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The Altamont

Enterprise

& Albany County Post No. 49 Thursday, June 21, 2012

For 127 years Albany County’s independent newspaper

Is Westerlo getting enough?

Money in metal By Zach Simeone WESTERLO — Transfer stations, built for local waste disposal, can also bring in revenue through the collection and sale of discarded materials. But local officials say that reaping these benefits requires research, or towns could lose out, as is happening in Westerlo. Scrap metal collected at transfer stations can be sold to the highest bidder, and the money received by a municipality can go towards public projects. Clinton “Jack” Milner claimed last year, when he was a town councilman, that steel was being stolen from the transfer station. The town had a longstanding tradition of swap meets among residents at the dump, but the board eventually amended the law to be less lax. Despite the board’s brief investigation into the efficiency of the transfer station last year, Westerlo is still getting a fraction of what neighboring

towns make in scrap metal sales, due in part to being paid a far lower price per ton than it could be. Last year, Westerlo got $4,235 for 58 tons — an increase over three years ago, but a fraction of the revenue that awaits scrap sellers now. Milner, who was not reelected, is now asserting that private haulers’ use of the town dump is adding to costs; he says taxpayers are stuck with the fees to dispose of garbage that is collected from homes and businesses in other towns. Berne’s supervisor has cited savings for his town in barring private haulers from Berne’s transfer station. Figures from the towns of Berne, Knox, and Westerlo, as well as Albany’s Rapp Road landfill, and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation — relating to population, tonnage of and revenue from recyclables, (Continued on Page 20)

At 67

Mayer has more to say

— Photo from the Guilderland Animal Hospital

Helping hands: Veterinarians at the Guilderland Animal Hospital give this baby deer, found in the Pine Bush Preserve, a clean bill of health after a thorough examination. A wild animal always has the best chance of survival if it is raised in nature, said Edward Becker, DVM, who had the fawn returned to the same spot it was discovered.

An enterprising reporter tracks down the deer that made her a human salt lick By Anne Hayden Last week, I decided it would be nice to go for a run on the trails in the Pine Bush Preserve, as I often do. Although the Pine Bush is an environment where various species of wildlife thrive, I have never seen animals roaming the woods when I jog there. Sometimes, I think I can hear the animals, but I’ve always been glad they haven’t revealed their presence to me while I’m alone and vulnerable. On Thursday, June 14, however, that all changed. I was running along, feeling good, when I saw a man stopped up ahead, giving water to what I thought was a dog. Not wanting to scare the animal by running up from behind or yelling, I slowed to a walk. As I approached the man on the trail, ready to give a friendly greeting and admire his dog, the animal trotted up to me, licked my leg, snuffled around my feet, and then ran back to the man. I stood there, shocked, as I realized that the animal was not a dog, but rather, a baby deer.

Inside

Opinion Page 2

“Oh!” I exclaimed. The man told me the fawn had run into the middle of the path as he was bicycling by, and that it had been crying. He said it seemed thirsty, so he gave it the water he was carrying in a bottle. As we talked, the fawn kept staring at the man and bleating. “It seems like something is wrong with it,” the man said. “I hope it doesn’t have rabies.” Well, I hoped it didn’t have rabies, too, considering it had just licked me. The man hopped back on his bicycle and rode away, and, not knowing what else to do, I started running again, back toward my car. The fawn continued to stand there in the middle of the path, bleating loudly. I could hear the deer crying for at least another quarter of a mile. When I got back to my car, I decided to call someone, just to ask for advice. I had a lot of questions. I wondered if the fawn was abandoned, or sick, if it needed help, and if I should be worried about disease. (Continued on Page 21)

News Page 7

scholarship to study Greek By Melissa Hale-Spencer Bernadette Mayer grew up and Latin, and left for Iowa. “Nobody raised me…I guess in a home in Brooklyn with I raised myself,” said Mayer in no books. “My sister and I would go a matter-of-fact tone. “I began to understand to the library, things about life which was luckI really didn’t ily near our want to know house, and we too early.” would bring the She moved books home,” she upstairs in recalled. “When her two-family Rosemary and Brooklyn house I brought them to live with her home, we real“Nobody raised mother’s father ized there were me…I guess a n d b r o t h e r. no bookshelves I raised myself.” H e r g o d p a rto put them on.” ents, a couple She laughed and with a young said, “If you’re child, moved me, it’s funny.” in downstairs. Now, at age 67, “They fought Mayer has pubconstantly. Plus, lished enough they had plastic books of poetry on their furni— more than 20 ture,” she said. — to fill a shelf. She describes herself as “These are the sounds that “driven” to write poetry. She I heard. And that’s when is driven by the desire to ex- I started writing poetry. I couldn’t really contain myself press herself. “I’ve lived a really long any longer.” On Sunday, Mayer will read and f---ed-up life,” she said. “And it’s made it necessary in Voorheesville from her newfor me to speak out and say est book, Helens of Troy, to be published, as many of her something.” Both of her parents died books are, by New Directions; when she was young. Mayer’s it will come out in January. father, an electrician, died She described the genesis of when she was 14. Her mother, her book. Mayer lives in East Nassau a secretary, died when she was 16. Her sister, who had been on Psatsawassa Lake Road. living with her until their “It took a long time for me to mother died, got a Fulbright (Continued on Page 22)

