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Class of 1972

40th Reunion

contents 2

The Barnard Experience

9

Career Paths

17

Family and Relationships

25

Retirement

29

Summing Up

Welcome back It’s been 40 years and we are as feisty and opinionated as ever. This Reunion Book compiles the answers to the survey of the Class of ‘72, with a minimum of editorializing. The voices of our classmates are so strong and so interesting that it really doesn’t need any introduction, except to say that the response was tremendous. More than 120 classmates answered the survey (about half anonymously) or about 25% of the total class. Your comments were thoughtful, moving and wise, and we have included every one of them, as well as providing summaries of the multiple-choice answers. Thank you all for making our 40th Reunion Book a valuable keepsake for ourselves and for generations of Barnard women to come. The Editors

All photos courtesy Barnard Archives


Photograph by Joseph Gadzak

Image from archives

Our thoughts about Barnard

Then and now How happy were you with your Barnard experience while you were at Barnard? Category average: 4.0 (5 is the most satisfied). Some were disappointed then and remain so now. Others maintain it was the best time of their lives. The comment below seems to sum it up best: I was such a babe in the woods. As I watch my son navigating through college and early adulthood, I see how much better prepared he is to make the most of everything. But the fact that our generation of Barnard women had to invent the world for ourselves, define our own terms, discover our feminism one step at a time, etc., also made for a very dynamic college experience! It bonded us as people who have been through a major challenge together and I am thankful for those bonds. And for everything I learned in those intense four years. Of course, I wish I could do the whole thing over again, knowing what I know now!! (Ginny Bales) Wouldn’t we all? Certainly, looking back we are more satisfied with our Barnard experience now than we were then.

Looking back now, how would you rank your experience at Barnard? Category average: 4.23. Following are the (mostly) positive comments. Read on for the negative ones. Comments without names were anonymous. It empowered me to never settle and to try new things. At a time when women were so far from having equal opportunity (they still are to some extent) it made me realize that if I wanted something I should pursue it. It also gave me great confidence. I loved being at Barnard—more the people than the education, which I didn't really take advantage of as much as I should have (and I regret now). (Evelyn Ehrlich) I loved Barnard women, I loved my field (anthropology), and I loved the upper west side. And I'm still here—in more ways than one. (Ellen Wahl) 2

I wish I could do the whole thing over again, knowing what I know now!!


I look back at my time at Barnard with gratitude. I felt then and still feel the best of the academic world was mine to pick and choose from. Even though I now wish I had picked and chosen more, I still feel blessed with the options I had. From Freshman English - English A??? - Catharine Stimpson to anthro senior seminar with Clive Kessler and the oh so wonderful French professors such as Serge Gavronsky and Tatiana Greene . . . it didn't get much better than that for me. And then there are the friendships forged in that environment. They are precious to me. (Suzanne Levinson Samelson) Those were some of the best years of my life! I LOVED Barnard. I still remember many of my teachers fondly.

ORIENTATION ISSUE -

THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 19, 1368 •

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President's Greeting to Students I have the honor and reponsibility of officially opening the 1968-69 academic year. Like you I have high hopes that this will be an important year '-for Barnard College. In the fall of 1888 Columbia University Trustees granted the Certain Committee of Friends of Higher Education for Women of , New',York City permission tff create a Board'of Trustees, seek funds, arid establish a college for women. Barnard College admitted .its .firet, freshman class in the fall of 1859-at 343 Madison Avenue. . ,'- The goal of the founders was to provide an equal opportunity for a college education for young women, particularly those in New York City. Barnard has been important in removing the barriers 'to education for women in the United States. Barnard hasi;also •.been important in setting high'standards of academic "•excellence for all of higher education. jr • - We now have new opportunities for leadership. We are in one . of the large citiiis in-the world;"we are closely affiliated to a great University, yet we are small enough to make our decisions on participation in thie City and the 'University relevant to our cap' abilities, arid ne;ds. We are a community of many ages, races, religions and political and cultural commitments, yet our purposes for being:here are compatible enough to allow us to find the value . in such heterogenity. We have on our campus the possibility of teing'.a.-concernejci p.articipanj;,in-thfe challenging conflicts of the idafeJfSBOrs'.:jf-waj.caii!learri.to be eflecUve^fe'-toitt make1 a difference-" at Barnard College and we may'have a larger influence.. Barnard Col ege. She will ad• ' My best wishes to each of you for a stimulating and productive at dress year for yourselves, for Barnard College and finally for the larger community of which we are a part. MARTHA PETERSON President

Barnard was the best thing that ever happened to me. As many of us well know—being a smart young woman was a tough slog in the old days. I had a lot of support from my parents and other "nerds" in my high school class, which was very important. However, I have met women who were at other colleges during the same time and their experience was so different—in a bad way. Breakfast, lunch and dinner were consciousness raising and affirming times. Having male and female professors who pushed and just were supportive mentors and examples was beyond wonderful. (Marcia Eisenberg)

Aside from the best academic education one can get, Barnard gave me a life-changing personal experience. Barnard was my introduction to a world beyond my dreams—a world filled with very confident women. It was a no-nonsense learning environment where I interacted and competed with Proposed College Govl some of the brightest young women in the country. The quality of To Give Students Vote By LINDA KRAKOWER education was one that only the mention of Ivy League or Seven Sisters can This fall, faculty and students type of housing do students Barnard College will vote in want the school to provide?), evoke. I was in this environment during the turmoil of the late 1960’s, ofa referendum and housing priorities (who gets to establish an all- into the dorms first on a wait-, government. ing list?) (2) Submitting re, • * / marveling at how freely my classmates challenged the establishment, our college With the -rise -of: the student forms and'changes to the Fac?> power movement* it would be ulty Committee oh Instruction. for the students to take a (3) The medical, office will be government and other governments around the world. Some of the most ,"wise good look' at the new form of better able to serve the students college government which is and reflect their needs if its memorable debates occurred spontaneously between classes in the study about to be placed before them. partite policy is determined by a trigroup. (4) Financial aid The new; .proposal gives students they have never had ber policy will reflect the opinion halls. These spur-of-the-moment gatherings where we exercised the right power to fore, i.ei participation in de- of the students in areas such "cisiohs affecting all areas ! of as "priorities and allocations. life. Students will wtark (5) Finally, Barnard's activities tackle any national or international issue taught me to have an opinion "" college wii.h faculty and administration in the surrounding Morningside these decisions. Across ^Heights community will fall unabout what was going on in the outside world. (Sylvia Montero, Excerpt tp'rnake the street students have no !ac- der the consideration of a Com;• cess to the decision-making pro- munity Affairs Committee on cess and at Barnard we are not which will, sit students along from my book, Make It Your Business) only participating, but partjki- with faculty and administration.

Barnard was my introduction to a world beyond my dreams—a world filled with very X confident women. :

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pating iri many areas with equal •' voices../ . ' . . - • • ' '. •

A functioning Barnard College: Government could- prove a

to label this participation prototype for colleges across the I had a wonderful time with friends I made at Barnard. I was a little lax.asBut student power is to increase country. Naturally Barnard is divisive .'lines among well suited to such .a system bestudents- - faculty - administra- cause it is small in size and has in taking advantage of the riches available in getting involved more with .Ihej.ojd: tion. The goal of this, new gov- a. responsive .administration. If is to do awaywilh^ucti Barnard's system proves effecthe professors, yet there were some who stood out and were helpful and • eminent divisions and create a Barnard tive, it;is;hoped that other ;Community in which .all. the schools.will •seek"to pattern govmembers in the de- ernmental system after Bar-. very interesting. I wish I had "hung around" more professors more often terminationparticipate of policy which will.. j nark's in which there is student power, faculty power, and adaffect the community during my their office and lab hours. (Claudia Ellis Harbert) .' The'lollowing arfe some aL the ministrative power Working todecisions in which students gether ,for what is best for all :

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would play a-part: (1) Determin-

I've always described Barnard as the place in which I was born into " ation of housing forms (i.e. what consciousness. My professors were nurturers and role models. Coming from an educationally backward all-girls religious high school, it was an entirely new experience for me to come into contact with women who were unapologetically brilliant. It made all the difference in the world to me. (Rebecca Newberger Goldstein) I look back with very fond memories of my Barnard experience. I was a transfer student and joined our class in my junior year. I recall taking stimulating classes, making wonderful friendships, finding internship opportunities, being part of social action of the time, and taking in all of NYC and the best of Morningside Heights. Those were fabulous years and I treasure the time I spent at Barnard. (Rhoda Weinstein Shapiro)

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Program Changes Last day to obtain approval for adding a course is Friday, October 4, 1968. All program changes will be filed by juniors and se-< niors on' Monday, October 7th; by freshmen and sophomores on Tuesday, Oct. 8th. FORMS: Students making program change must fill out an application form, an elective card for every course or section to be added, and a drop card for eyery^ course or section to be dropped. APPROVALS: A d v i s e r s and departmental representatives should be consulted for approval of program changes between September 26th and October 4th. FILING: The Registrar's office will be open for program change filing between 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m..on October 7th and 8th for processing of program changes. "Changes will be checked and entered on the permanent program card at the time of filing and the" instructor's half of the elective card for -"Barnard - numbered courses will be returned to the stufor submission at the class meeting. Drop cards and elective cards for IBM - numbered courses will be processed by the _ Registrar's office. After "October 4th, no course may be added for any reason. A. course may be dropped with the approval of the Adviser through Dec. 18.

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Photograph by William Megalos

March up Broadway, November, 1972

At the time I appreciated that it was exciting to be in NYC, at Columbia and at a women's college filled with leading feminist scholars and a great tradition. Now I realize how much attention the faculty was providing, and that it was more challenging than I realized. I still wish that I had made more close friends at Barnardâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in part it was a result of my choice to spread myself across Barnard, Columbia, and NYC. Barnard encouraged my independence and helped me go for a career in medicine, which I was scared to do. I actually value my time there a lot. The older you get the smarter you areâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I hope! I am incredibly grateful for my Barnard educationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;especially the support and encouragement I received as a woman at a time of huge social change. (Stephanie Brandt, MD) In the 40 years since graduating from Barnard, I've worked with women all over the world. It is clear to me that Barnard both provided a world-class education and fostered in us the conviction that we were as competent and as worthy as anyone we would meet. (Joanna Crocker) I value Barnard more in retrospect. I have met so many wonderful Barnard alumnae over the years. Barnard has meant more and more to me over the years. (Roxane Head Dinkin) I liked Barnard a lot when I was there. So much so, that I still haven't left the area. I live on 111th Street and Riverside Drive. My only regret is that as a transfer student, I lived in 616. I think if I had lived in one of the dorms I would have met more people. As it was I really only knew my suite mates and some people from some classes. (Catherine Cline) Most of my courses were at SIA but I did love the history of art classes at Barnard. I really enjoyed my Barnard experience. I was given the confidence and encouragement to pursue a career in medicine, which is what I wanted to do, and was also scared to do. I feel that Barnard prepared me for the tough course of study that I found in medical school. I felt confident as a student during and after Barnard. I feel I got individual attention as well. Since I was a commuter, I feel I missed out on whatever campus life that there was at Barnard. So that I feel was a negative. (Jane Karp, MD)

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Barnard fostered in us the conviction that we were as competent and as worthy as anyone we would meet.


