Market(space) Manifesto

from Ann Lui

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO NEW FUTURES FOR THE MAXWELL STREET MARKET


School of the Art Institute of Chicago Architecture, Interior Architecture and Designed Objects AIADO 6110-001 Fall 2015


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Studio Description Salon Bibliography Maxwell Street Research Dossier

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Research + Analysis Precedent Research Market Diagrams Palimpsest of Invisible Conditions Analytical Models In Situ Studies

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Projects Emma Jane Camilleri MAXWELL STREET MARKET SOUND ENVIRONMENTS

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Yi (Kevin) Miao MARKET OPERANDI

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Jihye Choe URBAN APPARATUS

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Ali Keshmiri MAXWELL VILLAGE

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Duha Hamdan A COMPACT MAXWELL STREET MARKET

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Kimberly Jean Arciniega THERMOSCAPES

236 SooMin Kim MAXWELL SQUARE 250 Sara Peña GREEN AND PUBLIC SPACES FOR MAXWELL STREET MARKET 264

Derar Alchikh Ibrahim MAXWELL BOAT MARKET

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Lorenis J. Rosario TRANSIT_HUB

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Kate Barbaria FOUR GATES


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Studio Description Established in the 19th century, Chicago’s Maxwell Street was a near legendary openair marketplace that was often a landing site for the city’s new immigrants. Called the “Ellis Island of the Midwest”—despite being an unruly and largely unregulated site of exchange rather than government control—the Maxwell Street Market reflec ed changing waves of the city’s immigrants; from Jews and Eastern Europeans at the turn of the century, to Asians and southern African Americans in later decades. Besieged in the urban renewal years by development and expansion by the University of Illinois at Chicago, the near mythic flea mar et has since relocated and now operates as a pale shadow of its midcentury bustling hubub. Nonetheless, despite constantly facing premonitions of its demise, the (New) Maxwell Street Market has persisted, echoing in its own chaotic way the broader struggles in the city’s urban fabric. Each Sunday blossoming and then disappearing again at nightfall, today’s Market attracts shoppers, hawkers, tourists, and vendors. Nonetheless, today’s market faces its own challenges: struggling after the recession, the new Maxwell Street has lost more than half its vendors to less regulated markets around the city and struggles to attract visitors in rainy and cold weather. This studio proposes to critically address the future of the Maxwell Street Market by drawing on its history and a deep analysis of its current condition. What is the urban and architectural character of temporary and mobile space? How are 6


This studio took place in Fall of 2015 at School of the Art Institute Chicago. Market(space) Manifesto was broadly organized into two parts. The first half of the semester was concentrated on intense, semiweekly charettes. The second half focused on a longer project that students developed across nearly two months. Monday mornings were be a studio “salon”: cross-pollinating discussion, student research presentations, precedent analysis and short lectures. Thursdays were be punctuated by field trips and reviews, including to the Market itself, as well as events in the concurrent Chicago Architecture Biennial which featured visionary speculations for the city. This book, which documents student work from the semester, is loosely organized into the same format as the class. I hope overtime as the Maxwell Street Market continues to evolve this document serves as a provocation to further question the market’s nature, role in Chicago, and possible futures. — Ann Lui Visiting Artist 7

RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

the logistics of the Market’s gatherings informed by Chicago’s layers of history, social frameworks, illegal trade and city regulation? How does a seemingly “outdoor” area function as a single interior or series of interiors? What is the role of spectacle, systems, construction, and choreography? What built infrastructure or architectural rules condition the chaotic functions of the market? This studio investigates Chicago’s broader contemporary urban condition by investigating the microcosm of the New Maxwell Street Market.


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Salon Bibliography This studio integrated a series of “salons,” modeled after 18th century gatherings for witty banter and intellectual discussion. Different from a seminar format, students directly engaged theoretical texts that asked questions about architectural methodology related to their own work. These texts were intended to speak directly to students design process. We engaged questions including, Are temporary urban conditions “architecture”? How can we perceive and represent constantly changing conditions? How should we involve local residents and integrate community voices in our design process? Continuing the SAIC’s ongoing questioning of the definition of “interior architecture,” students were asked to engage architectural theory which wrangled with this issue and to respond individually and analytically. The class read Peter Sloterdijk’s texts on the egosphere, which argues for a new individual interior formed by media and a sense of modern privacy. Students also read Keller Easterling’s “Subtraction,” which posits that voids and urban removal constitutes a series of signifcant architectural spaces formed by politics and often, violence. Foucault’s classic text on “heterotopias” can be interpreted as arguing for socially constructed spaces outside of main society, forming interiors shaped by ritual, hierarchies, and some degree of isolation. All of these definitions we e read against students’ experience of the market and tested for their usefulness and validity.

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— Latour, Bruno, and Albena Yaneva. “Give Me a Gun and I Will Make All Buildings Move: An ANT’s View of Architecture.” In Explorations in Architecture: Teaching, Design, Research. Basel: Birkhäuser, 2008. — Foucault, Michel. “Of Other Spaces.” Spaces of Visual Culture, 2006. — Easterling, Keller. “Subtraction.” Enduring Innocence: Global Architecture and Its Political Masquerades. Cambridge, Mass.; London: The MIT Press, 2007. — Sloterdijk, Peter. “Cell Block, Egospheres, Self-Container: The Apartment as a CoIsolated Existence.” Log, no. Summer/Fall 2007 (n.d.): 89–108. — Bishop, Claire. “Participation and Spectacle: Where are we now?” In Living as Form: Socially Engaged Art from 1991-2011. New York, N.Y. : Cambridge, Mass. ; London: The MIT Press, 2012. — Miljacki, Ana. “Some Crackpot Realism, Please!” Log, no. 5 (2005): 117–21. Cases — Alice Colverd and Alexander McLean, “Tokyo’s Pantry: Tsukiji and the Commodification of Mar et Culture,” Architectural League New York, 2013. — Jesse Lecavalier, “All Those Numbers: Logistics, Territory and Walmart,” Places Journal, 2010. — Max Hirsch and Jonathan Solomon, “Does Your Mall Have an Airport?”, Log, 2010.

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RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

Theory


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Maxwell Street Research Dossier Scholarly Articles — Morales, Alfonso, Steven Balkin, and Joseph Persky. “The Value of Benefits of a Public Street Market: The Case of Maxwell Street.” Economic Development Quarterly 9, no. 4 (November 1, 1995): 304–20. — Morales, Alfonso. “Planning and the SelfOrganization of Marketplaces.” Journal of Planning Education and Research 30, no. 2 (December 1, 2010): 182–97. — Cresswell, Tim, and Gareth Hoskins. “Place, Persistence, and Practice: Evaluating Historical Significance at Angel Island, San Francisco, and Maxwell Street, Chicago.” Annals of the Association of American Geographers 98, no. 2 (June 1, 2008): 392– 413. — Mayo, James M. “The American Public Market.” Journal of Architectural Education (1984-) 45, no. 1 (November 1, 1991): 41–57. doi:10.2307/1425134. — Morales, Alfonso. 2009. “Public Markets as Community Development Tools,” Journal of Planning Education and Research. 28: 4 426-440. — Morales, Alfonso. “Marketplaces: Prospects for Social, Economic, and Political Development.” Journal of Planning Literature 26, no. 1 (February 1, 2011): 3–17. Films — Shea, Mike. And This Is Free. Documentary, Kartemquin, 1965. — Ranstrom, Phil. Cheat You Fair: The Story of Maxwell Street. Documentary, History, 2006. — Balkin, Steve, Roosevelt University and Morales, Alfonso, Northwestern University. “Making Money at the Market: The Social 10


Archival Material + Other Resources — Maxwell Street Market Foundation (Print collection; signs and arch. fragments) Chicago History Museum (signs and street sheds) — Grossman, Ron. “Chicago’s love affair with Maxwell Street,” Chicago Tribune, August 30 2014. — “Maxwell Street Foundation History and Mission,” 2015. — Morales, Alfonso. 2006. Chicago’s Maxwell Street Market: Promise and Prospects. Prepared for the Maxwell Street Foundation. — Balkin, Steve. “The Roar of Irony is Deafening: Statement on Preservation Conference on UIC Campus,” remarks from This is Not My Beautiful House, 2012. — Mamoser, Alan P. “Requiem for Maxwell Street.” 2000. — Cowdery, Chuck. “Some Thoughts (Possibly Final) About Maxwell Street.” 2004. — Cowdery, Chuck. “Maxwell Street: Still Hanging On.” Books — Berkow, Ira, and Walter Iooss Jr. Maxwell Street: Survival in a Bazaar. Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1977. — Grove, Lori, Laura Kamedulski, The Maxwell Street Historic Preservation Coalition, and The Chicago Historical Society. Chicago’s Maxwell Street. Chicago, IL: Arcadia Publishing, 2002. — Eastwood, Carolyn. Near West Side Stories: Struggles for Community in Chicago’s Maxwell Street Neighborhood. Chicago: Lake Claremont Press, 2002. 11

RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

Organization of Street Vending at Chicago’s Maxwell Street Market.” Lifson Library (14.57 minutes) 1993.



Precedent Research Over the course of the semester, students were asked to research a range of relevant market precedents and present their findings to their peers. This dossier represents images from their findings which ranged from the logistics systems of Walmart to the changing real estate and demographics of Spitalfields Mar et. 12 14 16

Informal Marketspace Asia, Europe Tsukiji Fish Market Temple Street Night Market Spitalfields Mar et

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Department Stores, Malls: Privatized Space Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II Le Bon Marche

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USA: Management and Logistics Mall of America Trading Floor, NYSE Walmart

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Case Studies: “Architecture� Santa Caterina Market Markthal Rotterdam New Trade Fair


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Inner Market Plan

1935: The buiding’s original building was accomodating to both rail line and water unloading.

Inner Market | Outer Market Alice Colverd and Alexander McLean

Inner Market Elevations

Tsukiji Fish Market is located in city of Japan. It has been built and relocated a couple times due to natural disasters. The current market is built in a bauhaus style which is unusual for a building like it at the time. The market is divided into the outer and inner market with the inner market being the most formal division of the market operation.

Tsukiji Fish Market Kimberly Jean Arciniega 14

Outer Market Elevations


Inner Market | Outer Market • auction houses, offices, loading bays, and, in giant sheds, all of the intermediate wholesalers. • Some of the inner market stallholders have had businesses in the family for 200 years

outer market

inner market stall plan

current stall types

future stall types

Some of the inner market vendors have had family involved since 200 years ago. The inner market is composed of a regular grid and stalls supplying electricity, water, air, and phone lines. The businesses are mostly wholesale, auction houses, offices, and loading bays. The outer market is filled with retail fish stalls, knife specialists, sushi restaurants, and freezer stores. The machiya (Japanese merchant-house) is found here with residential quarters above, retail below. Plans to move the market in 2016 threaten the current organization with higher fees and less opportunity for an outer market.

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RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

inner market


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Temple Street Night Market SooMin Kim 16


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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Precedent Study - layout any way you want.