Community Calendar Page 18 Classifieds Page 32 Sports Page 35


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The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

Editorial

Student detectives make a tiny discovery with big consequences T

he silver lining can be hard to find as the dark cloud of the Great said. “We would go along the corn row and find missing or dead plants Recession still hovers over our land. Farmers are struggling; in New and find out the reason,” he said. The students counted the total number York State, they’ve traditionally looked to the Cornell University of plants for a specified length in a row and also counted the number of skips. “Then they’d dig up the skips, see if there’s a seed or no seed, see if Cooperative Extension for help. But the extension, like many other government-funded programs, has the roots or leaves are eaten…The thing they discovered, I did not expect,” been stretched thin. Take, for example, Aaron Gabriel, a crops and soil he said. That discovery was corn maggots. educator who has worked for the extension for 16 years. The students found the corn maggot pupae — each half the size of a “Our job is to work with commercial farms to provide educational programs to bring the latest research and technology to help them be profitable,” ex- grain of rice — in the soil where a corn seed was supposed to be growing. That is a hard thing to find in a mound of soil, said Gabriel. plained Gabriel. “You heard the initial screams when they first saw the maggots,” said He used to cover one county. He now is responsible for five counties — McGovern. “After that, they Albany, Schenectady, Columwere totally engrossed, and bia, Greene, and Washington. serious about what they “That’s a pretty big territory,” were finding. There was not a he says, including several problem getting their hands hundred dairy farms and “We would go along the corn row dirty. They were enthusiascountless part-time farmers. tic and methodical in their At the same time, school and find missing or dead plants and find out the reason.” methods. It was great to districts, including rural watch them.” Berne-Knox-Westerlo, are Four of her students will facing tough times as the tax be studying biology in college levy is capped and state aid is next year, she said, and this limited. As a result of recent experience will stand them in budget cuts, for instance, BKW good stead. The results of the has reduced its offer of collegestudents’ work will be used in level Advanced Placement BiolCornell extension workshops ogy to every other year. and newsletters to make farmYet these three entities — ers aware of the problem. the farmers, the extension, and The reason Gabriel was surthe school — despite their own prised with the maggot discovhardships, together have found ery is because both farmers had a silver lining in a triple crown bought seeds that were coated of win-win-win. with insecticide to protect them It all started because Gabriel from maggots. “The coating the — a model public servant — was farmer paid for wasn’t doing aware of the countless hours its job,” he said. His next step volunteers spend helping the will be to consult with a Cornell cooperative extension through professor about other ways of programs like 4-H and the Master treating the seeds. Gardeners. “I was being envious, Gaige said that he, too, was thinking it would be great if I had surprised with the students’ volunteers to help me, to do some discovery; he hadn’t realized of the legwork,” he said. there were maggots. On the He sent out an e-mail to area effectiveness of the insecticide high schools, and Donna McGovcoating, he said, “They say that ern, teaching AP Biology at BKW it is…you just don’t know.” for the first time, responded. She Gabriel would like to go back had regaled her 15 students, both to the same fields in the fall juniors and seniors, with stories and have students measure about her days as a biology major the yield and the quantity of at Siena College where she had yield loss. measured plants at different “It’s very labor intensive elevations on a mountain and work,” he said, estimating that, where she had studied streams if he were to do it by himself, in Albany Rural Cemetery. it would take all day to do 10 The timing was perfect because samples. “With a work force the AP exam was administered of students or retired folks or on May 15 and McGovern wanted other volunteers, I can get more to fill the end of the school year data,” said Gabriel. with worthwhile learning. The McGovern’s students are the students were taken to David first volunteers he has used to Gaige’s and Brian Wilson’s farms collect data and he hopes it will in Knox. Their task: To find out be a new way of doing things. why the farmers who planted We do, too. 34,000 corn seeds per acre grew Anyone who would like to sometimes only 26,000 corn volunteer may call Gabriel at stalks. Gabriel estimated that 380-1496. He doesn’t mind havthe loss could cost farmers as ing his phone number printed much as $50 an acre. in the paper. “I’m a public serDavid Gaige, who is 56, says he has been farming all his life. He has a dairy farm with about 100 head vant. I basically serve the community,” he said. A Cornell graduate with a and grows corn, oats, and hay. He remembers, years ago, a field scout from master’s degree in etymology, Gabriel has also been a teacher. He hopes this new model of field volunteers will expand. “I’ll keep it Cornell would “check stuff.” He said, as a farmer, “You just get too busy. simple and interesting for the students and any other volunteers,” Gabriel It’s always something different.” He was happy to have McGovern’s students examining the field corn pledged. We urge our readers — including teachers and Scout leaders — to conhe had planted on April 20. “Everyone has lost contact with agriculture,” Gaige said. “Years ago, everyone’s uncle or grandfather had a farm. These sider the benefits. “With the budget constraints, it’s a unique way for us to accomplish realkids learned there is so much more to it than just planting seed.” “It is real-world science, and they loved it,” McGovern said of her stu- world learning,” McGovern told us. We commend her for being the first to grab that opportunity for her students. dents. Letting kids learn is good for our society. So is helping farmers stay in When farmers plant their corn in the spring, said Gabriel, echoing Gaige’s words, they are “incredibly busy,” also getting in their hay at the same business. We salute Gabriel as a shining example of a public servant who time, and typically don’t check the corn for a month or two. “Problems can exposed the silver lining in the looming cloud of a dark economy. Maybe it will rain soon. “Wait for a thunderstorm if you want to talk to happen as the corn emerges,” he said. “It takes someone else to diagnose a farmer,” Gabriel advised. But the high heat did the trick yesterday when the problems.” And that is precisely what the BKW students, under Gabriel’s tutelage, David Gaige ceased his labors long enough to return our calls. “I had to stop for a drink of water,” he said. did. “You need hard data to bring a problem to light and make a case,” Gabriel