Barnard inculcated in its students the conviction that anything was attainable if one worked for it. Individuality was encouraged and diversity tolerated. Those ideals have stayed with me ever since. I was happy with Barnard and glad to be spending my college years in NYC at a small college within a large university. It was the best of both worlds. I blended in fairly well and enjoyed an atmosphere where I could explore new interests and grow. (Katie Cangelosi)

The Other Side of the Coin Other comments range from ambivalent to self-reproachful to unambiguously negative. In no particular order: We seemed to be on strike for a good chunk of timeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and I completed my education in three years! So it really was a very brief experience. (Nina Krauthamer) Those were very chaotic years, and I never felt quite connected to the school. I would have liked to have felt a greater sense of community. (Lynn Najman) On reflection, I was too young and scared to appreciate what was being offered. I also lived off campus, was married, ridiculous, and of course now divorced. Living in NY, I have maintained some connection with Barnard, the toddler Center, and mentoring, so it has remained part of my life. I did not got to graduate school until I was in my 40s, when I went to Teachers College, and spent 8 years getting a doctorate in art education. So I have this feeling of TC and Barnard as home. The Barnard years came at a difficult time for me personally. My father had died just prior to my beginning college, and my mother died right before my senior year. These personal difficulties were coupled with, and to a degree seemed magnified by, the political turmoil in the country. Although I remember feeling a tremendous sense of possibility because of my youth (I entered Barnard at 16 and graduated at 20), there was also an underlying sadness during that period of my life and a yearning for stability. (Libby Tatt Adler) A difficult period for college students to focus on their education. Barnard and other schools were involved in the tumult of the time. I was very conflicted about the political issues versus being in school. (Andres Vizoso) I was from out of town, but didn't ever live in the dorms here, and I wasn't a joiner, so I met very few classmates. I really remember only one Barnard grad that I worked with at the Columbia computer center (CUCC) after I graduated, and she was in the class of '73. My mother died while I was at Barnard. That event colored my whole experience. It was like living in two parallel worlds, the internal one which was very disrupted, the external one which appeared ok. It limited my ability to fully engage in my own intellectual development at that time, even though I did well in classes. (Ellen Nasper) I got an excellent education, but I didn't fit in to the general student body. I had a few good friends. (Frances Sadler) Being classified "commuter" meant not participating in campus life as much as I would have liked. I'm so happy that the problem has been addressed and there are enough dorm rooms for all. (Cheryl Foa Pecorella) 5

A difficult period for college students to focus on their education.


My first impression was that the faculty was very supportive but the student body impersonal in general, although there were a few students who were very helpful. The intellectual level was high, which I appreciated. It's only after you've left Barnard that you realize what a great institution it was, academically stimulating and intellectually nurturing. I realize now that, in spite of myself, my often-time feeling of being lost and not knowing what I was doing, I actually got a good academic education. And my experiences of living in NYC in the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;60s-â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;70s were beyond compare. Those were exciting times! Though I didn't major in art history (started taking those classes too late in my undergraduate career), I have loved art history since my first class with Prof. Barbara Novak and, to my great joy, both of my children have a great appreciation of the arts. (Evalynne Gould Elias) It was very hard to take art history and other classes at Columbia. Some of the English teachers needed to retire and were a bit rigid in their teaching and assignments. (Peggy Ludwig) I believe I got a wonderful education and met many, many dynamic women who were and still are engaged in the world. But, I wish my college years had been more fun. We were so busy demonstrating against the war in Vietnam and fighting for women's rights, that we didn't have as much fun as it seems my children had in college. Barnard was a great experience, but I wish I'd had more fun. (Martha J. Flanders)

Parietals

I graduated early. I wish I'd stayed longer. (Amy Persky) My high school experience did not prepare me academically for the level of work at Barnard. I was far from home and I couldn't afford to go home much. I was pretty unhappy and if there was counseling available, I didn't know about it. As my experience with having 3 children complete college has taught me, schools are much more attuned to the guidance and counseling needs of students today. As a minority student, I watched my peers struggle and several dropped out. I don't think Barnard was aware of or prepared to meet our challenges. This wasn't intentional, it simply wasn't anticipated. (Mila Oden Jasey) I was a commuter so that my experience was somewhat colored by this factor. Also, I majored in math and economics and there were only about 12-15 majors in each of those categories. I took about half of my classes at Columbia because of these majors so that probably modified my "Barnard experience" over what it would have been had I been an English or psychology major. (Anna Garfinkel Resnik) As a transfer student I was a bit lost and the administration was extremely unhelpful. However, the experience did toughen me up and taught me to be my own advocate...over and over. In addition I came for the politics and that was very exciting even though it added stress to the experience. I did have to be prepared to juggle both and I was aware that school came first. I was unhappy and confused. I never lived on campus or nearby and thus only very rarely took part in any activities on campus. I made only one friend at Barnard, and she was the friend of a high school friend. Years later I think that I could have made more of my experience at Barnard. (Judith Peck)

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As a minority student, I watched my peers struggle and several dropped out.


I was shy, not very confident and did not take full advantage of all the opportunities there were at Barnard, as least that is how I remember it. (Joanna Gilman Strauss) Although Columbia was right across the street, I do not recall having many classes there or much interaction with male students, other than at Wollman mixers where the men were all sweaty and reeking of beer, or at dorm or frat parties where they were trying to get you to drink beer and take drugs. I did not make many friends at Columbia and, I don't know why, did not take advantage of the many clubs and social organizations. Everything was so extremely political and left-leaning then, with no room for someone who did not share that political passion. I do not recall Barnard being a FUN place to go to school, as did alums I met later of other (equally competitive) schools who spoke glowingly and fondly of their experience at their respective schools. This lack of school spirit may be why Barnard does so poorly in alumnae contributions vs. other schools (even women's schools like Wellesley). And that is why I did not go overboard in encouraging my children to attend either Barnard or Columbia. Sadly, since Columbia admitted women, the reputation of Barnard has been somewhat diminished. Was the ideal of women's control and maintaining a female administration worth giving up what might have been a rewarding partnership, like Radcliffe, Pembroke, Jackson, etc. They seem to have done well with a single administration. Who has really benefited over keeping Barnard as an isolated female institution other than the self-serving administration? It is getting easier to get into most of the traditional women's schools, which may send a message.

I don't think I took advantage of much of what Barnard— or the college experience — had to offer.

I didn't make optimal use of Barnard's resources, but I made great friends there. I don't think I took advantage of much of what Barnard—or the college experience—had to offer. (Joan Spivak) I did not take advantage of as many opportunities to stretch myself as I could have. For the most part, my classes at Barnard weren't intellectually stimulating, in contrast to the courses I took across the street at Columbia. I think Barnard was in a slump when I attended it. The best part of the Barnard experience for me was New York City. With the knowledge I gleaned from the art and music courses I took at Columbia, I enjoyed art galleries, museums, classical music at Carnegie Hall, medieval music recitals at the Cloisters, and jazz at downtown nightclubs. I saw a few plays, and saw plenty of art house movies. I feel that I developed my personality, rather than my intellect, while attending Barnard. (Peggy Halpern Mitchel) It was a very mixed bag, with some highs and lows. The other Barnard girls were great, but it was kind of a cold institution. Although the classes were great and interesting, it seemed as if had I dropped off the face of the earth, the school would not have noticed. (Carolyn Kone) I was classified as a commuter after my freshman year, even though I lived more than 11/2 hours away from Barnard in the far reaches of Queens. After my freshman year I was not guaranteed housing each year and had few choices if housing became available. It was very stressful and affected both my academic opportunities and social inclusion in college. I believe more housing is now available to students who want to live on campus? (Diane Wunderlich Chabbott) 7

Folk dancing, Altschul Plaza, Spring Festival, 1972. Photograph by Joseph Gadzak


I saw NY as my community as a student, rather than Barnard. (Sloat Shaw) I did not join Barnard class of 1972 until I was a junior and I lived off campus with my first husband. I enjoyed the education and classroom experience although it was always a challenge for me. Later because of Barnard, doors were opened for me, when I sought a job as a paralegal with top notch smaller law firms in the 1970s. My employer once said "oh you went to Barnard…so you know how to think." I loved the compliment and wore it as my badge of honor and recognition for many years. It is good for your undergraduate experience to occur in connection with the larger world, but when I was at Barnard things were perhaps too much that way. College was a strong experience and having come from a different ethnic background, Barnard and Columbia gave me a connection to the more international aspects of college life compared to the other campuses. Having said this I did have a difficult time just getting through college and finding my voice. Looking back I would not have done otherwise. (Shoko Moriwaki Iwata) I always knew that Barnard was a life-changing experience for me, but as the years have gone by, I am more conscious of the things I gained and less conscious of what it cost. Many of the best things about Barnard—the intellectual excitement, the political turmoil, the amazing freedom to think and to do—all came at the cost of a lot of uncertainty and anxiety. In the long run I know that was invaluable but at the time it was very difficult. Thank God for the friends I made at Barnard—we really helped each other through the toughest times. (Goldie Alfasi-Siffert) As has been said, "youth is wasted on the young" and that indeed was my case. Also, as a scholarship student essentially working my way through school I felt huge financial pressures that often interfered with my overall satisfaction. In hindsight, I should have worried less and allowed the experience in more than I did. (Susan Baer)

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It is good for your undergraduate experience to occur in connection with the larger world, but when I was at Barnard things were perhaps too much that way.


