on ideas. They spend the rest of the weekend Harden has a 3-year-old son and Scheinberg a 3-year-old son brainstorming a viable product to see if anyone is interested in and 6-year-old daughter; each of the kids has been instrumental to their idea. the TROBO process. Harden and Scheinberg’s idea won second place, and TROBO “My inspiration for TROBO comes from my career in was born. theme park engineering,” Scheinberg said. “From an “Jeremy came up with the programmable robot concept and I early age, I knew I wanted to be an engineer and I decided on the storytelling aspect,” Harden said. “We came up with want to share that passion with my children.” TROBO, a teaching robot.” Girls can choose Curie, the female version of The first physical prototype of TROBO was developed in March TROBO. Curie calls the child by name to add a 2014; six months later, Harden and Scheinberg raised more than more personalized feature to the learning process. $61,000 in the first month of a Kickstarter campaign. “Jeremy came up with the TROBO is a plush robot toy synced with a programmable robot concept personalized storytelling app. They currently and I decided on the storytelling have a boy TROBO, Newton, and a girl, Curie. TROBO is designed for children ages 2-7 and aspect,” Harden said. “We came focuses on teaching kids about STEM—science, up with TROBO, a teaching robot.” technology, engineering and math—in a fun way. “TROBO works with an iPad app that connects wirelessly to a “We spent most of November packagspeaker in the stomach of the toy that can be removed when the ing, designing and filing for the necestoy needs to be washed,” Harden said. “In the app you can create sary patents,” Harden said. “Late an avatar of the child and add their name and age so TROBO can December was when we got the big address them. As the TROBO and child read the digital board news.” —Ashtyne Cole book, the avatar of the child will be able to go on the adventure with them.”

SUMMER 2015

Auburn Magazine

57


THE CLASSES > IN MEMORIAM

from senior management in

retired after 30 years with the

inducted into the

Columbus Carpet Mills.

Florida Education System, the last

Alabama Sports Hall

15 years spent at Destin Elementary

of Fame. He also was

School.

the Lakeshore

LOUISE SMITH AYLIN ’60 of New

Port Richey, Fla., died Feb. 26. She

In His Honor

Foundation’s

was a middle school math teacher

GEORGE D. MAKRAKIS ’60 of

for more than 30 years in Texas,

Lexington Park, Md., died Feb. 10.

Arkansas, Louisiana, Alabama,

He worked with the U.S. Depart-

WILLIAM G. WYATT

Connecticut and Pennsylvania

ment of Defense as an electrical

JR. ’60 of Sylacauga

before retiring to Florida.

engineer for more than 30 years.

died Feb. 16. He

The Auburn Alumni Association was saddened to learn of the recent death of an active member of our board of directors. William D. “Bill” Nelson Sr. ’62 of Ft. Walton Beach, Fla., passed away on March 11 after a long battle with cancer.  Nelson served in the U.S. Air Force during the Korean War, then returned home to work with the Corps of Engineers and serve as chief of programs for the Directorate of Civil Engineering.

weightlifting coach.

served with the Army JOHN B. BREWER ’60 of Tampa,

VIRGINIA SPIETH PRICE ’60 of

during the Korean

Fla., died Feb. 24. He served in the

Mobile died Jan. 21. A Kappa Delta

War, and was retired

Marine Corps and retired from

at Auburn, she was very involved in

from the Tennessee

Sears after 30 years.

civic and church activities.

Department of

JOHN WILSON “JAKE” DUNLOP

JOSEPH N. SHEPHERD ’60 of

’60 of Gulf Breeze, Fla., died June

Anniston died March 15. He was a

FRANKLIN DELANO

2, 2014. He had a 40-year career in

member of Kappa Sigma fraternity

“FRANK” FENN ’61 of

broadcasting, including helping in

and worked as a civilian pharmacist

Clayton died Jan. 31.

the launch of the nation’s first

at the Noble Army Hospital, where

He was retired from

educational television station.

he was awarded the Civilian Medal

the Alabama Pardon

of Honor.

and Parole Board after

Transportation.

