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June 2011 . Vol. 5, Issue 6

Family, Fashion, Faith

Inside: ALT Dining Guide Young Leaders Conquering the Continental Divide


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The CHRISTUS St. Michael Center for Joint Replacement is pleased to announce that we are the rst hospital in the four-states area to offer MAKOplasty. Utilizing the RIO® Robotic Arm Interactive Orthopedic System, this breakthrough solution means more people are free from suffering painful osteroarthritis of the knee. MAKOplasty enables surgeons to precisely target only the diseased portion of the knee which means: • A less invasive treatment option than total knee replacement for people with early to mid-stage osteoarthritis of the knee • A shorter hospital stay • A mo more rapid recovery and return to daily activities

Chris Alkire, M.D.

Orthopedic Specialsts of Texarkana 903.792.5005

Jeffrey T. DeHaan, M.D.

Orthopedic Specialsts of Texarkana 903.792.5005

Richard M. Hilborn, M.D. Orthopedic Specialsts of Texarkana 903.614.5400

Gregory J. Smolarz, M.D. Douglas E. Thompson, M.D. Orthopedic Specialsts of Texarkana 903.792.5005

Collom & Carney Clinic Association 903.614.3008

For more information, call the CHRISTUS St. Michael Center for Joint Replacement at 903-614-2880.

Thomas C. Young, M.D.

Orthopedic Specialsts of Texarkana 903.614.5400


S e p t e m b e r 2 0 11 / c o n t e n t s

EVERY MONTH

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k / FEATURE STORY

Recipe for success...

Christine Corley took a chance on something she loved -- cooking! Read about her journey from hometown girl to MasterChef!

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Conquering the Continental Divide Jane Bouterse enjoys the great outdoors and finds one more mountain to conquer!

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Editor ’s Letter

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Financial Focus

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F i s h Ta l e s

50

From His Heart

77

Real Estate

52

Resource Guide

74

Second Chances

57

Student Highlights

39 Uncorked EVENTS 64

Jump, Jive and Jawbone

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Celebrity Waiters / American Cancer

67

Guaranty Bond Grand Opening

68

I n a u g u r a l B e e r Ta s t i n g

69

Congrats Fastpitch Softball

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Kylee’s Paws for a Cause

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T w i n C i t y S o f t b a l l To u r n a m e n t

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N e w B a l a n c e S u r v i v o r o f t h e Ye a r

BUSINESS 21

Lifenet Announces Changes

C U LT U R E 76

Calendar of Events

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Dining Guide


EDITOR’S letter

ark-la-tex’s premiere magazine

Vision...

S e p t e m b e r 2 0 11 / V o l . 5 , I s s u e 9

Leaders need to be optimists. Their vision is beyond the present. ~Rudy Giuliani

Vision...what does it take to see? Some would say two eyes. Others would say a

keen sense of business. And even more would say luck! Well, I would say it is probably a combination of all those things -- plus a blessing from God!

This month we have articles about visionaries. Christine Corley had a vision -- she

dreamed of being a chef and with her cooking skills, business sense, and a little bit of luck, she is well on her way to becoming one of the best chefs in America! The ALT staff was delighted to not only be treated to the culinary prowess of Christine, but also the friendship offered by a young woman who is as wonderful a person as she is a cook. We had lots of fun talking and “assisting” her as she prepared our meal -- a meal you will be able to prepare yourself using her wonderful recipes included this month!

We were missing one of our staff members -- Jane Bouterse -- who was spending

time in Colorado helping build a legacy for our children -- The Continental Divide! I must say that it amazes me at the tenacity of Jane, who is easily the smallest one on our staff. However, in that tiny body resides a wonderful mind and a backbone that does not break

Publisher and Editor / Debbie Brower Associate Editors / Jaclyn Gooding, Miranda Johnson Photography / Image Forward Photography, Debbie Brower, Jaclyn Gooding, Miranda Johnson, Rozana Page, Sherrie Hewitt Sales & Marketing Manager / Charlie McMurphy Feature Writer / Jane Bouterse Contributing Writers / Mike Brower, Jeff Schreve, Vincent Senatore, Dustin Stringer Caregiver / Mike Brower

easily! She loves the great outdoors and is always up for a new adventure.

My new adventure this month came about when I decided to visit my optometrist,

Mark Allen of Vision Source. At my age, cataracts really shouldn’t be a problem -- but of course, no one ever said I was a normal person -- not even in my eyes! The diagnosis

If you have an event you would like to include in our Upcoming Events section, please email us at: info@alt-mag.com.

came as somewhat of a shock! However, it was nice to know why my vision went downhill considerably faster than it should have! My family had just about become scared to ride with me because my depth perception was severely lacking!

Dr. Allen referred me to Wanda Northam, M.D., a local opthalmologist. The care

I have received from these two doctors, and their staff, has been absolutely amazing! My

w w w. a l t - m a g . c o m

info@alt-mag.com 200 Heather Dr., Texarkana, TX 75501 (903) 334-9605

surgery, which was a little stressful to think about, went so smoothly that it seemed I was hardly there before I was going home. Thank you so much to all of you for taking care of me!

You see, vision is a big part of my life -- not only the ability to actually see things,

but the ability to know when it is the right time to do something. I believe that God gives you the ability to “see” what you need to “see” so that you know what is right for you and your family. You just have to wait for his timing. For those of you who know me, I am not a very patient person and waiting is very difficult! However, God’s timing is perfect. And my vision for the future is safe in His hands. May God bless you.

ALT Magazine is published the 1st business day of every month. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission of ALT Magazine is strictly prohibited. ALT Magazine is distributed free of charge. Direct mail subscriptions are available for $36.00 per year. Contributions from our readers are welcome. We reserve the right to edit or reject any material.

©2011 ALT Magazine Publisher/Editor

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by Jane Bouterse

Building a

Legacy T

he decade of the 60s made an energetic entry. “We stand today,” according to young Presidential candidate John F. Kennedy, “on the edge of a new frontier—the frontier of the 1960s, a frontier of unknown opportunities and perils, a frontier of unfulfilled hopes and threats.” Around the country, the political button of the day simply urged, “Give a damn.” Many Americans—younger and older—listened and acted. Among those early 60s individuals and visionaries were Benton Mackaye, founder of the Appalachian Trail along with David Maceyka and other members of the

Rocky Mountain Trail Association and the Colorado Mountain Club. They had the idea for a trail spanning the backbone of America, the Continental Divide. Maceyka and his group were the first to walk and mark the proposed Continental Divide Trail (CDT) in Colorado and gain Congressional support. “Their group called the soon-to-be CDT the ‘Blue Can’ trail because they marked the trail by nailing blue cans to trees so the Forest Service could locate and approve its location.” After much political manipulation, the U. S. Forest Service, which owned most of the proposed land, the Bureau of Land

Management (BLM) and the National Park Service were vested with the responsibilities of creating, managing and maintaining the Trail. From the beginning, the Continental Divide Trail was for the American people. In 1966 the Trail was officially proposed to Congress which in turn authorized the study of the Trail under the National Trails Act of 1968.” The CDT was described as a 3,100 mile trail, traveling from Canada to Mexico, through five western states: Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado and New Mexico. …approximately 1,900 miles of existing trails and primitive, seldom-used roads were

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available as part of the CDT, with hopes of expediting and reducing the costs.” “In 1976 a study report completed by the Bureau of Outdoor Recreation found the scenic quality of the CDT to surpass anything available elsewhere in the country. The study report notes, “trail users would wind their way through some of the most spectacular scenery in the United Sates and have an opportunity to enjoy a greater diversity of physical and natural qualities than found on any other extended trail. The route of the CDT would cross five ecological life zones where visitors would find much of the topography, climate, vegetation and wildlife for which the Rocky Mountain West is noted.” In November 1978, the Trail was designated a National Scenic Trail. Study after study was completed to establish plans and policies; meanwhile, Congress appropriated no money, and the Trail languished. Finally, the U. S. Forest Service hired Bruce Ward, former president of the American Hiking Society and his wife, Paula, a landscape architect, to create a public/private

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partnership that could make the dream of the CDT a reality. “By 1985, their efforts evolved into the Continental Divide Trail Alliance (CDTA), a non-profit organization devoted to the completion, maintenance and protection of the Continental Divide Trail.” Through its efforts the CDTA

has increased public involvement (3,000 members strong), volunteer commitment and private sector support of the Continental Divide Trail. “To date this grassroots movement has made a tremendous impact on the Trail: 9,500 CDTA volunteers have dedicated nearly $5 million of labor;

individuals, foundations and businesses have committed more than $14 million toward the CDTA’s efforts; and 2,050 miles of the CDT have been completed.” This is one time I am delighted to become a statistic. From July 22-24, 2011, I was a volunteer on CDTA Project #16 Winfield IV, CO. The goal of the 30+ people who arrived at the campground was to build a new section of the Trail, and our efforts would be measured in feet, although we would learn inches might have been more promising. The CDTA base camp was near the once-prosperous Rocky Mountain silver mining town of Winfield between Leadville and Buena Vista, Colorado. The “town” is now a few restored historic buildings, and several cabins still serve as summer retreats. The area of Trail on which we would be working was about two miles from the dispersed camp area. Tents were scattered about among the trees and near a robust (lots of snow melt this year) Clear Creek. Although I had my tent, I opted to stay in the makeshift bedroom I had created in the back of Waylon (the name of my Tundra). Early communications had stressed vehicles had to be high clearance and 4 wheel drive to get to the campsite. They were right. My first attempt at negotiating Forest Service “Road” 390A resulted in failure, as something scraped. I imagined complete destruction of the truck’s underbelly by one of the protruding boulders, so I turned around. Later, I spotted the dirt attached to the truck’s trailer hitch and concluded that was the scraping I had heard. I tried again. Sharp rocks jutted through the gray, grasping dirt that had been shifted into large mounds sliding into holes, some containing water. The rough terrain could easily throw vehicles into the boulders scattered on the sudden turns and unexpected twists of the “Road.” I felt more like an observer as the 4 wheel drive assumed command. Slipping and sliding through East Texas mud was never like this. What a trip for my first drive with 4 wheel power! Reaching the campground was a relief. After finally situating my truck in a comfortable location, I introduced myself to Scott, the CDTA Crew Chief for this Project. He was getting the kitchen together for our volunteer cooks who prepared breakfast and dinner for those volunteers whose brown bag nourishment would disappear long before the workday ended. My first response to my surroundings was WOW! The campsite was situated in a clearing surrounded by pine and aspen trees. The northern perimeter


I

DEDICATED. “Truman and I cherish this great institution and we are committed to helping provide a true university experience for all students throughout the region who attend here! We feel confident that our support will have a positive impact on the lives of both present and future generations of A&M-Texarkana students.� AnITA ArnolD

TAMUT.EDU


was 390A (an ATVers’ dream) and the rising mountains. Clear Creek provided the southern border as well as the camp’s bathing facilities. Our camp altitude was about 10,100+ feet, and we would hike at least 200 feet higher before descending to the Trail work site. At times we would be at 10,800 feet. I quickly became grateful for the two extra days I had taken to get acclimated to the altitude. Since I wanted to be sure I could get there, I started out early and was the first volunteer to reach the campground. Others quickly followed. The diversity of the group proved surprising. Volunteers came from around the country: Iowa, Minnesota, Texas and Colorado. Their ages ranged from 12-16 year old Boy Scouts to 73 year old Hank—Texan born and reared, UT grad who left Texas for the world. Like Hank, many participants had worked on the Trail before. Steve, from Iowa, had worked before and persuaded his friend Scott to accompany him; three recent high school graduates from Denver were familiar with work from previous years, while a nursing student was returning for her fourth year. Most of the returnees brought friends with them while two friends from UT Arlington included the Trail in their summer tour of the West. A family--mom, dad and teenage daughter-- worked together on the Trail for their first time, and a computer security manager from Denver fulfilled her CDT plans, stifled by illness the previous year. And I? Well, I was there from Texas having