Photograph by Joseph Gadzak

Career Paths

How satisfied are you today with your accomplishments in your career? Category average: 4.19 Is it possible that nearly every woman in the class of ‘72 received an advanced degree? Or is it (more likely) that only those with advanced degrees answered the survey? In either event, we are a singularly welleducated group. Out of 125 responses, there were 43 Masters’ degrees (not counting those with additional degrees beyond the Master’s), 8 MBAs, 22 law degrees, 13 medical/dental degrees and 18 Ph.D.s. In addition to our doctors and lawyers, we have 34 class members in education (at all levels), 9 in health care (not counting our MDs), 14 in business/management. Those who specified other career fields included individuals in industrial psychology, foundation fundraising, publishing (2), high tech (4), music (3), executive recruiting, psychotherapy, non-profit management (2), writing (3), government (5), architecture, homemaking, environmentalism (2), museum, painting, flower design, and the United Nations. Joanna Crocker wins the prize for most interesting career path, combining business/management, the environment, and early music. Evelyn Ehrlich may be a runner up, with an MS in Library Services, a Ph.D. in Cinema Studies, a business in financial services marketing, and a side trip in food magazine publishing. Wherever we ended up, our career paths have not always been straightforward, with about half of us having changed careers during the last 40 years. About a quarter of those who responded stopped working for 3 years or more during their careers. About one-third (37%) of us knew what our career path would be from the time we were at Barnard, having majored in a subject related to our current career. Another 26% said that their current career is “sort of” related to their undergraduate major. We received a lot of comments on the question about whether your major is related to your ultimate career. The first set below really point up how broadly we define both our careers and our undergraduate educations. All of these respondents see themselves as writers—a career Barnard has been especially successful at engendering—but with distinctly different takes on that profession.

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Photo top: Wollman Library, 1970—note the ashtrays!


I spent a good many years as a professor of the field I'd majored in, philosophy. But I also became a novelist, and I hadn't taken a single English course at Barnard. (I should have, but I hadn't.) (Rebecca Newberger Goldstein, Ph.D., academic, writer) Editor’s note: Rebecca is, of course, a prize-winning, best-selling novelist and non-fiction writer. I was a writing major. I now use that ability to create “stories” for brands as a marketing consultant.” (MBA, Business Management) I am the Outreach and Volunteer Coordinator at Berkeley High School. As such I spend a lot of time working on school to home communications. I have been writing one way or another since I graduated, gradually working my way down from large pond (The Associated Press) to small pond (Berkeley High School.) with several ponds in between including Time/Life Books and the University of California, Berkeley. (Janet Huseby) I majored in Latin American studies. I went on to get a Master's Degree in teaching English as a Second Language and Spanish and taught in bilingual programs and ESL programs in elementary education and adult education, in public schools, adult federal and community vocational training programs, community and 4-year colleges. I also taught college writing skills. After raising my children I became an assistant editor at a magazine, later acting editor, and for the past 10 years have been the publicist/communications manager for a 2,100-student/10,000 alumni school (preschool through 12th grade), the Yeshivah of Flatbush. (Diane Wunderlich Chabbott)

How does one assess the value of any liberal arts major? If we learned to solve problems, write cogently and think, our college experience was relevant.

I was an English major and having to write critical essays is akin to the law insofar as they both require logical thinking and clear and precise prose. (Martha J. Flanders, Law) How does one assess the value of any liberal arts major? If we learned to solve problems, write cogently and think, our college experience was relevant. I have also been a generalist for most of my career and my liberal arts education prepared me for that. (Susan Baer, MBA) I majored in anthropology and worked at the United Nations for 33 years. I spent time working for various student exchange programs before I joined the UN, and had a couple of administrative jobs there before I became an English editor in Conference Services, where I worked for 25 years. I would say that I spent time searching for a career path and trying out different jobs before I began editing the official records of the UN in English, with a 6-person team comprised of editors of the official UN languages. About half the people I meet say they think anthropology is related to working at the UN, and the other half don't see the relevance. I'd like to think there is a connection. Although I didn't pursue anthropology beyond college, it influenced my interests in working for an international organization. (Katie Cangelosi, Masters) In addition to writers of whatever persuasion, here are all the comments by other classmates on their careers. Comments without names were anonymous. Where the respondent didn’t describe her advanced degree but listed it in the survey, we included the information after her description. 10

History class with Prof. Annette K. Baxter at center, Milbank Courtyard, ca. 1970


I was an English major at Barnard and took Education classes to become an English teacher. I did teach English for several years, then left Education to go into the corporate world. I wrote software documentation and worked as a software trainer, but missed working with teenagers and returned to Education. Once back teaching English, I decided what I REALLY wanted to be when I grew up was a guidance counselor. I went back to school for a Masters in Counseling; I am currently the Director of Guidance at a high school in New Jersey. (Masters) I started out working in finance (security analyst) straight from grad school. I took a long career break when I had kids, and completely enjoyed the experience. I returned to work in a non-corporate setting, starting my own investment advisory firm. I'm also very committed to financial literacy education, an area that brings me a lot of satisfaction. (Lynn Najman, Masters) Art History major and Biology double major (now a dental-maxillofacial surgeon). My work has been about social change, something that I focused on as an anthro major in the midst of an era when that's what it was all about. I've been in research, program development, and consultant all around issues of equity—math and science for underrepresented groups (women, minorities, persons with disabilities), youth development to ensure that every young person makes a successful transition to adulthood. I've worked in national youth organizations (Girls Inc), think tanks (Education Development Center), and informal science institutions, including the American Museum of Natural History. I've been a consultant for the past 6 years, but I've just accepted a job at the New York Hall of Science to be a ‘thought leader’ on youth development and entrepreneurship. (Ellen Wahl, Masters) I was a math major, but I also took many courses in psychology and was very interested in experimental psychology. I am currently a mathematics professor at the United States Naval Academy. I sometimes wonder how my life would be different if I chose to go to graduate school in psychology instead of mathematics. (Jody Meyer Lockhart, Masters, Ph.D.) When I divorced I went to graduate school, Master’s in Psychology, Doctorate in Art Education. In my current role as a professor, I do thesis work with artists; for most of them writing is a great challenge. So my work as an English major certainly has impacted me life-long and has contributed to my ability to teach writing. I was an anthropology major and I work for an umbrella Jewish nonprofit. I am the general counsel, but I am involved in many aspects of my organization including running 2 websites. The organization works within the very diverse Jewish community in NYC, Westchester and Long Island as well as doing a great deal of inter-faith and inter-group work. What is not to like! (Marcia Eisenberg, Law) I was a government/poli sci major with French minor. An attorney, I worked in the US government for nearly 20 years in the area of International Trade and Banking. 11

My English major certainly has impacted me life-long and has contributed to my ability to teach writing.


Working in organization building. Psych major. (Frances Sadler, Masters) My Barnard degree was a door-opener when I was looking for teaching jobs. But my career path (college professor) was derailed—not for any failing on Barnard's part, but because of the unexpected disability of a family member. (Cheryl Foa Pecorella, Masters) I majored in English, but knew I wanted to work empowering people in some sort of way. When I was a senior I took a class in social casework and that set me on the path to get a Master’s degree in clinical social work. I am content to work part-time and have found myself less and less career driven over the years. I have a small clinical private practice and I also do a fair amount of work with military soldiers, spending several months a year on a military base working with soldiers and their families. It can be intense, difficult work, but very rewarding. (Evalynne Gould Elias, Masters) I went back to school for my MBA a few years after graduating from Barnard and then worked for a number of years in the private and public sectors. I stopped working when my children were school aged, and returned to work 4 1/2 years ago. What I do now, directing a communitybased non-profit with a budget of just under $500k, combines everything I learned along the way: a liberal arts perspective, writing skills (I was an English major), management, finance and marketing experience, and grantwriting skills that I picked up along the way. I have a very unique opportunity in the position I currently occupy. For almost a decade, I was board president of the same organization that I now head as its director. In both roles I meet, engage with, and am known by just about every segment of the community in which I live in northern Westchester county, NY — religious, civic and political leaders, the very wealthy and generous, and those most down on their luck. My small, very hard-working staff and I see just about everything. The Spanish I learned in high school has now become my second language. The challenges and rewards of my position influence and enrich all other aspects of my life. (Sherry M. Wolf, MBA) After majoring in biology, I was always able to get work related to my science background. I was a librarian, had many full and part-time jobs, many of them science libraries or medical libraries. Most librarians didn't have the science background, so the biology major turned out to be a good choice. I also worked as a medical editor, another specialty stemming from my biology degree. (Claudia Ellis Harbert, Masters) I retired when my sons were little from the computer field. My math major was “sort of'’ related to my work, which I learned mainly on the job. I've been doing an assortment of volunteer jobs since, including math tutoring. (Masters) Started with an internship at the Guggenheim during summer at Barnard, and have continued to work in museums ever since! (Stephanie Barron, Masters) I have held various positions in the financial/investment management and consulting field ranging from working in the Economics Research Department of the Federal Reserve Bank of NY, the lock box back office division of Citibank, managing the investing of the PepsiCo pension fund,

12

Our Career Paths I was educated as a research scientist in ecology… Instead of research, I manage a municipal nature reserve and nature center, run environmental education programs and organize volunteers to work on open space conservation, reforestation and stream restoration projects.


to heading Global Equity Research at Evaluation Associates, a former Investment Consulting firm that was recently bought by Mercer Investment Consulting. Now, I am a Senior Research Consultant in Mercer's Equity Boutique Group. (Rhoda Weinstein Shapiro, MBA) I majored in biology, went to grad school in biology, but changed to clinical psychology. My work in biology always informs my work as a clinician. (Roxane Head Dinkin, Ph.D.) I was educated as a research scientist in ecology and ordinarily would have pursued an academic career, but instead entered the civil service at the local level. Instead of research, I manage a municipal nature reserve and nature center, run environmental education programs and organize volunteers to work on open space conservation, reforestation and stream restoration projects. Also try to influence land use decisions towards a more sustainable direction. (Masters, Ph.D.) American studies major led to work in a Congressional office, which later led to many years working in government policy consulting firms. I was lucky enough to be able to take 12 years off in between to raise three daughters. From a career standpoint it was a mistake to take that much time off, but when I am frustrated by my "career" mediocrity, I remind myself of the time I was able to spend, not only with my children, but also with my parents, who are now gone. Plus, volunteer activities during that time kept me engaged and learning new skills. I also found women who shared my passion for the community organizations I was working with, and they are still my closest friends. Taking time off from a career made my life much richer. I was a psychology major. Even though I am now a psychiatrist and my major was mainly experimental psychology, it did help my understanding in my field. I would have preferred a more clinical emphasis in college. (MD) Architecture was not an easy career path for women in the 1970s. In fact, in 1967 Penn State University told me I did not have a chance of being accepted into their undergraduate school of architecture, as I was a woman and an out of state student. My mother tells the story very well, including the part about marching out of the admissions office. History of art and architecture was a great foundation for the real thing, a second degree 7 years later. I dabbled around in the world of customer service/sales until I got serious and realized I would regret it if I did not pursue my interest in architecture. (Joanna Gilman Strauss, Masters) I was a psych major and taught psychology and counseling on the college level for 12 years. I had a private counseling practice for 8 years, serving adult survivors of child sexual abuse. I was also briefly involved in community organizing. I have been a musician for my entire postcollege life and also now teach exercise classes, so it's been a real mix. To my great surprise, I have also put a tremendous amount of work into being a wife and mother and for a couple of years, also took major responsibility for helping my mother-in-law. I didn't aspire to any of this family activity when I was an undergradâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it has actually been some of the hardest but most meaningful work I have done, but doesn't count much on a resume. (Ginny Bales, Masters)

13

Janice Sims

Isn't every pursuit that involves critical thinking, learning and communication related to the liberal arts?