The Spitalfields Market is located at Spitalfields in the East End of London. After the Great Fire of London(1666), Traders had begun operating outside the city gates. As the market grew, so did the traffic and trash congestion in the narrow streets around the market. With no room for the expansion it needed so badly, the market was forced to

Old SpitalďŹ elds Market Yi (Kevin) Miao 18


RESEARCH + ANALYSIS move in 1991 to Leyton, East London. The Old Spitalfields Market has opened at the end of 2005, after 18 years of sensitive preparation, the so called Spitalfields regeneration program was completed. Today, Old Spitalfields Market is still the hub of ativity in the east end of London. The regeneration has resulted in the creation of two new public spaces, Bishops Square and Crispin Place, a public art program, an events program. Designers and artists selling fashions, homewares and accessories or a treasure trove of vintage and antique clothing, furniture and other wondrous oddments.

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II. Some brief History about the building: In center of Milan; Masonry building with glass and iron roof; Designed 1861 and built between 1865 and 1877; Neoclassical, nearing on Baroque stylistically; Architect - Giuseppe Mengoni; One of world’s oldest shopping malls; Four story double arcade; Arch added in 1867 and took 10 years to complete; 700 man days of work to complete. “The 640-foot-long north/south axis of its cruciform plan links the

Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II Emma Camilleri 20


RESEARCH + ANALYSIS secular Piazza della Scala on the north to the spiritual Piazza della Duomo on the south. In 1877, a triumphal arch was added to the southern end of this cruciform gallery, thereby formally terminating this covered urban link between the opera house and the cathedral. The iconography of the inlaid mosaic concourse and the painted pendentives of the 164-foot octagonal dome, raised over the crossing, represents the union of church and state which firs came into being with the triumphant nationalist revolution of 1848.� — Kenneth Frampton and Yukio Futagawa. Modern Architecture 1851-1945. p26.

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Top: “The Good Market” founded in 1852 by Aristide Boucicaut. Bottom: considered as the very firs department store

Le Bon Marche Ali Keshmiri 22


RESEARCH + ANALYSIS Top: adopted new market positioning after becoming part of the LVMH group. Bottom: La Bon Marche’s “food counter,” positioning itself as a genuine local supermarket for food enthusiasts

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Mall of America Lorenis J. Rosario 24


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The Floor

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

http://www.perkinseastman.com/project_2403244_new_york_stock_exchange_next_generation_trading_floor https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5c/US_Navy_090526-N-6367N-042_Rear_Adm._John_Christenson,_commander,_Carrier_Strike_Group_Twelve,_and_Lawrence_Leibowitz,_Group_Executive_Vice_President,_New_ York_Stock_Exchange_Euronext,_ring_the_bell_to_open_the_New_York_Stock_E.jpg

http://econintersect.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/NYSE-1903.jpg http://georgiainfo.galileo.usg.edu/gastudiesimages/New%20York%20Stock%20Exchange%20Floor%201.jpg http://econintersect.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/NYSE-2011.jpg

http://www.thedisciplinedinvestor.com/blog/2008/10/26/sunday-fun-3d-nyse-trading-floor/ http://cargocollective.com/eugenechang/New-York-Stock-Exchange

The NYSE provides a fascinating study in how interior plans, combined with ritual and costume, lend to a rich and nearly mytholgocial system of communication and captial exchange.

New York Stock Exchange Kate Barbaria 26


+ “the power of man and machine” + the trading floor is the “face” of the American economy

Methods of Communication hand signals

https://www.nyse.com/market-model

http://www.buzzfeed.com/matthewzeitlin/meet-the-most-photographed-trader-on-wall-street#.mn1rR5Ryex

Methods of Communication

Methods of Communication high-to-low architecture http://images.latinpost.com/data/images/full/20160/traders-work-on-the-floor-of-the-newyork-stock-exchange-nyse-on-august-26-2014-in-new-york-city.jpg

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RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

jackets


Walmart Sara Peña

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Remodeled roof of Santa Caterina Market got a new roof on top of original structures. The pattern of roof is a pixelized photo of fruit basket, which is much related to the function of space under it. Tiles were attached on the roof and a bit floa ed height is for people to feel like being outdoor while shopping. All vendors are under the roof and

Santa Caterina Market in Barcelona Jihye Choe 30


RESEARCH + ANALYSIS the longest span of steel structure is connecting one end to the other secures a wide space without any columns inside the market area.

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Markthal is an amazing piece of architecture, located in Rotterdam, Netherlands. The construction was started in 2009 and completed in October 2014 with a cost of 178,000,000 Euro. The design for the Market Hall by MVRDV Architects was constructed in the ancient center of the city.

Markthal Rotterdam Derar Alchikh Ibrahim 32


RESEARCH + ANALYSIS The Market Hall is a sustainable combination of food, leisure, living and parking, fully integrated to celebrate and enhance the synergetic possibilities of the different functions. A secure, covered square emerges beneath an arc, conceived as an inversion of a typical market square and its surrounding buildings. During the day it serves as central market hall, after hours the hall becomes an enormous, covered, well lit public space.

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Above: Location and Site Plan; Ground Plan; Sections

Milan Trade Fair Duha Hamdan 34


35 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS



Market Diagrams This project introduced students to the New Maxwell Street Market through analytical diagrams developed through on-site observation, casual interviews, and research. Students documented and recorded the patterns of products for sale at the Sunday outdoor market, interviewed and met sellers and visitors, observed regulations or logistic schemes and architectural or urban rules. What are the patterns of items sold within the market? What are pathways of visitor circulation? What architectural, urban or regulatory systems are at play? Students visited the site (on Sundays) and created a series of simple diagrams of non-visible organizations and systems.


POLK

POLK

CABRINI

CABRINI

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

JEFFERSON

DESPLAINES

JEFFERSON

DESPLAINES

TAYLOR

TAYLOR

Vendor Signage Identifying the location and quantity of vendor signage

Disposal Cans Identifying the location and quantity of disposal cans

POLK

POLK

CABRINI

CABRINI

JEFFERSON

DESPLAINES

JEFFERSON

DESPLAINES

TAYLOR

TAYLOR

Hot Food Vendors Identifying the location and quantity of vendors who sell hot foods

Ali Keshmiri 38

Music at Vendor Booths Identifying vendors who use music as a form of solicitation


POLK POLK

CABRINI

CABRINI

JEFFERSON

DESPLAINES

JEFFERSON

DESPLAINES

Maxwell Ad Signage Identifying the location and quantity of on-site Maxwell Street Market advertisement

Tents Identifying the location and quantity of vendors that use tents as part of their shed design

POLK

POLK

CABRINI

CABRINI

JEFFERSON

DESPLAINES

JEFFERSON

DESPLAINES

TAYLOR

TAYLOR

Trees Identifying green-space at Maxwell Street Market

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Umbrellas Identifying the location and quantity of vendors who use umbrellas as part of their shed design

RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

TAYLOR

TAYLOR


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Diagram 01 Existing building Security guard walking path

Diagram 02 People who pass through the market in transit and do not stop.

Diagram 03 Shoppers path during the rush hours in the market.

Diagram 04 Group of Visitors

Derar Alchikh Ibrahim 40


Diagram 06 Existing building with streets traffic. Showing the Music tent.

Diagram 07 Showing the tents locations and the static elements in the market.

Diagram 08 The traffic movement - in and out of the market.

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RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

Diagram 05 Tents, Shadow


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Building Heights This diagram represents the height of the buildings surrounding the Maxwell Street Market.

Ethnicities This diagram represents the ethnicities of the different vendors at the Maxwell Street Market.

Traffic Flow This diagram represents the car traffic flow and density surrounding the market.

Combination Diagram 1 This diagram documents significant sound factors on the site.

Emma Camilleri 42


Foot Traffic over time This diagram represents the amount of foot traffic throughout the market between 7am and 10am.

Combination Diagram 2 This diagram documents significant access factors on the site.

Combination Diagram 3 This diagram documents vendor relations on the site.

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RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

Tent Types This diagram represents the variety of different tent types at the Maxwell Street Market.


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Shade Diagram This Diagram maps the shaded area.

Noise Diagram This diagram maps the noise level with decible scale.

Duration Diagram This Diagram Maps the vendors’ duration(in years) in the market.

Revenue Diagram This Diagram Maps the daily/weekly revenue of vendors.

Yi (Kevin) Miao 44


Foot Traffic Diagram This Diagram maps the market-goers’ foot traffic in the market.

Revenue Diagram This Diagram Maps the daily/weekly revenue of vendors.

Revenue Diagram This Diagram Maps the daily/weekly revenue of vendors.

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RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

Revenue Diagram This Diagram Maps the daily/weekly revenue of vendors.


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Maps 1-4 Left to Right: Mapping Shading, Tent Types, Tree Locations and Common vs Vendor Rest Points

Maps 5-8 Left to Right: Mapping Signs, Product Types, Gender of Vendors, and Performance Space location

People Group Types Cabrini Intersection (AM) Plotting points for group types(families, friends, couples, and singles) for a 30 minute period.

People Group Types Taylor Intersection (PM) Plotting points for group types(families, friends, couples, and singles) for a 30 minute period.

Kimberly Arciniega 46


Tent Types and Rest Points Combined Map of Tent Types and Places of Rest or Shade

People Group Types Comparative Map of Taylor (left) and Cabrini (right) Intersections

Vendors’ Gender and Product Relationships circles represent product types, right lines represent male, and left lines represent female

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RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

Map 6-9 Left to Right: Mapping Security and Maintenance Personnel, Vendor, Vehicles, and Adjancencies


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Eating and Cooking Separation of areas cooking and eating under each tent

Location General location of vendors in the food section

Overall Location Diagram of Maxwell Street Market and its overall location

Trash Location of big and small trash cans in food area

SooMin Kim 48


Axon 3-D examination of food vendors and their seating and cooking areas

Volume Density of customers for each vendors to observe pattern

Volume 3-D Density of customers in axon view

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RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

Scale elevation Evaluation of scale of tents to people


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Circular size A size of red circle represents how big one market is. And two lines with area between them show how people approach

Black and White Unit Repeated black and white units show th commercial zone as well.

A oating population Measuring population on the intersection of streets and these diagonal lines indicate which part is densded with people. Red part is where Maxwell Market is.

Circulation Light lines are all connecting roads, stre approaching way to the commercial bui

Jihye Choe 50


s, streets which are the ial buildings.

Building Height Each building height is seen as the length of note since the type of building structure in Maxwell street market has changed, observing height helps in explaining history of market.

Combined interpretation Showing sizes of commercial buildings and density of population together.

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RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

how the size of


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Bridges

Public transit and access points

Parking (private and public)

Road paint

Kate Barbaria 52


Traffic speeds

Road paint and adjacent buildings

Green spaces visible from market

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RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

Surface streets and the highway


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Connections Showing all public transit hubs and making connections between them.

Movement Showing the movement of people whitin the market.

Physical model ideas

Transportation Analysis Drawing

Lorenis J. Rosario 54


Movement visualization #2

Transportation Analysis Model version #1

Transportation Analysis Model version #2

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RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

Movement visualization #1


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Bathroom Locations

Handsanitizing stations

Garbage Bins Locations

Security Personnel locations

Duha Hamdan 56


RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

Site Study 1

Site Study 2: The buildings around the market drastically changed in height, and also in Maxwell Street Market aren’t many green spaces. The first site study is a general study of the area, it was there where the noticeable difference in green spaces were first spotted. The second site study is a zoom out of the area where now the eastern side of the highway and the west are visible.