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The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

Seeds Of Learning

Back In Time. . . 1912

100 Years Ago

2012

Altamont Enterprise June 21, 1912

— Photo from Donna McGovern

Solving a mystery: Students taking a college-level biology course at Berne-Knox-Westerlo — from left, Taylor DellaRocco, Eric Collins, and Katelyn Slaver — examine David Gaige’s corn crop in Knox, looking to discover why some seeds did not grow. See the editorial on the facing page for the full story.

Family Reunion: The annual reunion of the Frederick family was held on Saturday, June 15, at the home of Mrs. Aaron Pangburn, near Dunnsville. This family gathering is composed of the descendants of the late Mr. and Mrs. Peter M. Frederick who resided near Meadowdale, and were esteemed members of the old St. Johnís Lutheran Church near Guilderland Centre. Mr. and Mrs. Frederick were blessed with a family of nine children, five girls and four boys. All of these nine children were married in later years and with but a single exception they are all living today. Their children and childrenís children have been added to the membership of this remarkable family which includes no less than 89 people at the present time. It was certainly a very happy inspiration which prompted the suggestion of holding an annual family reunion, which should bring as many as possible of these descendants together in order to spend a day in happy associations with one another. The gathering which has just been held was the fifth of its kind and one of the best yet held. Early in the forenoon last Saturday, wagons and automobiles could be seen approaching the Pangburn home, each bearing its load of happy expectant guests, until when the last arrivals had come it was found that all but three of the 89 members of the family were present. **** Feura Bush Ball Team: The Feura Bush willow wielders took the crack Unionville bunch in camp last Saturday to the tune of 28 to 6. Creble and Fritz Rothaupt were on the points for the locals, and Glasser and Weyrick for the visitors. Much credit for the victory is due the battery, Creble having 18 strikeouts to his credit and Fritz only let one ball get by him, which netted the Unionville boys one run. Craton makes a crack first-baseman and can run wonderfully for one his size The local team gained a star when Bill Mathias offered to cover second, and Dan Heller on third is doing fine base and stick work. Billington, the old timer, has shown he can ìcome backî by his work at short. Dave Rothaupt, over whom there was some doubt, surprised the wise ones by nailing all the flies that came in his vicinity of the field and landing on the sphere for a hit each time at bat. Daveís only fault seems to be in throwing in the high speed clutch after rounding first and exceeding the speed limit home. Floyd Johnson and Hubbard were both prominent in the field and at the bat. The boys will play a return game with Unionville on the 29, at 3:30 p.m. Come out and encourage the boys to win.