I majored in American studies, so it's easy to say everything I do is related to it — and I chose a broad major precisely so I wouldn't pin myself down. And of course we all have liberal arts educations, so isn't every pursuit that involves critical thinking, learning and communication related to that? (Law) As I was a philosophy major, there are very few professions that are directly related. Nonetheless, for more than 25 years I have worked on issues related to pharmaceutical and biotech products, and often there are ethical or philosophical considerations that must be evaluated. (Joan Spivak, Masters) I am an associate professor of public policy and also the founding chair of the new Public Policy and Administration Department (PPAD), which is part of the equally new School of Global Affairs and Public Policy at the American University in Cairo (the real Cairo, with the Large Pointy Objects). It seems fair to say that this is related to my major, political science, but it is more a reflection of my later academic work in public policy (MPP, PhD) at the Kennedy School. From 1975 to 2006, I worked as an international development professional, either in government (Mexican, American) or for consulting firms (DAI, Nathan Associates), and then as director of a center in Washington for the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill that did international development work, although it was affiliated with the biz school. I've been here for 5 years. (Jennifer Bremer) I practiced law for my first 15 years out of law school. I was a political science major at Barnard, which certainly helped me understand how governments work, a big part of practicing law. After taking off about twenty years to serve as my kids' "case manager," (they had a lot of issues to deal with), I am now a volunteer mediator. That doesn't relate to my political science major. (Peggy Halpern Mitchel) I was an ace paralegal for 20 years and I worked very hard and was not financially well compensated for my effort...it was interesting, exciting, intellectually stimulating and stressful, but not being an attorney at that time really limited me financially. I've been painting the intersection of ancient myths with the modern world. My anthro major helps. (Sloat Shaw, Masters) I majored in what was then termed "Oriental Studies." My background is Japanese and having originally come from Tokyo at an early age, I wanted to know about my roots. It turned out I have been sharing my culture through workshops, demonstrations and exhibits to the greater New York audience and in Westchester. I also teach Japanese Ikebana flower design. What is interesting is that one of my daughters has also taken on my interests. (Shoko Moriwaki Iwata) I was a psychology major. However, the psychology at Barnard was more experimental and what I do is clinical. (Jane Karp, MD) What astonishes me about my adult life is the stability and consistency: psych major in college, grad school in psych, working as a psychologist; married to the same guy for 37 years; I even lived in the same building (around the corner from Barnard) for almost 40 years

14

My career has been a journey. I started out as a psych major pursuing a Master’s/Ph.D. in psychology and totally switched gears and went and got my MBA at Wharton… I am now running a non-profit… I find this so much more rewarding [and] a great role model for my daughters.


(finally moved diagonally across the zip code 2 years ago). Happily, it doesn't feel boring to meâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I feel that through hard work and great good fortune (and a wonderful partner) I've succeeded in creating the stability that I never had growing up. (Goldie Alfasi-Siffert, Masters, Ph.D.) My career has been a journey. I started out as a psych major pursuing a Masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s/Ph.D. in psychology and totally switched gears and went and got my MBA at Wharton. I think I was motivated by being independent from my parents and having enough money to do what I wanted to do. I spent 25 years in the private sector, the last 12 running my own business in financial services. Then did a major switch into the non-profit world and working for someone else with the goal of running a non-profit in healthcare. Although I am now running a non-profit and making much less money than when I was running my own business, I find this so much more rewarding and feel like I am actually giving back instead of making my clients richer. I also think it is a great role model for my daughters. (MBA, health care/medicine/business management) I did not end up in the academic career I had aspired to, but did manage to write a couple of books. I have changed careers several times (from academia to business) and am grateful for my liberal arts undergraduate education that prepared me to forge my own career path. (Evelyn Ehrlich, MA, MS, Ph.D.) I majored in anthropology and I'm now a clinical psychologist. In undergrad I hated "scientific" psychology, despite the fact that I enjoyed teaching rats and pigeons to hit bars for food and turn around in circles. (These days I find the science of psychology fabulously interesting.) Anthropology seemed much closer to what interested me, which was and is the ways people manage their relationship to universal experiences. (Ellen Nasper, Ph.D.) I was an art history major, worked for a year, went to architecture school for a year, then took all the pre-med courses I had so assiduously avoided as an art history major and then went to medical school. (Ruth Steinberg, MD) I ended up in the field of recruiting serendipitously around 1989 and I have loved what I do even during the lean times. When my uncle, a dean emeritus from NJIT and a mechanical engineer by training, asks why I never did anything with my anthro degree, I remind him that I tap on what I learned and internalized from anthro in my work all the time. (Suzanne Levinson Samelson) I wanted to be a public school teacher but they were being laid off in NYC! So I decided to go to nursing school after graduation. I took intro biology senior year along with my senior thesis in American studies and senior seminars. In graduate school I earned an MS and an RN, found a job easily and was always able to work full or part time. With children came community involvement, especially in their schools, 3 terms on an elected school board and the opportunity to run for the state legislature. I'm in my third term working on education reform, health care and housing issues. It's all making sense finally;-) (Mila Oden Jasey, Masters)

15

With children came community involvement, especially in their schools, 3 terms on an elected school board and the opportunity to run for the state legislature. I'm in my third term working on education reform, health care and housing issues. It's all making sense finally ;-)


I am retired now but after 3 years in education, I joined the pharmaceutical industry and had a 30-year career in Human Resources. (Masters) Speaking five languages and having a Masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in international affairs never yielded me my one and only career choice; the foreign service. I passed written exam (based on social security number) but no women in 1974 passed the "orals" (i.e., the interview). There was a class action lawsuit but nothing came of it. I work as a teacher in a Berkeley elementary school. I help students K-5 with reading, math, writing, homework, etc. (Peggy Ludwig) I worked for two people via referrals from student employment as amanuensisâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a retired distinguished surgeon on his biography and a writer and artist from the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;20s in Paris. Both changed my life and helped support my interest in a career in medicine. (MD)

16


Photograph by William Megalos

Family and Relationships

On our five point scale (with 5 being the highest), our satisfaction with our family situation was the highest of any question, with an average of 4.37. Wealth was rated 3.36 on average and community 4.08. The question of marital status stymied a few respondents, who had divorced and remarried or those who felt that the response of “married/partnership” did not really describe the nature of their relationship. Some specified partnership as a separate category, though we did not ask and they did not specify if these were heterosexual or homosexual partnerships. Overall, the class broke out as follows: Married/partnership: 72% Never married: 10% Separated/divorced: 10% Widowed: 5% Partnership/other: 3% We asked about wealth to determine if our classmates were comfortable with their financial well-being at this point in their lives. Overall, the answer is “somewhat” with satisfaction rated the lowest of any question. On community (which we didn’t define but meant to encompass volunteer activities, friends, and other social interactions), the average satisfaction level was somewhat higher. We have chosen to alphabetize the responses to the marriage, children, grandchildren question so that classmates can easily find the vital stats of those they are most interested in. Of the 62 anonymous responses, 11 noted that they do not have children. Many women proudly wrote about their children, even if they chose not to be named. These are included below the named individuals 17

Photo top: Folk dancing in the gymnasium, Barnard Hall, Spring Festival, 1970


Libby Tatt Adler (M, C, G) I have very accomplished children. One son is a lawyer and investment banker; his wife has a Ph.D. in Psychology. One son is a Ph.D. candidate in Biomedical Engineering; his wife is a third year law student. One son is in public service working in NYC government with plans to pursue a Master’s in Public Policy. All of them are intelligent, kind, and hardworking. My granddaughter is, as are all grandchildren of course, an exceptional child. I feel extremely blessed. Goldie Alfasi-Siffert (M, C) I have two sons (no legacy at Barnard, unfortunately). David is about to be 28, finished law school and has clerked, first for a federal judge and now for a judge on the New York State Court of Appeals. He wants to be a philosopher when he grows up. Matt is a composer, singer-songwriter, jazz bassist, poet and photographer. He is trying to make it in New York as a professional musician. You can see and hear him at www.mattsiffert.com. No grandchildren yet, but about 20 grand-nephews and grand-nieces. Kheng See Ang (M) Susan Baer (M, C) I started the path to motherhood fairly late in life and dealt with serious fertility issues. My first child was born shortly before our 25th reunion! After that I decided to adopt a child. And then, after 9/11 I adopted yet another. While challenging, they are indeed the joy of my life and I cannot imagine my life without them. My son Nick is a high school sophomore, very bright but not yet very focused. He is fun to be around, a fencer and a blessedly good kid. My daughter Lizzy just started middle school and has found a multi-racial social set that works, including a couple of adopted kids. School is lower in her priorities than it is in ours but we are working on that. Jack is our mischievous third child who entertains us all. The smallest boy in the third grade, he loves and excels at sports and the multiplication table! I would be happy to expound on the trials and tribulations of older motherhood—just ask me at Reunion! Ginny Bales (M, C) Karin Johnson Barkhorn (M, C) I have two children, a daughter, Princeton ‘06, working for the Atlantic Monthly and a son, Wash. U. ‘09, working for a private equity firm in LA. Stephanie Barron (D/S, C) Son graduated magna cum laude from Columbia College 2011. Stephanie Brandt, MD (M, C) My youngest daughter is a sophomore at Barnard. Nancy Brek (M, C, G) Jennifer Bremer (D/S, C) Gloria Ortiz Brinn (M, C, G) My granddaughter is only 12 years old now but I'm trying to see if she would set her sights upon possibly attending Barnard. Linda Yancovitz Carr (M, C) Katie Cangelosi (M, C) My son, John, is 21 years old and is graduating from college this year. He is majoring in math and physics and has found a good job next year at an economic consulting firm in the NYC area. He is 18

