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Angela Lufkin M.Arch I Candidate Design Portfolio


Angela Lufkin angela.lufkin@gmail.com 28 Houghton St Somerville, MA 02143

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CONTENT

1120 E Apache Blvd

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Multi-family Housing Fall 2013 Tempe, AZ

Learning In Place

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Honors Thesis Spring 2015 Phoenix, AZ

Station 9

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Fire Station Fall 2014 Tempe, AZ

Burst

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Bird Watching Pavilion Fall 2012 Tempe, AZ

Professional

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Professional Work Summer 2015 - Present Tempe, AZ / Boston, MA

Sketchbook

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Personal Work Ongoing

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1120 E APACHE BLVD

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Year Instructor Location Award

Fall 2013

Introduction

As the Baby Boomers enter their elderly years, the image of the senior lifestyle is rapidly evolving. A design for an age 50+ multi-family housing community is proposed, which seeks to integrate, rather than marginalize, the aging population with youth culture. Capitalizing on its proximity to Arizona State University, the project proposes learning and making oriented facilities and ease of access to educational opportunities on campus. Though the architecture suggests a strong public face, its interior cultivates a private oasis in which the seniors can benefit from a shared neighborhood experience.

Greg Brickey Tempe, AZ Design Excellence Winner


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Youth has no age. - Picasso

Key Research The number of college students aged 40 64 has increased 20% over the last decade and continues to rise. “Through social interactions alone, the young can pass some of their vigor on to the elderly, improving the older generation’s cognitive abilities and vascular health and even increasing their life span.� - Erica Westly, The Scientific American

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Independent Senior Living

Internal Community

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University Value

Privacy

Health + Wellness

Teaching + Learning

Community Interaction

Meeting Resident Needs

Responding to Site Conditions

Connecting to the Community 7


Interior Neighborhood Arrayed around a circular courtyard, the units include a private entry which caters to a “front porch� neighborhood culture. Older residents can benefit from the exercise of an uninterrupted stroll while visiting with others. It poses a distinct contrast to the more outwardly oriented ground floor.

View 1

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Individualized front porches along interior neighborhood courtyard walk.


View 2 Typical unit kitchen and dining space.

Key

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Shops Multi-Purpose Gallery Workshop Coffee shop Multi-Purpose Performance Bathrooms Lobby Gym Pool Community Patio

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1 2

Typical Upper Floor Plan 9


View 3 Outdoor cafe seating along light rail corridor.

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View 4 Work/Shop public plaza

Urban Strategy The ground floor podium projects to the street edges, creating a more continuous, though porous, street wall which drastically increases walkability. Functioning as a pinwheel plan, outdoor rooms with distinctive character are formed, allowing the interior life of the project to spill onto the street.

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LEARNING IN PLACE The Tactical Architecture of Resource Based Education

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Year Advisors Critic Location Award

Spring 2015

Introduction

In response to the modern discussion of secondary education reform, a design is proposed for a decentralized high school composed of a network of hybridized learning centers. The project adopts a pedagogy of Resource Based Learning and appropriates the Valley Metro Light Rail Line as a unifying infrastructure. In pursuit of symbiotic public/private relationships, the project offers a broad avenue of access to a diverse array of students and resources, ultimately visualizing a radical potential for the classroom of the 21st century.

Renata Hejduk, Phil Horton Martin Felsen, UrbanLab Phoenix Metro Area, AZ Design Excellence Winner


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1900s

1930s

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Explode the singular conception of the schoolhouse With a belief that architecture and pedagogy are intrinsically tied, the project proposes the complete decomposition of the current “school� typology.

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196

2

Deconstruct

In light of the constant chan deconstructed a fluid, place-s of personaliza resilient to ch


60s

the curriculum

post-digital climate of nge, the curriculum is d and unfixed, resulting in specific network, capable ation and inherently hange.

1990s

Today

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Distribute throughout the city along transportation corridors New emphasis is placed on the integration of education with the city and its resources, decentralizing the school into a network of learning centers located at key transportation hubs for maximum accessibility. 15


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Methodology Key transportation nodes are located and the surrounding city is analyzed based on a series of educational resources. This further categorizes the node in the broader scope of the curriculum structure. The available facilities of the city are then audited to determine what infrastructure is missing in order to absorb and facilitate the new learning network.

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Storyboarding the Student Experience

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Roof

Central Ave. + Cambelback R Transit Hub Learning Center on existing vacant lot.

Ground

Event

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Rd.