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an adventure and trying to do something worthwhile in the process. The CDTA refers to the Trail projects as “Building a Legacy.” Under the capable leadership of Justin and Scott from the CDTA and Chris from the U. S. Forest Service, a finished trail was to be carved from an area previously untouched. Although the blue cans were long since gone, Justin and Chris knew where and how the route should go. With the exception of the first day, mornings began with breakfast at 7:15 a.m. For me, that was the hardest part of the day. Temperatures were in the 40 degree neighborhood and crawling out of a warm sleeping bag was hard to do. Activities began each day in a circle where safety rules were reviewed and exercises took away some of the night’s stiffness. Then with backpacks containing at least 3 to 4 quarts of water (a heavy load) and lunch, volunteers were turned loose to hike their way to the work area. Fortunately, workers on previous projects had carried the tools-Pulaskis, sledge hammers, shovels, pick axes, iron bars, and oversized “come alongs” (in Texas talk) for starters—to the work area. The original CDT mandate specified that “The Trail would be designed to the most simple, yet high quality standards for the hiker and horseman. No gross or significant alteration of the land, vegetation or other resource values were envisioned. None was needed or desired.” Therefore, the only mechanized tool was a chain saw—used when absolutely necessary. Otherwise, the source of power was volunteer labor. Justin and Chris distributed the crew along the potential route and reminded the builders to 1. Drink plenty of water; 2. Take frequent breaks and respect the weather; 3. Leave no stone unturned if it will injure a horse’s hoof and be sure there is at least a 10-12 foot head clearance; 4. Wear gloves; 5. Be sure either Justin or Chris has approved your portion of the Trail before moving on. Then we get to work. Some areas of the Trail route are quickly cleared. The juniper can be moved easily even though the roots go everywhere. The real challenges come from boulders. I genuinely understand now both the “tip of the iceberg” and how appropriately the ROCKY Mountains have been named. ROCKS…ROCKS…ROCKS—all sizes, configurations, colors, textures and degrees of hardness. (Just wish I knew more geology.) Beware of those sharp tips which barely peek above ground level. In some cases the sledge hammer sends the tip down the mountainside and dirt can be moved to cover the remainder. In others, the tip is connected to a rock that grows larger and rounder as the shovel removes the surrounding dirt. Hiding below the surface is a boulder with what appear to be arms melted to the rock’s body and moving


I COMMITTED. “To further the vision of building a comprehensive regional university that provides students a quality education, Anita and I have worked hard to garner support all across the state of Texas and we have made a significant personal commitment by way of providing land and financial resources to this great university.� TrUMAn ArnOlD

TAMUT.EDU


in all directions. Scott and I work an entire morning attempting to define the boundaries and remove one such beauty. When we summon Garrettt, the young man dubbed King of the Iron Bar, to try prizing our beauty from its earthly home, the boulder breaks in half. The remaining half also has to be coaxed by shovels and the iron bar before turning loose. Our neighbor finds herself with the same boulder challenge. We have a similar experience with a major tree root that is crossing the Trail. Removing tree roots is discouraged unless absolutely necessary for the Trail’s safety. By now, the sun is scorching, so vests and jackets are removed; hats, sunglasses and sun screen checked. Drink…drink…drink—Hurray for those quarts of water. Dehydration is the foe in the mountains, as it sneaks up on its victims. No sweating here in spite of the heat, since the moisture evaporates too quickly. Altitude sickness must also be immediately addressed, as one volunteer discovered.

The results can be not only uncomfortable but deadly. When lunchtime arrives, everyone seeks the shade and a bit of rest. Food— whether nutrition bars, pop-top treats or fruit—tastes like gourmet fare. A quick review of the jobs to do: two retaining walls are under construction to prevent the

Trail’s disappearing down the mountain. One wall will be 20 feet long while the other is only 17. Justin observes, “Those three feet may not seem like much, but they are ginormous.” Boulders from throughout the site are moved to construct the walls. Some even get away, like the boulder which was supposed to roll down the mountainside to the wall site, but once that monster started

rolling there was no stopping it at the wall. Just get out of the way. Rock moving proves to be the major job. As large rocks are removed, they create holes which have to be filled with smaller rocks from another location. Dirt is much in demand for filling and leveling the emerging Trail. All the materials used to construct the Trail come from the Trail area itself; they’re just moved around a bit. While some volunteers are movers and shakers, others manicure the almost completed Trail to be sure it is not only functional and safe but clearly visible and attractive. This is hot, hard work—some of the hardest I have ever done and everyone works! So what’s the fun in that? At the end of the day, there is a Trail where none existed before, a Trail which can be used by generations to come. I have participated in building an opportunity, a legacy for those generations who follow to enjoy a mountain trail like no other. Its limitless vistas are filled with brilliant colors and patterns; its terrain—a land of change and struggle and promise; its world—a place of freedom and restoration. “Cimb the mountains and get their good tidings,“ John Muir wrote. Nature’s peace will flow into you as sunshine flows into trees. The winds will blow their freshness into you, and the storms their energy, while cares will drop off like autumn leaves.” I cannot recall a time when I have been so happy to see 4:30 arrive—the end of our workday. Still remaining is a long, challenging climb back to base camp, since the work area is 200 feet below our starting altitude. My walk seems shorter, however, as I have become Hank’s shadow. I walk behind him, silently for the most part, as he tells me stories of his adventures. What an impressive man who is so comfortable in his own skin and so much a part of the mountains. He stops at a stream flowing out of the mountain and fills his water bottle—something no one else will dare. He just laughs, “I guess my system is used to the Giardia (the most common cause of waterborne disease in the US). I’ve been doin’ this for 40 years. I don’t want to carry all that water.” Finally, we arrive at the base camp and have only a few moments to get our dishes and head for the cook tent where our cooks—voted the best in the CDTA corps— have prepared an unpredictable, delicious meal of Bulgur salad and Indonesian vegetables. After dinner, groups form in various locations. Justin plays his guitar

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For information on advertising in Texarkana’s Premiere Magazine, Call Charlie McMurphy Today! 903-908-5797


while musicians from the volunteers join in with harmonicas; others whittle while songs are sung. On the last night of the project, the county’s burn ban is lifted. A bright, warm fire soon burns in the fire ring and lasts well into the cooler night as the group circles ‘round to sing and laugh and talk together and maybe swig a free beer or two. The last day of the Project is still busy, as the come-alongs are put in place to uproot the seven or so trees which have to be removed. With most of the grooming finished, walls built and Trail cleared, some begin clearing still more of this continental pathway. Time to measure. Justin returns to the point at which we began – it seems so far away now -- and starts to roll. By the time he has reached the end of our Project’s building, the measure reads 790 feet. No record but not bad considering the terrain. Everyone was proud of the results of our teamwork. Departures were marked by weary, proud hugs and hopes for safe travels and next year. I closed my tailgate, started my truck in 4 wheel drive and, once again, headed down 390A—proud of my legacy building and happy to have met “The King of Trails.” For information about CDTA and participating in a CDTA project, check out the Continental Divide Trail Alliance website. You will be glad you did.

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by Mike Brower

Gloves…Now…Really?

I

know it’s still hot. Rain is short and cold is a long way off, but it never hurts to be prepared and ready. Fishing in the winter brings its own challenges and keeping warm ranks right up there with catching fish, so let’s talk about the most at-risk part of a fisherman in winter.

My personal preference follows two kinds of cold -- pretty cold and really, really OH GEEZ cold. For those times its just cold, I like the “Under Armor” liner gloves. These gloves are fairly thin and have those little silicone things on the palm which help grip the rod during casting and retrieval, block the wind very well, and still hold a reasonable amount of heat when wet. The liner gloves fit close to the skin and are not bulky. They will also dry quickly. Now for those days when its smarter to stay inside but you want to fish, try a pair of “Under Armor” fleece gloves, worn over the liner gloves. Your hands will thank you. With both gloves on, the first 30 minutes or so it will feel somewhat bulky. That will soon pass and you will be darn proud to have them.

Now, if you have read this far, I’ll let you in on a secret….. slip over to the mega sports store and pick up some small chemical hand warmers, Slide one in under the glove and I’m going to assume that we have warm clothes and headgear settle it into the palm of your hand. You can do this with either so I’m going to focus on HANDS. It’s not a lot of fun fishing the liner gloves, the fleece gloves or both. with cold hands. It will drive most fishermen off the water early. Now, my thoughts may not be the best and there may Keeping hands warm is a challenge, but try this tip and see if be a better way, but here goes. you don’t handle the cold better.

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LifeNet Announces Pivotal Change for Ambulance Subscription Program LifeNet, the exclusive paramedic ambulance provider in Hot Springs, Arkansas and Texarkana, Texas, is announcing a significant change in the organization’s LifeNet Subscription Program. LifeNet’s subscriptions are convenient methods for eliminating insurance deductible fees and insurance co-payments.  These deductible and co-payment amounts are typically several times higher than the cost of an annual LifeNet subscription.  Now instead of offering citizens a 40% discount on all ambulance fees, the program commits to waiving all out-ofpocket fees whatsoever for insured subscribers who must make medically necessary ground or air ambulance trips to the hospital.  For those living in the more rural locations of LifeNet’s service area, the organization offers its medical helicopter ambulance services Gold Plan.  LifeNet subscriptions are no longer only available with a once a year enrollment period.  Open enrollment allows Texarkana citizens to enroll at any time, all year long.  -Ground ambulance subscriptions are available for $75.00.

-Gold Plan members receive medical helicopter and ground ambulance subscription services for $135.00 -Ground ambulance subscriptions are available for $75 and Gold Plan subscriptions cost only $135.00 for a full year! Renew early, (by August 31st) and take another $5.00 off  both plans.   LifeNet subscription programs (Ground ambulance/ Gold Plan) makes the organization’s community outreach and illness and injury prevention projects possible.  The company also contributes $5.00 from each subscription to its most important support program for area first responder organizations who respond volunteer ambulances to citizens who are injured or who become seriously ill in the more rural locations of LifeNet’s service areas.  Last year LifeNet contributed more than $5000.00 to first responder organizations.  This funding pays for equipment, supplies and training. -By removing rigid enrollment coverage restrictions, new subscribers are guaranteed a full year of coverage regardless of when they enroll in

the program. -Uninsured subscribers or transports not meeting insurer’s medical necessity requirements will receive a 40% discount on billed charges. For these cases, the subscribed patient remains responsible for the discounted bill. Says LifeNet President, David Baumgardner, “We want to make sure that our citizens are getting full value for their LifeNet subscription. The last thing we want citizens to worry about during a medical emergency is how they will pay for our services. Subscriptions also help fund our programs to reduce illness and injuries, to teach people how to access Emergency Medical Services, to support area first responders and to encourage our youth to consider EMS as a career.” Current LifeNet subscribers are credited with helping fund LifeNet’s Prom Night mock crash scenes for high school students demonstrating the effects of drinking and driving.  LifeNet also offers blood pressure screenings  and medical stand-by services during public events, among other current and planned illness and injury prevention efforts. To join or learn more about this program, please visit the LifeNet subscription page at HYPERLINK “http://www.lifenetems.org” www. lifenetems.org, or call 800.832.6395

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Financial Focus... Submitted by Dustin Stringer Stringer Wealth Management LPL Financial

Meet the Education Challenge: Planning for Tomorrow’s Tuition Costs

M

any parents dream of the day their child strides to the stage to receive a college diploma. On the other hand, many parents dread the day that college tuition bills arrive. Despite steep tuition costs, however, a college education may be a sound investment that’s within the reach of many families. All it takes is a degree of planning. It Starts With a Strategy On average, tuition costs have been increasing between 4% and 6% annually in recent years. And consider this: Four years at a public college or university for today’s newborns could tip the scales at greater than $100,000.* That’s why you may want to begin by developing an asset allocation — the mix of investments in your portfolio — based on the length of time you have until your child enrolls. The more time you have, the more you may want to rely on stock investments to reach your goals. Stock investments, while generally subject to more short-term market volatility than other investments, may offer the potential for higher long-term returns. As tuition bills appear on the horizon, you may want to shift your asset allocation toward potentially less risky investments, such as bond and money market investments. Take This into Account Too In addition, consider the type of account you use to invest for a child’s education. A Coverdell Education Savings Account, for example, lets you contribute up to $2,000 per year, and your withdrawals may be tax free if they are used to pay qualified college expenses. Another avenue you may want to consider is a custodial account. The Uniform Gifts to Minors Act (UGMA) or Uniform Transfers to Minors Act (UTMA) allows you to open an account in your child’s name and potentially save on taxes. If your child is under age 18, the first $900 of earnings may be free from federal taxes, and the second $900 may be taxed at the child’s rate, which could be lower than yours. Be careful though: Use of a custodial account could affect your child’s financial aid eligibility.

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Finally, don’t overlook tax incentives and financial aid. The HOPE Credit and the Lifetime Learning Credit, two relatively new federal tax credits, can help offset qualified education expenses. Also, tens of billions of dollars are available in financial aid in the form of loans, scholarships, and grants from government and institutional sources. For more information on how to meet the

education challenge, your qualified financial professional today. *Sources: Standard & Poor’s; The College Board (October 2008). General risks inherent to investments in stocks include the fluctuation of market prices and dividend, loss of principal, market price at sell may be more or less than initial cost and potential illiquidity of the investment in a falling market. Bonds are subject to market and interest rate risk if sold prior to maturity. Selling bonds prior to maturity may make the actual yield differ from their advertised yield and may involve a loss or gain. Bond values will decline as interest rates rise and are subject to availability and change in price. © 2010 Standard & Poor’s Financial Communications. All rights reserved. This article is not intended to provide specific investment advice or recommendations for and individual. Consult your financial advisor, or me, if you have any questions. Stringer Wealth Management and LPL Financial are not estate planners and cannot provide tax or legal advice.


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Fresh Ginger Pumpkin Cheesecake

in love with our delightful dishes from Master Chef’s Christine Corley!