KEY: M

Married

NM

Never Married

P

Partnership

D/S

Divorced Separated

W

Widowed

C

Children

G

Grandchildren


doing very well and it has been fun watching him grow up and launch himself into the wider world. Diane Wunderlich Chabbott (M, C, G) My husband, Hy, and I have 3 wonderful children and 6 amazing grandchildren. Norma, who graduated from Columbia University, went on to earn a Master's degree and teaches both English and Bible in a yeshiva high school in NJ. She and her husband have 3 sons - ages 9, 4 and 2 - and a daughter who is 7. My son David graduated from Brooklyn College and works with my husband in his wholesale coffee business - the oldest coffee company in America - Gillies Coffee Company. David and his wife have one son. My daughter Sarah, after graduating from Hunter College, moved to Israel with her husband and son, now 1 1/2 years old. She is a teacher and is studying to earn a Master's Degree in Bible as well as certification as a "Yoetzet Halacha," a consultant to women in areas of health and Jewish ritual law. Catherine Cline (D/S, C) Mardge Cohen (M, C) We have 2 children 30 and 27, Eugene and Davida. Both are graduating medical school this spring. Joanna Crocker (W) Roxane Head Dinkin (M, G) I am blessed to be married to Robert J. Dinkin, who received his doctorate in American history at Columbia in 1968. He is a retired professor of American history. Recently we have written and published together. I have a grandchild (step-grandchild actually). She is thirteen years old and absolutely delightful. She is already a published poet! It was incredible to participate in her Bat Mitzvah. Nancy Newill Doniger (M, C) I have two sons, Colin, 31, and Nick, 27, and a daughter, Alexandra, 23. Colin is married. My children all have jobs; Nick and Alexandra have Bachelor's degrees; Colin, who served in the Army, is completing his Bachelor's degree. We are very close. Evelyn Ehrlich (NM) Marcia Eisenberg (M, C) Rob and I have three children spread out quite a bit. We just became empty nesters after “30 years of having someone under the age of 18!” Our oldest is married, living in NYC and is involved in market research which draws heavily on her major (like mine) of anthropology. Our middle one is hoping to become an academic in medieval history. Our youngest just started college at Rice Univ. and seems to be going in a math, computer, astronomy path. Evalynne Gould Elias (M, C) My son Adam is 26 and lives in DC. He graduated from the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University with a degree in Latin American studies and is now a legislative assistant for Congressman Bill Owens (D-NY). In May he will complete a Master’s degree from National Defense University. My daughter Ariel is 22 and lives in New Orleans. She graduated last May from Tulane University with a major in Latin American studies and a minor in music performance. By day she is a Spanish interpreter in a nonprofit medical clinic and by night she is a stand-up comedian. Both of my children are bi-lingual and both have spent time abroad in Spanishspeaking countries. Their abilities, talents, sensibilities and general sense

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KEY: M

Married

NM

Never Married

P

Partnership

D/S

Divorced Separated

W

Widowed

C

Children

G

Grandchildren


of who they are has been a constant source of amazement and delight to me and their father, my husband David. Maria Enrico (D/S, C) Martha J. Flanders (D/S, C) My children are my joy. My daughter graduated from Boston University's College of Communication in 2010 with a degree in television and film. She is currently working at The Metropolitan Opera as an assistant to the Director of Creative Content. She is involved with the HD transmissions of the operas so is using her degree and at the same time developing a life-long appreciation for one of our great art forms. My son graduated from Colgate University in 2007 with a degree in political science. Since then he taught for two years in the South Bronx as a corps member of Teach for America, served as the student recruitment coordinator for the Success Academy Charter Schools in Harlem, acted as Cy Vance's “bodyman” in his successful run for Manhattan DA, was a litigation paralegal and is now a first year law student at Syracuse University. My children are each others’ best friends and we have great times when we are together. I feel blessed that we get along so well. Diane Levine Gardener (M, C, G) Hannah, PsyD: Epidemiologist at the University of Miami Medical School; founder of A Green Slate (agreenslate.com); married with 2-year-old daughter. Jacob, JD: Litigation associate at NYC law firm. Phoebe: Community organizer working with immigrant workers’ centers in the Boston area. Rebecca Newberger Goldstein (M, C) I have two daughters. One is a novelist, also studying to be a psychologist, and the other is a poet. Catherine H. Gordon (NM) Claudia Ellis Harbert (M, C) I have two daughters, currently aged 25 and 28. The younger one is a geologist about to embark on a Master’s program in Information Science. The older one is closing in on a Ph.D. in Musicology. Both have gone to excellent schools, though not Barnard. Education was always important to them. We communicate and get together as much as possible! Janet Huseby (M, C, G) I have three daughters and a son. One is a consultant, one a psychiatrist, one a journalist, and one working in solar power on the business side. Four grandchildren (two girls and twin boys.) Life is good though one never stops worrying, a fact my 87-year-old mother assures me is true. Shoko Moriwaki Iwata (M, C) I have three. My oldest, a son, is 31, two daughters, 29 and 25. My older daughter will be married this August 2012 to a Greek-Egyptian who grew up in New Jersey and was educated in New York. My husband (from Tokyo and educated there) and I feel we have raised our children to be international and that is very important. Also, they all are pursuing careers that they feel deeply about. I guess I want to say they are happy with what they are doing. I did not grow up with “happiness” as a standard of measurement. Mine was more for my family not for myself. Mila Oden Jasey (M, C, G) They are the lights and loves of my life! Each is pursuing their dream. Neil is an MD specializing in traumatic brain injury, married with 2 toddlers living nearby. Rhena is a public school

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KEY: M

Married

NM

Never Married

P

Partnership

D/S

Divorced Separated

W

Widowed

C

Children

G

Grandchildren


teacher in NYC after 6 years in NJ, involved in ed policy and is featured in a documentary, American Teacher. Kyle, who has more original ideas per week than I have in a year, marketed his first invention in high school, has started a few businesses and wants my seat in Trenton, is finishing his MBA this spring. Nate and Claire keep us grounded and laughing along with my 87-year-old mom who lives with us and reminds us of how blessed we are every day.

KEY: M

Married

NM

Never Married

P

Partnership

D/S

Divorced Separated

Jane Karp, MD (M, C) One daughter is a college student in criminal justice. The other daughter is a breast surgeon.

W

Widowed

C

Children

Carolyn Kone (M, C) My daughter is a researcher for a nonprofit antismoking foundation; my son founded an internet marketing company for local businesses.

G

Grandchildren

Cheryl Johnson (M, C)

Nina Krauthamer (M, C) My daughter is 15 and a freshman (9th Grade) at Birch Wathen Lenox in NYC. JoLynn Klier (M, C, G) My 23-year-old son graduated from NYU with a degree in economics and is working in the insurance industry in NYC. My20year-old daughter, currently a junior at Syracuse University, is studying for a dual degree in advertising and marketing. Leslie LiDonnici (NM) Jody Meyer Lockhart (M, C) I have two daughters. My younger daughter is a Barnard graduate and is currently working on her Ph.D. at Indiana U. My older daughter majored in art history at Indiana U. and is working for a nonprofit art organization in New York City. Peggy Ludwig (M, C) Alexandra, 27, graduate of the U. of Puget Sound, Tacoma, Wash., BA biology major, teaching now; Anne, 25, graduate of Santa Clara U., Santa Clara, CA, environmental studies major, and anthropology; Adam, 21, senior at New York University, New York, Tisch School of the Arts, dramatic arts major. Peggy Halpern Mitchel (D/S, C) My son, Noah, is 23 and is now a professional (and working!) actor in musical theater, straight theater and even a small opera company in the Washington, DC area. He was born with a lot of physical issues, and a lot of other issues as well. That's how my law career went down in flames, but it was worth it. He now lives a mile away at his dad's, and I see him often. He's in a strange play by Mamet right now, and will play the teenaged son in a small production of "Next to Normal" soon. By day, he's a paid intern for a small opera company, working as an Assistant Stage Manager and in Outreach. Life is good. My daughter, Leah, is a junior at Towson University and has just turned a corner in her life. She spent her first two years of college worrying that she couldn't make it. Now, she's a psych major with plans to go to grad school. She wants to conduct research in anxiety and depression. She's already conducting psychology research at her college now. She's on her way. Lynn Najman (M, C) Ellen Nasper (M) Judith Peck (NM) 21


Cheryl Foa Pecorella (M, C) Our daughter, Christine, will be married in a small ceremony at home, in June. She and her South African husband (great guy and such a cute accent!) will be living in London for a while. They met on a dive boat on the Great Barrier Reef. They're looking forward to a lifetime of adventures together! Our son, Andrew, graduated college last Spring, not an easy feat since he's been a quadriplegic since his spinal cord incident in 1998. It was a long haul, one class at a time. He did all his papers and tests with a sip 'n puff attachment to his computer â&#x20AC;&#x201D; yay for technology! Andrew is well-known in Bergen County for his disability advocacy work.

KEY:

Amy Persky (M, C, G) Three of my four children are married; two have children of their own (2 each, and one more on the way). Three have graduated college; two have advanced degrees and a third is getting one now. Donna Tonkon Punim (M, C) Melissa Punim: DOB 11/12/1986, graduate of Emory University 2008, graduate of Loyola Law School of Los Angeles, CA 2011, member of California Bar Association. Amanda Punim: DOB 5/29/1989, graduate of University of Pennsylvania 2011, currently working and will be applying to graduate school in engineering or industrial design. Terrific kids, as different as night and day but very close. Anna Garfinkel Resnik (D/S, C) Simon, born in 1985 (27 yrs old); Harvard graduate. David, born in 1987 (25 yrs old); graduated from U. of Maryland. Both gainfully employed and doing well (thanks to God). Divorced/separated is not mutually exclusive with partnership! I am both! Was married for 25 years (met him while I was at Columbia Business School and he was in joint Business/Law Schools). We divorced about 14 years ago and I have been in a partnership (with another male) for the past 12 years. We chose not to legalize our relationship. Frances Sadler (M, C, G) I have a son and a stepson, 25 and 35 respectively. One 5-year old grandson from my stepson. Suzanne Levinson Samelson (M) I have nieces and nephews on both my side and my husband, Howie's side and I adore them all. They have all grown up to be interesting and not bland and I love them all. There are also great-nieces and nephews now and they are delightful. All very smart, too!! Rhoda Weinstein Shapiro (M, C) I am blessed to have two daughters, Sheryl, who is a litigation associate at Cleary Gottlieb Steen and Hamilton, and Elana, who worked in the health care PR field for five years and is now in her first year at MIT Sloan School of Management. She wants to work in the health care field. As an aside, my oldest daughter interviewed at Barnard College, but decided to attend Brown University, as did her younger sister. I tried!! Sloat Shaw (P, C) My daughter, Emily, works as a museum exhibit designer at the Hirshorn. My son, Jesse, is a furniture designer in Atlanta. Joan Spivak (M, C) I have two wonderful boys (now men!): Jesse, born in 1985, lives in New York City, has a Master's degree in Urban Planning, and works for the Alliance for Downtown. Marcus, born in 1989, is a senior at Indiana University, and although an education major at college, will likely move more into sales and marketing.