Sara PeĂąa 57



Palimpsest of Invisible Conditions In the second phase, diagrams from the last project were be layered into a series of 5 palimpsests, each with unique arguments relating the different layers. These arguments responded to urban questions, such as, How do points of entry effect market circulation?, as well as socio- economic issues, such as, Is there a correlation between race, gender, nationality or other identities and the organization of vendors? For the pinup of this three week charette, students developed one drawing into a refined presentation. This section features both the draft version and final version.


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Palimpsest: food, signage and solicitation

Ali Keshmiri 60


ROOSEVELT

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DESPLAINES

ROOSEVELT

JEFFERSON

TAYLOR TAYLOR

RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

MAXWELL MARKET BANNERS VENDOR SIGNS

BILLBOARD

COLD DESSERTS

HOT FOODS

VENDOR MUSIC

ADVERTISEMENT EXPOSURE

TOILETS GARBAGE DISPOSAL

UMBRELLA

FRESH PRODUCE + PLANTS

FOOD

POLK POLK

CABRINI

Palimpsest: food, signage and solicitation (revised)

JEFFERSON

DESPLAINES


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Fluid elements traffic Movement

Derar Alchikh Ibrahim 62


RESEARCH + ANALYSIS Static and Fluid elements traffic Movement

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Soundscapes

Tents Ambient Noises

Emma Camilleri

Live Performace 0

Solicitation

Original palimpsest drawing dealing with the sound at Maxwell Street Market.

Emma Camilleri 64

50

100ft


RESEARCH + ANALYSIS Final palimpsest drawing dealing with the sound at Maxwell Street Market.

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Palimpsest 1: The first iteration represents the tent typologies, the products sold and the vendors’ gender.

Kimberly Jean Arciniega 66

Food + Drink

Bikes

Electronics/Tools

Clothes + Shoes

Home

Accessories


Bikes

Electronics/Tools

Clothes + Shoes

Home

Accessories

Umbrella

Tent

RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

Food + Drink

N

Summer

Palimpsest 2: This final iteration comines the initial iteration with sun and shade studies of the adjacent buildings

Winter

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Understanding that the west side includes UIC, which is a campus therefore making it greener and the east side being and industrial zone it doesn’t have this type of benefit.

Sara PeĂąa 68


RESEARCH + ANALYSIS Vendors and Services Palimpsest: Diagram showing vendor locations with direct connections and services (Garbage, restrooms and security

Duha Hamdan 69


A

B

C

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

D

A

B

C

D

E

E

F

F

G

G

H

H

I

I

J

K

L

M

J

K

L

M

Elevation/Section: A study of the elevational and sectional qualities of the buildings immediately surrounding the market

Kate Barbaria 70


Final Transportation Analysis

Lorenis J. Salgado 71

RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

PALIMPSEST + REVISED VERSION (or, just the best one)


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Palimpsest: Initial collection of all observation of food vendors

SooMin Kim 72


RESEARCH + ANALYSIS Palimpsest: Final collection of all observation of food vendors

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p Po n tio ula on se

er int s on cti

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Wholesale market

access

Desplaines St

Taylor St

Maxwell market

Two market axes: Two strong axes with walking man figu es indicate which streets people frequently passing by, and those axes are where market and commercial buildings are aligned.

Jihye Choe 74


market Canal St

Jefferson St

Dan Ryan Expy

Roosevelt Rd

Haslted St

University village

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RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

Clinton St


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Vendor Revenue Map: Circles indicate the revenue of each vendors. Vendors types are also labled.

Yi (Kevin) Miao 76


RESEARCH + ANALYSIS Vendor Revenue Map 2.0: Vendor Revenue Map displays financial condition of the market with additional detail information. (Details ctd.)

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


In this project, students translated their palimpsest drawings into three-dimensional form. Models used material, scale, and form to convey a spatial argument about the Maxwell Street Market. Students read Lecavalier’s text of logistics operating across architectural scales—from the placement of goods to the territorialization of urban space—and Bruno Latour’s “Give me a Gun,” two texts which investigate the way traditional representations of architecture often miss different the multiplicitous and invisible ways in which the built environment engages its inhabitants and contexts. How can we represent conditions which change over time in spatial form? How can we visualize and formalize invisible systems at work in the urban field? How can we “design” a rhetorical argument? These models respond to the palimpsest drawings developed in the past phase and developed formal strategies to respond to students’ unique research interests.

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RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

Analytical Models


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Full Bleed Analytical Model pic 1

Architecture through Marketing Ali Keshmiri 84


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RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

Full Bleed Analytical Model pic 2


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Full Bleed - 2 pgs Analytical Model pic 3

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87 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Soundscapes Emma Camilleri 88


89 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


91 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Market Revenue Yi (Kevin) Miao 92


93

RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

Full Bleed Analytical Model pic 2


94

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


95 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


Duha Hamdan

96

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


97 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


98

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


99 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Full Bleed Analytical Model pic 1

Movement represents neighboring buildings: rather than showing their architecture, I showed them as traces of the people moving through them. Derar Alchikh Ibrahim 100


101

RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

Full Bleed Analytical Model pic 2


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Full Bleed - 2 pgs Analytical Model pic 3

102


103 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Spatialized Shadows Kimberly Jean Arciniega 104


105 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


106

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


107 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Invisible Conditions Sara Peña 108


109 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


110

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


111 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


SooMin Kim

112

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


113 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


114

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


115 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Moving Urban Grid Jihye Choe 116


117 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


118

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


119 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Street Menu Kate Barbaria 120


121 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


122

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


123 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Full Bleed - 2 pgs Analytical Model pic 3

Private vs. Public Transportation Analysis Lorenis J. Rosario 124


125 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


126

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


127 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS



In Situ Studies Rather than designing remotely, this project proposed that students design in situ. Projects produced 1 “on site� test of their shed design which was documented through constructions, photography, and recording. This could take the form of: hiring a performer to act as a verbal solicitor for the market; testing out a planting of native grasses in an abandoned lot; doing a temporary tape installation of a new floo pattern.


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO I placed red balloons in front of vendors who sold the same items on that Sunday to test out the viability of placing markers for reference for customers

Duha Hamdan 130


131 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO In Situ Soundscapes: For this portion of the project I chose to collect recordings of street performers from around Chicago in order to replay them on the Maxwell Street Market site. These sounds thus mingle with the existing sounds of the site and recreate a musical hub of Chicago at Maxwell Street Market.

Emma Camilleri 132


RESEARCH + ANALYSIS In Situ Soundscapes continued: These are images from a video created for this in situ performance.

133


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

MAXWELL STREET MARKET The Maxwell Street Market is a Chicago tradition of bargains and bargaining with an international flavor. The market offers an eclectic mix of merchandise—from tools to tires, plus fresh produce, furniture, clothing, rare finds and collectibles and some of the best Mexican and Latin street food in Chicago. For about 100 years, Maxwell Street was one of Chicago’s most unconventional business—and residential—districts. About a mile long and located in the shadow of downtown skyscrapers, it was a place where businesses grew selling anything from shoestrings to expensive clothes. Today, that tradition continues at Maxwell Street Market (800 S. Desplaines St.), featuring bargains and bargaining with an international flavor, year round on Sundays, 7am–3pm.

MAXWELL STREET MARKET The Maxwell Street Market is a Chicago tradition of bargains and bargaining with an international flavor. The market offers an eclectic mix of merchandise—from tools to tires, plus fresh produce, furniture, clothing, rare finds and collectibles and some of the best Mexican and Latin street food in Chicago. For about 100 years, Maxwell Street was one of Chicago’s most unconventional business—and residential—districts. About a mile long and located in the shadow of downtown skyscrapers, it was a place where businesses grew selling anything from shoestrings to expensive clothes. Today, that tradition continues at Maxwell Street Market (800 S. Desplaines St.), featuring bargains and bargaining with an international flavor, year round on Sundays, 7am–3pm.

MAXWELL STREET MARKET The Maxwell Street Market is a Chicago tradition of bargains and bargaining with an international flavor. The market offers an eclectic mix of merchandise—from tools to tires, plus fresh produce, furniture, clothing, rare finds and collectibles and some of the best Mexican and Latin street food in Chicago. For about 100 years, Maxwell Street was one of Chicago’s most unconventional business—and residential—districts. About a mile long and located in the shadow of downtown skyscrapers, it was a place where businesses grew selling anything from shoestrings to expensive clothes. Today, that tradition continues at Maxwell Street Market (800 S. Desplaines St.), featuring bargains and bargaining with an international flavor, year round on Sundays, 7am–3pm.

MAXWELL STREET MARKET The Maxwell Street Market is a Chicago tradition of bargains and bargaining with an international flavor. The market offers an eclectic mix of merchandise—from tools to tires, plus fresh produce, furniture, clothing, rare finds and collectibles and some of the best Mexican and Latin street food in Chicago. For about 100 years, Maxwell Street was one of Chicago’s most unconventional business—and residential—districts. About a mile long and located in the shadow of downtown skyscrapers, it was a place where businesses grew selling anything from shoestrings to expensive clothes. Today, that tradition continues at Maxwell Street Market (800 S. Desplaines St.), featuring bargains and bargaining with an international flavor, year round on Sundays, 7am–3pm.

Soliciting at Maxwell Street Market: This brochure was created to test how receptive visitors are to solicitation at the Maxwell Street Market. The flyer was handed out during market hours.

Ali Keshmiri 134


MAXWELL STREET MARKET

MAXWELL STREET MARKET The Maxwell Street Market is a Chicago tradition of bargains and bargaining with an international flavor. The market offers an eclectic mix of merchandise—from tools to tires, plus fresh produce, furniture, clothing, rare finds and collectibles and some of the best Mexican and Latin street food in Chicago. For about 100 years, Maxwell Street was one of Chicago’s most unconventional business—and residential—districts. About a mile long and located in the shadow of downtown skyscrapers, it was a place where businesses grew selling anything from shoestrings to expensive clothes. Today, that tradition continues at Maxwell Street Market (800 S. Desplaines St.), featuring bargains and bargaining with an international flavor, year round on Sundays, 7am–3pm.

RESEARCH + ANALYSIS

The Maxwell Street Market is a Chicago tradition of bargains and bargaining with an international flavor. The market offers an eclectic mix of merchandise—from tools to tires, plus fresh produce, furniture, clothing, rare finds and collectibles and some of the best Mexican and Latin street food in Chicago. For about 100 years, Maxwell Street was one of Chicago’s most unconventional business—and residential—districts. About a mile long and located in the shadow of downtown skyscrapers, it was a place where businesses grew selling anything from shoestrings to expensive clothes. Today, that tradition continues at Maxwell Street Market (800 S. Desplaines St.), featuring bargains and bargaining with an international flavor, year round on Sundays, 7am–3pm.

MAXWELL STREET MARKET

MAXWELL STREET MARKET

The Maxwell Street Market is a Chicago tradition of bargains and bargaining with an international flavor. The market offers an eclectic mix of merchandise—from tools to tires, plus fresh produce, furniture, clothing, rare finds and collectibles and some of the best Mexican and Latin street food in Chicago. For about 100 years, Maxwell Street was one of Chicago’s most unconventional business—and residential—districts. About a mile long and located in the shadow of downtown skyscrapers, it was a place where businesses grew selling anything from shoestrings to expensive clothes. Today, that tradition continues at Maxwell Street Market (800 S. Desplaines St.), featuring bargains and bargaining with an international flavor, year round on Sundays, 7am–3pm.