Published continuously since July 26, 1884 “We seek the truth and print it” JAMES E. GARDNER Publisher

MELISSA HALE-SPENCER Editor

NEWS OFFICE — 861-5005 or 861-5008..................BUSINESS OFFICE — 861-6641 Staff Writers.......................................................... Jo E. Prout, Zachary simeone, JORDAN MICHAEL, ANNE HAYDEN, TYLER MURPHY Illustrator.................................................................................................... FOREST BYRD Advertising Director......................................................CHERIE LUSSIER — 861-8179 Advertising Representative.................................... JACQUELINE THORP — 861-5893 Office Manager..................................................................................WANDA GARDNER Photographer..........................................................................................MICHAEL KOFF Production................................ JAMES E. GARDNER JR., BARBARA DEGAETANO, ................................ELLEN SCHREIBSTEIN, RICH MENDOZA, CHRISTINE EKSTROM The Enterprise is the newspaper of record for Guilderland, New Scotland, Berne, Knox, Westerlo, and Rensselaerville. Our mission is to find the truth, report it fairly, and provide a forum for the open exchange of ideas on issues important to our community.

— Photo from Donna McGovern

Examining a corn seed, Angela Cunningham, right, and Keely Dufney, look to see why it didn’t germinate. Donna McGovern’s students discovered that corn maggots had affected the crop. The finding surprised Aaron Gabriel, an educator with the Cornell University Cooperative Extension, who had reached out to the students for the project.

PUBLISHED THURSDAYS at 123 Maple Ave., Altamont, NY 12009. Periodical postage paid at Altamont, NY. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Altamont Enterprise, PO Box 654, Altamont, NY 12009. USPS 692-580, ISSN 0890-6025. FAX: 861-5105. E-MAIL: info@altamontenterprise.com WEBSITE: www.altamontenterprise.com OFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: For Albany County residents, one year, $33; six months, $26. For out-of-county subscribers, one year, $37; six months, $31. Postal charges incurred by a subscriber’s failure to notify the newspaper of an address change will be billed to the subscriber upon renewal. No refunds on subscriptions. Single copy: $1.00. ADVERTISEMENT RATES available upon request. The publisher reserves the right to reject advertising at any time for any reason. Liability for errors in advertisements will, at the publisher’s discretion, be limited to the value of the ad only. NEWS DEADLINES: For correspondents’ columns, Monday before publication. For all other contributions, Tuesday before publication. CORRECTIONS: The Enterprise will correct errors and clarify misunderstandings in news stories when brought to the attention of the editor, phone 861-5005. VIEWPOINTS expressed by staff members, contributing writers, and correspondents do not necessarily reflect those of the ownership of The Enterprise. QUESTIONS and COMMENTS concerning the content of this newspaper should be directed to the editor by calling 861-5005 or in the form of a letter to the editor. WEDDING AND ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCEMENTS will be printed free of charge. A $20 fee will be charged for announcements with a photograph. PHOTOGRAPHS will be printed with announcements about students for a $30 minimum fee. There is no charge to print announcements without photographs.


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The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

In Memory Of

The Enterprise opinion pages are an open forum for our community. We encourage readers to express their thoughts about issues that appear in this newpaper or affect the community. Letters should be brief (with an outside limit of 1,000 words) and must include the writer’s address, name, and phone number for verification. The editors may reject letters that have been printed elsewhere. Letters concerning elections will be cut off one issue before the election at the editor’s discretion. No unsigned letters. Deadline for letters is Tuesday at noon.

To the editor

Pressure from the people needed on fracking issues

The Enterprise –– Tyler Murphy

Star-Spangled Banner: Town of Guilderland grant writer Donald Csaposs, front, along with Annie and Ray Wilson, in flag shirts, with other local residents, stand for the national anthem while attending a veterans’ memorial service at the Prospect Hill Cemetery in Guilderland on Saturday June 16. More on page 15.

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To the Editor: There’s a lot of discussion and concern about “fracking” in the Hilltowns communities, specifically Westerlo, where the town board is currently considering a moratorium on fracking but has not yet heard from the committee it established to report on that subject. Natural gas is a valuable resource, primarily as a fuel for heating, vehicles, and electricitygenerating plants. It burns more cleanly than coal, oil, or gasoline. Natural gas supplies about a quarter of all energy consumed in the United States, so it’s a big business. Natural gas is found deep underground, where ancient plant matter got trapped millions of years ago, then decomposed and reformed into coal, crude oil, and methane (the primary component of natural gas). Until recently, most natural gas came from conventional wells, which are just holes drilled down until they reach deposits of natural gas (just like the water wells so many of us depend on and the oil wells found in Texas and elsewhere). Halliburton, a $25 billion company headquartered in Texas, has done a lot to develop and implement well technology. It developed a new method of extracting natural gas from underground formations that trap the gas so it won’t come out of a conventional well. This new method starts by drilling, but then pumps a huge volume of special fluid (water mixed with a lot of special chemicals that are secrets of Halliburton, protected by law, so no one can know what they are) into the well, then applies tremendous pressure to that fluid to break open (or fracture, which is where the term “fracking” comes from) the underground formations so the gas can escape and flow into the well casing and come up above ground. Fracking makes it possible to extract natural gas from big shale formations, such as the