22

M

Married

NM

Never Married

P

Partnership

D/S

Divorced Separated

W

Widowed

C

Children

G

Grandchildren


Ruth Steinberg (NM) Joanna Gilman Strauss (M, C, G) I have an amazing family and feel blessed to have had a wonderful second marriage (to another architect), 2 kids, and a successful career complete with a few highs and a number of frustrations. I have two wonderful stepsons who could not be my children because of age. Jonathan is in China, married to a Chinese woman; they adopted a baby girl, now almost 2. The older son is in Burlington; Andrew and his wife, both lawyers, are expecting a baby in April. Rebecca Tinsman (D/S, C, G) Not biologicalâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;I inherited them through a partner. Andres Vizoso (M, C) Both of my children moved to the northeast for college and career. They felt that they had missed out by growing up in the south. Ellen Wahl (M, C) My older daughter, Laura, has Down Syndrome and lives at home with us. She plays the violin, takes singing lessons, works out at the JCC, and has had the same boyfriend for more than 15 years. My younger, Meg, just graduated from U. Chicago and started Project Harmony, a summer camp in Jerusalem that brings together Arab and Jewish middle school kids, with the motto, "Peace through shared experience, One summer at a time." Sherry M. Wolf (M, C)

Anonymous comments on family Marriage not an option: lesbian in California. I have twin daughters who are very different but both very interesting. I have noticed that the fact that I work and have been successful has shown them that they can have big aspirations and work hard to achieve them. It has also shown them the importance of community and giving back, which is something I believe in very strongly. It is a joy to watch them make their own choices and think about what they can do. Daughter, 31, artist, yoga teacher. Son, 29, film production, not working. Son, 22, college senior, social sciences, wants to teach. Granddaughter, 4, Barnard toddler center alum, currently at Columbia Greenhouse. I have 3 step-daughters and 3 grandsons. One child, one grandchild. One child deceased. My son (Ken) is married to a wonderful woman (Joanne). They are great parents to 2 children, Ken Jr, 12 and Miranda, 9. They are the joy of my life. Ken also works in the pharmaceutical industry. One daughter is an author and the other two are still in college. My youngest daughter is studying in Switzerland for the semester and my son is a freshman in pre-engineering. My daughter is a tax attorney. My son works for a large consultancy firm. On the grandchildren questionâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;t's a "sort of". My daughter is pregnant. I also have another daughter who graduated from Barnard in the past 5 years.

23

KEY: M

Married

NM

Never Married

P

Partnership

D/S

Divorced Separated

W

Widowed

C

Children

G

Grandchildren


Due to career priorities and vacillating over choosing the "perfect mate", I delayed too long in getting married and having children. I went through 6 years of hell to have children, and would have liked more. After all the angst over who to marry, it wound up I made a bad decision, and have been in a marriage that has been mostly unhappy and unloving for over 20 years. After having a great career and also having children (too late), I see how one-sided the Barnard experience was. No discussion on how to combine family and career; in those days, feminism made it frowned upon to have children and, heaven forbid, to skip a beat in your own personal selfactualization to have them or nurture them. The attitude was always me, me, me. Having my children was the best thing I ever did; I weep tears of joy every time I think of them; and this was in no way reinforced or encouraged by the Barnard experience. In fact, quite the opposite. Our son has been a great joy to us at every age. He is extremely bright and good-heartedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it has been delightful to love him and watch him grow up. We made a conscious decision not to have children. It was the right choice for us, and in a vague way, I guess I understood that meant we would not have grandchildren, but I wish we did. One of my goals is to ramp up relationships with small children who are short on grandparents to fill that space for both of us. One child is finishing up at General Studies and loving it. The other is taking a second gap year and working at being very successful in the hospitality industry in Colorado. Must say with tuition being where it is at most colleges, if you don't know why you are there you probably shouldn't be! Both of our children are in stable relationships that seem to have longterm potential. One is engaged and one not. I adopted my daughter from Romania with my husband at the age of 41 and immediately retired. We had a wonderful ten years of childhood together and now face many challenges as older parents of a daughter with adoption

In memoriam Abby Bartlett Jane Carnahan Ellen Datloff Lynne Dumas Rosalia Ennis Patricia Fosdick Frances Wahrsager Friedlander Blanche Grosswald Katherine Carton Hammer Mary Kahl Barbara Kohn Katz Joan Licht Mantel Angela Manzo Deborah Milner Linda Morse Jane Rothenberg Leslie Fleisher Schwartz Carole Grad Sherwood Ruth Smith Sandra Spittle Judith Fram Wilstein

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Our Plans Going Forward

The vast majority of our classmates are not planning to retire anytime soon. Whether it’s because we love our jobs or because we are not comfortable with our financial situation, only 12% are currently retired and another 18% plan to retire within the next 3 years. In contrast, 35% are not looking to retire for at least four years or more, and an indomitable 30% never plan to retire. Once we do retire, 9% of those who answered the question will be looking forward to becoming more involved in community and volunteer activities, 20% to spending more time with their families, 18% to hobbies and avocations, and 30% to travel. Many respondents thought the choices too limiting. Write-in responses included: “new career,” “study and teach,” and “all of the above.” Comments were split on whether the concept of retirement (at least as it applied to our parents’ generation) even exists any more. The fortunate among us can’t imagine retiring; unfortunately, some can’t afford to do so financially. Since I think and write for my living, retiring would be like retiring from being me. What I would like to do at some point is simplify my life, not have so many obligations sending me in so many directions. (Rebecca Newberger Goldstein) I never think of retiring because I think I will always be busy with some project or other. Will need to work longer than perhaps expected but will transition to more teaching, less clinical practice, and fewer days a week. I would like to stay in the workforce until my daughter completes her education—so at least another 10 years. (Nina Krauthamer) I don't think I'll retire until I get too old to think straight. I work freelance and have for the last 15 years. I will probably continue 25

President Peterson serving burgers


to work in my field (which has turned out to be mostly civil service testing) as long as my contacts last. At some point, I may sell my apartment and move somewhere cheaper, but right now most of my work is in NYC or surrounds and that is where I live. I have some health concerns that may cause me to be less employable, and then I will have to re-evaluate. (Catherine Cline) We have a retired parent living with us; guessing that takes up the retirement slot! We have not planned when to stop working. Perhaps it is the next thing to do. (Andres Vizoso) I don't plan on retiring, but hope to reduce my work hours when I am in my mid-70s. On a reduced schedule, I hope to travel abroad and to visit my summer and winter homes more. I teach French in our local evening school, tutor MS and HS students, and hold classes for adults at my home. I don't think I'll ever give up offering "Salon Chérie"—it's such fun to combine French language and culture lessons with wine and hors-d'oeuvres. (Cheryl Foa Pecorella) I want to keep my retirement options open. I may keep my hand, or my finger, or my toe, in counseling to some degree or another, but I would love to not be tied down. I want to be able to visit my children, travel with my husband, spend time in my garden, and be involved in my community through volunteer work. I do all these things now to some degree, but my focus moving forward is to decrease commitments and increase my flexibility. (Evalynne Gould Elias) I don't think I will ever truly retire but I hope to do some different things and have more time to think and read and swim and go to the theater and sit on the front porch. Actually, I hope to move back into Manhattan so the porch may not work! As I have very young children, retirement seems like it will be a long way down the road—I only worry about keeping my health good so I can be there for everyone I love. (Susan Baer) My husband and I try to travel now. We can't wait for retirement, because who knows what will happen. I am not working right now and am trying to figure this out. My husband has nine years on me and my parents are 93, happy and in good health. My priority is to be able to spend time with Bill and my parents and be there for them if they should need me. I have a very full life, many interests and expect I will look for an alternative to work in my profession. I have not fully explored my artistic interests and talent and look forward to spending time nurturing artistic interests. We have traveled a great deal and I look forward to more of that, some volunteer work, as well as my dressage riding, reading, gardening, entertaining friends and endless work on our old house. (Joanna Gilman Strauss) I have no idea what I will do when I retire. Sounds very scary and empty. (Janet Huseby) I do a lot of all those activities now—maybe that's why I haven't accomplished more!! I smell the roses all the time—the challenge for me is to work more effectively more of the time. I love to travel, go to operas and concerts. If only the stock market hadn't crashed, I could do more. (Ruth Steinberg) 26

I don’t plan on retiring but hope to reduce my work hours when I am in my mid-70s.


I look forward to more travel and to more time for dance, yoga, and gardening. I don't know if I ever will retire. (Roxane Head Dinkin) I may never be able to afford to retire, so I may have to work at least part-time, and perhaps full-time, for many years. I'm trying to see if I can get back into the practice of law in some sedentary way, but it will take years of classes and volunteer work to attain that goal. I've also volunteered to raise my kids' kids if they and their spouses have to work. Both of my kids are single at the moment, but my son is always at his girlfriend's place. I'm already involved in community activities as a volunteer mediator in my community, and might try to use that experience to practice collaborative law. I'm very involved in Jewish activities, including singing in an a cappella group formed by two synagogues. I also take continuing Jewish education classes. Finally, I'm a live theater addict, although I currently lack the financial resources to indulge my habit as much as I like. Once I turn 65, it will be easier to get cheap tickets. Hooray. (Peggy Halpern Mitchel) I did all the really fun and adventurous things when I was young. I haven't stopped yet, and don't plan to. Work is interesting and I love my colleagues. I'm already doing what I love, and I want to continue doing it as long as possible. (Joanna Crocker) Can't imagine life without some work in it. I could maybe imagine cutting back sometime in the future but what would I give up? (Goldie Alfasi-Siffert)

Still, many of us are looking forward to a more traditional retirement, the beginning of a new life phase. Until just recently I resisted the idea of stepping away from work, and even now I am working on succession planning in my organization but with a fairly long glide path to allow me to taper, not shift gears sharply. Now the R word is starting to seem more tempting and I'm looking forward to many things about this change: I'll probably still raise money for something, but it won't be at the heart of my job. I want to write and travel and speak and read and especially release the artistic left side of my brain that is increasingly clamoring for attention. And have long lunches with friends and be able to plan parties and holidays with attention, not on the fly. And dance more and sing and bake and watch animals.... Art is what I'd like to do more of. (Ellen Wahl) Although I have a lot of interests that I hope to pursue, I want very much to be close to my children and grandchildren as my family grows. (Libby Tatt Adler) I hope to have more grandchildren nearby to spend time with while I continue my community-based activities, travel and advocate for social justice, health care coverage and our public schools. Can't really be specific because one never knows what challenges or opportunities may come our way. (Mila Oden Jasey) Writing another book. (Evelyn Ehrlich) I do hope to travel and I have tons of things I love to do and look forward to having more time for all of my projects. I have just joined a 27