135

The Maxwell Street Market is a Chicago tradition of bargains and bargaining with an international flavor. The market offers an eclectic mix of merchandise—from tools to tires, plus fresh produce, furniture, clothing, rare finds and collectibles and some of the best Mexican and Latin street food in Chicago. For about 100 years, Maxwell Street was one of Chicago’s most unconventional business—and residential—districts. About a mile long and located in the shadow of downtown skyscrapers, it was a place where businesses grew selling anything from shoestrings to expensive clothes. Today, that tradition continues at Maxwell Street Market (800 S. Desplaines St.), featuring bargains and bargaining with an international flavor, year round on Sundays, 7am–3pm.


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Drone Delivery Test: A field test of using drone to deliver an item that was purchased in Maxwell Street Market.

Yi (Kevin) Miao 136


RESEARCH + ANALYSIS The test also study the flight path of a drone, the amount of weight a drone can carry and the effectiveness of using drone as a spectacle.

137


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO what’s my clo?: In trying to probe comfort in relation to weather, I visited Maxwell Street Market with the intention of measuring the clo-values of my layered clothing. The clo-unit, defined y the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) as “a unit used to express the thermal insulation provided by garments

Kimberly Jean Arciniega 138


RESEARCH + ANALYSIS and clothing ensembles” is what is featured in each of the photos as I undress. The measurement of the clo-unit is based off 1 clo-unit which is equal to a man wearing a three piece suit at 21 °C (70 °F) with 50% Relative Humidity and 6 m/min air movement. The series of photographs were taken at night in Chicago at a temperature of about 50 °F.

139


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Water Flow: Pouring water in specific a eas in the market and showing how water spreads differently because of its surroundings or ground material. The insitu is what the project represents, an invasion in a zone with no landscape, which also adapts to its surroundings, since the project adapts to the existing green areas, parking and building walls.

Sara PeĂąa 140


141 RESEARCH + ANALYSIS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Since I was focusing on food, I wanted to introduce the concept of “slow food� into the Market by proposing an urban gardening. For my In-Situ experiment, I wanted to see how plants would look like at the actual site, so I had purchased a pepper plant and a mint plant from one of the Market vendors when it was open.

SooMin Kim 142


RESEARCH + ANALYSIS The way the plants reacted at this site, the contrast it created, was beautiful and made me wonder how this would look like if it was even bigger. I also wanted to see how it would sustain in this environment, so I had left these plants for a week.

143


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO In Situ: Architecture of Waiting: For my in-situ analysis, I went to the Maxwell Street Market to collect data about the conditions in which are the bus stops today. Having been there, I noticed how dehumanized where the bus stops. Meaning that the majority of them didn’t

Lorenis J. Rosario 144


RESEARCH + ANALYSIS had any type of shelter for those who wait to protect themselves from the hormonal weather changes of Chicago. Therefore I went prepared and stood with various umbrellas under those bus stops, and served as a human shelter for those who waited for the bus when I was there.

145


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Spatial experience with balloons: Aligned balloons in a long line show how wide is the space between two buildings. When it is a narrow alley, balloons become more dense, and when it is floating ove the wide road, balloons are not as dense which shows more opened space. Such density of balloons is an indicator of the size of a certain space.

Jihye Choe 146


RESEARCH + ANALYSIS Top two photos are spaces of narrow alley between two buildings, and bottom on the left is a personal space which is intruded more than exterior wall for the door access. And the one on the top right is taken in the middle of Maxwell street market showing the distance between two vendors. This is the size of the space for pedestrians and customers. The last bottom one on the right is showing the widest space between two big markets, Whole foods market and TJ MAXX.

147



Market(space) Manifestos The Maxwell Street Market today is, in many ways, a ghost of its former self. It is neither the bustling, black market unregulated city hub—which fostered a rich jazz and blues scene as well as a landing pad for immigrants—nor the initial success at the new site, when the market overflowed with vendors. Nonetheless, the Maxwell Street Market is a unique opportunity to become a diverse, cross-cultural attraction for the city of Chicago. This project proposes that students deploy their critical analyses from the first half of the semester to look at the larger picture of the heterotopic market. Students were challenged to think critically about the next iteration of the Maxwell Street Market on an urban, as well as architectural, scale. Students developed a broad thesis towards the Maxwell Street Market and deployed this argument in their design for a new iteration of this unique fluctuating landmark. Guided y Alexander Eisenschmidt’s thesis of the “visionary pragmatist,” students were encouraged to draw from both the radical speculative projects that used paper architecture to change building discourse and the grounded, but innovative, in situ practices which engage local contexts and sitespecific stra egies to generate work with a positive impact.


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Maxwell Street Market Sound Environments Emma Camilleri

150


This project, Sound Environments, began with an exploration of sound at the Maxwell Street Market. I started by exploring the site through both metric-based and subjective documentation of sounds, soundscapes, and music: from the shouting of the vendors, to the white noise of the highway, to the historic street performers. I then translated these sounds into two-dimensional representation in order to better understand the sound conditions on the site. From this, I developed a three dimensional model, specifically hig lighting significant sound contrib tions on the site that would later be used in identifying potential intervention spaces. After this research, I began further exploration into the symbiotic relationship between sound and the Maxwell Street Market, particularly in regards to blues and jazz music. This project argues that historically, the Maxwell Street Market customers and street performers had a mutually beneficial elationship, providing entertainment for customers and providing a space for exposure and money making potential for both successful and struggling performers. The market allowed for the continuation of cultural traditions of immigrant com151

PROJECTS

Manifesto


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

munities and became a space where the birth of new music types was fostered, i.e. the Electric Blues. This project proposes to recreate Maxwell Street Market as a sound hub for the current music scene in Chicago. The focus of this musical scene would be on Blues and Jazz music. My analysis showed that the current geographical location of the Maxwell Street Market is in an area, which I am referring to as a “blues desert�: a space in the city without performance venues. Drawing from my early sound analysis of the current site, a new built form responds to the site conditions in order to create a harmonious sound environment across the site. In areas where the sound environment was quieter, I made new spaces for sounds, and in areas where this condition was louder, I prevented further sound infiltr tion in order to create a balanced sound condition throughout the site and penetrate underutilized spaces with sound. Both interior and exterior sound hubs provide unique sound atmospheres throughout the site. During the off days, spaces serve as sites for partnerships with local groups such as the Hull House and Gateway programs that already work with Chicago youth providing access to extracurricular activities such as music. The main 152


153

PROJECTS

interior sound environment can be used during the Markets off hours as a music venue attracting the adjacent UIC community as well as the greater Chicago community. The material choice for this environment as well as the development of the overall sound condition on the site resulted in a choice to use Aluminum foam. The Aluminum foam responds to sounds and both encapsulates as well as repels these sounds through new built form. The main strategy for locating and siting these new structures was “hybridization�: my project, mimicking the way sound travels across a site and into crevices of underutilized space, interfaces with existing structures to further stimulate and create a new symbiosis of music with the existing acoustical environment of Maxwell Street Market.


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Study models produced in an exploration of translating sound into form.

154


155 PROJECTS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Exploration collage of form using 3D scan of tinfoil.

156


Existing Building

Restroom

~ 95 dB Popular Music

~ 70dB Conversational Speech Maximum

Tent 3 Tent 3 Storage

Tent 2 Storage Tent 2

Tent 3 Storage

~ 60 dB Conversational Speech

Tent 1

Exterior Sound Environment ~ 80 dB Popular Music Outdoors

Existing Building

Single node development design. This node includes and interior and exterior sound environment and 3 vendor tents.

157

PROJECTS

Interior Sound Environment


Hub 4 Interior Hub 3 Exterior

Restrooms

Hub 2 Exterior

Hub 2 Interior

Concessions

Storage

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Hub 4 Exterior

Restrooms

Recording Studio

Classrooms

Exhibition Space

Restrooms

Offices

Hub 1 Exterior

Hub 1 Interior

Large Scale plan of the market with new program design.

158


the history of music at storically, the Maxwell Street nment for customers and erformers. The market where the birth of new music

ene in Chicago. The focus of graphical location of the y without performance he site conditions in order to was quieter, I made new tion in order to create a

ring the off days, spaces that already work with nd environment can be used the greater Chicago und condition on the site ncapsulates as well as repels ctures was “hybridization”: my nterfaces with existing nvironment of Maxwell Street

Hub 2 Exterior

Hub 3 Exterior

Hub 1 Exterior

Hub 1 Interior

Program Education and Community Outreach These spaces will create room for educational opportunities and events at the market as well as provide a space for community outreach programs to function. Classroom space (70 dB) Recording studio space (95 dB) Exhibition space (30 dB) Lockers/ Storage space (15 dB)

3,083 sqft 992 sqft 5,096 sqft 465 sqft

Total – 9,636 sqft Performance + Market Synthesis Throughout the market there are several different sound environment hubs that provided either an interior performance experience or an exterior performance experience. The vendors continue to operate in the existing manner. Thick walls and aluminum foam properties contribute to acoustic containment of interior condition performance spaces while exterior conditions are opened to the street. Similar walls create a barrier to the highway noise. Interior spaces include A/V equipment and are lined with acoustic dampening material and/or sound proof glass in order to contain sound while the exterior purposefully mingle with the other acoustical sounds of the market environment. Sound Environment Hubs (95 dB indoor/ 80 outdoor) Hub 1 - 5,400 sqft (interior) -- 528 sqft (exterior) Hub 2 - 3,900 sqft (interior) -- 1,444 sqft (exterior) Hub 3 - 3,696 sqft (exterior) Hub 4 - 3,774 sqft (interior) -- 648 sqft (exterior) Aggregation of tents

200 sqft X 144

Service/ Utilities Areas Permanent seating and restrooms will be available for guests during market hours as well as be available to the music community when the market is closed. Restrooms Outdoor seating (50 dB)

5,314 sqft 5,000 sqft Total – 10,314 sqft

Administrative This portion of the program allows a permanent space for administration in order to allow the new musical hub to function regardless of when the market itself is open. A permanent information and help center will provide greater assistance to guests during market operation hours. Information center/ help center (190 dB) - Offices for Maxwell (70 dB) - Satellite office space for Hull House and Gateway programs (60 dB) - Offices for administration of sound environments (60 dB) Total – 3,904 sqft

* Average decibel levels for sound environments

Total – 48,190 sqft

Axon of site with implemented program and program distribution.

159

PROJECTS

Sound Environments

Market. I started by exploring music: from the shouting of the se sounds into om this, I developed a three later be used in identifying

Restrooms Hub 4 Interior

Hub 4 Exterior


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

~ 60 dB Conversational Speech

~ 70dB Conversational Speech Maximum

~ 80 dB Popular Music Outdoors

~ 95 dB Popular Music

Enlarged images of Maxwell Street Market sound environments.

160


PROJECTS Chicago street performer at the new Maxwell Street Market.

161


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Interior sound environment at Maxwell Street Market.

162


PROJECTS Maxwell Street Market during the off hours of the market.