Marcellus Shale that extends into New York State, which contain a lot of natural gas, enough to make a big difference in the price and availability of natural gas in the U.S. and enough to make a big business out of exporting natural gas from the U.S. to other countries. This leads gas companies to offer money to landowners so the gas companies can drill wells on their land and extract gas. However, fracking currently has several major issues, which is why a number of Hilltowns communities either already have a moratorium on fracking (meaning that no wells for fracking can be dug in those towns for a year or so while the issues get sorted out) or are, like Westerlo, considering having a moratorium. Why hold off on fracking? Several reasons: — Water consumption: The huge volume of fluid pumped into a fracking well includes millions of gallons of water, enough to drain aquifers and reservoirs and cause water supply problems for homes and farms; — Water pollution: The special chemicals in that fluid travel further underground after the shale formations are fractured and can get into the aquifers that supply water wells far from a fracking well. Because those chemicals are secret, it’s not possible to know what to test for in well water, but there is evidence that those chemicals can harm people and livestock; — Air pollution: When shale formations are fractured, not all the gas comes up the well. Some gas comes up through other natural cracks and gets into the air, where it can cause problems ranging from bad smells to chronic headaches to explosions, and into well water, where the water not only isn’t good to drink but can catch on fire; — Waste disposal: After the fluid does its fracturing work, the part that hasn’t traveled into the fractured shale is pumped out of the well and then needs to be disposed. Most fracking operations

currently just dump that toxic fluid in huge outdoor ponds; — Road damage: Fracking requires huge volumes of fluid to be trucked to and from each well. This puts a big wear and traffic burden on rural roads; and — Damage to the land: Fracking wells are highly visible and noisy, and require a lot of clearing of the land around them. This makes farming harder and tends to spoil the land and the views. Because of public concern, some of these issues are being addressed. It should be possible to extract gas from shale with less pollution and damage, but that requires new technology and imposes higher costs on the gas companies, so they won’t do this voluntarily. New York State can impose regulations that would require the gas companies to use procedures and materials that would reduce pollution and damage. Because New York is a homerule state, counties and towns can impose their own, even tighter, regulations. However, none of this will happen without interest and pressure from the people. The next Westerlo Town Board meeting is at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 3, at 933 County Route 401. It would be good to have another year or so to sort out the options to see if and how fracking can be done so landowners can get money for the gas under their land without spoiling the water, air, roads, and land for themselves and their neighbors. Leonard Laub Westerlo Editor’s note: The state’s Environmental Conservation Law says that it “shall supersede all local laws or ordinances relating to the regulation of the oil, gas and solution mining industries” but some have argued municipalities can exercise some control through their local zoning laws. (See last week’s story, “Governor may let towns decide” online at www.AltamontEnterprise.com and earlier archived stories and editorials at the same site.)

Vietnam vets reunion in July

A time to laugh, to cry, and to remember To the Editor: Greene County will proudly host The 13th Annual Northeast USA Vietnam Veterans Reunion from July 27 to 29 at a picturesque field in Greenville near the junction of routes 81 and 32. The reunion is intended to be a time of camaraderie for Vietnam veterans, but the highlight of the weekend is a memorial service at noon on Saturday saluting all who have served our country. There will be color guards, guest speakers, and patriotic music. Homage is paid to those lost in combat, Prisoners of War, to soldiers missing in action and to each and every veteran who has served our great nation. A special salute will be given to the members of the United States military, who are once again safeguarding our nation. All of these people are heroes, and all veterans and their supporters are invited to join in honoring those who have given

so much to our country. Local veterans and civic groups not only offer financial support to this event but also participate in a beautiful color guard at the memorial ceremony. The committee’s goal for 2012 is to welcome these organizations, to thank them for their support of the Vietnam vets, and to honor all they have done for this great nation. A very special welcome is also offered to our Gold Star families whose loved ones made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. The reunion has grown from a small assembly to last year’s tremendous “Welcome Home” gathering of veterans from every branch of the military. There are no fees and no vendors. Thanks to the gracious support of area residents, businesses, and veterans and civic organizations, the reunion provides food, soft drinks, and entertainment but does not charge for anything. The

committee does not want a single veteran to stay away because he or she cannot afford to attend. The committee states that its objective is “To provide a weekend for old friends to come together and for new friends to meet. To have veterans, their families and the public join in a Memorial Service that honors the fallen, remembers the missing, and celebrates the living. “It is a time to laugh, a time to cry, and a time to remember. In the past, we were honored to host the Traveling Wall, but nothing makes us prouder than fulfilling our original purpose of giving a rousing ‘Welcome Home’ to our veterans.” For more information, visit our website at www.nevietvets.us. Bill Fay, president Northeast USA Vietnam Veterans Reunion Association, Freehold, N.Y.