I may never be able to afford to retire, so I may have to work at least part-time, and perhaps fulltime, for many years.


chorus at my synagogue and have rediscovered singing (no great voice— but good enough) and I am having lots of joyful fun. I also plan upon retirement to keep working part-time or volunteering at my nonprofit for a while—if for no other reason—a smoother transition. (Marcia Eisenberg) I am looking forward to enjoying the many opportunities that retirement brings my way. My husband and I love to drive through the United States and will continue to do so. For 19 years now we have enjoyed an annual wilderness (canoeing, portaging, camping) in Minnesota/Canada and will continue to do so while our health holds. I am avid exerciser and go to the gym 5 days a week. I enjoy time and overnights with the grandkids. I'm blessed. Retired from wage slavery. Currently working for myself part time as Certified Academic Language Teacher and homeschooling my son. My only hobby is cooking so I hope to learn others during retirement. Not too big on community service but perhaps I can learn this as well. (Anna Garfinkel Resnik) I retired after taking an early retirement buyout from a major corporation, when my kids were in elementary school. The past 10 years have been involved with their well-being and now getting them into a great college. It is MUCH more competitive getting into a competitive college than when we went so many years ago. They visited Barnard and Columbia on many occasions and chose not to attend; they had other schools of that caliber that they preferred. They wanted more of a fun and socially stimulating campus, with high academics AND high school spirit, which Barnard is not. Yes, we know all about the wonders of NYC, but that does not make up for it. You don't need to live here for 4 years of your college life to experience NYC.

I have tons of things I love to do and look forward to having more time for all of my projects. I have just joined a chorus at my synagogue… and I am having lots of joyful fun.

Hope to live abroad. (Rebecca Tinsman)

BARNARD BUL

Bob (my husband of almost 42 years) and I just bought a snowbird condo in downtown Sarasota, FL. Am writing from there right now, enjoying swaying palm trees, blue skies, 80-degree days in February. Stress begone! Love it here for its array of restaurants and European style sidewalk bistros within walking distance. Also, Sarasota's got high-brow culture (opera, museums)VOLUME as well asLXXV low-brow (Ringling circus), and everything in-between. Anybody else here?? (Cheryl Foa Pecorella)

Many Attend Conference Held For Women

If and when we are able to retire would love to travel around the globe and to spend more time with our children. Traveled a good deal for business in my former career but that is not the kind of travel that is enriching and edifying. Would love to do more of the latter. By LYNDA HORHOTA I retired in 2010 and am finding life inbefore the slower to be In a speech 1200 lane women in enjoyable. WoUman Auditorium, The benefits of the reduced levels of stress include having more time and Kate Millett, former instructor of English at Barnard and energy to explore other things. been volunteering with last tutoring authorI have of Sexual Politics, called weekend's women's programs to help inner city kids with "the the college admissions conference best thing that'sprocess, happened at Columbia since the so-called "68." Millett's speech something I always said IUniversity was going to do when I retired.not I amoftaking afternoon, March 7, advantage of NYC more,on butSunday I still have all those fantasy trips I dreamed wound up the two-day confer- who have it soft Consequently about waiting for me to make reality. (Katie Cangelosi) we have the images of Dagwood ence them that aattracted approxi-

28

mately 1500 women to the Barnard-Columbia campus "We are in the midst of a sexual revolution," said Millett, which she defined as "a profound, radical change of the istatus of the sexes in relation to each other" She called for an end to 'he "ancient regime — the patriarch lal system of male

and Norman Mailer's prisonerhood." Our notions of sexuality are "deeply suspect," Ms Millett said "The language of love ib more like the language of war — loaded with terms like^'surrender' The new 'sexual freedom' is only a new freedom for men to exploit women with less

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 10, 1971

PetersonTalks On "New Feminism"

midd

On Thursday, March 4, BarOn M nard President Martha Peterson a case stu delivered a speech at Sw; Education more College entitled "Some1 Aspects of the New Feminism " sor so, Bar The following passages are ex- past five review the cerpts from that speech There is no doubt about it a case stuch "new feminism" is abroad in the full fledged land For some it is centered on case study a radical sexual revolution, on ana prepar which sexual politics is one as- re'ated to pect, for others it is a legisla- cerns, Adm tive and judicial matter — the ultv from equal rights amendment to the eollegei wi Constitution or the enforcement three day servers wil of Executive Ordei 1246 of Oc tober 1967, which instructs the mission in Labor Department to issue for reaccre guidelines, effective October, Rover cha 1968 to eliminate any barriers Case Stud ' Barrard s to equal opportumtv for em


Summing Up

Life lessons and other thoughts I think life is a journey and you have to always be open for taking different paths (opportunities) as they appear. I know my career is a work in progress and there is still much ahead to interest me and round out my life. Regrets: I should've gotten a Ph.D. Otherwise, I have wonderful friends, wonderful family, and a pretty satisfying career. (Ellen Wahl) More than anything I always wanted a family. My husband and children are my greatest source of contentment and happiness. I am currently working part time and have no immediate plans to retire since that is giving me a lot of satisfaction as well. (Libby Tait Adler) I am happier now than college or childhood or childrearing days. I enjoy my work far more than ever. (Andres Vizoso) I have chosen to put more energy into community and family than into career or wealth, and I am happy with the outcome. I have many strong connections in my community and feel that I have made a difference through my volunteer activities. I have a very positive relationship with my children, and they are good friends with each other. 29

I hold dear several friends from my time at Barnard, and they form one nexus of community for me. I feel very satisfied with my career choices, so if I wish something were different with regard to wealth, it’s that I would have married a man who made more money (but I never chose partners on that basis and that was right for me). I'm very glad that I was "raised" into being a young woman among women who truly valued their own intellects, though I've discovered the world isn't always appreciative of women with a strong sense of their own opinions. (Ellen Nasper) Wealth? Rich or poor, it's nice to have money of course. I have gone through ups and downs of having money to spend. I guess I have always been content in that I have owned my money and my money has not owned me. Community: I have become such a city mouse but sometimes I really miss the community I grew up in which was a small suburban town— Verona, NJ—and I loved growing up there. Once in a while I experience that sense of community here, usually as part of a structured volunteer activity, and I miss what seemed like the spontaneity of it all in that small suburban town in north Jersey. (Suzanne Levinson Samelson)

Photo above: First Annual Spring Festival—members of the Barnard Organization of Soul Sisters performing South African dance, Barnard Gymnasium, April 19, 1969. From left: Sandra J. Hemphill '71, Frances Sadler '72, Ruth M. Louie '71, Phyllis McEwen '72, and unidentified.


Neil and I have been married since 1974. Our love and friendship has grown along with our family. We both come from large families where education and service are priorities. We chose the community we live in for it's racial, economic and religious diversity and that has benefited us all, especially our kids. We have never been planners, letting life take us in unexpected directions so the adventure continues! Neil has retired twice and is anticipating yet another career. I retired from nursing and entered politics which is a challenge right now as I try to advocate for good public policy on behalf of the voiceless in Trenton. (Mila Oden Jasey) My financial well-being is more due to luck (inheritance) than to any effort on my part. I think Barnard prepared us very well for the life of the mind—maybe not so much for the practical side. Or perhaps I just wasn't ambitious enough to overcome the impediments. I have not been very active in the community but hope to rectify that situation now. (Evelyn Ehrlich) Satisfied is such a funny word for me. I did not have plans to be married much less have children. Being raised in the 50s I thought I would have a career in science— and that was as far as I got in thinking of the future. So surprise! I never focused on money, probably because I was raised by a no nonsense nurse and an academic. I have not done enough in the smaller community of Manhattan Upper West Side—ran out of energy with husband, kids, aging parents and work. So I hope to spend more time on community now. (Marcia Eisenberg) We moved to Israel from Manhattan, when I was 50, so my community is divided between two countries. (Amy Persky) I have been fortunate to love the work that I did. However, I now love retirement and it's very busy. I'm involved in non-profit work (board member), my community (board member of homeowners assoc.) and my parish (Vestry member). I published my story in March, 2011 (Make It Your Business: Dare to Climb the Ladder of Leadership) and that has kept me busy as well. And more! (Sylvia M. Montero)

I started my career with great excitement, but then after marriage, we moved a lot because of my husband's job. I decided to sacrifice full-time work to be with my kids because of the moves—I thought they needed my extra support because we never knew anyone when we moved. I always did some volunteer work at the schools and helped on field trips. I did a lot of part-time professional work, and I thought that was great, considering the moves. But in my later years, I couldn't move forward in my career because I had missed so much by working part-time. I am disappointed that I am not a career success or career expert any more. My children grew up to be wonderful, and I'd probably do it the same way if I had it to do again. Now we have stayed in the same place for 15 years. I worked Wednesday. October 16, 1968 BARNA part-time for 10 of those years, and now Vera Institute Aids Prow I have so many friends here from being (Conhmted from Page 3) here so long that I am too busy socially If he is poor he may have lost his job, forcing his family to go on welfare He ha^ been restricted in his ability to consult with counsel, gather witnesses and evidence in his defense All these to have time to look for work! (Claudia By E factors may influence both judge and defender Chances of reAmid habilitation also narrows for even first offenders detained before Ellis Herbert) over th trial Convictions for those incarcerated before trial are far higher 1

I have been fortunate to love the work that I did. However, I now love retirement and it's very busy.