163


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Market Operandi Yi (Kevin) Miao

164


This project began with an initial analysis of vendors’ daily and weekly revenues, which ranged from [around $100 to over $1,500]. Over the course of my interview with [97] individuals, it became clear that most of the vendors have a problem with cash flow: their access to capital is based on seasonal up-and-downs and the lack of connections with costumers. This project, Market Operandi, proposes to improve Maxwell Street Market’s (MSM) inventory management tactics in order to provide a more sustainable environment for the vendors and attract new ones. I argue that architecture can serve as an infrastructure for a better economic model, and that there is a mutually affecting relationship between spatial systems and fiscal succes . Market Operandi is located on Maxwell Street (the original MSM site), where it was sited before being relocated in 1994. The architecture engages with the culturally rich, architecturally confused, and social complicated part of Chicago (UIC’s campus). As Chicago’s urban environment changes in response to forces including gentrification, inc eased densification and expansion, archi ecture – seen as infrastructure, rather than a unique tailored product – is 165

PROJECTS

Manifesto


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

often reused for new purposes. For example, the facades of the old MSM now serve as storefronts for commercial chain restaurants. Consequently, this project proposes transformation of the current Maxwell Street Parking Garage. The architecture is a hybrid of the warehouse and the new market, two programs that are traditionally treated as unrelated. The warehouse (profi -driven, with an aesthetic dictated by logistics) is aimed to provide a more regular cash flow to vendor by adapting the Amazon/ Walmart warehouse model [where products are shipped directly to consumers’ homes]. The new market (heritage-driven, designed to attract visitors) aims to continue the traditional form of market scenes and revive the market, which both recalls a nostalgic past but also creates spectacle out of contemporary retail technologies.

166


167 PROJECTS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

BUSINESS POSITIONING STRATEGY

Market Operandi will position Maxwell Street Market as an nostalgic market – fun for visitors, good for the city to market as a tourist attraction – backed by the novel introduction of an advanced logistic strategy in a high-tra˛c urban location. Rather than locating these logistics sites in non-description locations, this project draws from MSM’s tactic of making spectacle of retail by showing the pioneering movement of inventory in the warehouse operation.

MARKETING STRATEGY

The architecture of Market Operandi is a union of the warehouse and the market operation. The vertical tubes are not only designed to support the vertical and lateral loads of the building but also render visible the ˜o w of inventory – which literally act as the ÿnancial support of the operation.

PRODUCT ADVANTAGE

The products on MSM consist mainly general merchandise that can be found in other market place and some rare handcrafted products. Considering Old Spitalÿelds Market (London, UK) as a precedent, it supported local designers and turned the market around to one of London’s main fashion incubators. The plan is to expand the handcrafted clothing and products business on the market by inviting more new vendors (Chicago local designer, SAIC Fashion design students) to open in the market.

DISTRIBUTION SITUATION

Market Operandi provides the infrastructure for vendors to reach more consumers. The current model is limited and relies on nostalgia and heritage to draw consumers to the site; this explains vendors’ struggle to distribute their products. In addition, the lack of public transportation access, parking, bathrooms and shelter all contribute to the low inventory ˜o w. This proposal improves the distribution network with sharing economy delivery drones, potential dispersed network of warehouses, resulting in a market which both expands up the historic entrepreneurship of the MSM to a new era. It also is a pioneering example of how architecture can translate anonymous logistic practices into a site of wonder.

CURRENT

MARKET OPERANDI

Market Operandi begins with a business plan to restructure the business model of Maxwell Street Market.

168


LOGISTIC INVENTION TIMELINE 2015

2015, UNITED STATES. AMAZON NEW DRONES

2015,SINGAPORE. DRONE POSTAL DELIVERY

2000 Amazon debuted its new drones that can fly for 15 miles at 400 feet altitude. The new horizontal orientation design allowed the drone to be faster and more energy efficient.

In collaboration with IDA labs, Singapore Post has successfully performed the world’s first delivery of mail by drone. The drone can carry a payload up to 500g(1.1 pounds) and travel up to 2.3 kilometers(1.6 miles).

2015, UNITED STATES.

ROBOT TO DELIVERY YOUR GROCERY

1985

2013, UNITED STATES. AMAZON PRIME AIR

1960

1973, UNITED STATES.

FEDERAL EXPRESS JETS

1971, UNITED STATES. WALMART DISTRIBUTION CENTERS

1945 Walmart opened it’s first distribution center and Home office in Bentonville, Arkansas. Before then, stores were stocked by vendor direct shipments and wholesalers.

389 FedEx’s team members and 14 Dassault Falcon jets delivered 186 packages overnight to 25 U.S. cities. This marked the born of the modern air express industry.

1956, UNITED STATES. MARITIME

CONTAINER

1930 The invention of the sea container -- structural evolution of world trade and the boom of international flows of goods.

1924, UNITED STATES. FIRST CONVEYOR BELT SYSTEM

1913, UNITED STATES. UPS UPS debuted a technological innovation -- the first conveyor belt system for handling packages. This helped the company to improve and expand its common carrier service.

DELIVERY

CAR

1915

UPS focused on package delivery for retail stores and used motorcycles for some deliveries. The company acquired a Ford Model T as their delivery car in 1913.

A logistic invention timeline shows how logistic inventions can contribute to business.

169

PROJECTS

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced Amazon’s plan to use drones to delivery products to costomers. He estimated that delivery-by-drone will be available in as soon as 4-5 years.

Skype’s co-founders developed the Startship autonomous delivery robot vehicle that uses similar technology as self-driving cars, but are cheaper to build. The robot can delivery equivalent of two frocery bags with 5-30 mins from a local store.


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO A study of existing vacant warehouses to show potential expansion for the Market Operandi Business Model.

170


18,000’

PROJECTS

FAA DIAGRAM.

1,200’

700’

400’

200’

A I R S PAC E S E C T I O N :

DELIVERY DRONES CAN BE OPERATED IN

CLASS G (FROM GROUND TO 700 OR 1,200 FEET. THE DELIVERY DRONES WILL MOSTLY BE OPERATED AROUND 200 TO 400 FEET ABOVE GROUND.

Air Space Section studies the legistics of using drones for logistics in complied with FAA rules and regulations

171


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

S DESPLAINES ST

W POLK ST

W TAYLOR ST

W ROOSEVELT ROAD

S HALSTED ST

W ROOSEVELT ROAD

I-90 DAN RYAN EXPRESSWAY

S UNION AVE

S HALSTED ST

W MAXWELL ST

W 14TH PL

W 16TH ST

Site map shows the current location of Maxwell Street Market in light red and the relocation to the existing Maxwell Street Parking Garage in dark red.

172


GLAZING

CURTAIN WALL SYSTEM

STRUCTURAL TUBES SYSTEM (VERTICAL AND LATERAL SUPPORT )

VERTICAL CIRCULATION

WALLS

FLOORS

OLD MAXWELL STREET MARKET BUILDING FACADES

Exploded Axonometric Plug-in Diagram to show how Market Operandi will situate in the existing parking garage structure.

173

PROJECTS

PARKING GARAGE EXISTING RAMP


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

SEC 2

SEC 1

N

Ground Floor Plan

N

Second Floor Plan

174


Third Floor Plan

N

Roof Plan

175

PROJECTS

N


South Elevation

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

East Elevation

Section 1-1

Section 2-1

176


DRONE TRAFFIC LEVEL

DRONE LAUNCHER

ROOF LEVEL COMMUNITY GARDEN: 10,000 S.F. BATHROOM: 1,500 S.F. MARKET SPACE: 50,000 S.F. MAXWELL STREET MARKET HISTORY RAMP: 3,000 S.F.

THIRD FLOOR LEVEL SORTING ROOM: 18,000 S.F. DRONE AND ROBOT DAYCARE: 3,500 S.F. MULTI-MEDIA SPACE: 4,500 S.F. BATHROOM: 1,000 S.F. MARKET SPACE: 30,000 S.F. MAXWELL STREET MARKET HISTORY RAMP: 3,000 S.F.

CONVEYORS AND VERTICAL LIFT SYSTEM

SECOND FLOOR LEVEL

UN IO

N

AV E

WAREHOUSE: 29,000 S.F. CONFERENCE AND OFFICE: 3,500 S.F. MECHANICAL ROOM: 1,500 S.F. BATHROOM: 1,000 S.F. MARKET SPACE: 20,000 S.F. MAXWELL STREET MARKET HISTORY RAMP: 3,000 S.F.

S

ROBOT ARM DETAIL

W

GROUND LEVEL

AX

M

WAREHOUSE: 18,000 S.F. CONFERENCE AND OFFICE: 2,000 S.F. SECURITY OFFICE: 600 S.F. EMPLOYEE REC ROOM: 1,800 S.F. UBER ITEM PICKUP AREA: 4,000 S.F. PARKING: 10,000 S.F.

ST

177 OPERATIONAL AXONOMETRIC

L EL

W

UBER AND BIKE PICK UP DETAIL

PROJECTS

VERTICAL LIFT MODULUS AND DRONE DOCK


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

DRONE LAUNCHER

VERTICAL LIFT MODULUS AND DRONE DOCK

178


PROJECTS

DRONE TRAFFIC LEVEL

ROOF LEVEL COMMUNITY GARDEN: 10,000 S.F. BATHROOM: 1,500 S.F. MARKET SPACE: 50,000 S.F. MAXWELL STREET MARKET HISTORY RAMP: 3,000 S.F.

179


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

VERTICAL LIFT MODULUS AND DRONE DOCK

ROBOT ARM DETAIL

S

180

UN

IO

CONVEYORS AND VERTICAL LIFT SYSTEM


THIRD FLOOR LEVEL

PROJECTS

SORTING ROOM: 18,000 S.F. DRONE AND ROBOT DAYCARE: 3,500 S.F. MULTI-MEDIA SPACE: 4,500 S.F. BATHROOM: 1,000 S.F. MARKET SPACE: 30,000 S.F. MAXWELL STREET MARKET HISTORY RAMP: 3,000 S.F.

SECOND FLOOR LEVEL

NI

ON

AV E

WAREHOUSE: 29,000 S.F. CONFERENCE AND OFFICE: 3,500 S.F. MECHANICAL ROOM: 1,500 S.F. BATHROOM: 1,000 S.F. MARKET SPACE: 20,000 S.F. MAXWELL STREET MARKET HISTORY RAMP: 3,000 S.F.

181


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

UBER AND BIKE PICK UP DETAIL

OPERATIONAL AXONOMETRIC

182


W

GROUND LEVEL

ST 183

PROJECTS

L

EL

W

AX

M

WAREHOUSE: 18,000 S.F. CONFERENCE AND OFFICE: 2,000 S.F. SECURITY OFFICE: 600 S.F. EMPLOYEE REC ROOM: 1,800 S.F. UBER ITEM PICKUP AREA: 4,000 S.F. PARKING: 10,000 S.F.