Resource Guide Fall 2011


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FA L L 2 0 11 / c o n t e n t s

F E AT U R E

HELPFUL INFO

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Campfire Recipes

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From His Heart

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Resource Guide

Christine Corley - A Recipe for Success

F O O D F E AT U R E S 42

Dining With a Star - Cooking With Christine Corley

39 Uncorked

Publisher and Editor / Debbie Brower

k / RECIPE FOR SUCCESS

Associate Editors / Jaclyn Gooding, Miranda Johnson

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Photography / Image Forward Photography, Debbie Brower, Jaclyn Gooding, Miranda Johnson, Rozana Page, Sherrie Hewitt Sales & Marketing Manager / Charlie McMurphy

“The judges are looking for presentation, flavor, originality and creativity, but most importantly—to have a chance—every contender must possess an immense passion for food.” And that she does.

w w w. a l t - m a g . c o m Right: Fall is a great time to enjoy time with family and friends. Check out Christine’s recipes from our ALT Staff Dinner!

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info@alt-mag.com 200 Heather Dr., Texarkana, TX 75501 (903) 334-9605

©2011 ALT Magazine


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by Jane Bouterse

A RECIPE FOR SUCCESS

“T

he judges are looking for presentation, flavor, originality and creativity, but most importantly—to have a chance—every contender must possess an immense passion for food.“ The judges—“Michelin-starred chef Gordon Ramsay; restaurateur and wine maker Joe Bastianich; and the youngest four-star chef in America, Graham Elliott”—are hard boiled about their standards as they narrow an initial 20,000 applicant, amateur chefs to a winner on the Fox Channel’s MASTERCHEF. “One thing is certain,” so they say, “Winning will be no piece of cake.” No one knows that better than Christine Corley whose “passion for food,” determination and hard work earned her an unexpected slot in the MASTERCHEF competition. Like so many other times in her twenty-eight years, Christine has lived up to the challenge and discovered another new path to explore in her life. Maybe her Icelandic birthplace prepared her for dealing with hardships. While Christine and her family followed her Air Force dad to many places temporarily called home, her Grandma Mary has always lived in Nash, Texas, and has provided her a strong base. In fact, Christine attended school from the first through third grades in Nash but eventually found herself in Sopchoppy, Florida, a small, rural community near Tallahassee and nearer to her dad‘s family. In Sopchoppy (an Indian word meaning “dark water”), “everyone knew everyone else,” Christine explains. She and her sister Melissa and brother “Jake” spent lots of time swimming in the Ochlockonee and Sopchoppy rivers which intersected in the city park. “There was no worry about kidnapping. Kids played from sunup to sundown outside. We had no air conditioning. We lived with our mom, but our dad lived just down the street.” Christine’s only breaks from Sopchoppy came when her mom and siblings—in bathing suits or blankets-- loaded into the car and headed for Nash and their biannual visits with Grandma Mary. Sopchoppy was basically in the woods. “If you blinked when you went through town, “ Christine recalls, “you missed

it. There were a few mom and pop stores, the post office and the IGA grocery store which always had fresh food, especially meat. We had lots of SOS, fried chicken and Hamburger Helper at our house. Mom’s Seafood and Steak was the restaurant in town, and it was the best ever.” At age 13, Christine’s first job in a restaurant was at Mom’s where she bussed tables, became a hostess, server and even helped in the kitchen when she was needed. (By her own admission, she doesn’t mind the chopping.) Her introduction to food service was thorough. “Just like a Big Family.” Not surprisingly, Christine’s adolescent years were challenging. She moved to her dad’s house when she was 14. He had no air conditioning to deal with the 105 degree summers and only a wood stove for heat during the sometimes 15 degree winters. Her mom died when she was 15; her brother moved to California, and Christine and her sister made their permanent move to her dad’s. Fortunately, Margaret—a friend of her dad’s—came to her rescue. Margaret lived just down the road and had air conditioning and heat as well as cable TV. Christine rode the school bus from Wakulla County High School to Margaret’s each day to complete her homework in comfortable surroundings. Eventually, Christine and all her family moved into Margaret’s where she lived until her high school graduation in 2001. Already Christine, the teenager, had learned the necessity for flexibility as well as vital friendships in her life. After high school graduation, Christine enrolled in Tallahassee Community College to earn a degree. She explored nursing, substitute teaching, even computer design and architecture. While she was attending classes full time, she worked three jobs. She had met an accomplished Wine Sommelier who taught her about wine selection and cooking. As a result, she was able to work as both a waitress and bartender just to make ends meet until she earned her Associate in Arts Degree. “Not easy,” she smiles weakly as she moves her head from side to side. Her next move was to Miami. In spite of her experience, however, finding a

job without knowing someone who knew someone proved challenging. She enrolled in Miami Dade College, still interested in architecture, but that project soon ended. South Beach beckoned. Christine became a bottle server at the high end Showclub for a few years. The minimum cost of a bottle of wine here was $300 with a limit on the number of bottles purchased. “I could make $500 during the day and $1,000 a night…Do I have it now?” Christine pauses only briefly. “No. Kinda’ blew that one.” This job led to others—still in wealthy South Beach real estate: Rokbar, a Miami hotspot; Mansion, Prive, Molokai night clubs. “I met so many people—numerous celebrities. It felt natural to me not to be star struck. Coming from nothing with a thrift shop wardrobe or hand me downs, and food from the church, I’ve never been easily impressed. My family and I would go to the Sopchoppy Baptist Church on Fellowship nights so we could eat. “I spent my money on dinners, wine and nice places to live. After five years, the 10 p.m. to 7 a.m. party scene became draining.” A break-up of her three year relationship ended her party scene schedule and sent her back to Tallahassee, followed by a temporary move to Fort Lauderdale and her introduction to Ivan—then back to Miami. This time Christine started with an “amazing job” at the Fontainebleau and a fancy name for bottle server—“Recreational Host.” “The Fontainebleau had just spent $1 billion remodeling, and I was the first Recreational Host to get hired.” After 4-6 weeks of training, Christine was given a bathing suit, high heels and flexible hours—a “fun job.” Her life was getting better. The improvement did not last as long as Christine would have liked. In January 2009, she got pregnant. Ivan, the baby’s father moved to Destin, wanted her to have an abortion, but she just couldn’t do that. Christine remained in Miami determined to work and go through her pregnancy alone. This is where and when she found another rescuer. His name was Kris Wessel, and he was the amazing chef at the Red Light, a small restaurant

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specializing in Caribbean and Cajun Creole cuisine. Sitting right on the canal which the manatees frequented , the tiny, family restaurant provided a unique experience. Christine, the head bartender, now became a student of Kris Wessel, an accomplished chef and willing teacher. As Christine’s pregnancy progressed, problems developed. Still-no Ivan, so Christine decided to return to Sopchoppy and Margaret’s house “to get some help.” With her two cats, Ally and Stripe, Christine set out in the summer’s heat—not to go far. Her car broke down in Orlando, but Margaret drove down, picked her up and towed her car back home. Living with Margaret and her dad did not work out, so Christine’s next move was to Alyssa Blink’s small Sopchoppy house (one bedroom and one bath, four dogs and two cats plus the people). Alyssa had been her best friend since childhood. The good intention was certainly there, but the space was not, so Christine was forced to move again. Coming up on six months pregnant, Christine was surprised by Ivan’s sudden appearance. His unexpected call to Grandma Mary netted him Christine’s phone number, and he successfully persuaded Christine and her unborn baby to move to Destin. On September 11, 2009, Lincoln was born. The family remained together until the physical upheaval of April 2010’s oil spill and personal turmoil compelled Ivan, Christine and Lincoln to move to London for two and a

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half months. On July 4, 2010, Ivan proposed to Christine on the very top of the Eiffel Tower. Although she said “Yes,” the wedding never happened. The threesome returned to Destin at the end of July 2010 and moved in with Ivan’s dad. Christine was engaged; Ivan played golf and Lincoln was thriving. Everything appeared to be working happily for the young family until October 2010 when Ivan kidnapped Lincoln who had never been separated from his mom. The two were gone for ten days during which time Christine was distraught and refused to eat. She suddenly found herself with no car, no money, a dead cell phone, no key to their apartment and inundated by legal papers. However, Ivan had left the laptop computer which Christine figured out how to use and called Margaret, Grandma Mary and Alyssa. She then managed to get court petitions to get Lincoln back. Alyssa appeared with a car and money; Grandma Mary came from Texas. Christine succeeded in her efforts to get her son and quickly moved back to Sopchoppy with Margaret and her dad. As luck would have it, on October 2010, Ivan had happened to catch the end of MASTERCHEF, the Fox Channel’s popular reality show. Since Christine had always— even in her most desperate times—cooked, watched the Food Network and studied cooking, he suggested she enter. Although considered an amateur, she knew food and enjoyed the pleasing reactions her cooking

always created. Miami had also spoiled her with its multitude of cultures, aromas and tastes. As her world seemed to settle down, Christine remembered Ivan’s suggestion. She submitted an online application to MASTERCHEF which accepted her petition and invited her to a VIP casting call 4 1/2 hours away in Orlando. Immediately, she called Alyssa, and they began the preparations: Weber Grill, propane tank, coolers with an IGA filet mignon that looked as if it had been on steroids, goat cheese, lemons and butter, sun-dried tomatoes and asparagus. These would be created into her signature dish freshly prepared in the Cordon Bleu parking lot. In spite of their 3 a.m. departure, Christine’s alert, knowledgeable preparation pleased the judges. She felt pretty positive about her success but returned home and found a job in Tallahassee. Two weeks later, Grandma Mary became Lincoln’s temporary caretaker while Christine became one of the 100 invited to Los Angeles. The elimination was brutal: the 100 was reduced to 38 then 24 headed toward the winner. Christine succeeded until her elimination as #8. Nonetheless, her talent in the kitchen has been clearly established. During her Texarkana visit, she has prepared meals for private parties—a personal chef. One of those demonstrations was for dinner guests at Vincent’s Fine Wines. “Christine pan fired a sirloin steak and created a wonderful red wine reduction for us to dip the steak in,” Vincent writes


on his web site. “We were in awe of the wonderful flavors and rich texture of the dish. And, I realized how easy it was to make. “Or maybe Christine made it look easy.” “The Root 1 Cabernet Sauvignon was perfect.” Obviously, this chef has definitely converted her lemons into lemonade. She is totally self taught, although she has also had access to some talented mentors. As she observed in Aaron Brand’s Texarkana GAZETTE article, “’I love food, I’m very passionate about cooking and making people smile. I love the expression on my friends’ faces when they eat my food,…It’s entertaining for me and I love it.’” In addition, she has also had the remarkable support of caring family and friends to make her world a happier place with a future for her son and herself. With the confidence gained from both her adversities and successes, Christine has learned to believe in herself and her food. “Just do it,” she declares. At last, she has created her own recipe for success. For now, she plans to return to Miami and the Red Light, recently named The Best Restaurant in Miami. Perhaps one day she too will have a similar restaurant— upscale and casual where people can enjoy—again and again—her passion for food and drink. BON CHANCE and BON APPETIT.

MATERCHEF: Jennifer Behm (second from R) is named MASTERCHEF Winner in the season finale episode aired Tuesday, Aug.16 on FOX. Also Pictured L-R: Judges Graham Elliot, Gordon Ramsay and Joe Bastianich. Jennifer Behm, Age 34, is a realtor from Wilmington, Delaware. www.alt-mag.com

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A LOOK UNDER THE CHEF’S HAT COOKING FAVORITES

New potatoes with fresh rosemary

Professional Costume: Comfortable shoes / chef’s pants / white chef’s coat and hat / white apron with name monogrammed in front. OR At home: Barefoot with spaghetti strap tank top and shorts.

OR Buttery, juicy, screaming filet mignon— medium rare. Glass of red wine: Cote du Rhone--#1 Favorite.

Pose: Stand on one foot, like crane in Yoga pose. Switch feet.

BEST DISH: Killer apple pie with own flaky, double crusted pie crust.

Music to Cook By: Blues music or 80s tunes. Love Stevie Nix and Hotel Costes…like chill music.

IMPORTANT TO KNOW

Cookbooks: PROFESSIONAL CHEF or FRENCH LAUNDRY IDEAL MEAL Food: Cornish hens roasted with different herbs or citrus.