A memorial scholarship has been established in Bill Nelson’s honor. For information, please contact Steve Inabinet at (334) 844-2995 or steveinabinet@auburn.edu.

35 years.

BARBARA DAUGHTRY GOSSER ’60

of Auburn died Feb. 21. She was a

JERRY R. WILSON ’60 of Birming-

lifelong teacher and gardener, and

ham died March 5. He was on the

DONALD O. HILL ’61 of Birming-

KENNETH N. WILLIAMS ’62 of

was president of the Village

1957 National Championship

ham died Feb. 27. He served with

Montgomery died Feb. 7. He joined

Gardeners.

Auburn team, and played in the

the Air Force in France during the

the faculty at Huntingdon College

NFL for the Eagles, the 49ers and

Berlin crisis and as a process

in Montgomery in 1969 and taught

LOU ANN WHALEY KEEL ’60 of

with the Toronto Argonauts in the

engineer for the 3M Co. He also was

mathematics and computer science

Destin, Fla., died Jan. 16. She

Canadian Football League. He was

an environmental engineering

until his retirement in 2008.

professor at Mississippi State University.

JAMES S. BENTON ’63 of

Peachtree Corners, Ga., died Jan. 15. CLAUDIE G. LIVINGSTON ’61 of

He enjoyed a 40-year career with

Fayette died Feb. 15. He worked for

Georgia Power Co., retiring in 2003.

20 years in the Army, where he completed two combat tours in

JUDY STITH FREEMAN ’63 of

Vietnam and was awarded the

Huntsville died Jan. 25. She was

Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster

active within community organiza-

and the Legion of Merit, retiring

tions, particularly those raising

with the rank of lieutenant-colonel.

money for cancer treatment and

Afterward, he became an ordained

research.

minister and missionary. CONRAD ERNST GERNT ’63 of WILLIAM EARL “BILL” MISSIL-

Cookeville, Tenn., died Jan. 7. He

DINE ’61 of Springville died Feb. 6.

worked with the Tennessee Division

celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary with an Alaskan cruise

A U.S. Navy veteran, he was a

of Forestry for 14 years before going

accompanied by their large family of Auburn grads and future grads.

longtime veterinarian.

into business for himself as a

Fifty and Counting

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J.O. and Angelyn Fucci Conway ’63

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THE CLASSES > IN MEMORIAM

consultant forester and

taught at the College of

registered land surveyor.

Veterinary Medicine at Texas A&M. To generations

KITTY SUE GREGORY ’63 of

of Aggies, Feldman also

Waverly died Jan. 22. She

was known as the “Voice of

was active as a volunteer and

Kyle Field.”

consultant to the Child Advocacy Center of East

TOMMY C. LOGGINS ’64 of

Alabama.

Decatur died March 7.

DON FRANKLIN HOUSER

JOHN THOMAS REGAN ’64

’63 of Raleigh, N.C., died

of West Hyannisport, Mass.,

Feb. 18. He was an SEC

died March 5. He served as

wrestling champion at

the dean of architecture at

Auburn, winning every

Texas A&M University,

match with a pin, and

Auburn University (1994-98),

worked with NASA and the

North Carolina State School

Environmental Protection

of Design and the University

Agency. After retirement, he

of Miami. While at Auburn,

launched a successful home

he collaborated with Sambo

inspection business.

Mockbee to integrate the Rural Studio into the

DIANNE L. MARSH ’63 of

architecture curriculum.

Jacksonville died Feb. 21. She serviced in the Marine Corps

E. JACK REHBURG ’64 of

for more than 24 years,

Detroit, Mich., died Jan. 29.

retiring in 1988.