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Urban Apparatus Jihye Choe

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The Maxwell Street Market is a Chicago tradition of bargains and bargaining with an international flavo . About a mile long and located in the shadow of downtown skyscrapers, it maintained its tradition for more than 100 years. However, the number of visitors are getting decreased recently and presumably, it might be because of its transformed city. Market’s current location can be described that it is blocked by Chicago River on the east side, Dan Ryan Expressway on the west, Chicago-Kansas City Expressway on the north, and Metra Railroad on the south. Considering its surroundings, it became hard to access compare to the past. Since ‘Street Market’ has unique features that attract people’s interest, people are still visiting this Maxwell street market every Sunday for a while. But on the other side, the street market can hardly fulfill people s desire to buy what they need in their life. So, after enjoying vibrant Sunday morning’s street market, people tend to direct their steps toward big markets such as Whole Foods Market, Target, or Home Depot. By investigating how people move from the Maxwell street market, their movement composed two strong axes along Desplaines Street where 185

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the market is, and West Roosevelt Road where big markets are located. However, except these two axes, other area is still inactive, hard to find pedestrians on the streets. So, there needs a new plan to make the whole area active, and spreading commercial zone will lead people’s movement to several other directions. Then how is it possible to make new market places on the original city ground? What if the city, Chicago grid is flexible and movable? Supposing the grid can be slightly changed, newly expanded area can be designed as a new public space or market place. Such deconstruction of Chicago grid can suggest a possibility of putting new programs in between original blocks. Because the whole city is organic so that each block affects other blocks, transforming one spot will influence other . By moving a few blocks, it becomes possible to design new urban space.

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187 PROJECTS


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Maxwell Palimpsest Ark Complex = Mist Maker @6 units Mist Maker unit = M# @4 units

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PROJECTS Attracting Urban Elements Ark Complex = Mist Maker @6 units Assuming that new spaces are created by controlling grids, it becomes important to decide what kind of urban programs can be put there. Because the main purpose of making new spaces throughout the city is to lead people toward inactive zones, it needs to be considered how to induce people to move toward other parts. So I categorized possible elements which can attract people, and set a certain circumstance of putting a program on the intersection of narrow street and wide street. So when these elements start on the corner of intersection, people would expect to see something when they turn the corner. Then, it works well as a strong attraction point. Things are classified in o 7 types- panel, bridge, pavilion, bench, paint, greenery. And these are selected depends on the width of street, for example, when a distance between two opposite buildings is 120ft, ‘Painting on the Street and building facade’ is chosen to be designed.

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191 PROJECTS


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Pavilion Movable Unit structure for Vendors A unit of pavilion is used as kiosk when vendors want to sell their products. Since this unit doesn’t have ÿ xed surface of wall, everything can be newly organized by adding partitions or panels. Or else, when it’s not a market day, the structure can be opened for public to sit on.

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Pavilion - Roof Roof Pavilion Covering Three-way intersection Usually cars go underneath this roof pavilion, but on a market day, the road is blocked and vendors are allowed to set up their own kiosks. Since the pavilion can be seen from three di° erent sides, there are more possibilities for pedestrians to notice this structrue and come toward it.


PROJECTS Paint

Paint

Paint over the Building facade and road

Circular Paint on the Pedestrian way

On the surfaces of builidng facade and street of the intersection, it’s designed to be color-painted. That is for people to see the one on the wider road ÿ rst and to realize that it’s continued to the other one on the narrower street. It induces people to walk toward the narrower one and after passing through it, people arrive at the next zone.

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Colored circular pattern on the street will make people to walk along that special pattern. This is one speciÿ c shape as an example, but the aim of this is to continue this pattern to narrow street so that pedestrians keep walking towards it.


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Street Design Reorganized street with roundabout Planning a roundabout on the intersection provides more green space in the middle and it puts pedestrians before cars since drivers reduce the speed when turning corners. It is a lot safer and when the way to the center of the intersection is planned, people can be part of that scenery.

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Bridge Multi-bridges between markets When there are several adjacent commercial buildings but not connected, customers have to walk all the way down to look for another entrance on the ground level. It cuts o° their Ë› ow of shopping, so when a bridge becomes a passage to go over the street, people have more options to choose what they need to buy. And bridges can also be planned as secondary market with linearly aligned kiosks.


Panel

Bench + Greenery Green space with benches along the sidewalk

When there are randomly placed poles extruding from the building facade, they become objects of behavior a° ordances. Poles which are knee-high above the ground a° ords sitting on, and some which are elbow-high would a° ords leaning on. So irregulary located poles can induce people to do something in that zrea.

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When the levels of the sidewalk and the road di° ers, pedestrains get to have more opportunities to sit on some benches. And they don’t need to stare at cars whether they approach or not while taking a rest. Then this condition creates safer and greener space.

PROJECTS

Poles attached to the building facade


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PROJECTS This skyview map shows which menu can be adopted in a certain spot and this whole design shows transformed city with newly added public space and market places. This suggestion based on the original chicago city grid sounds unrealistic, but it can be imagined as a possibility to design a new urban space in the future.

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Maxwell Village Ali Keshmiri

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Signage and solicitation played a prominent role in characterizing Maxwell Street Market’s identity and attraction during its prosperous years. Comparing it to its current forms of business-to-consumer communication strategies, Maxwell Village is derived from the concept of how architecture can be shaped through marketing and advertisement, both from vendors and through the Maxwell Organization. To maximize its exposure to the greater public, the market is relocated to the unused spaces of the UIC-Halsted Blue line station, allowing better accessibility, convenience, and most importantly noticeability. The Village consists of ten themed structures categorized based on the goods sold, each designed around signage visibility and exposure. However, the market’s spectacle is heavily promoted through the satellite division of the Maxwell Village, which consists of recreating the market on the transit system itself. Each car on the Maxwell Village Train corresponds to a theme from the market, which includes satellite vendors to sell their goods to users who ride this train for their regular commute. These marketing strategies are the building blocks that have driven the design of the market, as a way of restoring its unique identity to contemporary competitive standards. 199

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Top: historic photo of prominent signage use in Maxwell Street Market Bottom: archived signage from Maxwell Street Market

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PROJECTS Railway “Market” Precedents Top: Maeklong Railway Market, Thailand Bottom: Books on the ‘L’, Chicago

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S. TILDEN ST

S. MORGAN ST

THE RECREATION ROOM

THE LAB

THE PARLOR

THE ARMOIRE

THE SAFE

THE STUDY

THE KITCHEN

THE CONFECTIONERY

THE GREENHOUSE

1,500 SQFT HARDWARE TOOLS CONSTRUCTION GEAR

1,000 SQFT SPORTING GOODS TOYS/GAMES

1,000 SQFT ELECTRONICS PHONES WIRES ROUTERS ACCESSORIES

3,000 SQFT SEASONAL GOODS FURNITURE HOME ACCESSORIES KITCHEN ACCESSORIES ANTIQUES

2,500 SQFT MENS APPAREL WOMENS APPAREL KIDS APPAREL SHOES BAGS

1,000 SQFT WATCHES JEWELERY VALUABLES

1000 SQFT BOOKS VINYL MUSIC MOVIES STATIONARY SUPPLIES

3,000 SQFT INTERNATIONAL SAVORY FOODS

1,200 SQFT PASTRIES & DESSERTS

2,000 SQFT PRODUCE SPICES DRIED GOODS TEAS &COFFEE PLANTS

SCALE 1’ : 1/32”

N

Plan of Maxwell Village

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FINE

THE WOODSHOP

999.9

NET WT 1000g

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER EXPY

GOLD

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER EXPY


S. PEORIA ST

FINE

999.9

NET WT 1000g

GOLD

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER EXPY

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PROJECTS

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER EXPY


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Section of Maxwel Village

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PROJECTS SCALE 1’ : 1/32”

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N


THE WOODSHOP

THE CONFECTIONERY

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

THE WOODSHOP

THE CONFECTIONERY

THE LAB

THE PARLOR

THE LAB

THE PARLOR

THE KITCHEN

Taxonomy of Maxwell Village structures and their moving facades as signage

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THE ARMOIRE


THE ARMOIRE

THE SAFE

THE ARMOIRE

THE SAFE

THE ARMOIR

THE STUDY

THE RECREATION ROOM

THE STUDY

THE RECREATION ROOM

THE GREENHOUSE

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PROJECTS

THE KITCHEN

THE RECREA


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Greenhouse car of the Maxwell Village Train

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A Compact Maxwell Street Market Duha Hamdan

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As a first time user to the Maxwell Street Market, I struggled to find y way around, to figu e out what the vendors are selling, where I can buy certain items and where the service facilities are located. So I started by charting out the items the vendors sold, the exact locations of the services, coming out with four different categories for the vendors: Clothing Vendors, Food Vendors, Trade Vendors, and Home Goods Vendors. On the palimpsest, the vendors are connected by direct lines between vendors of the same kind, with the categories color coded, and the services areas within their service radius marked out. This translated into an analytical model that showed the chaotic connections and the different categories of goods sold at the Maxwell Street Market. As a solution for the market, I began by folding the existing plan into the existing parking lot to create a multi-level structure that can hold the full capacity number of vendors set by the Maxwell Street Market management on a smaller foot print. The folding of the plan created four levels, and within the intersecting areas of where those levels intersect, different services were placed (ATMs, Elevators, Bathrooms, Storage, and 211

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offices . Columns and walkways create a structural system onto which the different vendor sheds can be placed into their desired positions using a forklift. The vendor sheds come in three different sizes and are all equipped with built in recycling and landfill garbage eceptacles, hand sanitizing pump, and color-changing lighted signs which will help identify what the vendor is selling on that day according to the different categories predetermined by the market, and help guide the customer towards that vendor. In order to attract more customers to the market, new functions were included in the market, such as a children’s playground and exhibition gardens. In addition a flexibility to the structure was kept in mind by using foldable glass partitions between beams, retractable flooring between walkways and retractable roof curtains in order to add more programs as needed, and where it is needed, and utilize the structure for other various functions when the market is off.

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO The fla image plan to the left shows the Maxwell Street Market vendor locations with color indicators referencing to what each vendor was selling on that day, the image on the right shows a folded multi-floo version of the Maxwell Street market, and how the colors could be translated into light indicators.