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The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

I’d rather be seen as a statesman than a politician

I believe, if the town hired a $242.92 per load from Rensselaer To the Editor: I am writing to the good people professional engineer, he would Iron & Steel. Now, as of 2012, Freedman of Westerlo. I feel very obligated come up with a huge savings, to write a summary of my short by making a firehouse out of and Hudson River are paying $220 per ton. time on our planning board and the school. I believe, if Councilman Zeh On June 1, 2010, I brought up the three years as your councilthat we should have a plaque for gave me some help and looked man. In April of 2007, the town our war veterans that served and into this matter he wouldn’t have board started Westerlo’s second died fighting for our country. This to cut our board’s pay in half. I asked to have an inspection planning board. I was one mem- issue, too, was side lined. I noticed South Westerlo hon- of independent dump haulers ber of five, and Leonard Laub ored its World War II vets with to find out if the independents was our chairman. As chairman, Leonard told their 45 names on a plaque in were bringing outside garbage the board that he did not want the center of the hamlet off of into the town dump. But I had the $4,500 and keep it for other Route 405. Four of the 45 women no help from the other four board town matters. After doing an and men gave their all, and were members. An independent hauler from outstanding job for 10 months, killed in action. On Sept. 7, 2010, I brought up Rensselaerville, John Vogel, the town board made up a law to fire Leonard for not signing a the issue of the heating oil left picks up from three main busiat the Westerlo School by Helder- nesses — Shell Inn, Erickson’s Civil Service paper. I thoroughly investigated the berg Christian School. Between Garage, and the race track firing with the State Attorney the Berne-Knox-Westerlo School formerly M & B’s — and also General’s Albany Office, the District and the town board of Woodstock Rd. Vogel takes it department of State’s General Westerlo, I believe $1,100 of straight to the city’s Rapp Road landfill {so the taxpayers in town Council’s office, and the Comp- heating oil was stolen. Before the Nov. 3, 2010 meet- don’t have to foot the bill}. troller’s Office of Albany County. I believe we are still 350 tons All said Leonard was fired ille- ing, donors came up with the over average. This would mean gally because he was working for $1,100 for the oil. At a workshop meeting on taxpayers are paying $18,200 no pay. All he was required to do Jan. 26, 2011, I told the town for what I believe is out-of-town was to take the oath of office. I believe he was too intelli- board about Maven Technologies garbage. At the Feb. 16, 2011 special gent, and someone wanted him of Rochester, N.Y. Ken Johnson out. I, therefore, resigned at the faxed me a contract to pick up all town-board meeting, I told the next town meeting, to support computer and electronic equip- board that I had a discussion with ment, and 30 or more different Mr. Roger Hannay. If he would Leonard. At this point, I decided to run items. If the board OKs this part with some land bordering for the councilman’s seat in No- contract in a reasonable time, the town’s transfer waste stavember 2008 because, if elected, hundreds of dollars could have tion, we could have underground canisters to I would look out make it easfor all residents ier and safer of Westerlo and, for all He said thanks to close he would conto 800 voters, I Now, 15 months have passed and nothing has been sider making made it. done about the land that Mr. Roger Hannay a deal with Now, on to a summary of what has available to make our transfer station up-to-date. the town. At the May went on from 3, 2011 regu2009 to 2011. lar meeting, From the start there was of 2009, I pushed discussion for a transparent about Mr. Roger Hannay’s offer town board. On Jan. 9, 2009, An- been saved. Finally New York State man- but nothing was done. drew Marrone asked about town On July 12, 2011, Mr. Roger seals on our trucks. I believe dated in April this separation Supervisor Richard Rapp said had to be done, so the town board Hannay came to the town board at the May 3 meeting went with a meeting and explained how his they were too expensive. At the Feb. 4, 2009 meeting, I company that the city of Albany land would be a natural site to expand our