A U.S. Navy veteran, he enjoyed a successful career

Board matters THE AUBURN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Board of Directors’ nominating committee, having solicited nominations from the membership as required in the association bylaws, has submitted its list of candidates for four new directors to the full board. The recommended candidates have been approved by the board and are presented below for the membership’s consideration. According to the association’s bylaws, members may propose other candidates via the process outlined in Article XI, Section 4 (see below). The deadline for contesting any candidate recommended by the board is June 25, 5 p.m., CDT. If no further nominations are received, the unopposed candidates will be deemed automatically elected and will begin their terms at the association’s annual meeting on Oct. 3. All annual and life members are invited to attend.

LUANNE L. HART ’80 RESIDENCE: Eufaula MAJOR: Psychology EMPLOYMENT: Human Resources/Mar-

keting, Senior Vice President, MidSouth Bank AUBURN ACTIVITIES: Board Member,

Secretary and Treasurer Barbour County Auburn Club; Club Leadership Conference 2009, 2010, 2014, 2015; Foy Society – 10 Years KELLEY P. MOSSBURG ’77 RESIDENCE: Rosemary Beach, Fla. MAJOR: Finance EMPLOYMENT: President, South Walton

Community Council AUBURN ACTIVITIES: Emerald Coast

Auburn Club; Samford Society DEWAYNE T. SCOTT ’95 RESIDENCE: Decatur, Ga MAJOR: Business Administration, Man-

agement Information Systems EMPLOYMENT: Accenture, Associate

DONALD W. STEWART ’63 of

with Columbus Manufactur-

Gadsden died Jan. 16. A

ing Co. and started Great

Directors

Manager/Technical Architect

veteran of the Army

Lakes Sportswear. He also

CHARLES D. HART, JR., D.V.M ’85

AUBURN ACTIVITIES: Atlanta Auburn

Veterinary Corps, he

spent years in media

RESIDENCE: Trussville

Club; ODMA Leadership Council; George

practiced veterinary medicine

ministry.

MAJOR: Agriculture ’82, Veterinary

Petrie Society; Minority MAIN Event;

Medicine ’85

Founder, War Eagle Society

in Rainbow City and in Gadsden, retiring in 2008. SHIRLEY M. DUCHOCK ’64

MARION RICHARDSON

EMPLOYMENT: Founder and President,

HARRIS JR. ’65 of

Clay Chalkville Animal Clinic P.C.

Birmingham died Feb. 21.

AUBURN ACTIVITIES: Past President

Greater Birmingham Auburn Club

of San Diego, Calif., died Jan. 13. She was a longtime

MARTHA TATUM NEWSOM

(2014), President (2013), Secretary (2011

teacher in the San Diego

’65 of Newnan, Ga., died

& 2012); Alumni Walk; Club Leadership

Unified schools, primarily at

Feb. 3. She taught elemen-

Conference 2010, 2014, 2015; Circle of

Mira Mesa High School.

tary school in Coweta County

Excellence, Sustaining Diamond; Foy So-

for 30 years and was an avid

ciety – 10 Years; George Petrie Society;

doll collector.

Samford Society; College of Veterinary

ROGER G. FELDMAN ’64

Medicine Alumni Advisory Council 2015

of Kalona, Iowa, died Feb. 25. He was a practicing

ROSEMARY J. HAINES ’66

– Present; College of Veterinary Medi-

veterinarian, the faculty

of Newark, Del., died Feb. 24.

cine Centennial Club – Diamond Member

advisor for Alpha Psi

She served on the board of

veterinary fraternity and

the Delaware Interagency

Applicable passage from Auburn Alumni Association Bylaws Article XI, Section 4: Nominations from Members at Large. Section 4. Nominations from Members at Large. Members may propose other candidates for any position provided that (1) the name and a biography of their proposed candidate is submitted in writing to the Secretary of the Association by the time specified in the notice which can be no sooner than thirty (30) days from the day of the announcement; (2) the submission specifies which candidate submitted by the Directors the new candidate opposes; (3) the submission bears the new candidate’s signed consent; and (4) the submission of the new candidate contains the signed endorsement of at least seventy-five (75) Members. Mail, facsimile or email transmissions of this information will be accepted.