“I’m a cool person and a friend— one who will always be there. I’m a single mom lucky enough to have one break I so desperately needed.” “I’ve been up and down and all around. I like to cook for anyone.“

CHRISTINE CORLEY

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by Vincent Senatore

I

t’s taken me 35 years in the adult beverage industry, and the consumption of millions of pounds of gourmet food, for me to finally “Get IT”! The 70s and the 80s were a time of great technical Chefs. They produced tasty dishes that could be familiar, and very similar, from restaurant to restaurant. Sauces were exactly the same with very little variation from region to region. The 90s brought us a new crop of Chefs who began a “California style” revolution of grilling meats and veggies with an accent of herbs and spices. Avocados and lemons were not just used in guacamole. Steaks were being hand rubbed with rich spices and prepared with a myriad of new sauces which were unlike the traditional brown, red and white sauces with which we were all so familiar. With the new millennium, the traditional, technician Chef is giving way to the stylistic, artisan Chef with wild ideas and interesting combinations. Further, as Chefs become more innovative and resourceful, cuisines develop and wine becomes a major part of the meal. The addition of wine to a fine gourmet meal is almost a necessity. Wine completes the overall texture and flavors of today’s unique dishes. For the past few years we, (in Texarkana) have been blessed with an insurgence of really great gourmet chefs. Even Texarkana College is getting in the act with their newly formed Culinary Department which will be training our future chefs. With all of that said, we (in Texarkana) are having a great time creating some really inventive Gourmet Wine Dinners. During the past five years we have produced some of the most innovative dishes that Texarkana has ever seen. And, the best is yet to come. Cooking has become fun again and we’re all eager to learn. I know that I really pay close attention when I can get some tips from a chef. Further, when I produce a meal from a recipe that I gleaned from one of our chefs and match it up with the right wine, it’s euphoric. With all of the cooking shows that are currently on TV, one doesn’t have to leave the kitchen to get some great advice and wonderful, delicious ideas. The past few weeks have brought a very special opportunity to our quiet little neighborhood in the form of Christine Corley.

Recently, Christine was a finalist on the hit FOX TV show, “Master Chef”. Out of 20,000 contestants, Christine made it into the final eight. While Christine will be leaving the area to pursue her dreams at a wonderful Miami restaurant, she has been producing some spectacular meals for a few private groups. You wanna talk fun? Have a popular and talented TV star cook in your kitchen! It’s Fuggetaboudit… Recently Christine produced an awesome gourmet feast for the ALT Magazine Staff. Debbie and the team were treated to three fantastic courses and matching wines (of course). So, what was for dinner? The first course was an Arugula salad with pears and leeks tossed with honey pecan vinaigrette. A New Zealand (Starborough) Sauvignon Blanc was selected as the matching wine based upon the rich herbal aromas of the greens, Tarragon, Leeks and Celery. Also, the fruit filled flavors of the pears and vinaigrette match really well with the Tropical bouquet of the wine. This combo makes a wonderful summer match.

coming in from the side dish. This dish can easily served year around. Super Bowl Parties, Father’s Day and Halloween will never be the same. Now it’s time for dessert. Christine again reached into her bag of innovative recipes to dish out a Fresh Ginger Pumpkin Cheesecake. Talk about flavor! Not too sweet and not too spicy, it’s the balance of the two major flavors which were screaming for the delicious Tosti Asti. A true DOCG Asti brings the rich nose of pears and vanilla and the flavors that propose marriage to the Pumpkin Ginger Cheesecake. This is the kind of dinner that starts with some sassiness and finishes with an effervescent explosion of flavors and tastes. Remember, the most memorable meals are those that offer the balance of taste and aroma, while tempting the taste buds with richness of texture and spice. Certainly, wine was utilized as a beverage and a condiment in Christine Corley’s spectacular feast.

The main course was jumping with spectacular flavors; Red wine marinated smoked baby back ribs, and Potato, Pancetta and Parmesan Gratin. The ribs were marinated and rubbed with a myriad of seasoning. This very inviting blend of spice and flavor was the ideal match for Bogle Old Vine Zinfandel. The rich “Jammy” textures and the full mouth feel were made for Christine’s Ribs. Add the smoky pancetta paired with the spice of the parmesan and we’re talking about some amazing flavors

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*Luxury cloth and leather couches! *Entertainment centers for that big screen TV! *Wonderful snack foods including Gluten Free! *Dining sets and Lazy Susans to set up the ultimate game-day feast!

Why is Oak Creek Furniture Different?

Why all the fuss about details?

We have chosen Amish furniture craftsmen who are recognized leaders in the solid wood furniture industry. Amish furniture is made by hand in small Amish wood shops so every piece of furniture receives the same attention to detail. Our Amish handcrafted furniture is built to last.

Because the Amish craftsmen build furniture that your children and grandchildren will be proud to inherit. Come see our Amish-built bedroom furniture and oak dining room furniture. The selection of the boards and the grade of the hard wood, along with dovetailed drawers, mortise-and-tenon construction and the multi-step finish are all just small parts of the build process that add up to an heirloom quality piece of oak or cherry furniture.


Come see our new E X PA N D E D S H O W R O O M ! Great selection to choose from!

Lasting elegance...

Did you know...

There is no better place to sit for a meal than around Amish dining room furniture. Amish dining room furniture is made for a family to sit around and enjoy not just the meal, but each other’s company, as well. All of our dining room furniture is sturdy and durable - your family and future generations of your family will be able to sit at and around our dining room furniture for years to come.

That most of the furniture made today uses substitute materials such as particleboard. Because particleboard is made from wood fragments bonded with resin, it is considered an all wood product BUT IT IS NOT solid wood. Our Amish furniture is made of SOLID Oak, Cherry, Maple, Hickory or Quartersawn Oak.

Polywood Outdoor Furniture... At Oak Creek Furniture, you will find many different styles of polywood furniture. The material used is water and weather resistant, and most importantly, created from recycled polyethylene. For this reason, our polywood lawn furniture is considered a green product.

There is no maintenance required, no cracking or splinting, and the polywood material does not promote bacterial growth or mildew. Choose from seven different colors and products such as swings, gliders, benches, deck chairs, table & chair sets, bridges and footrests.

Huge Se le of Glute ction n Free Foods! Check it out toda y!


Our staff here at ALT felt very blessed to be able to meet and spend time with Christine Corley, a former contestant on the hit show, Master Chef. It was a huge delight when Christine agreed to cook a fabulous meal for us to see her in action! Trust us, she did not disappoint!

Arugula with Pears, Pecans and Honey Vinaigrette 16-ounce bag of Arugula 2 Pears 2 Leeks 2 celery stalks, diced with celery leaves ¼ cup of pecans, toasted or untoasted 2 teaspoons of fresh lemon juice 2 ½ tablespoons apple cider vinegar ¼ teaspoon of honey 3 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil Kosher salt and pepper, to taste In a small bowl combine the honey, apple cider vinegar, salt, pepper and slowly whisk in the olive oil. Peel and slice the pears off the core and reserve in a small bowl with the lemon juice to prevent browning. Slice the leeks lengthwise, removing the dark green ends and thoroughly rinse, pat dry and dice. In a large bowl, combine the arugula, pears with the lemon juice, leeks, celery, pecans, honey vinaigrette and toss.

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Potato, Pancetta and Parmesan Gratin 6 large potatoes Tablespoon of olive oil 1 cup (2 packages) of pancetta, diced 1 onion, coarsely chopped (I use Vidalia onions) 1 egg, lightly beaten 1 cup grated parmesan cheese ½ cup parmesan cheese, diced into small chunks 1 cup Italian breadcrumbs Tablespoon of fresh chives, finely diced Kosher salt and pepper, to taste Preheat oven to 400°. Quarter the potatoes. Cover them with salted water in a large pot and boil until slightly fork tender. Strain, let cool slightly and peel the skins off. Mash the potatoes in a large bowl. In a sauté pan, heat the olive oil on medium-high heat sauté the onions and pancetta until onions are soft and the pancetta is crispy. Combine the onions, pancetta, grated parmesan cheese, chunks of parmesan cheese, egg, chives, salt and pepper to the potatoes in a large bowl. Put the potato mixture into a 9 qt. casserole pan, packing down then top with the breadcrumbs. Bake until warmed through and golden brown approximately 22-25 minutes.

Smoked Ribs 2 tablespoons of chili powder 2 tablespoons of paprika 2 tablespoons of onion powder 2 tablespoons of garlic powder 1 tablespoon of cayenne pepper 1 tablespoon ground pepper 1 tablespoon of kosher salt 2 cups of red wine, plus 1 cup for basting ¼ cup canola oil In a small bowl, combine the chili, paprika, onion, garlic, cayenne, pepper, salt. Rub the ribs with the spices all over. Place them in a large aluminum pan and add the 2 cups of red wine and oil. Marinate overnight. Heat the smoker to 300° (I add Red Oak wood bark). Smoke the ribs between 250° - 300° for 2 ½ hours in a rib rack, reserving the pan with the juices. Slice the ribs, put them back in the aluminum pan, and baste with the remaining 1 cup of red wine. Cover tightly and bake on 275° for another 1 – 1 ½ hours.

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Fresh Ginger, Pumpkin Cheesecake Crust: 9 graham crackers ¼ cup (½ stick) butter, melted 1 teaspoon of vanilla 1 teaspoon of cinnamon ½ cup pecans ¼ cup granulated sugar Filling: 4 – 8 ounces packages of cream cheese, room temperature 1 ½ cup granulated sugar 3 eggs 15-ounce can pure pumpkin puree (Libby’s) Tablespoon of fresh grated ginger 1 cup whipping cream 2 teaspoons of ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon of ground ginger 2 teaspoons of vanilla ½ teaspoon of ground nutmeg ½ teaspoon of ground allspice ¼ teaspoon of ground cloves *Tip: Do not be intimidated using fresh ginger. Use the back of a spoon and scrape the skin off, use a zester to grate the ginger. For crust: Preheat oven to 350° and position rack in center. Wrap a double layer of foil around the outside of a 10-inch springform pan. In a processor combine graham crackers, sugar, cinnamon, pecans, and blend until finely ground. Add the melted butter and vanilla. Blend until crust comes together. Press the crumb mixture onto the bottom (not the sides) of the pan. Bake until golden brown approximately 10 minutes. Cool on a wire rack. For filling: With a mixer beat the cream cheese and sugar until smooth. Beat in the eggs one at a time. Add the pumpkin puree and the last 8 ingredients and beat until incorporated. Pour the filling into the springform pan. Place the springform pan in a large roasting pan and add enough water to come halfway up the sides. Bake at 350° until slightly puffed, softly set and top is golden brown approximately 1 ½ hours. Cool the cheesecake on a wire rack. Cover and refrigerate overnight. Release the sides of the springform pan and cut cheesecake with a wet, warm knife.

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*Special Thanks to Jennifer Crawford of Twisted Vines Floral Studio for our table arrangement.


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Charlene and Mike Carter

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Charlene lost 13 pounds in 30 days. Jackie Pope

of my sore feet. Now walking several MILES daily! I was overweight. Lost 14 pounds in 30 days and working toward my goal weight.” -Jackie Pope Larry and Lela Harrison

“It’s never too late to take charge of your health,” say Larry and Lela Harrison of Texarkana. “Our results prove it!”

CHIP is now available in your community!

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Difference -56 -54 -2.18 -1.16 -65 -88 -7 -2

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19 Delicious Meals will be

served during the fall schedule! *Pictured, just a few examples of the meals provided.

Fall CHIP 2011 schedule! First blood draw early morning session September 29, 2011 (Thursday morning 6:00AM-8:00AM) *sessions below will be from 6:30PM in the evening until 8:30PM

Week One: October 3, 4 , 6 (Monday, Tuesday, Thursday) Week Two: October 10, 11, and 13 (Monday, Tuesday, Thursday) Week Three: October 17, 18 and 20 (Monday, Tuesday,Thursday) Week Four: October 24, 25, 27 (Monday, Tuesday, Thursday) Week Five: October 31 (Monday) Last blood draw November 1st, 2011 (Friday morning 6:00AM-8:00 AM) GRADUATION EXERCISES November 7, Monday evening (6:30 PM)

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Phone: 888-843-9199 Email: TXKCHIP@aol.com Learn More at our website: www.TXKCHIP.com www.alt-mag.com

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CAMPFIRE RECIPES

Campfire Biscuits-on-a-Stick Ingredients: *1 can Hungry Jack buttermilk biscuits *squeeze butter *1 stick Preparation: Roll out a biscuit with your hands so that it becomes elongated and about one inch thick at the center. Wrap it tightly around the end of your stick and pinching it as you go to insure that it stays on the stick while cooking. When done wrapping, the biscuit should take up about six inches of the stick. Heat over the campfire until golden brown. Pull it off the stick, pour butter down the hole left by the stick, and enjoy. Tip: Try sprinkling sugar on your cooked biscuit or pouring your favorite jelly inside!

Campfire Cinnamon Apples Ingredients: *6 apples, large, solid cooking types *6 tablespoons butter *6 teaspoons sugar *3 teaspoons cinnamon Preparation: You’ll need 12 sheets of aluminum foil, each about 10 inches long. Move back large burning embers to expose hot coals -- oak coals are best. Prepare each apple by first cutting a topshaped “plug” out of the stem-end with a sharp paring knife. Keep the plugs to re-insert later. Leave the stems on if you wish. Use a butter knife or the paring knife to carve out all of the core and seeds. This is the trickiest part. Do not go through the bottom of the apple. Into each apple, insert 1 tablespoon of the butter, 1 teaspoon of sugar and 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon. That should pretty

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much fill the void. Then, re-insert the top plug and double-wrap each apple in aluminum foil. Lay the apples on the coals and after 5 minutes, roll them over so that the second side can bake. Roll them out of the coals after 10 minutes, let them cool for a bit and serve with spoons! Tip: Don’t puncture the aluminum foil with a fork to turn the apples because all your butter will leak out! Use a pair of tongs if you have a big pair.