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PROJECTS Site Plan: Proposed building on current parking lot space, with the office o be demolished and relocated within the building

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO GROUND FLOOR PLAN

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2 3 4 5

FAMILY RESTROOM WOMENS RESTROOM MENS RESTROOM ELEVATOR FOYER STORAGE OFFICE

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7 8 9 10 11

ATM MACHINE FRIEGHT ELEVATOR FORKLIFT STORAGE ROOM VENDOR SHED EXHIBITION GARDENS

FAMILY RESTROOM WOMENS RESTROOM MENS RESTROOM ELEVATOR FOYER STORAGE

6 7 8 9 10

OFFICE ATM MACHINE FRIEGHT ELEVATOR FORKLIFT STORAGE ROOM VENDOR SHED


PROJECTS SECOND FLOOR PLAN

THIRD FLOOR PLAN

1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2 3 4 5

FAMILY RESTROOM WOMENS RESTROOM MENS RESTROOM ELEVATOR FOYER STORAGE OFFICE

7 8 9 10 11 12

ATM MACHINE FRIEGHT ELEVATOR FORKLIFT STORAGE ROOM VENDOR SHED CHILDREN PLAYGROUND SAND BOX

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FAMILY RESTROOM WOMENS RESTROOM MENS RESTROOM ELEVATOR FOYER STORAGE

6 7 8 9 10

OFFICE ATM MACHINE FRIEGHT ELEVATOR FORKLIFT STORAGE ROOM VENDOR SHED


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO BIRDS EYE PERSPECTIVE Retractable roof screens can be used for protection against the elements (Sun, Rain and Snow). Vendor can sell various items, customers are guided by the color coded lighting system, and vendors

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PROJECTS are not limited to one location but rather they choose their location on availabity

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE: Movable screens can be used as advertising panels for the goods sold in the market in its new form. Colored light indicators help guide the customers towards vendors who are selling what they are looking for

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223 PROJECTS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Thermoscapes Kimberly Jean Arciniega

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Imitating Chicago’s climatic variations and the atmospheric logic of the Supermarket, this project proposes a new generation of Maxwell Street Market which takes root on Desplaines Street. Named after Galileo’s temperature instrument (thermoscope), Thermoscape market produces climatic variations through a system of walls, columns, and material properties connected to an underground mechanical chamber. The Market contests the idea of thermal comfort and its own current vulnerability to relocation, exposed physical state, and economic constraints by embracing the idea of weather as its cultural producer and product. While, Maxwell Market is meant to exist on a Sunday year round, it lacks the infrastructure to be not only comfortable for visitors, but also for the participants of the market: the vendors, maintenance, and security personnel. The new climate organization will be composed of three zones, all equipped with the capability to adjust humidity: Hot, Cool, and Temperate. The distribution of zones is manifested through the construction of not only the atmospheric conditions but also the materiality of new architectural infrastructures. 225

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

W POLK ST

S DESPLAINES ST

W CABRINI ST

W TAYLOR ST

N 1/32”= 1’ 0”

THE MAXWELL MARKET MANIFESTO: THERMOSCAPE MARKET

Starting in the North, the cool climate contains areas for a sauna, freezer storage, and experiential spaces- imitating the logic of projects like the Blur Building, Rain Room, and spray misters in the produce section of the super market. The logic behind this area is that IMITATING CHICAGO’S CLIMATIC VARIATIONS AND THE ATMOSPHERIC LOGIC OF THE SUPERMARKET, THIS PROJECT PROPOSES A NEW GENERATION OF MAXWELL STREET MARKET WHICH TAKES ROOT ON DESPLAINES STREET. NAMED AFTER GALILEO’S TEMPERATURE INSTRUMENT (THERMOSCOPE), THERMOSCAPE MARKET PRODUCES CLIMATIC VARIATIONS THROUGH A SYSTEM OF WALLS, COLUMNS, AND MATERIAL PROPERTIES CONNECTED TO AN UNDERGROUND MECHANICAL CHAMBER. THE THERMOSCOPE THE MARKET CONTESTS THE IDEA OF THERMAL COMFORT AND ITS OWN CURRENT VULNERABILITY TO RELOCATION, EXPOSED PHYSICAL STATE, AND ECONOMIC CONSTRAINTS BY EMBRACING THE IDEA OF WEATHER AS ITS CULTURAL PRODUCER AND PRODUCT.

WHILE, MAXWELL MARKET IS MEANT TO EXIST ON A SUNDAY YEAR ROUND, IT LACKS THE INFRASTRUCTURE TO BE NOT ONLY COMFORTABLE FOR VISITORS, BUT ALSO

FOR THE PARTICIPANTS OF THE MARKET: THE VENDORS, MAINTENANCE, AND SECURITY PERSONNEL.

THE NEW CLIMATE ORGANIZATION WILL BE COMPOSED OF THREE ZONES, ALL EQUIPPED WITH THE CAPABILITY TO ADJUST HUMIDITY: HOT, COOL, AND TEMPERATE. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ZONES IS MANIFESTED THROUGH THE CONSTRUCTION OF NOT ONLY THE ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS BUT ALSO THE MATERIALITY OF NEW ARCHITECTURAL INFRASTRUCTURES.

226

STARTING IN THE NORTH, THE COOL CLIMATE CONTAINS AREAS FOR A SAUNA, FREEZER STORAGE, AND EXPERIENTIAL SPACES IMITATING THE LOGIC OF PROJECTS LIKE THE BLUR BUILDING, RAIN ROOM, AND SPRAY MISTERS IN THE PRODUCE SECTION OF THE SUPER MARKET. THE LOGIC BEHIND THIS AREA IS THAT WHILE IT MAY SEEMINGLY DESIGNATE ZONES, IT ALLOWS FOR A DISTRIBUTION OF MARKET VENDORS THAT COULD BENEFIT FROM SUCH CLIMATIC CONDITIONS EITHER THROUGH ATMOSPHERIC PRODUCT RELATIONSHIPS OR SIMPLY THROUGH ADJACENCIES. THE USE OF GLASS EMPHASIZES THE CONNECTION TO WEATHER PRODUCTION BY ALLOWING VISITORS TO SEE THE INNER PIPEWORK. ADJACENT TO THE PRODUCE/RAW FOOD SECTION AND MOVING SOUTH, FOLLOWS THE WARM/DELI ZONE ALSO CREATING TENSIONS OR INTERMEDIARY ATMOSPHERIC QUALITIES. THIS ARENA FOLLOWS THE LOGIC OF PLACES WHICH ARE EITHER MECHANICALLY HEATED, ENVIRONMENTALLY HEATED, OR SIMPLY BECOME WARMER THROUGH A HIGHER VISITOR PRESENCE. THE AREA CONTAINS A GREEN HOUSE, RESTROOM FACILITIES, AND A PERFORMANCE AREA, AS WELL AS A MARKET AREA


PROJECTS while it may seemingly designate zones, it allows for a distribution of market vendors that could benefit from such climatic conditions either through atmospheric product relationships or simply through adjacencies. The use of glass emphasizes the connection to weather

227


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO production by allowing visitors to see the inner pipework. Adjacent to the produce/raw food section and moving south, follows the warm/deli zone also creating tensions or intermediary atmospheric qualities. This arena follows the logic of places which are either me-

228


PROJECTS chanically heated, environmentally heated, or simply become warmer through a higher visitor presence. The area contains a green house, restroom facilities, and a performance area, as well as a market area conceptualized to include the deli logic of a supermarket such as the

229


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO production by allowing visitors to see the inner pipework. Adjacent to the produce/raw food section and moving south, follows the warm/deli zone also creating tensions or intermediary atmospheric qualities. This arena follows the logic of places which are either me-

230


PROJECTS chanically heated, environmentally heated, or simply become warmer through a higher visitor presence. The area contains a green house, restroom facilities, and a performance area, as well as a market area conceptualized to include the deli logic of a supermarket such as the

231


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO production by allowing visitors to see the inner pipework. Adjacent to the produce/raw food section and moving south, follows the warm/deli zone also creating tensions or intermediary atmospheric qualities. This arena follows the logic of places which are either mechanically heated, environmentally heated, or simply become warmer through a higher visitor presence. The area contains a green house, restroom facilities, and a performance area, as well as a market area conceptualized to include the deli logic of a supermarket such as the food vendors and products benefitting or needing a warmer climate.

232


PROJECTS Radiators and spray misters also regulate and monitor warmth. The focus material for this zone is concrete to take advantage of its thermal properties. The final zone is the temperate section dedicated mostly to retail space. Advocating for the creation of shopping malls, Victor Gruen, argued that “providing a year-round climate of ‘eternal spring’ the shopping center consciously pampers the shopper, who reacts gratefully by arriving from longer distances, visiting the center more frequently, staying longer, and in consequence contributing to higher scales figures”. His suggestions and the creation of mall asso-

233


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Initial Iterations of Weather Defined Mar et.

234


PROJECTS Tent Types of Maxwell Street Market.

235


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Maxwell Square SooMin Kim

236


Maxwell Street Market was an iconic location to shop when it established around the late 19th century. However, due to the construction of Dan Ryan Expressway in 1957 and The University of Illinois at Chicago’s (UIC) expansion in the 1990s, it has significantly educed from occupying approximately nine blocks (from east to west) to little over two blocks (from north to south) and it only opens on Sundays from 10 AM to 3 PM, steering away most of its vendors from the new proposed business structure for the Market (proper business license, annual fee, restrictions, etc.). Although many vendors had to close their business due to drastically reduced profi , there is one part of Maxwell Street Market that seems to be strong still. That is Food. If customers’ objectives are not to come to Maxwell to hunt for bargained goods, they are coming for the food and its cultural context within. Early analysis of this project had introduced the concept of “slow food” to Maxwell with hopes that this will bring more people to Maxwell who are not within Maxwell’s clientele scope. However, that seemed to have a conflicting argument with the reason why people are visiting the market and showed possibility of 237

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losing its current clientele. Therefore, instead of trying to change the way food is made, it proposes to celebrate the greasy, hearty, traditional food that is central to the Maxwell Street Market by centrally organizing the vendors where it becomes the heart of the market and to have the rest of the vendors branch off of it. First proposal to the Maxwell Street Market is to relocate it to an abandoned lot next to the Chicago River, which is located near many attraction point such as the ICON movie theater, Target, and the famous Sky Deck few blocks down. Given the market’s relocation through the years across many sites, current location is not supporting it, in fact, it is hurting it. Second proposal is to introduce a structure to combine all of Maxwell Street Market vendors, food and merchandise, and create a community to make it a destination point. The idea of this community will later bring previous Maxwell Street Market vendors, such as Jim’s Original Hotdog, back only to grow from now on.

238


239 PROJECTS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Instead of trying to grow and develop within its current location, I have proposed to move the Maxwell Street market to an abandoned site that is next to the Chicago lake.

240


PROJECTS On this site plan, the old and new proposed location is indicated. Since Maxwell Street market has already experienced the big move from its original location within currently UIC to a small three block area around warehouses, I believe it would be beneficial for them to move to a location that is more populated by main attractions around it such as the ICON movie theater or the Willis Tower couple blocks north.

241


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO After series of sketches and diagram, I was able to come up with two best shapes that made the best use of the site available. Also, instead of making it one level, I have proposed to combine two shapes, making the building 2 levels.

242


243 PROJECTS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

UP

244


DN

PROJECTS

Open to Below

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246

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


247 PROJECTS


248

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


249 PROJECTS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Green and Public Spaces for Maxwell Street Market Sara Peña

250


Located west of the city of Chicago, the Green and Public Spaces for Maxwell Street Market project is an new architectural concept which shows different qualities to the various parks that already exist in the city. The project is defined a landscape in ervention in an industrial zone, in order to take advantage of the potential the area has and also be able to highlight them. The project will be able to adapt on a zone where there is no green spaces but it will also be able to adapt to its surroundings with the help of parking lots, building facades and existing green spaces. The project is solved in different blocks which include urban parks, coffee shops / restaurants, a green house and on the second level is a large promenade where the Maxwell Street Market will be located. Here there are also going to be common areas, social spaces and walkways for pedestrians in order to see the entire project. The project also includes an intervention to the building facades turning them into green walls and the intervention of parking lots. The existing green areas will be preserved and given equal importance for the entire project.