SUMMER 2015

Auburn Magazine

59


THE CLASSES > IN MEMORIAM

Council on Homelessness, the

MICHAEL THOMAS ’67 of Portland,

JOHN R. SCHIERLMANN ’69 of

Alabama’s District 2 Elementary

co-president of the Delaware

Ore., died Feb. 9. He began his

Reston, Va., died Jan. 28.

Teacher of the Year.

Citizens Opposed to the Death

career as a lumber trader and then

Penalty and the University of

went into fundraising sales for

RANDALL PAUL SUMMERFORD ’69

ANN GILMORE WOODALL ’72 of

Delaware Figure Skating Club.

World’s Finest Chocolates. In

of Montgomery died Feb. 20. He

Auburn died March 17.

retirement he and his wife founded

served in the Army, discharged with

Wine Tours Northwest.

the rank of captain, and enjoyed a

JAMES S. FLYNN ’73 of Bowling

successful career as a contractor.

Green, Ky., died Dec. 11. He served

CARLTON NICKIE MCDANIEL ’66 of

Albany, Ga., died Jan. 11. He worked for Alcon Construction Co., and

BERNARD S. “BUDDY” DUNAWAY

then Kinney Construction, from

JR. ’68 of Montgomery died March 7.

RICHARD E. BROGDON ’70 of

Western Kentucky University in both administrative and academic

which he was retired.

He served with the Army in the

Daphne on Oct. 1.

positions for more than 40 years,

Dominican Republic, where he was

where he taught English literature.

SUZANNE KELLEY RUTLEDGE ’66

awarded the Bronze Star, and retired

MARLAND “DOC” DULANEY ’70 of

of Iuka, Miss., died Feb. 28. She

from the U.S. Civil Service after

Wilkes-Barre, Pa., died Feb. 1. A U.S.

EDWIN A. THOMPSON ’73 of

was a member of Alpha Gamma

serving as an accountant at

Marine Corps veteran of World War

Atlanta died Jan. 25. A lifelong

Delta sorority and was a majorette

Maxwell-Gunter AFB for many years.

II, he earned a Purple Heart in the

educator, he was serving as

Battle of Okinawa. He then enjoyed

president of Atlanta Junior College at the time of his retirement.

for the Auburn University Marching Band. She was a

JAMES M. GLENN ’68 of Madison

a long career as a veterinarian, first

longtime middle school teacher as

died Feb. 6. He was retired from

in New Orleans and then in

well as consultant for Alpha

SAIC as a networking engineer.

Birmingham and in Pennsylvania.

RITA SHIRONE LONG ’68 of Macon,

IMA JEAN STEPHENS ’71 of

enjoyed a 25-year career in

SHERMAN M. SELTZER ’66 of

Ga., died March 8. She worked for

Columbus, Ga., died Feb. 10. She

teaching.

Huntsville died July 17, 2013. He was

30 years as a math teacher and

was a lifelong educator and had

a veteran of the Korean War and

retired from the Bibb County Board

served more than a thousand

CHARLES LEE VIVERETTE ’73 of

worked for NASA on the Apollo Space

of Education.

volunteer hours at the John B.

Pensacola, Fla., died March 14. He

Amos Cancer Center.

served with the U.S. Coast Guard

Gamma Delta on a national level.

Greensboro, Ga., died Jan. 21. She

Project and Skylab. He co-founded Control Dynamics and SVS.

MARY GREYNO TIPPINS ’73 of

PHILLIP JOHN MANGINA ’68 of

and was a teacher and junior

Oneonta died Feb. 10. A member of

WILLIAM RALPH BELL ’72 of Falls

JAMES R. BOX ’67 of Tavares, Fla.,

Omega Tau Sigma at Auburn, he

Church, Va., died Feb. 2. A U.S.

college administrator.

died Dec. 25.

practiced veterinary medicine for

Coast Guard veteran, he was

LEWIS D. “LUKE” ADAMS ’74 of West

more than 25 years and retired

instrumental in establishing the

Point, Ga., died Jan. 20. He was an

LINDA EDWARDS DEAN ’67 of

from the U.S. Department of

Coast Guard station in Panama City,

Army veteran of World War II.