Campfire Pepperoni Pizza Ingredients: 1 pound refrigerated pizza dough 1/4 cup pizza sauce 1/2 cup shredded mozzarella cheese 1/2 cup sliced pepperoni Preparation: Place pizza stone on grill directly over wood fire. You may need to begin by spreading out the wood if the flames are too tall. Roll out the pizza dough to desired thickness. Place it on the pizza stone and cook 10 minutes on one side until golden. Remove from the fire and on the cooked side, spread the pizza sauce in an even layer over dough, leaving about a half inch around the rim of the pizza dough bare. Sprinkle mozzarella cheese evenly on top of the sauce, followed by the pepperoni slices. Place uncooked side down, back on the pizza stone. Cover with a foil tent and cook until cheese has melted, about 10 minutes more. Transfer pizza to a cutting board and let cool slightly before cutting and serving.

Campfire Hash Ingredients: *2 tablespoons cooking oil *1 large onion, chopped *2 garlic cloves, minced *4 large potatoes, peeled and cubed *1 pound fully cooked smoked kielbasa, cubed *1 (4 ounce) can chopped green chilies *1 (15 ounce) can whole kernel corn, drained Preparation: In a Dutch oven, heat oil. Saute onion and garlic under tender. Add potatoes. Cook, uncovered, over medium heat for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add kielbasa; cook and stir until potatoes are tender and well browned, about 10 minutes more. Stir in chilies and corn; cook until heated through.

PB S’mores Ingredients: *2 large marshmallows *2 graham cracker squares *1 peanut butter cup Preparation: Cook the marshmallows over an open flame or hot coals until they are browned outside, and soft all the way through, 2 to 4 minutes. Place the marshmallows on top of one of the graham cracker squares. Place the peanut butter cup on top of the marshmallows. Top with the last graham cracker square.


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by Jeff Schreve

“If your brother sins, rebuke him; and if he repents, forgive him. And if he sins against you seven times a day, and returns to you seven times, saying, ‘I repent,’ forgive him.” Luke 17:3-4

S

ome years ago, I needed to get things right with a friend I had wronged. While I felt he had also wronged me, that wasn’t the issue. I had wronged him … and needed to seek his forgiveness. I needed to own my wrong actions, repent of them, and humbly apologize – easier said then done. When I finally called this person, I said something to this effect, “I was very wrong in the way I handled things and responded to you when we worked together. I did not support you like I should have done. I am so sorry. Will you forgive me?” This man readily agreed that I had wronged him and forgave me … and our relationship was restored. BUT WHAT ABOUT WHAT HE DID? Did you know there was a part of me that wanted to say, “I’m so sorry for what I did … BUT your actions surely did not help the situation either.” I so wanted to add a “but” and justify myself a little in my apology. That’s what a “but” apology does. It tries to add a little justification for our wrong behavior. “I’m sorry I snapped at you, honey, BUT I’ve had a bad day” (i.e. it’s not really my fault). “I’m sorry I talked bad about you to other people, BUT you provoked me” (i.e. it’s not really my fault, it’s your fault).

THINGS TO REMEMBER WHEN APOLOGIZING 1. Be repentant. Apologies mean nothing without genuine, heartfelt repentance. If you simply mouth the words “I’m sorry” without truly being sorry, your apology is hollow and ineffectual. God doesn’t forgive us because we say some magic “I’m sorry” words. He forgives us when we are genuinely repentant. 2. Be specific. General apologies mean little to nothing. Don’t say, “I’m sorry.” Rather say, “I’m sorry that I did _____________ (whatever it was).” Specific apologies own the wrong that was done and right the wrong that was done. 3. Don’t add a “but.” When you apologize, don’t try to justify your wrong behavior with a “BUT.” You cannot control what other people say and do. You can only control you. And if you messed up, fess up and seek forgiveness, regardless of what you perceive the other person did to provoke your actions. Good apologizers are humble, willing to take honest inventory of their lives and actions, and willing to do what is necessary to make things right with God and others. Bad apologizers are filled with pride and an unwillingness to admit wrongdoing. Their theme song is, “Sin in others I can see, but praise the Lord there’s none in me!” What kind of an apologizer are you?

“I’m sorry I embarrassed you, BUT remember those times you did that to me?” (i.e. you deserved it).

Jeff Schreve is Senior Pastor of FBC Texarkana (www.fbctexarkana.org) and Founder of From His Heart Ministries (www.fromhisheart.org).

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Jeff Schreve Pastor www.fromhisheart.org jeff@fromhisheart.org


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Ark-La-Tex Resource

Guide

Air and Heating Central Air 450 S. Kings Highway Texarkana, TX 75501 903.832.1212 Kraus Heating and Air 200 Industrial Blvd. Nash, TX 903.831.3912 Apartments Legacy at Pleasant Grove 5911 Richmond Rd. Texarkana, TX 888.763.2676

Texarkana First Bank 3601 East 9th St. Texarkana, AR 870.772.0222 615 Sam Houston Dr. New Boston, TX 3625 Richmond Rd. Texarkana, TX 903.793.6955 Cakes Coldstone Creamery 4228 St. Michael Dr. Texarkana, TX 903.838.2653

Richmond Oaks Apartments 2815 Richmond Rd. Texarkana, TX 903.832.6150

Julie’s Deli 4055 Summerhill Sq. Texarkana, TX 903.792.3354

Summerhill Woods Apartments 4501 Summerhill Rd. Texarkana, TX 903.793.7888

Reception Arts Becky Risinger Ashdown, AR 870.898.5273

Westwood Apartments 101 Redwater Rd. Wake Village, TX 903.832.8446

Caterers Culinary Creations Pam Elliott 903.831.4674

Attire Abby Gayle’s 4012 Summerhill Square Texarkana, TX 903.792.0088

Fuzzy’s Tacos 4809 Texas Blvd. Texarkana, TX 903.791.8226

Gayle’s 4059 Summerhill Square Texarkana, TX 903.792.0056 Banks Guaranty Bond Bank 2202 St. Michael Dr. Texarkana, TX 903.792.8600 Red River Federal Credit Union 2700A University Ave. Texarkana, TX 75503 903-735-3000 800-822-3317 Texar Federal Credit Union Richmond Rd. Texarkana, TX 903.223.5626

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Julie’s Deli 4055 Summerhill Sq. Texarkana, TX 903.792.3354 Smokey Joe’s BBQ 300 W. New Boston Road Nash, TX 903.223.8227 Wendy’s 4201 Stateline Avenue Texarkana, TX 2902 Richmond Road Texarkana, TX 3737 New Boston Road Texarkana, TX 1615 N. Hervey Hope, AR 124 N. Loop Highway 59 Atlanta, TX

Wingstop 2700 Richmond Road, Suite 14A1 Texarkana, TX 903.255.0090 4501 N. State Line, No. 106 Texarkana, TX 903.792.9464 Clothing Abby Gayle’s 4012 Summerhill Square Texarkana, TX 903.792.0088 Gayle’s 4059 Summerhill Square Texarkana, TX 903.792.0056 Dry Cleaning Holiday Cleaners Locations throughout Texarkana Area 870.773.4072 Event Locations Prissy Chrissy Ranch 915 FM 2148 South Texarkana, TX 75501 903.838.6121 www.prissychrissy.com Regional Arts Center Cabe Hall 321 W. 4th Street Texarkana, TX 75501 903.792.8681 www.trahc.org Financial Planner Dustin Stringer Stringer Wealth Management 210 N. Stateline, Suite 204A Texarkana, AR 870.216.0089 Fitness Centers Anytime Fitness Richmond Road 3415 Richmond Road. Texarkana, TX 75503 903.794.5348 Minton’s Sportsplex 5610 Richmond Road Texarkana, TX 903.838.4697

Florists Queen City Floral Highway 59 North Queen City, TX 903.796.2891 Ruth’s Flowers 3501 Texas Bllvd. Texarkana, TX 903.793.6711 www.ruthsflowers.net Twisted Vines 406 N. Stateline Avenue Texarkana, AR 870-772-2700 Furniture Oak Creek Furniture 8024 West 7th St. Texarkana, TX 903.832.0793 Gifts Dot’s Ace Hardware 3411 Richmond Rd. Texarkana, TX 903.838.0059 Lane’s Gifts & Collectibles 720 Realtor Ave. Texarkana, AR 870.773.2123 Queen City Floral Highway 59 North Queen City, TX 903.796.2891 Twisted Vines 406 N. Stateline Avenue Texarkana, AR 870-772-2700 Guns and Ammunition P&J Guns Jeff and Pam Cliften 248 E. New Boston Rd. Nash, TX 75569 903.293.4867 Hair Care Headmasters Hair Salon 3703 Mall Drive Texarkana, TX 903.832.6261


Style Studio Lisa Harris 3201 Kennedy Lane Texarkana, TX 903.223.1719

Ron Morrow State Farm Insurance 3306 Richmond Rd. Texarkana, TX 75503 903.832.5505 www.ronmorrowagency.com

Mark Wren, M.D. Physiatrist 3510 Richmond Road, Suite 400 Texarkana, TX 75503 903.831.6275

Teresa Liepman Remax 5120 Summerhill Rd. Texarkana, TX 75503 903.276.9464

Home Designs/Remodeling Taylored Home Solutions 2840 Richmond Rd. Texarkana, TX 903.278.2353

Jewelers Alexander’s Jewelers 3701 Mall Drive Texarkana, TX 903.832.3557

Vision Source 4401 Morris Lane Texarkana, TX 903.838.9063

Refreshments Bolls Distributing 700 E. Broad St. Texarkana, AR 870.774.9283

Hospice Dierksen Hospice 6500 N. Summerhill Road, Suite 2B Texarkana, TX 903.793.6350

Blue Isle Expressions 3402 Richmond Road Texarkana, TX 903.791.9992

Hospitals Christus St. Michael Health System 2600 St. Michael Dr. Texarkana, TX 903.614.1000 Health South Rehabilitation 515 West 12th St. Texarkana, TX 903.793.0088 Wadley Hospital 1000 Pine St. Texarkana, TX 903.798.8000 Hotels Clarion Lacross Hotel 5100 N. Stateline Ave. Texarkana, AR 870.774.3521 www.lacrosse-hotel.com Fairfield Inn and Suites by Marriott 4209 Mall Dr. Texarkana, TX 903.838.1000 Insurance Brian Purtle Allstate Insurance 3301 Richmond Rd. Texarkana, TX 903.832.5881 Elite Insurance Tammy McDowell 1705 N. Kings Highway Nash, TX 903.794.0000 Farm Bureau Insurance 4140 McKnight Rd. Texarkana, TX 903.838.8707 Greg Cockerell State Farm Insurance 4807 Texas Blvd. Texarkana, TX 75503 903.793.7502 Kelli Ashbrook State Farm Insurance 3410 Moores Lane Texarkana, TX 75503 903.223.8100 www.kelliashbrook.com Kristi Smith State Farm Insurance 418 Walton Drive Texarkana, TX 903.223.3276

Micah’s Jewelers 2812 Richmond Road Texarkana, TX 903.735.2336 Make-up Gayle’s 4059 Summerhill Square Texarkana, TX 903.792.0056 Salon Visage Esthetique Mary Ann Robbins 4506 Summerhill Rd. Texarkana, TX 903.794.4007 Sanctuary Kimberly Parham, M.D. 3502 Richmond Road Texarkana, TX 75503 903.334.8661

Plumbing Central Air/Roto Rooter 450 S. Kings Highway Texarkana, TX 75501 903.832.1212 Real Estate Columbia Property Management 4425 Jefferson Avenue #108 Texarkana, AR 71854 870.772.2080 Connie Walker Coldwell Banker United 3001 Richmond Road Texarkana, TX 903.277.0100 903.832.2486 Impact Realty Bill and Tracy Spradlin 1200 N. Kings Hwy., Suite 104 Nash, TX 903.748.3186 903.748.2477

Rentals Big Event / Atlas Game Room 2837 New Boston Rd. Texarkana, TX 903.334.7444 Bounce-A-Lot 903.276.2961 www.bounce-a-lot.org Dot’s Rentals 814 N. Robison Road Texarkana, TX 75501 903.792.7011 3413 Richmond Rd. Texarkana, TX 903.838.0551 Lone Star Amusements 903.949.5802 Twisted Vines 406 N. Stateline Avenue Texarkana, AR 870-772-2700

Medical Equipment Respiratory Solutions 3101 Kennedy Lane, Suite 1000 Texarkana, TX 75503 903.793.2110 Pet Groomer Bows & Tows 254 E. New Boston Rd. Nash, TX 75570 903.223.3647 Photographer Image Forward Photography 200 Heather Dr. Texarkana, TX 75501 903.334.9605 www.imageforwardtxk.com Physicians Express Care 5483 Summerhill Road Texarkana, TX 75503 903.223.5931 Ly Gaylor, M.D. Dermatologist Collom & Carney Clinic 5002 Cowhorn Creek Road Texarkana, TX 75503 903.614.3006 Trevor Swanson, D.C. Advanced Spine, Sports & Rehab 4206 Richmond Place Texarkana, TX 903.792.2060 806 West Main St. Atlanta, TX 903.796.2060