251

PROJECTS

Manifesto


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Site Study 3

Noticing the big difference the third site study zooms out even more, including UIC and residential areas from the west side. The difference between both spaces is now more drastic. Understanding that the west side includes UIC, which is a campus therefore making it greener and the east side being and industrial zone it doesn’t have this type of benefit. So I decided to use the market knowing that it’s a public space as an starting point to the development of green areas on this side of the city. Study Models

The study models demonstrate how the design analysis began, where it shows that the market will still be the most important part in the project.

252


253 PROJECTS


254

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


255 PROJECTS


256

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


257 PROJECTS


258

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


259 PROJECTS


260

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


261 PROJECTS


262

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO


263 PROJECTS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Maxwell Boat Market Derar Alchikh Ibrahim

264


Since the main idea from my initial research was about movement, I propose moving the market onto the river. In this case it would be everything moving including the market itself. The existing market location is far from the city center, in an area without many people, and hard to reach. So I studied the path of Chicago Architecture Boat Tour and found how it is accessible and very popular. I thought to bring this liveliness to the market, and bring more visitors, and in my aspect moving the market through Chicago River will rich it with diversity, So it can visit many neighborhoods in the city. Boat size: 125’ * 50’ = 6250 sq f Tent size 10’ * 10’ = 100 sq f Total of tent venders is 44 on the ship and 45 small boats. 14 tents in Clark station. The boat stop in six different location: Union/ Ogilvie train station; Kenzie / river north; Lasalle/ Clark Street; Michigan Ave; McClurg Ct.; Navy pier. In each deck the ship has waiting time one hour so the people can know decide which stop they want to go or getting off.

265

PROJECTS

Manifesto


McClurg Kinzie

Michigan

NavyPier Lasalle/Clark

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Oglivie/Union

RiverCity

Section A

Section A

Floor Plan

Urban Plan, Site Plan and Section: The site plan and the section are for the station on Clark/Lasalle st. I show in this plan the close interrelationship between the ferry and the boats surrounding on one hand, and between them and the static elements in the existing location on the

266


PROJECTS Boat and the Tent.

267


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Rendering 01 Boat Market activities

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269 PROJECTS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Rendering 02 Boat Market activities

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271 PROJECTS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Rendering 03 Boat Market activities

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273 PROJECTS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Transit_Hub Lorenis J. Rosario

274


The Transit-Hub’s proposal focuses on creating an urban area much more accessible and appealing for pedestrians, for the purpose of reducing the use of private vehicles in the area, in order to give priority to public transport. Maxwell Street Market is currently situated within a very nice network of public transportation (CTA bus stops, Blue Line trains, Greyhound, etc.), suggesting that the market’s area is favoring public transportation vs. private. Nevertheless, when you walk to the Market the walk doesn’t feel safe, and it can be described as deserted because you won’t see people until you arrive the Market. Therefore, an opportunity was presented to bring alive The Maxwell Street Market through something bigger, and consequently transforming the entire sector. The proposal is achieved by placing hubs were there are bus stops today, unifying them in order to make the waiting experience fun and comfortable for those waiting. The transit hub’s architecture looks like it’s peeling from the ground, following a colorful path that leads you to The Market. Inside each hub you will find a comfortable place for seating, bathrooms, vending machines, and some fun elements like swings and see275

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

saws, among others to make the waiting bearable. In addition to the hub intervention, the project intends to seize the parking lots near the hubs in order to provide additional retailing space for the market, and clearly, to promote the idea of a car-free area. Transit-Hubs has the potential to keep growing on the entire city, but for now it’s main goal is to create a pedestrian friendly getaway in the city, reducing the usage of private vehicles, and bringing attention to The Market.

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277 PROJECTS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Inside View of a Transit_Hub

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279 PROJECTS


Painted Pavement

Market Tents

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO The transit_hub site plan shows how the bus stops have been uniďŹ ed by the placement of the hubs. Each one of them was designed to look like their skin is peeling and elevating from the ground, which has also been designed to form a colorful path that leads the pedestrians

280


PROJECTS

Permanent Market

to the Market and vice versa.

281


Transit Hub #1

Transit_Hub #1 Floor Plan

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Floor Plan

Transit_Hub #1 Side Elevation

inside each hub you can ďŹ nde a comfortable place for seating, bathrooms, vending machines, and some fun elements like seesaws and swings, among other to make the waiting experience, bearable.

282


PROJECTS

Transit_Hub #2 Floor Plan

in addition to the hub intervention, the project intends to seieze the parking lots near the hubs in order to provide additional retailing space for the market vendors, and clearly, to promote the idea of a car-free area.

283


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO Even though the transit_hubs were designed and placed based on the actual bus stops of the CTA, there’s also the possibility of proposing a new type of transportation that serves only to The Maxwell St. Market.

284


PROJECTS

Transit_Hub #3 Floor Plan

Transit_Hub #3 Long Section

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO In addition to designing all the transit_hubs that facilitate the access to The Market to pedestrians, the project also proposes to make the market permanent, and redesign it entirely, including the tents.

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287 PROJECTS


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Four Gates Kate Barbaria

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The concept of this project is to fortify the territory that the Maxwell Street Market occupies—to make it more permanent and present in the collective consciousness of Chicago. The market has, historically, been a victim of its own softness. A heritage institution, it is both persistent, and incredibly fragile, in large part because it appears for only one day each week. The strategy is to use architectural languages of power (the elevation) and territory (the plan) to define the space, and in doing so, to create a new, firm in erior for the market. Interiors are privileged spaces in contemporary capitalist culture. To have an interior communicates value and/or security to those within it. To have a home is to have privilege and security, and further, to make an interior is to generate power. This project studies the basic elements that enclose an interior (walls and thresholds), and deploys them to make boundaries visible. This new border leverages the existing landscape that the market is currently sited at—mostly a low lying channel of blank brick walls—and builds off of it strategically. The border is permeable by cars during the week, and impermeable during market hours. However, it is visible at all 289

PROJECTS

Manifesto


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

times, exerting a continuous power. The border is not meant to be “secure�, but rather to act as a functional filter, as a sign, as a part of a set of tactics deployed to create an interior space out of no place. The gates are made out of materials that are found on the site, especially materials that are typically marginalized, boring, or tools of oppression (traffic cones, police barricades, wires, signs, cords, poles). These objects, or icons, are reconstituted into whimsical, machine-like creature-gates that, through their thickness, movement, and mass create a new firmer space.

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Walls, portals, thresholds, gates, and gatehouses Interiors are privileged spaces in contemporary capitalist culture. To have an interior communicates value and/or security to those within it. To have a home is to have privilege and security, and further, to make an interior is to generate power. The interior is created through elevation, section, and plan. The elevation is the spatial language of control, the plan is the language of terrorialization, and the section is the language of offense and defense. This project studies the basic elements that bound an interior: walls, and other dividing or filtering devices.

Door: A hard vertical surface that is impermeable, but can open and close to alow things to pass from one side of the surface to another. Gate: Similar to a door, but usually on the periphery of a territory, and larger. Not every private space has a gate. They are often found in locations where different levels of filtration are required between spaces. Gates can allow in large amounts of things, while doors are closer to the center and are therefore more selective. Portal: A portal is a gap in a wall or other surface that actively transports things from one location to another. Portals do not necessarily have doors or gates, and are often magical. Threshold: The area surrounding and immediately beneath a door, gate, or portal. Thresholds bridge material changes and they highlight the passage from one location to another.

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PROJECTS

Wall: A hard vertical surface that is impermeable.


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Gate House North Elevation at Harrison and Des Plaines 1/4” = 1’-0”

Gate House South Elevation at Harrison and Des Plaines 1/4” = 1’-0”

Gate House Plan 1/4” = 1’-0”

A study of walls, portals, doors, thresholds, gatehouses, and other filtering and blocking mechanisms

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PROJECTS Material palette of Maxwell Street Market site

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passage from one location to another.

ls, portals, thresholds, gates, and gatehouses

riors are privileged spaces in contemporary capitalist culture. have an interior communicates value and/or security to those in it. To have a home is to have privilege and security, and her, to make an interior is to generate power. The interior eated through elevation, section, and plan. The elevation e spatial language of control, the plan is the language of orialization, and the section is the language of offense and ense.

s project studies the basic elements that bound an interior: s, and other dividing or filtering devices.

l: A hard vertical surface that is impermeable.

r: A hard vertical surface that is impermeable, but can open close to alow things to pass from one side of the surface to ther.

e: Similar to a door, but usually on the periphery of a territory, larger. Not every private space has a gate. They are often nd in locations where different levels of filtration are required ween spaces. Gates can allow in large amounts of things, e doors are closer to the center and are therefore more ctive.

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

al: A portal is a gap in a wall or other surface that actively sports things from one location to another. Portals do not essarily have doors or gates, and are often magical.

eshold: The area surrounding and immediately beneath a r, gate, or portal. Thresholds bridge material changes and y highlight the passage from one location to another.

Sketches of interiror elevations of gates, made up of gates from study

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PROJECTS Sketches of interiror elevations of gates, made up of materials found around market site

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S. Desplaines

MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

W. Harrison

at the borders of the market’s territory, gates filter flows of traffic

Collage showing interior of market, with painted street and new gate structure

beneath the trees lining the street are painted traces of market seating and traffic cones that delinenate the seating space

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the marks act as stage set, or a ghost, leaving a twodimensional trace throughout the week that blossoms into three dimensions during market hours


S. Desplaines W. Harrison

at the borders of the market’s territory, gates filter flows of traffic

beneath the trees lining the street are painted traces of market seating and traffic cones that delinenate the seating space the marks act as stage set, or a ghost, leaving a twodimensional trace throughout the week that blossoms into three dimensions during market hours

the street within the market’s territory is painted vibrant colors, clearly marking boundaries, thresholds, and the interior space

S. Jefferson

this surface treatment is persistent, allowing the market’s presence to remain strong in the collective conciousness of the city

S. Jefferson

PROJECTS

W. Polk

W. Cabrini

the market is condensed and reorganized to accommodate up to 400 vendors and the vendors are distruibuted into fresh produce, general goods, handmade items, and hot food this organization reflects best practices of other heritage markets around the country

S. Desplaines

W. Taylor

Maxwell Street Market site plan 1” = 80’-0’

Site plan of Maxwell Street Market

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MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Elevation at W. Polk and S. Jefferson outside looking in 1/4” = 1’-0”

Elevation at W. Polk and S. Jefferson inside looking out 1/4” = 1’-0”

Plan at W. Polk and S. Jefferson 1/4” = 1’-0”

City-facing and market-facing elevations, plan

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Elevation at S. Desplaines and W. Harrison inside looking out 1/4” = 1’-0”

Plan at S. Desplaines and W. Harrison 1/4” = 1’-0”

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PROJECTS

Elevation at S. Desplaines and W. Harrison outside looking in 1/4” = 1’-0”


MARKET(SPACE) MANIFESTO

Elevation at S. Desplaines and W. Taylor outside looking in 1/4” = 1’-0”

Elevation at S. Desplaines and W. Taylor inside looking out 1/4” = 1’-0”

Plan at S. Desplaines and W. Taylor 1/4” = 1’-0”

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Elevation at W. Cabrini and S. Jefferson inside looking out 1/4” = 1’-0”

Plan at W. Cabrini and S. Jefferson 1/4” = 1’-0”

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PROJECTS

Elevation at W. Cabrini and S. Jefferson outside looking in 1/4” = 1’-0”


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