Columbus, Ga., died May 13, 2014.

Agriculture.

Fla. In his last tour of duty, he was

She worked for Aflac for 34 years. PAUL A. MCINTYRE ’68 of Jackson, VINCENT JOHN PORTERA ’67 of

assistant chief of search and rescue

RAYMOND JOHN NIX ’74 of

for the Miami district.

Montgomery died March 14. He

Miss., died March 5.

Merritt Island, Fla., died Aug. 14,

served in the Air Force for 23 years, CAROL BRAZELL DAVIS ’72 of

and fought in World War II and the

2011. He worked as an electrical

EDWARD KING MERCER ’68 of

Cumming, Ga., died Jan. 8. She

Korean War. After retiring from the

engineer for more than 30 years.

Ojai, Calif., died Jan. 11. He had a

served for many years as a

Air Force in 1972, he worked for the

long teaching career at California

kindergarten teacher and assistant

Alabama Department of Industrial

GEORGE W. SHANNON III ’67 of

Polytechnic-Pomona, finishing as

principal for the Houston County

Relations.

Meridan, Miss., died Feb. 27. He

chair of the biological sciences

School System.

started his own veterinary practice

department.

in the 1960s and practiced there

JOE PERDUE ’74 of Atlanta died JACQUELYN “JACKIE” TAYLOR

Jan. 19. Since 1986, he had served

until he retired. He also flew hot air

CHARLES CREIGHTON “RUSTY”

EDWARDS ’72 of Auburn died Feb.

as director of education, vice

balloons and was a Harley Davidson

HEARN ’69 of Alexander City died

23. She enjoyed a 30-year career as

president and academic adviser for

aficionado.

Nov. 21, 2014. He was a pastor and

an educator in Tuskegee and in

the Club Managers Association of

Bible teacher.

Phenix City, and in 1990 was

America, coordinating more than

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ALUMNI SNAPSHOT

ON THE MOVE Need a fast, inexpensive way to haul your belongings across town? Bellhops has your number.

Vlahos and Doody took their own experience helping Auburn friends move and created a fast-growing company aimed at the national college market.

THERE IS AN OLD SAYING about the three most stressful events in life being death, divorce and moving. Alumni Cameron Doody ’09 and Stephen Vlahos ’08 can’t do much about the first two, but they have found a way to help with the third—and in the process created Bellhops, one of the fastest-growing young startup companies in the country. It all started at Auburn. “During our years at Auburn, we were constantly being asked by friends to help them move with our pickup trucks,” Doody said. “I think I moved about nine times in college and that helped us identify the market.” Two years after graduation, Vlahos and Doody created a company they first called Dorm Movers, then Bellhops. Unlike large commercial moving companies, they aren’t looking for the corporate clients making interstate moves, but the untapped market in university communities. “We believe moving companies aren’t realistic for the majority of Americans, which is probably why 75 percent are do-it-yourselfers,” Vlahos said. “Our mission at Bellhops is to provide a

realistic solution that is easy to book, fun and affordable.” “Moving companies only capture a small percent of the market,” Doody added. “Most people don’t really need professionals. They just need great people to help them move. The market we are going after is totally underserved.” The duo created a technology-enabled platform that produces an on-demand service for customers to obtain movers in their local communities. As soon as a customer places an order for a mover, a notification goes out to the local Bellhops employees, who choose whether or not to participate. They clock in and out using their smartphones; after the job, the customer goes online to verify the job is done and provide a performance review. Recently, the company was nominated by TechCrunch as one of five startups noted for their ingenuity. Bellhops has also garnered more than $6 million in Series A funding from Binary Capital and moving into new office space in Chattanooga. They’re on track to completed more than 40,000 moves this year, quadrupling last year’s total. —Ashtyne Cole

SUMMER 2015

Auburn Magazine

61


THE CLASSES > IN MEMORIAM

300 week-long Business Manage-

a former lab tech at Raleigh

ment Institute programs and

General Hospital.

recognized as a leader in the

pharmacist for more than 26 years.