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Restaurants Amigo Juan Mexican Cafe 2004 Hampton Rd. Texarkana, TX 903.794.2300 4301 Morris Lane Texarkana, TX 903.334.6971 1200 N. Hervey Hope, AR 870.777.0006 611 Loop 59 Atlanta, TX 903.796.2400

Ironwood Grill 4312 Moores Lane Texarkana, TX 903.223.4644

Coldstone Creamery 4228 St. Michael Dr. Texarkana, TX 903.838.2653

Pop’s Place Highway 67 Texarkana, AR 870.773.4887

Daddy Dougaloo’s 905 New Boston Road Texarkana, TX 75503 903.791.0172

Shorty’s Donuts 2729 New Boston Road Texarkana, TX 75501 903.832.6686

Dairy Queen Locations throughout Ark-La-Tex

Smokey Joe’s BBQ 300 W. New Boston Road Nash, TX 903.223.8227

Fuzzy’s Tacos 4809 Texas Blvd. Texarkana, TX 903.791.8226

Julie’s Deli 4055 Summerhill Sq. Texarkana, TX 903.792.3354 Los Agaves 5100 N. Stateline Ave. Texarkana, AR 870.773.2300

Tasty Donuts 1443 N. Kings Highway Nash, TX 903.838.0422

Golden Corral 3809 Sowell Lane Texarkana, TX 903.334.8399

Wendy’s 4201 Stateline Avenue Texarkana, TX 2902 Richmond Road Texarkana, TX 3737 New Boston Road Texarkana, TX 1615 N. Hervey Hope, AR 124 N. Loop Highway 59 Atlanta, TX Wingstop 2700 Richmond Road, Suite 14A1 Texarkana, TX 903.255.0090 4501 N. State Line, No. 106 Texarkana, TX 903.792.9464 Retirement/Assisted Living Home Cornerstone Retirement Community 4100 Moores Lane Texarkana, TX 903.832.5515 Spas/Salons All About You Diana Gregory/Lori Campbell 4100 Summerhill Sq. Texarkana, TX 903.792.7775 Salon Visage Esthetique Mary Ann Robbins 4506 Summerhill Rd. Texarkana, TX 903.794.4007

THE FESTIVAL YOUR MOMMA ALWAYS WARNED YOU ABOUT

State

Championship BBQ Cook Off

sanctioned by IBCA

FREE

daytime admission with canned good donation to Harvest Texarkana

Texarkana Trivia Race

Children’s Child

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1

Play Area

DOWNTOWN

TEXARKANA HOSPITALITY NETWORK

For More Information Contact the Texarkana Museums System at 903.793.4831

featuring:

SHOOTER JENNINGS IN CONCERT!!!

PAID FOR WITH A COMBINATION OF STATE & REGIONAL ASSOCIATION FUNDS.

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The Sanctuary Kimberly Parham, M.D. 3502 Richmond Road Texarkana, TX 75503 903.334.8661 Sporting Goods Baits and Blades 3302 Richmond Rd. Texarkana, TX 903.832.4545 Wedding Attire Bridal Castle 3209 Kennedy Lane Texarkana, TX 903.838.3886 Wedding Coordinators Abracadabra Wedding and Event Planning Debra Mason, Event Coordinator 903.748.4838 damason@cableone.net Wedding Favors Pop Pop Shoppe 2011 Mall Drive, Suite B Texarkana, TX 903.793.0209

Wedding Planners Abracadabra Wedding and Event Planning Debra Mason, Event Coordinator 903.748.4838 damason@cableone.net Wedding Rehearsal Dinner Locations Julie’s Deli 4055 Summerhill Sq. Texarkana, TX 903.792.3354 Smokey Joe’s BBQ 300 W. New Boston Road Nash, TX 903.223.8227 Weight Loss All About You Diana Gregory/Lori Campbell 4100 Summerhill Sq. Texarkana, TX 903.792.7775 Richmond Nutrition 3316 Richmond Road Texarkana, TX 903.832.0437

Wedding Officiant Jeff Taylor 903.733.6347 pgccminister@yahoo.com

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ALT is proud to highlight our area students for their accomplishments in sports and the arts! Our children are our future...and the future looks bright for the Ark-La-Tex! If you know a student you feel should be included in upcoming months, see below! Our Senior Leaders were such a hit in August, we have decided to continue highlighting local students each month – specifically leaders in sports and the arts! Since we have so many great young leaders who come from this area, we wanted the community to get to know them! If you know someone you feel would be great to be highlighted, please have them submit a photo in their uniform, via email, to debbie@alt-mag.com, along with responses to the following questions: Name: Parents: School/Grade: Sport(s)/postion(s): Achievements: What motivates you to do your best? What famous person has been an inspiration to you?

If they are submitting a professional photo, we will need a release from the photographer to use it.

Our 2011-2012 Schedule follows: Year-Round: Senior Leadership Youth Church Leadership Teachers/Coaches Cross Country Swimming Band Cheer/Drill Team/Mascots Theater Visual Arts Choir August, September, October, November: Football Volleyball Swimming

December, January, February: Basketball Soccer Tennis March, April, May: Softball Baseball Track/Cross Country Powerlifting We have tried to cover everything! We want to be sure all of our athletes/arts students have an opportunity to be highlighted! Now, meet some amazing young people from around the area! We are proud of all of you!

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MELVIN GRAY

inspires me to be a servant leader. Her work serves as a constant reminder that we are all created in the image of God.

Parents: Marvin and Felicia Gray School: Pleasant Grove High School Sport/Position: Football Quarterback and Cornerback Baseball Shortstop What motivates you to do your best? My teammates motivate me to do my best so that we can accomplish our goals as a team What famous person has been an inspiration to you? Jackie Robinson inspires me because he faced so much adversity and still was a tremendous athlete and person.

Abby Pickett Parents: John and Paula Pickett School: Pleasant Grove High School Sport/Position: Volleyball/Middle Blocker What motivates you to do your best? I feel that God has blessed me with a talent, and I want to fulfill that to the best of my ability! My parents have always told me to have the attitude of the Bible verse 1 Corinthians 10:31 which says, “So whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do it all for the glory of God,” which always helps motivate me to do my best.

Jeremy Ramos

Megan Hammett Parents: Sam and Jennifer Hammett School: Pleasant Grove High School Sport/ Position: Drill Team/ Senior Captain What motivates you to do your best? I tried out for the Drill Team at the end of my 8th grade year so I could be on the team as a freshman. At the tryout week I was completely alone because no one else in my grade wanted to try out. After I made the team, I spent my freshman and sophomore year as the only respresentative from my class to be a Showstopper. The fact that I was the only one and everyone above me had more experience and acutally knew what they were doing motivated me to do my absolute best and work to fit it on their levels. I knew that freshmen didn’t usually make all of the dances every week, but I tried my hardest to keep up and to make every dance. I never gave up and I continued to push myself even more with every day of practice. I wanted to prove to myself and everyone else that you could still do what you loved even if you were the only one doing it. That’s where my motivation arises and stays. What famous person has been an inspiration to you? The person that has been an inspiration to me was only locally famous but famous all the same to me. Miss Dixie Splawn has always been my inspiration and she will always be engraved in my heart. I began taking dance from her when I turned six years old. I took tap, jazz, and ballet/ toe for ten consecutive years under her direction. She taught me the importance of poise, grace, manners, politeness, kindness, discipline, and the beauty of dance. She always pushed me to do my best and was always challenging me with new and difficult steps that I took on with optimism and confidence. My entire dance background started with her as my teacher and ended with her as my inspirational role model to always continue dancing and to never give up on my goals and dreams. If it weren’t for her, I wouldn’t be where I am today.

Parents: Joseph and Judith Ramos School: Pleasant Grove High School Position/Title: P.G.H.S Drum Major, Varsity Soccer Goalkeeper, Student Council Officer, Interact Club President, HOSA Officer, Science Club Member, Altar Server at Sacred Heart Catholic Churc, and Junior Volunteer at CHRISTUS St. Michael. What motivates you to do your best? My ultimate goal in everything I do is to succeed, which gives me the motivation to give my absolute best at all times. At the end of the day, the outcome of my work is a reflection of who I am. What famous person inspires you and why? Mother Teresa taught me the value of humility and selflessness, and

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Alicia Walden Parents: Joe and Sandra Walden School: Trinity Christian School Sport(s)/postion(s): Cheerleader Captain What motivates you to do your best? I think being a positive role model is one of the most fulfilling things in this world. I strive to do my absolute best so that I might be an inspiration to young girls on my squad, at my school and in my community.


What famous person has been an inspiration to you? I suppose Anne Frank is an inspiration to many people. However, she is especially inspiring to me because she knew what she wanted out of her life. Neither the turmoil in which she found her country, nor the persecution of her people could stifle her determination.

Megan Elizabeth Bean

who pushes me to strive for my best. She is my number one fan always believes in me even when when I think im in impossible circumstances. Without my mom’s support I could not do what I have done this far. My mom is my motivator, leader, a sholder to cry on, and most of all, a friend. I love you mom. What famous person has been an inspiration to you? I look up to Carrie Underwood because of her actions and her songs. I can relate to her songs in my life and they help me follow the Christian walk that she leads.

Parents: Rebecca Shipp and Dan Bean School: Arkansas High School

Kaitlyn Kinder

Sport/Position: Arkansas High Redline Captain; Student Council, EAST, NIKE

Parents: John & Kim Kinder

What motivates you to do your best? I am greatly motivated by my mother. She is wonderful person

School: Texas High School Sport(s)/postion(s): THS Varsity Cheerleader What motivates you to do your best? What motivates me to do my best is to look ahead and see the opportunities that life could bring me. Also, I know that with God, all things are possible. With him in my life I know that I can do anything and be the best I possibly can be. What famous person has been an inspiration to you?

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Carrie Underwood has really been an inspiration to me in life. She is a strong, talented, Christian woman that God has done so many amazing things for.

What motivates you to do your best? Having a competitive spirit and my will to win keep me focused on my goals.

Matthew Ryan Cox (Matt)

What famous person has been an inspiration to you? President John F. Kennedy inspires me due to his “can do” attitude. He always aspired to achieve what he set out to do. “Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country”. – John F. Kennedy

Parents: Brenda and Jimmy Kendrick School: Texas High School

Lindsey Beth Long

Sport: Swimming - 200 Freestyle, 100 Butterfly

Parents: Jeff and Trish Long

Accomplishments: Member and Officer Student Council at Texas High – all 4 years Texas High Leadership National Honor Society 4.0 GPA Lettered in Swimming Freshman year and each year since Selected as a Texas All State Swimmer Selected as an All American Swimmer Texas UIL State Medalist in the 200 Freestyle and the 100 Butterfly Texas Interscholastic Swim Coaches Association (TISCA) Recordholder – 200 Freestyle and 100 Butterfly Texas High School Recordholder – 200 Freestyle and 400 Freestyle Relay

School: Redwater High School Sport(s)/postion(s): Cheerleading (captain), Volleyball (captain, middle hitter, back row), Basketball (post), Softball (outfield) What motivates you to do your best? I inherited a strong desire to succeed in everything I do from my dad. What famous person has been an inspiration to you? Misty May Treanor

the LegaCy of suCCess Continues in 2011-2012 All CAmpuses Southern Association of Colleges & Schools Accreditation AdvancED/CASI Accreditation Pleasant Grove Elementary School

Pleasant Grove Intermediate School Pleasant Grove Middle School Grades 3rd-5th

Grades 6th-8th

Pleasant Grove High School

6500 Pleasant Grove Road Texarkana, Texas 75503 Phone: 903-838-0528 Fax: 903-831-3799

8480 North Kings Highway Texarkana, Texas 75503 Phone: 903-832-0001 Fax: 903-832-0147

5605 Cooks Lane Texarkana, Texas 75503 Phone: 903-831-4295 Fax: 903-831-5501

5406 McKnight Road Texarkana, Texas 75503 Phone: 903-832-8005 Fax: 903-832-5381

Chad Blain, Principal cblain@pgisd.net

Pam Bradford, Principal pbradford@pgisd.net

Linda Erie, Principal lerie@pgisd.net

William Harp, Principal wharp@pgisd.net

Grades PK-2nd

Grades 9th-12th

Texas Education Agency Accreditation Texas Education Agency Gold Performance Superior Achievement School Financial Rating State and Nationally Recognized Teachers State and National Award Winning Students

8500 N. Kings Hwy. • Texarkana, TX 75503 • 903-831-4086 • www.pgisd.net

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BOX OFFICE NOW OPEN 9-5! PRES

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UNLIMITED GATE ADMISSION

Advance (9/15) $55 $60 at gate

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GET YOUR FOUR STATES FAIR FUN PASS & RIDES!!!

MILLER COUNTY

Texarkana Nursing Center

For more information, call theWITH CHRISTUS St. Michael forASSOCIATION Joint Replacement at 903-614-2880. PAID FOR A COMBINATION OF STATE &Center REGIONAL FUNDS.