recycling and solidrequested that the rescue squad uses RCR & R . At the January 2011 meeting waste collection area. could accept payments from Now, 15 months have passed insurance companies. Squad with Jerry Cifor, principal of member Debbie Mackey was told County Waste, he told me they and nothing has been done about 10 years ago that it was illegal would start paying us $30 a ton the land that Mr. Roger Hannay for all recyclables and $75 a ton has available to make our transto bill. fer station up-to-date. I only hope The board suggested that the for cardboard. We had 50 fewer tons of solid that our two new councilmen will rescue squad hold a public meeting to inform the public that waste, and, at $52 a ton, we saved get this underway. At a May 3, 2011 town board they would be billing, set up the $2,600 from the year of 2010. And billing procedure with a billing our recyclables increased 60 tons meeting, I announced that there agency, and then come back to the to a total of 163 tons. The total is a donor for purchasing and apbrought in $5,322.95 an increase plying town seals on our trucks. board with the billing plan. This resolution was passed. The Nothing came about. I brought of $3,987.95. Other years, I believe, the resolution passed unanimously. this up a coupled of more times At the Sept. 6, 2011 town board and made no headway. By doing 60-ton savings would have been nothing, it’s costing taxpayers, put into solid waste, costing us meeting, the board acted on a I believe, around $100,000 a $3,120 more. Our solid waste, petition signed by 54 residents I believe, is still 350 tons over which I presented to reduce the year. speed limit in South Westerlo to Most of 2009 was spent on the average. Now, onto the steel report. For 35 miles per hour. It was passed Westerlo water works. At the March 2, 2010 meeting, the last 10 years before 2011, unanimously and is now under town attorney Ailine Galgay lost Rensselaer Iron & Steel hauled consideration by the state. I believe the communication her temper and threw a previ- an average of 9.4 loads per year, ously submitted school petition for a total of 94 loads, averaging that our town attorney Galgay across two tables at me, which $278.68 per load for $2,619.65 had with the State Attorney was very unprofessional. And per year. A total of 10 years comes General’s Office on March 7, 2011 didn’t change any of the staff at then, at the April 6 meeting, to $26,196.50. Just who is the town board our transfer waste station, probthe March meeting report stated that attorney Galgay handed the looking out for Rensselaer Iron ably because this is the town’s petition to me. Then councilman & Steel, Inc. or the taxpayers main political hub. I believe this is why there has Gregory Zeh had the sentence of Westerlo? I’ve mentioned we removed from the minutes, just should take steel into Freedmans been no inspection on most of of Green Island like our neighbor, the independent waste haulers. another cover-up. And the town’s political party I On May 4, 2010, before buy- the town of Knox does. The Altamont Enterprise back believe used our transfer station ing the Westerlo School I told how Albany County had a on Feb. 3, 2011, showed a scale to get me out of office. Go to the dictionary; look up 3,000-square-foot building put of Berne, Knox, and Westerlo, up for the weatherization depart- which definitely shows a large “politician” — one who seeks only to advance himself or his party, ment. I believe there were eight mismanagement at our dump. We do have an account at Hud- as by scheming. I would prefer offices, a kitchen, a large meeting room, two baths, a full cellar, son River Recycling at the Port to be a statesman, a person who and all furnishes for $150,000. of Albany, for the town garage. shows wisdom and deals with A building like this would have Both Freedmans and Hudson public issues. At this time, I been a very cost-saving adven- River told me, for 2011, they would like again to thank you, ture and we wouldn’t have to were paying $200 a ton for light the voters of Westerlo, for electspend countless thousands of steel, so multiply 200 by 61 tons ing me your councilman for the dollars on renovations and ex- and you’ll see we would have last three years. tremely high heat and electric gotten $12,200 by delivering it Clinton J. Milner Jr. bills that the 60-year-old school to Albany. That would have been Westerlo Editor’s note: See related story. $717.65 per load. Instead, we got will cost us.