DAVID GARRETT HOOPER ’93 of

Huntsville died Jan. 13. A U.S. Army LEE COLLIER HOWARD ’89 of

Ranger who went on multiple tours

BERNARD ELDER “BUDDY” COX

Fairhope died Jan. 30. After a

of duty in Iraq, Afghanistan and

JR. ’79 of Eclectic died Feb. 21. He

career in medical sales, she devoted

North Africa, he joined the Judge

RONNIE B. DAVIS ’75 of Villa Rica,

retired as a colonel in the Air Force

her time to raising a family.

Advocate General Corps as an

Ga., died Dec. 2. He was band

with 30 years of service and

director for 19 years at Paulding

maintained a cattle farm in

CHRISTOPHER S. REICHRATH ’89

County High School and 12 years at

Hardaway for 30 years.

of Cumming, Ga., died March 10.

LEE RANDAL MCDONALD ’01 of

He was a member of Sigma Pi

Auburn died March 12. He was a

ARLENE T. HARDING ’79 of

fraternity at Auburn. He worked as

part-owner of Lake Martin

FORD E. ALLEN JR. ’76 of

Montgomery died Jan. 14. She taught

a self-employed insurance broker.

Pharmacy in Dadeville.

Baltimore, Md., died Feb. 15.

fourth, fifth and sixth grade at Maxwell APRYL T. TINNON-MORING ’90 of

BLAYNE HARDY BARFIELD ’05 of

Suwanee, Ga., died Jan. 25. A member

Dothan died March 12. She was a

hospitality industry.

Hiram High School.

Air Force Base for nearly 20 years. DICK S. ANDERSON ’76 of

attorney.

Montgomery died Feb. 5. A member

SCOTT EDWARD FISCHER ’80 of

of Alpha Chi Omega at Auburn, she

member of Kappa Delta sorority

of Sigma Alpha Epsolon at Auburn,

Auburn died Jan. 21. He was

worked as a speech pathologist at

and taught middle school the last

he enjoyed a long career with

information technology director for

Riverside Elementary School.

five years.

Algernon Blair and Caddell

the AU architecture program.

Construction Co.

FRANK M. “BUDDY” DEGRAFFEN-

CAMILLE ALAINA COATS ’13 of

JEFFREY LEE HOLLINGSWORTH

RIED ’91 of Notasulga died March

Auburn died Feb. 27. She was a

JAN ORIN GARS ’76 of Citra, Fla.,

’82 of Atlanta died Jan. 24. A

5. He served with the Auburn Police

member of Alpha Delta Pi sorority.

died Feb. 13. He founded the Oak

member of Kappa Alpha fraternity

Department for 33 years, the last

She worked full-time as children’s

Ridge Animal Hospital, where he

at Auburn and an intramural boxing

seven of which he served as Chief of

minister at Trinity United Method-

served the Ocala community as a

champion, he worked in medical

Police before retiring in 2010. He

ist Church in Opelika.

veterinarian for 35 years.

sales in the pharmaceutical industry.

was an active community volunteer and was especially passionate about

Faculty & Friends

EDWARD A. HIGHERS ’76 of

ROBERT KANE JORDAN ’82 of

Needham, Mass., died Feb. 10. He

Fort Payne died Jan. 27. A member

United Way of Lee County.

served with the Marines as an F-4

of Kappa Alpha fraternity and a

DONALD MATTHEW “MATT” MAY

University Hargis Professor Emeritus

fighter pilot and worked in

Plainsman while at Auburn, he

’92 of Mobile died March 7. He

of English, died Feb. 1. He taught

commercial real estate.

practiced law in Fort Payne for his

worked for Spring Hill Toyota.

colonial American literature, drama

RICHARD E. AMACHER, Auburn

entire career after opening his own

and other courses in the AU English

LINDA C. DICHIARA ’78 of Gulf

firm in 1999. He was active in

RICK A. MARTINDALE ’92 of

Shores died Feb. 4.