Parents: Charlotte and Ron Terry School: Redwater High School Sport(s)/postion(s): Varsity Cheerleading, Varsity Tennis What motivates you to do your best? The thing that motivates me to do my best is that I I like to feel confident that I have done my best. It is gratifying to know that I have tried hard to accomplish my goals. I know that no one will be pleased with my work, unless I am. What famous person has been an inspiration to you? Adam Sandler has always been an inspiration to me. I think he is hilarious and obviously very successful. I strive everyday to have a sense of humor and to be a success.

Sarah Dodd Parents: Richard Dodd and Kristen Woods School: Arkansas High School Sport(s)/postion(s): Varsity Cheerleader Arkansas High School

What motivates you to do your best? The drive inside me to succeed is what motivates me to do my best. I’m always pushing myself to do better and to fill expectations for my family, friends, and most importantly, my self goals.

Amber Fenix Photography

Colin Terry

What famous person has been an inspiration to you? Sara Evans has been a huge inspiration to me. The song, “I Get a Little Bit Stronger” has really had an impact on me. When I feel down or sad about something I always think back to that song and know I’ll overcome life’s obstacles and become stronger everyday. I’m sure her songs have helped many teens just like me!

Jaeci Layne Card Parents: Tawna Mulherin School/Grade: Hooks High School Sport(s)/postion(s): Track/300 Hurdles, 800 relay What motivates you to do your best? I feel fortunate to live in a country where I am able to achieve the goals I have set for myself. I run for the less fortunate. What famous person has been an inspiration to you? My inspiration is Will Smith who quotes, “Greatness exists in all of us”.

Example is not the main thing in influencing others. It is the only thing. ~Albert Schweitzer~ 62

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Jump Jive & Jam Fest Pre-Party EVENT

WHERE

Cabe Hall

WHEN

8/20/11

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1. Jennifer Unger and Charlotte Smelser 2. Laura Williams, Rachel Pride and Angie Sass 3. Lucinda DeBruce and Lane DeBruce 4. Walter and Frances Hudson 5. Dick and Allene Stark 6. Charlotte Smelser and Kay Thomas 7. Mary Jane and David Orr 8. Connor Patman and Margaret Cobb 9. Carolyn and Charlie Mudford 10. John and Zachary Taylor 11. Bill and Beverly Moss, Greg and Donna Wallace 12. Nancy Whitehead and Steven Whitehead 13. Richard, Joy, and Matthew Nelson, Allison Thomas 14. Matt and Cindy Young 15. John Pelham, Lynn Whitt and Rita Pelham 16. Steve and Belinda Doss, Pat and Kim Roberson 17. Dr. James Ward and Tammy Havel 18. Lance and Shelly Cline 19. Eugene and Cristina Oubre 20. Billy and Dawn Hopper 21. Vince and Peggy Senatore 22. Ranga and Mitun Balasekaran 23. Luann Oute, Sandra Browning, Elaine Lindsey and Howard Morris 24. JAWBONE

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Celebrity Waiter’s Benefitting the American Cancer Society EVENT

WHERE

Texarkana Country Club

WHEN

8/6/11

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1. Ken Cowling, Dr. Sonia and Jeff K. Sandford 2. Sharon Park, Stina Brown, Linda White and Bill Thornton 3. Linda Fielding, Joan Tribble and Karla Settlemoir 4. Strawberry Shortcake 5. Larry Cowling and Ken Cowling 6. Steve and Leslie Cole, Mandy and Marty Hooker 7. Bill Beaver and Joe Narens 8. Kathy and Dan Boyles, with Kathy Narens 9. Cindy and Darron White, Glenda Barron and Sam Robbins 10. David and Charlotte Potter, Shelly Ashcraft, Tom Cooper and George Steel 11. Lindsey Lampton and Shea Garner 12. Nikki Ezell, Jason Brady, Brenda Knight, Leslie Humphrey and Sherry Bailey 13. Hanna Fletcher and Ryan Campbell 14. Miss Little River, Christa Burton 15. Mike and Jackie Kelly 16. Charlotte Potter and Cathy Butler 17. Lloyl and Carol Ackley, Mike and Linda Chambers 18. Mike and Linda Chambers

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Guaranty Bond Grand Opening

EVENT

WHERE

Cowhorn Creek Location

WHEN

7/22/11

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1. Fresh Fruit! 2. Various Desserts! 3. Various Desserts! 4. Trish Reed and LaNita Colley 5. Ribbon cutting at Guaranty Bond 6. John and Julie Ray Harrison, with John Singleton 7. Jeff K. Sandford and Jeff McGuire 8. Judy Langford and Bennie Estelle 9. Dan Boyles and Martin Bell 10. Jay Cowan, Sylvia and Mike Venable 11. Nicole Blue, Martin Bell, Gayle McKinney and Johnny Conroy 12. Travis Mauldin, Tracey Wardlaw and Jeremy Burris 13. Willau Sanders, Felicia Lewis, Carol Taillon and Tracey Wardlaw 14. Judy and Bill Crutchfield 15. Ruthie Nix and Paul Falcon 16. Jeff Loving

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Inaugural Beer Tasting EVENT

WHERE

Julie’s Deli

WHEN

7/21/11

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1. Emily Jones, Jennifer Hughes Tanner, Julie Furlow, Christine Corley and Vincent Senatore 2. Rodney and Linda McDaniel, Peggy and Vincent Senatore 3. Staff and Crew from Julie’s Deli and Vencent’s Fine Wine’s 4. Chris and Laura Ross 5. Miranda and Tyler Johnson 6. Joromeo and Charlie McMurphy 7. Jaclyn and Marshall Gooding 8. Kip and MaryAnn Pavey 9. Larry Mosley and Debbie Brower 10. John and Rozana Page 11. Leslie Bates and Miranda Johnson 12. Josh and Jennifer Addington 13. Eileen Hensley and Peggy Fontham 14. Bob and Bev Kahn, Debby and Kurt Brown 15. Jennifer Hughes Tanner and Christine Corley 16. Mark and Sarah Duch, Jon Purifoy, Kerry and Alan Ribble 17. Sherry and Jim Vinson, with Jan Goodson 18. Jennifer Hughes Tanner and Julie Furlow 19. Mike and Debbie Brower 20. Charlie and Jeromeo McMurphy, Jaclyn Gooding, Leslie Bates and Miranda Johnson

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Congrats Tanel 98 Fastpitch Softball Team! Congratulations Tanel 98 2011 USSSA 12U A World Series champions! Tanel 98 Fastpitch Softball team won the 2011 USSSA 12U A World Series held at the ESPN Wide World of Sports in Orlando, Fl on July 23-31. They went undefeated in bracket games 6-0 defeating the Miami Wildcats,7-6 in championship.

Coaches Scott Hawthorne, Ricky Lee and Jhune Atienza

The team also won the USSSA North Texas State Tournament held in Longview, Tx.

Youngblood of Jefferson, Tx.; KK Trombley of Chapel Hill, Tx and Alyssa Pierce of Lufkin, Tx.

Team members include Kimmie Atienza, Brette Wacha, Faith Lipham of Texarkana, Tx; Emma Hawthorne of Hallsville, Tx.; Bethany Knotts of Haughton, La.; Hannah Lee of Shreveport, La; Lexi Brooks of Mena, Ar.; Shelby

And a special congrats to tournament MVP, Hannah Lee!

Emma, Hannah, Alyssa, Faith, Bethany, Lexi, KK, Brette, Shelby and Kimmie

Way to go girls!

Opening ceremonies held at Champions Stadium at ESPN Wide World of Sports.

Senior Girl Scout Troop 2259 working to help Kylee’s Paws for a Cause Senior Girl Scout Troop 2259 (Maria Harrison, Brenda Heminger, Mikayla Shelton, and Brandie Johnson) is working to complete their Girl Scout Silver Award project and they need your help! The Girl Scout Silver Award is the second level community service project that these girls need to complete to progress to the highest honor of Girl Scouting’s Gold Award. They are teaming up with Kylee’s Paws for a Cause to help open their new over-flow animal shelter. What is Kylee’s Cause? Kylee’s Cause is a non-profit organization started to honor Kylee Laine Sullivan who lost her life on June 11, 2010 in the Albert Pike flood. Kylee had a love for people and animals but had a special fondness for shelter animals. Any money she earned was always donated to the local animal shelter. She thought all animals should be loved and cared for. The over-flow shelter is where the animals that are going to be euthanized will go in order to have a

and place them at businesses around town. The girls were also responsible for contacting local businesses to establish locations for collection. The response from local businesses was outstanding. The businesses where the boxes will be located are: Stateline Animal Hospital, Wisdom Veterinary Clinic, North 40 Feed Store, Genoa Feed Store, Richard Sexton Allstate Insurance, Ace Hardware, Tractor Supply and Doggie Divas.

second chance at being adopted. The volunteers for Kylee’s Cause will train, groom, spay, neuter and prepare them for a good home. To open the shelter, they need many items including dog food, old towels, blankets, toys, food and water bowls, water hoses, grooming items, etc. They are also accepting monetary donations. Girl Scout Troop 2259’s Silver Project is to design, build, and distribute donation boxes

Special thanks to H&H Enterprises and Jeffrey Harrison for donating building supplies. Donations may be dropped off anytime during business hours at the designated locations beginning the last week of July. Monetary donations will also be accepted and may be mailed directly to Kylee’s Paws for a Cause at: P.O. box 6948, Texarkana, Tx 75505-6948. Troop 2259 will make the initial collections. After that, Kylee’s Paws for a Cause will continue pickup. Girl Scout Troop 2259 and Kylee’s Paws for a Cause are very thankful to have such great support from the community. With Kylee’s big dream, your help, and the support of others, they believe that they can reach their goal!

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Making life better... from the ground up.

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ondering if there is anything you can do with that worn and unattractive concrete patio or driveway? Building an outdoor kitchen and interested in having concrete countertops, cabinet cases and flooring? Remodeling your home and looking for a rich, beautiful and unique floor covering? Want to put your logo in concrete at the entry to your business? Consider decorative concrete! Decorative concrete overlays and staining by Gooding Decorative Concrete can transform your existing concrete into beautiful, one-ofa-kind surfaces. Using overlays and stamps, stains and dyes, pigmented concrete sealers and epoxies, templates and engraving … and your imagination … you no longer need to tear out, hide or cover your worn and unattractive concrete. We can transform it into a beautiful and durable surface. The overlay systems combine the strength of cement with the durability and bonding power of polymers and acrylics. Colors are added to enhance the beauty of these durable products. Stains and dyes, along with engraving equipment are used to score decorative patterns into your existing concrete surfaces. A penetrating cure and seal is applied to provide superb durability, weather and UV resistance and ensure a long product life.

Gooding Decorative Concrete’s mission is to transform your existing concrete by providing outstanding customer service, delivering excellent results and employing talented and dedicated men and women. Marshall Gooding, owner, has extensive experience in the construction industry. His interest in the industry began with the influence of his mother, Ann Gooding, an interior designer. He has built homes, cabinets, furniture, arbors, and water features. Our staff, including Debbie Brower, Jaclyn Gooding, and Miranda Williams, all graphic designers, have a combined total of more than 30 years of experience. David Melson and Christian Cisneros complete the staff. Gooding Decorative Concrete is a small family owned and operated contractor business specializing in staining, engraving, overlaying and stamping established concrete. The business center is located in Texarkana, Texas, with easy access to all residential and commercial sites in the Ark-La-Tex and surrounding area. In addition to our Texarkana office, we have satellite offices in Longview and Allen, Texas.

Marshall Gooding, Owner

David Melson

Gooding Decorative Concrete makes it possible for customers to convert their dreams and ideas into plans. We take those plans and convert our customer’s dreams into reality. For a free estimate, give us a call. We’d love to talk with you!

Christian Cisneros

Other companies may talk about experience -- our quality and experience shows in our work!