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Topology

Billboard

Platform

The roof structure unifies the project, mediating the flexible program below through ceiling heights that foster different levels of spatial intimacy.

The roof structure utilizes the module of a standard billboard, providing community art opportunities and serving as a revenue source for the project.

The Learning C integrates stud community by a covered tran trains, bikes, an offering shared for recreation, dining.


Center dents with the doubling as nsit hub for nd buses and d amenities retail, and

Workshop

Restaurant

In addition to shared community functions, the Learning Center provides workshop space for students to meet with their teachers and peers, work on online academic assignments, and attend programed classes and events.

Capitalizing on its proximity to notable local restaurants and a large community garden, this learning center thematically focuses on food systems and agriculture and features a restaurant run by students on the weekend.

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STATION 9

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Year Instructor Partner Location Award

Fall 2014

Introduction

As the symbolic role of the fire station evolves, the design proposal predicts a deeper, more open integration with the community served. A community center and park are introduced to the typology, providing opportunities for health, wellness, and prevention classes as well as cultural outreach. In this light, the project carefully balances the boundaries between work, private life, and community engagement, creating spaces of respite for the firefighter and, in a neighborhood wrought with vacancy, standing as a unifying gateway for local residents and beyond.

Dennis Bree Lena Ding Phoenix, AZ Design Excellence Winner


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Central Phoenix Fire Station Network

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Balancing Programs: Learning Center Community Beacon

Park Clinic Kitchen

Home

Dorms Gym Garage

Workplace

Offices Training Tower

New Identity, New Neighborhood In the car-oriented city of Phoenix, fire stations are typically set-back and inward looking. In relocating the old Station 9 closer to public transit and an up and coming development corridor, the new design seeks to recast the station identity, setting a community-oriented precedent for the surrounding neighborhood.

Existing Station

Program Objectives

Continued Education and In-Station Support

Center for Health, Wellness, and Prevention

Strong Community Presence and Relationships

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Private

Semi-private

Interconnections

Primary Thresholds

Public Park Training

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9

13

10

8

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Level 2

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3

4 1

5

2 8 6 7

Level 1

Key

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Apparatus Bay Turn-out Storage Kitchen + Dining Work Rooms Bathrooms Battalion Offices

7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Clinic Community Center Mezzanine Storage Dorms Washroom Day room

13. Gym 14. Park 15. Training Tower

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View 1

Community center front desk, view of educational programs beyond.

View 2 Firefighters lounge, view

out toward dorms and below to private covered patio.

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Passive Strategies Volumes which puncture the roof plane throughout the project provide passive cooling, heating, and ventilation while often doubling as reflective courtyards below. In the summer months, an integrated misting system evaporatively cools funneled air as it enters the building. The roof plane caters to lower sun angles in the winter, warming trapped interior air.

Summer

Winter

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BURST

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Year Instructor Location Award

Fall 2014

Introduction

A design is proposed for a bird-watching pavilion that is inspired by the rich vegetation that bursts forth from the cracks in the desert after rainfall and the similarly vibrant intensity of the roadrunner. Seeking to capture this elemental energy, the form accentuates the surrounding topography and connects two paths of an existing trail network. At its core, the pavilion isolates a unique moment of aviary interaction and draws the visitor into moments of motion and reflection.

Adam Tate Tempe, AZ Design Excellence Winner


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Existing Trails Project Site Moeur Park

Canal Underpass to Tempe Town Lake, ASU Campus

Physical Features

Food

20.5 in 21.3 in

19.3 in

Habitat

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Oddities


Exi

sti

ng

Tra

ils

Cut and Fill Intervention Land is extracted at the southwestern edge of the pavilion to connect to a nearby stream. This land is mounded to the north of the site against sharply angled retaining walls. The resulting manipulation highlights contrasting moments within the desert climate - both of which the roadrunner depends upon to survive.

Nesting The Greater Roadrunner Geococcyx californianus Ground-dwelling Cuckoo

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View 2 Framed Peak

View 1 South Bridge

Xeriscape Feeding Area Riparian Nesting Area Roadrunner Crossing

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Existing Trail Connection


Site Plan

Section A Looking South

Section B Looking North

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Section C Looking West

Experiencing the Desert The weathered steel structure appears to erupt from the earth, encapsulating the trail and choreographing the hiker through an iconic and reflective experience. The selfsustaining landscape and minimal pavilion require little maintenance and naturally embody the intensity of both the desert climate and the roadrunner.