T

posal in number than for those defendants free at the time of trial realize Interviewing • Defendants ed in t Vera was given two rooms in the Manhattan Criminal Courts reform building to conduct its study as well as a small cell adjoining the conside detention pens, to interview defendants before morning court The opened A half-dozen NYU law students, salaried by Vera, asked been th defendants where they hved and for how long, what their mantal, pus aff family, financial status was, their previous criminal record, ser- gested yjce record and employment stability The answers of those de- good c fendants considered good risks were verified by phone and oc- the fra casional field work Herbert Sturtz, New York Director of Vera, ed grou and the students in consultation would decide which defendants out of h seemed to have sufficient community roots A Com Summaries of these cases with recommendation for parole tried a was sent to the judge and Legal Aid lawyer handling the case projects Usually the judge would follow Vera's advice. Of those granted to be t parole, only one. per cent did not show up for trial, of 111 cases ferent considered, only five were sentenced to jail terms In 1964 the pro- ture of gram was turned over to the Office of Probation for the entire ducive Manhattan! area In an Last year Vera's Manhattan Bowery Project attempted to re- nels fo habilitate derelicts and drunks through street rescue (by teams of enthusi one reformed derelict or welfare worker and one plamclothesman ed a cruising in a station wagon) and voluntary entrance to Vera's 50-bed study r mfirmery for de-intoxication screening and referral to other agen- ation o cies The police force cooperated, and Vera is now trying to co- ity •; ordinate the efforts of various charitable bodies whose spheres of Servi influence overlap, in this matter has me Vera is continuing research on problems of pressures on vol- the spe umes of court work and aid to indigent defenders on a legal and means social basis As a private agency, Vera is not hampered by financial which difficulties and intermcene quarrels of city agencies Its program ulty, a of reform is constructive rather than muckraking, it serves to jointly genuinely improve conditions instead of simply hardening the op- fairs T position The Institute has the backing of Mayor Lindsay and self w Judge Bernard Botein, Presiding Justice of the Appellate Division task, a if stud of the New York State Supreme Court, among others of the couldn and st

I think I have done well in my career but at one point had aspirations to be a corporate board director—I'm far from it! My career became somewhat off track by my decision to have children as well as a function of the industry I was in—I had reached a relatively high position at Seagram's—liquor business but the decision to have children definitely put me in a different career path and ultimately downsized. I chose to take 7 years off commencing in 1992 when a corporate restructuring forced me into redundancy again—I did raise my kids at the time and feel lucky to have gotten back into the workforce and worked my way up again to a fairly comfortable position. (Anna Garfinkel Resnik) FIFTH Money has never been my goal although now with college tuitions looming I think I might have been wiser to pay a bit more attention. My kids are great. At this age I have lost both parents, my mother recently, and that has been hard. My Mom suffered towards her

FLOOR FURNALD FOLK FESTIVAL Fifth Floor Furnald Hall

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end and I find myself wishing I could have done even more although at the time I seemed to be doing all that I could. I like where I live because the schools are good for my kids. My career has been interesting and I have achieved enough that I get to participate on important issues in my world often at the national and occasionally international level. That is gratifying as is the opportunity to give back to younger staff, people in the industry and women in general. I speak to groups often and that is gratifying as well. (Susan Baer) I have a great circle of friends. My career is wonderful, but sometimes can be isolating. My family is great, but very challenging. Other people are talking about retiring and I feel like I have barely started. Not that I haven't done things, but that I haven't done anywhere near enough yet. I probably made some serious miscalculations in my choices. If I were to do things over, I would try some different things! (but only if I could keep what I have learned through what I have already done.) My life has been extremely interesting and my relationships with people are excellent and rich. I am not satisfied with the impact I have had or what I will leave behind when I die. Fortunately, I am blessed with excellent health and will probably have more time than most to try to accomplish something more lasting. (Ginny Bales) I have had a fascinating career(s), and am proud of what I've done to serve, learn and be in on the issues of our day. I am very happy in my marriage, but wish I had a better relationship with my mother and only brother (no kids by choice). We are comfortable, and have so much more than so many othersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;in terms of not only money but the freedom from worry that it bringsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that I cannot rate that anything other than satisfied. I feel good about the many community organizations and causes that I have been able to be involved with. I am fortunate to have a long marriage to a devoted husband (although not always the case in younger years), a wonderful family, a relatively high level of success professionally, and a rich, fulfilling life with a wide range of

31

interests, friends and acquaintance and am comfortable financially, but not overly material. As this was not always the case, it is always important to see and accept our less than perfect selves and disappointments, while also keeping an eye on what is most important in life. (Joan Spivak) I went to law school believing that I could "have it all," simultaneously having a law career and raising my kids. Boy, was I wrong. I could have it all, just not at the same time. My kids needed a lot of medical appointments (and sometimes ER visits), medical tests, specialists, therapists of all kinds (physical therapy for both kids, occupational therapy for my son, speech therapy for my daughter). And they also had a lot of unscheduled illnesses. That doesn't work when you're a litigator who can't afford a nanny and don't have local grandmas. I ended up "sequencing," having a career and being a mom in different times of my life. Although I'm probably one of the few Barnard and Harvard Law grads who has a small bank balance, I'm still happy with the way things turned out. Most of the years that I was a litigator, I didn't have family obligations that I was slighting. And most of the time that I was a mother, I was able to be there for my kids when they needed me (which was a lot). I also believe that I would have been neither a good nor a happy mom if I'd undertaken it as a young person who hadn't been out in the world. After all those years of both the grind and the glory of litigating, after business trips all over the country and pleasure travel over much of the world, I could settle down to enjoy my kids without worrying that I was missing anything out there in the world. I feel lucky that, at the advanced age of 38, I had my son, and at the age of 41, I had my daughter. I truly have "had it all." (Peggy Halpern Mitchel)

Other people are talking about retiring and I feel like I have barely started.


I am a very very lucky person. (Carolyn Kone)

terrific kids with interesting minds and big hearts, work I enjoy, dear friends who I went to law sustain me and good health. I wish there ' . "nation's "number 1 crime area." We need another category "health." If The were more time for community, for good school one loses one's health, all the rest becomes works, for artistic pursuits, for working difficult. If one regains good health, all is believing that out, for visiting aging relatives, for making possible. In this world, it takes discipline to new friends, for walking in the park, for I could "have maintain health, thus it becomes an learning how to garden, for sunbathing on achievement. (Joanna Crocker) the roof, for travel, for talking on the phone it all" with girlfriends, for getting a pedicure, for Wealth—Although I get personal Barnard and Columbia Women's Liberation will participate in a city-wide reading trashy novels, for Groups reading serious simultaneously satisfaction from the work I do and for reading anything than the The Women's Strike Coliberation week sponsored by novels, the Women's Strike other Coalition. acknowledgement of my accomplishments NY Times. But mostly I'm filled with alition grew out of the now-famous August 26 National Women's Strike. purposesaof —The having from colleagues, I do not feel I ever learned profound gratitude for the gifts I've been liberation week according to a BWL spokeswoman are to protest the Albany governto be athe proper advocate for my own law career given and most especially the loving and ment's plans to place more interests professionally or sufficiently savvyrestrictions on abortion care, to work for child care, and to sustaining relationships that began at get people in women's lib. "We're trying to give the campus friendly kick in financial matters. interested Community—For anda raising myin Barnard. (Goldie Alfasi-Siffert) the derriere" oneyears women's liberationist. The week begins with a demonstration on various reasons over thesaid past few I kids. Boy, wasday. I December 5 up demanding free abortion care and ends with the December 12 strike have neglected to keep with old friends and build new friendships.toIt'sa time to tryoftoBWL, the most widely publicized event of the week is the According leader wrong. I could do something about that. (Diane basketball "game of the century" pitting Barnard Women's Lib against the male faculty. Wunderlich Chabbott) Response from the faculty has been "heavy." One professor wrote that he had waited

Barnard-Columbia Women's Lib. Participate In City-Wide Liberation Week, Dee. 5-12

twenty years such an event. I feel grateful to befor alive. I always have. Another added that he would

(Sloat consider Shaw) "his time at Barnard

ill spent',1 if he could not par-

I feel the community is really ticipate in the game of special the cenand having had the good luck to remain in tury. A professor of Philosophy New York and in himself Westchester County and • described as "hell under havingthe hadboards," long relationships with, for while a'-more modexample, YWCA of of White Plains, Isugfeel est the member the faculty I have gested receivedBWL and given what makes for change the sporta good life. Barnard trainedwas me. to Certainly volleyball. The has match announced at a"fertile" recentlife faculty The older I get the more •meeting. Unconfirmed reports becomes, at least for me. (Shoko Moriwaki have it that members of the facIwata)

dime — all wrapped discreetly in brown paper, of course." Other festivities for the week include rap sessions, an appear-

ings;

Administration and Faculty Plan Women's Studies

In an interview with Bulletin President Martha Peterson discussed the "dozens of proposals" ulty have asked .President Peter- that students, faculty, and adsonfound to provide them with I have life interesting and "male ministrators had offered on the subject of women's studies. Ms. chauvinist pig sweatshirts." satisfying, but I suppose there is always Peterson said that she expected • While BWL It's insists room for improvement. a workthat in the a committee o n Women's . game will be "friendly," hostilprogress. (Katie ities areCangelosi) already rising. Two Studies to develop from the members of the faculty team re- discussions soon. Ms. Peterson Myportedly biggest surprise turning 60 is said that what was emphasized sent aabout correspondence how young I feel and continue feel.slight I most in discussions about woto BWL requesting to"a have not intention of retiring or slowing favor." The letter read, accord- men's liberation was the possibility that Barnard might bedown. ing Muchtohas been said spokeswoman, about our the BWL wonderful Ruth Bayard Smith. "Ourclassmate, players have indicated that come a leader in this newly they tribute do have The biggest to herappropriate was that overuni25% developing field. Lynda Horhota, B '72, a forms for the fray. However, we of the class contributed to the fund that was spokeswoman for Barnard Wowould be eternally grateful if established in her memory to support the men's Lib, suggested that the you would be considerate Barnard Bulletin. I don’t think anyone else college institute a major in woenough launder in the class had sotomany friends.and (Karingive them a good neat pressing so men's studies. Lynda noted that Johnson Barkhorn) that we do not present a tawdry Barnard receives few governappearance in our debut." The ment grants and can hardly I am blessed with a wonderful, spokeswoman said that "BWL compete with Columbia in most supportive and loving husband and two sweetly replied by sending the scientific research. "Why not profs two tablets of salvo and a work on something in which 32

have it all, just ance by Bettynot Friedhan, a coffee at the hour with Ruthann Miller, guerilla theatre, and film showsame time.

Barnard has a chance to be a leader?" she said. Ms. Peterson said Professor Mirra Komarovsky had suggested a seminar where students might study the biological, anthropological, sociological and psychological aspects, of sex roles. Catherine Stimpson, Assistant Professor of English, suggested that Barnard sponsor seminars on 'the subject of women. Ms. Stimpson said that the college might be able to put together a publication from the forums. Ms. -Peterson said that she hoped scholars from the city might make use of Barnard's Overbury collection, on books about women. The collection will be on display from March through April. Ms. Peterson said "we want to select what we can do well and wha't will have an impact on the women now at Barnard."

abo McC .late

larg coun of t

__

P T Sist poli a se as p bia A s that join Wom dem off the plan beca like base as w Pan litic Fr JT i

desi

plan the new inclu wor abou the gle a thea the part

I pa de Lib sta B'7 NA teg


1972 Class Book