DeKalb County business and

Huntsville died Feb. 19. He worked

department from 1957 to 1984.

conservation groups and was a

at Synapse Wireless as a software

EDWARD A. CARROLL of Wood-

JAMES E. HAYES ’78 of Cocoa

two-time president of the DeKalb

engineer.

worth, La., died Jan. 16. A U.S.

Beach, Fla., died Feb. 2. A veteran of

County Auburn Club.

Vietnam, he earned a Bronze Star,

Army paratrooper during the DAVID ALAN MOBLEY ’92 of

Korean War, he spent his career as

the Army Commendation Medal

TERRY WILBUR DODD ’87 of Cordele,

Smyrna, Ga., died Jan. 17. He was a

a marketing consultant in the insur-

with Valor, and Armed Forces

Ga., died Feb. 24. Throughout his

member of both the Florida and

ance industry.

Honor Medal, among other honors.

career, he worked with ECC Kaolin

Georgia bar associations and was a

After retiring from the military he

Co., Coats and Clark Co., Vanity Fair

partner at Smith, Gambrel &

JEANETTE WALL of Birmingham

worked as a fishery biologist with

Corp., West Point Stevens, IsoChem

Russell in Atlanta for several years.

died Nov. 14. She worked in the

the Tennessee Wildlife Resources

and King America Finishing.

Agency in Nashville.

motor-freight business and was BRENTON LAWRENCE DEAN ’93 of

MARTHA ARMSTRONG STROM-

Auburn died March 13. He practiced

KIMBERLY ANNE ABBOTT ’79 of

BERG ’88 of Fort Walton Beach,

law in LaFayette with the law firm

Beckley, W.Va., died Feb. 3. She was

Fla., died March 13. She worked as a

Dean and Carlton.

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AUBURNMAGAZINE.AUBURN.EDU

president of Sharron Motor Lines.

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BACKCHAT Online Speak

PINTEREST Cool pin by Jodi Garner: Auburn War Eagle State of Alabama sign by TCWoodshop on Etsy.com TWITTER @Tiffany_sheri: We did it! #WarEagle

AUBURN MAGAZINE ONLINE Michael Stricklin ‘13 and his “loyal shop pup” Mason. Loyal Stricklin offers locally produced American-made leather crafted artisan goods. See more at auburnmagazine.auburn.edu INSTAGRAM FAVE! Posted by JAG0001 Sometimes a power nap is required to finish out a game day. #WarEagle, #WDE, #AuburnFootball

SUMMER 2015

Auburn Magazine

63


BLUE SKY YOUR CAREER

Would you advance within your company? Expand your authority and responsibility, take on a new challenge? Yes, of course. But how? How do you escape your routine and transform yourself?

WITH AN AUBURN EXECUTIVE MBA A Master of Business Administration degree from Auburn, tailored for you, the working executive, will round out your basic skill set, educate you in emerging business thought and practice, and equip you with the skills, knowledge, and qualifications the business world demands of its leaders. The Auburn program is a clever, flexible combination of on-campus residencies and distance technologies that allow you to continue in your job while receiving the first-class education that will send your career skyward.

Executive MBA Programs

Contact us for more info at: www.AuburnEMBA.org or 1.877.AUB.EMBA Auburn University is an equal opportunity educational institution/employer.

64

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Why do we

RISE AS ONE?

Because now is the time for every member of the Auburn Family to join together for the future of this institution. With the launch of Because This is Auburn, a $1 billion fundraising campaign, thousands of new academic scholarships will be created, along with more than 100 new endowed chairs and professorships, enhanced programs and research, and new facilities. To date, Auburn has raised $775 million in this campaign. This is the result of more than 73,000 gifts and commitments made by individuals in the Auburn Family. Each one tells a different story. Now is the time to tell yours.

THERE’S A STORY BEHIND EVERY GIFT. GIVE TODAY AT BECAUSE.AUBURN.EDU.


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Auburn Magazine Summer 2015