Site Model

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View 3 Northern trail entrance, view of roadrunner crossing.

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PROFESSIONAL

Introduction

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The following presents a snapshot of my professional involvement after graduation from ASU in the Spring of 2015. I have had the privilege of contributing to the design and implementation of multi-scaled projects primarily in the public realm as an urban designer.


Office Date Project Team Role

Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, ASU Summer/Fall 2015 HIDA Facility Development Michael Underhill, Project Manager Working under the direction of the HIDA Interim Dean, Michael Underhill, I conducted research, designed, and created illustrative drawings for a presentation to the University President’s Office on HIDA facility development.

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Office Date Project Team

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Utile, Inc. Fall 2015 - Fall 2016 Malaysia Vision Valley Frame Plan Drew Kane, Project Manager Matthew Littell, Principal-In-Charge Larry Chan, Project Lead

Role

I was involved in the project from its beginning as a designer. Our scope included the generation of an open space network, FAR density heat map, transportation network, road hierarchy, and land use zoning for three large sub-districts that totaled about 28,000 acres. In addition to design contributions, I created the graphics and crunched the development numbers.


Office Date Project Team

Utile, Inc. Fall 2015 - Spring 2016 Revere Beach Creative District Drew Kane, Project Manager Sneha Lohoteker, Graphic Designer Tim Love, Principal-In-Charge

Role

As the main designer for this project, I worked on test fit development capacity scenarios before building out a vision design for the beach front which included infill buildings, exterior renovations, and the addition of a play structure, multiple shade pavilions, and a Ferris wheel (Sneha Lohoteker helped generate final graphics).

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Office Date Project Team

Utile, Inc. Winter 2016 - Present Cambridge Citywide Plan Meera Deean, Project Manager Tim Love, Principal-In-Charge Kennan Lagreze, Project Manager (Alewife) Nupoor Monani, Planner John McCartin, Planner

Role

I joined the project to work on the Alewife planning study which included development scenario test fits, 3D modeling, and the final generation of plan graphics. I also helped on graphic design and photography for the Cambridge Today and Alewife reports.


Office Date Project Team

Utile, Inc. Fall 2016 Imagine Boston 2030 Meera Deean, Project Manager Jessica Robertson, Campaign Manager Matthew Littell, Principal-In-Charge

Role

I was brought onto the team for the creation of the 4th engagement campaign. I designed the game, its graphics (with some help from Kyle Jonasen), built/ compiled the materials, trained the street team, and ran several of the events. My photography (including the cover photo) is also featured in the final plan book. 47


Office Date Project Team

Role

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Utile, Inc. Dec. 2017 domestiCITY for an Affordable Atlanta Competition Jeff Geisinger Charlotte Lipschitz Zach Campbell Ben Greer Nupoor Monani The competition, hosted by Atlanta City Studio, asked designers to explore “best practices & innovative strategies for the planning, design, construction, & operation of affordable & sustainable developments in increasingly urbanized areas” (domesticity.org). Our intent was to replace the existing SRO units on site with more permanent housing, and to exploit the inherent economies of small dwelling units by creating a community that integrates a more diverse and growing cross section of the population that for a variety of reasons—including age, health,

income, or job-related mobility—live alone; a community that is equally attractive to those with few options to leave and those who can choose to live elsewhere. I was heavily involved in the competition from initial research to final visualization. I focused on the site and urban scale, designing the park, mews streets, entry plaza sequence, and community pavilion. I graphicized the site plan, several exterior renderings, and hand drawn aerial views (all pictured).


Site Section by Jeff Geisinger

Wet Meadow

Metropolitan Pkwy

BRT Stop

Central Green

Entry Plaza

Community Pavilion

Dog Park

Overlook

Fireplace Outdoor Gym

Woodland Preserve

Pegg Rd.

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SKETCHBOOK

Introduction

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The following drawings capture scenes from the three most influential places in my life. The first, Boston, MA, the homeaway-from-home that I trace and re-trace daily. The second, Phoenix, AZ, a warm vision for the desert downtown I grew up in. Lastly, Tokyo, Japan, in recollection of the summertime journey which forever tinted my architectural gaze.


Boston

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Phoenix

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Tokyo

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Angela Lufkin angela.lufkin@gmail.com 28 Houghton St Somerville, MA 02143

M.Arch I Candidate Portfolio  

Angela Lufkin 2011-2017

M.Arch I Candidate Portfolio  

Angela Lufkin 2011-2017

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