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3rd Annual Twin City Softball Tournament

EVENT

WHERE

Grady T. Wallace

WHEN

7/23/11

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1. Paul, Kristina, Jacob and Abigail Lauck 2. Julia Wilhite and Nicole Hamilton 3. Texas D.P.S. - Chad Ford 4. Texas D.P.S. Cole 5. T.T.F.D - Shane Page 6. T.T.F.D. - Jordan Williams 7. Farrell Lloyd pitching for RRAD employee’s team 8. Cass County player Josh Bowman 9. Mary Robison and Stephanie Robison 10. Casey Sheleny and Krystal Henley 11. Texarkana, Texas F.D. - Jason Applegate 12. T.T.F.D - Burt Robison 13. T.T.F.D. - Paul Lauck 14. Texas D.P.S. - Mason out at First base 15. Lifenet player rounds 3rd base 16. RRAD Employee’s 3rd base coach give the signal to run home

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New Balance Survivor of the Year

WHERE

Bi-State

WHEN

7/27/11

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1. Family of Stephanie Haak 2. Kevin Sanders and Shawn Vaughn 3. Terrie Arnold putting a bracelet on New Balance Survivor of the year Stephanie Haak 4. Cade, Madeline, Marley, Jason and Stephanie Haak, Sharon and Arley Smith 5. Laura LaCroix, DeAnn Goins and Cindy Hubbard 6. Stephanie Haak and Terrie Arnold 7. Kristi Mitchell, Jason Haak, Chris King, Jason Whit and Brett Gatlin 8. Carolyn and Buddy Allen 9. Debra Moore and Julie Sanderson 10. Stephanie Haak gets presented with pink roses by her mother Sharon Smith 11. Patti Finley and Sharon Ann Smith 12. Suvivor Commitee Tarisha Duson and President of Komen Affiliate Julie Sanderson 13. Stephanie Haak and Tarisha Duson

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The Texarkana Humane Society is a non-profit volunteer organization dedicated to re-homing orphaned animals, promoting the human-animal bond, preventing animal cruelty, educating children and adults about responsible pet ownership and preventing pet overpopulation. In order to reduce the number of unwanted animals and the euthanization of them at the shelter people need to spay/neuter their pets. The Texarkana Humane Society has a program to help individuals do this and urge everyone to get involved and tell your neighbor, family, and friends to be responsible and do their part in putting a stop to this problem here in our city. Have them contact us regarding our program. Call 903 8386334 and we will be glad to help you.

The Texarkana Humane Society is always needing volunteers as well as foster homes. If you would like to get involved and lend a helping hand they would love to talk with you. They are also needing the following items to help with the care of all the babies that come into foster: Puppy and kitten chow, formula for the babies, animal baby bottles, as well as monetary or debit card donations. We have a big need for individuals who have the time to bottle feed some of these babies. It is so sad when we cannot take any in because we are full and would welcome a few more bottle moms. It is a great expereince as well as very rewarding taking care of these little ones. If you can help with donations or feeding call Sherrie at 903 838-6334. Volunteers who agree to provide a foster home for our strays are provided with medical care for the animals. The Humane Society pays for all immunizations and spays or neuters the animal.

Texarkana Humane Society

Our goal is to place these animals in permanent homes with responsible, loving pet owners. All of our services are provided through private donations from our community. Donations are accepted and needed! Our animal friends appreciate you and your donations are tax deductible! (The Humane Society is all volunteers and all money goes towards the animals.) We’ve got a full house! Please come visit us! You might find the addition your family has been looking for! Do you have an animal that needs a new home? Please don’t neglect it! Call us and let us help you find a foster home. We will list your animal on our Facebook page at no charge. Let us help! For more information, contact Sherrie Thompson, President, at 903.838.6334, or got to www. texarkanahumanesociety.com. We’re also on Facebook!

Come visit us at Petsmart on the fourth Saturday of every month!

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1. Dusti is a 1 year old Dauch-Pug mix. She is current on vaccinations, spayed, and is on heartworm and flea prevention. Dusti weighs 13 pounds. She loves kids and gets along well with other dogs. We are working on her house-training. For more info call Sherrie at (903) 8386334. 2. This beautiful little girl is an 8 month old cur mix. She has been spayed, given all her shots and is heartworm free. Ziva can be a little shy until she gets to know you and then her wonderful personality will shine. She is very social and loves to play so if you have another dog that would be great with Ziva. For more info on her call Lee Ann at (903) 244-4847. 3. Midnight is a 7 month old male Chihuahua. He is neutered, current on shots, housetrained, walks well on a leash and loves children. Please call Diana at (903) 8384965 for more iformation on this loving little fellow. 4. Sophie is a beautiful little papillon mix. She weighs a

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whopping 7 pounds. Sophie has been spayed, current on all her shots, negative for heartworms and is microchipped. This sweet little girl is doing very well in her housetraining, rides well in the car, walks on a leash and gets along well with other dogs, she would definately a great addition to any family. For more info on her please call her foster mom Susan at (903) 826-9004. 5. Hank, a redbone hound mix, was found on the side of a country road starving and lifeless. After being rescued by a nice lady he is now in foster with two other dogs and two cats. He is a little timid but is loving being an inside/ outside dog. He gets along with other dogs and cats and loves kids. Hank is doing great on housetraining and walking on a leash. He is about 7 months old, less than 40 pounds and has been fully vetted, neutered, chipped and heartworm negative. For more info call Carrie at (903) 277-8370. 6. Bullet is a beautiful 8 month old Husky mix. This

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sweet little fella has had a rough start and is looking for that wonderful loving home he so deserves. Bullet was picked up after seeing a man hitting him with a pipe. After catching him he was also found to have been shot in his leg. He was vetted and treated for his bullet wound and is on the road to recovery. You wouldn’t even know his leg had been injured. Even after all he has been through he has so much love to give. For more info please call Amber at (870) 653-6983. 7. Tony is a little male chihuaha mix that weighs 9 pounds. He is around a year old, neutered, micro chipped and is negative for heartworms and is current on all shots. If you would like more info on this precious little man call Diana at (903) 838-4965. 8. This kitten is female that is about 10 weeks old. She has been wormed and shots have been started. For more info please call Diana at (903) 277-3389.


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1. Darcey weighs about 35 lbs and is about 6 months old. She’s a Labrador Retriever/Chow Chow. 2. Charlie is about 5 months old and weighs about 30 lbs. He’s a Heeler/Treeing Walker Coonhound. 3. River is about 1.5 years old and weighs about 20 lbs. She’s a Beagle mix. 4. Princess is about 1 year old and weighs in at about 15 lbs. She’s a Yorkshire Terrier. 5. Bama is 2 years old and weighs in at about 10 lbs. He’s a male Rat Terrier.

The mission of the Animal Care & Adoption Center of Texarkana, Arkansas is to be a technologically advanced, self sustaining, human and animal friendly facility that specializes in personal customer service from a team of knowledgeable, caring individuals who endeavor to achieve rapid placement of all adoptable animals. We are always in need of caring, capable volunteers to assist in with duties at the center, adoption events, fund-raising activities and more. Your tax-deductible donation will help care for and assist in the adoption of loving animals to good homes! The Animal Care & Adoption Center of Texarkana, Arkansas is located at 203 Harrison, Texarkana, AR, 71854. For more information, call Connie Slater at 870.773.6388, or visit www. animalcareadoptioncenter.org. We’re also on Facebook! We’re open Monday-Saturday from 10:00 - 5:00. Please note, all dogs adopted from this shelter MUST be spayed or neutered. Spays cost $89-$104, neuters are $76-$92 depending on the weight of the dog.

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We’ve got lots of kittens needing good homes right now!

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6. Sela is about 1 and a half years old and weighs about 26 lbs. She’s a Beagle/Heeler Mix. 7. Twinkie is about 18 months old and weighs about 40 lbs. She is a Pit Bull Terrier. 8. Laker is about 6 months old and weighs about 30 lbs. He’s a Cocker Spaniel/Labrador Retriever. 9. Wesley is about 1 year and 7 months old and weighs about 15 lbs. He’s a Labrador Retriever. 10. Brody/Ace is 5 months old and weighs about 25lbs. He’s a Pitbull Terrier/Pointer Mix.

Who else can help? Artex Animal Welfare, Inc. (mostly horses) 903.824.1990 Three Rivers Animal Rescue 903.490.4048 Poodle Patch & Friends poodlepatch@yahoo.com Passion for Pooches (mostly small dogs) 903.832.8632 Texarkana Animal League (must leave message) 877.525.4825

Want to help but can’t adopt? The Texarkana Humane Society is in need of collars, all sizes; leashes; flea prevention for both dogs and cats; dog and cat food; and monetary donations. They are also in need of more volunteers. If your are interested in donating, helping with events, fostering or working fundraisers call Sherrie at (903) 838-6334.

This is Sugar with Carmilita, her new Mom. Sugar is the little red female Dachshund that was hit by a car on July 4. Sugar joins Miss Carmilita’s othe r adopted siblings, two dogs and one cat. Carmilita says, “all she has to do is look up at you with those big brown eyes and your hear t just melts.” Thanks to Dr. Hendershot that stapled up the cut in her leg and to Dr. Old for the wonderful surgery to put her leg back toge ther. Diana Logan, thanks for all the TLC you gave this little girl getting her on the road to recovery. And thanks Micki for help with the vet bill! Great big HUGS to Carmilita for opening your hear t and hom e to this precious angel. A very happy ending! (Courtesy of the Texarkana Humane Society )

Happy

Tails! www.alt-mag.com

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September Calendar September 1 Hunger Action Month Community Luncheon at

Williams Memorial United Methodist Church, 4000 Moores Lane, at noon. Please email the names of those attending to harvesttxk@cableone.net or call 870-774-1398. Tickets are $10 each, payable to Harvest Texarkana. $10 Hunger Action Month T-shirts will also be for sale.

September 5 L abor Da y! September 10 Circle of Friends Membership Fish Fry for Arkansas Children’s Hospital. Join Circle of Friends, Texarkana chapter, as we work together raising funds for Arkansas Children’s Hospital. The annual Membership Drive Fish Fry will be held at Grady Wallace Park off Loop 151 and Leopard Drive from 5:00PM - 7:00PM. For more information, call (903) 276-9296 or (903) 293-5959.

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September 27 The New Americana Tapas and Wine Tasting

Fundraiser Join HandsOn Texarkana for their annual fundraiser to benefit their continued remodeling of the Historic Collins Building. Enjoy delicious foods by Executive Chef Bryan Ogburn - TAPAS style - and wonderful wines by Vince Senatore. Only $50 per person. RSVP by 9/15. 6:30PM on the lawn of the Collins Building, on Southwest corner of 20th and Olive. For more information, (903) 798-3211 or HandsOnTexarkana.aol.com.

of Events OCTOBER 8 “Jeans & Bling” will be held at 7 p.m., October 8

at Ramage Farms Barn in Hooks, Texas. Event will feature Local Sensation “Split Decision”, live music and dancing, a Live Auction, huge prizes including Two Florida Vacations, drinks and heavy hors d’oeuvres from the area’s Best Restaurants. Tickets only $50 per person, limited available at www.HospiceofTexarkana.org or 903-794-4263. All proceeds benefit Hospice of Texarkana, a non-profit organization.


Buying? Selling? We Can Help! Bill & Tracy Spradlin 903.223.0710 . 903.748.3186 . 903.748.2477 Email to: billsprad@aol.com . spradlintd@aol.com www.realtyexecutivestexarkana.com 1200 N. Kings Hwy., Suite 104, Nash, TX 75569

Click in 24/7 for all your real estate needs!

www.realtyexecutivestexarkana.com

This home is Exquisite. One of the most Magnificent Luxury Homes in the area. The amenities in this home are superb. Game Room, Media Room, Exercise Room, in ground pool, butler’s pantry, granite countertops, marble floors in entry and formal living area, beautiful custom wood work, immaculate luxury home, sprinkler system, security system and more.

Immaculate 2 Story, PG, 4 bdrms, 3.5 baths, 2 gorgeous fireplaces w/gas logs in place, master bath w/whirlpool tub, tall ceilings throughout, open floor plan, landscaping, in ground pool.

Fantastic custom built home, 2 Story, 4/4/2C, vaulted ceiling in great room w/gas log fp, lge kitchen, each rm has bathroom, 2 m. bdrms downstairs, sunroom, covered patio, 6 acres

This house is Awesome! 3/2/2G, FD, Remodeled w/granite countertops, decorative glass & stone mosaic backsplash, some new appl., ceramic tile in master & 2nd bath, new paint & roof, landscaped.

This fabulous split level home has 3 bdrms, 2 baths, one half bath, formal dining, and a 2 car garage. Its many features include granite countertops, a beautiful master bath with ceramic tile, split master bdrm arrangement, bonus room upstairs and a separate 1500 sq ft brick shop/garage. It is set on 2 acres that are enhanced with beautiful landscaping.

Gorgeous Home 4/3/2L/3G, office, gourmet kitchen, butlers pantry, FD, M Bdrm split, ceramic tile shower, deck w/ hot tub. Amazing Home!

Liberty Eylau, new construction, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 car garage, open floor plan, beautiful fireplace in family room, wood and ceramic tile floors, covered patio, high ceilings throughout, this home has it all and priced right, call for your showing today.

Fantastic 2 story home in Pleasant Grove, 2,052 Square feet, 3 bdrms, 2.5 baths, 2 car garage, 2 living areas, Fireplace, on 0.99 acres.

www.realtyexecutivestexarkana.com billsprad@aol.com spradlintd@aol.com Realty Executives Impact, 1200 N. Kings Hwy., Suite 104, Nash, TX 75569 Each office independendly owned and operated.

2nd Location in New Boston, TX NOW OPEN!

Gorgeous 2 story LE home is located in a cul-de-sac and features 4 bdrms, 2.5 baths, breakfast & formal dining area, 3 car garage, fireplace in family room & in master bdrm, open floor plan with high ceilings throughout, gorgeous deck with hot tub overlooking a salt water pool. An extra 24 x 30 concrete pad could be made into a workshop, garage, or RV shed.

Residential . Land . Timber Recreational Property Commercial


ALT September 2011  

ALT Magazine's September issue includes fabulous articles!

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