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6

The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

Storm Aid raised $7K at festival To the Editor: Recently, Storm Aid, a 501c3 organization, held a fund-raiser (A Festival of Hope) at the Altamont fairgrounds to help survivors of tropical storms Irene and Lee. The Altamont Fair, with help from Marie McMillen and her staff at the fairgrounds, helped us raise almost $7,000. We are grateful to Dean Haskins of the band Flashback for donating his time to arrange the music and sound systems for this event. Also, Joe Sinatra,

Out2Play, County Line Rebels, Inky Salad, and Chicken Herders donated their time and talents for this event. We would like to thank all the vendors and all the people that contributed to help us to make this event a success. We also would like to thank the public for its support! Please look for our next event on our website: www.stormaid2011.com. Cheryl James Mae Ogsbury event coordinators

Seriously Muddy

To the editor For supporting “I Remember Altamont” as village reminisces over World War II, thank you To the Editor: To everyone who attended our “I Remember Altamont” gathering, thank you! Even though the attendance was lower than expected, we had a good time. These programs take a lot of planning, and I want to recognize the special work of Marijo Dougherty, curator for the Village of Altamont Archives and Museum, who worked many hours setting up the beautiful display. Also, special thanks to Chris

Zimmer for loaning us her firstday-of-issue stamps from the 1940s. They were beautiful and interesting to see and will soon be on display at the Home Front Café. Mayor Jim Gaughan, Ed Frank, Vall Pulliam, Fred Crounse, Judy Dineen, and Everett Rau all had a part in the program — we thank them. A special thank-you to Wilma and Francis Curry for attending. Francis is New York State’s sole surviving Medal of Honor

recipient from World War II. He is one of 12 remaining recipients who served in the Second World War. Last, but not least, thank you to The Enterprise for the excellent coverage you gave this program. We were impressed with the Enterprise reporter, Tyler Murphy, who provided outstanding and in-depth coverage of the event. Again, thanks to all. Cindy Pollard Altamont

On the Fourth of July, consider this local history To the Editor: On July 4, 1777, one year after the United States Colonies declared independence from England: General George Washington retreated to Pennsylvania, having lost New York City to British General William Howel, and British General John Burgoyne captured Fort Ticonderoga with sights set on Albany and the lower Hudson Valley. Many patriotic Colonialists were rethinking their allegiance to independence. Those who turned their loyalty to British rule were dubbed “Tories” by the American patriots who fought for independence. Jacob Salisbury, a Tory spying for General Burgoyne, together with several other British loyalists, found refuge in a cave, the Tory House, located on the

exposed precipice below the Helderberg escarpment overlooking Albany and the Hudson River Valley. General Gates, commanding Continental troops at Albany, awaited generals Benedict Arnold and Benjamin Lincoln leading Colonial reinforcements north from the New York City engagement. Using a spyglass, Jacob Salisbury could view Colonial troop formations, movement, and approaching reinforcements from the south. Armed with this information, General Burgoyne could position his troops and cannons to intercept the Colonial Army in an ambush. The Tory House is a large cavern located along the lower “Bear Path” approximately 30 feet below the Indian Ladder on

the escarpment. A clear sinkhole is located in the center of the cavern, offering a natural fire chimney for warmth and cooking. Smoke rising from the cavern led a Colonial scouting party to discover and capture Jacob Salisbury and his band of Tories just in time to prevent word reaching General Burgoyne that General Gates’s troops were marching north in his direction. Was the capture of the Tories at Indian ladder an insignificant event having no effect on the Battle of Saratoga, France coming to our aid, victory at Yorktown, and Independence? It’s something to think about. Enjoy the Fourth of July celebration! John Meineker Summerfield, Forida

The Old Men of the Mountain

The Enterprise — Colleen Ingerto

Looking rather like a bronze statue emerging from the muck, this competitor in a Mud Mania race at Tawasentha Park wears Army fatigues. The second annual event, sponsored by Guilderland’s Parks and Recreation Department, was held on June 16, and included competitions for both kids and grown-ups. Over 1,000 attended and more than $10,000 was raised for playground equipment at the park. More pictures on page 13.

Graduation Keepsake Edition On July 5, The Enterprise will publish a Graduation Keepsake Edition, featuring coverage of commencement ceremonies for Voorheesville, Guilderland, and BerneKnox-Westerlo. Home-schooled students or students who are graduating from private schools and who live in Guilderland, New Scotland, or the Hilltowns, are invited to submit news of their graduation name, parents’ names, school, and any special honors to be published in the keepsake edition. Such information must be received by June 25. It may be faxed (518-861-5105), e-mailed (MHale-Spencer@AltamontEnterprise.com) or mailed (Post Office Box 654, Altamont, NY 12009).

Enterprise deadlines The Enterprise staff will be on vacation for one week, beginning Saturday, June 30, through Sunday, July 8. The Keepsake Graduation Edition, dated July 5, will be printed on Thursday, June 28, but will be mailed and available at newsstands July 5. All legal notices and classified ads must reach The Enterprise no later than noon on Friday, June 22. All letters to the editor and columns must reach The Enterprise by noon Friday, June 22.

Following a universal custom, OFs swap stories, talk about how to raise kids By John R. Williams Somewhere in a galaxy far, far away, there is a globe of unknown color spinning around a massive unknown source of energy. The time of this sphere’s trip around its power source is not measured by our time, of days, weeks, and months. The planet’s recognition of time is also unknown but the inhabitants all over the planet still gather for their morning inhalation of energy to keep them going throughout the day similar to us plodding this thing called Earth — only we call it bacon, eggs, toast, and coffee.   Strange as it may seem even, with time being so unsure, this planet does have a Tuesday, and all the older male inhabitants gather at a specific time on this one known day of Tuesday to join as a group affectionately called the OFs for the exchange of stories — some true, some fabricated — and some have a great deal of embellishment on a small piece of fact. How do the Old Men of the Mountain know all this?  It’s because some of the OFs are so old they have come to our blue sphere from this galaxy far, far away to carry on a tradition that started eons ago.  In order to carry on this tradition of telling old stories, the Old Men of the Mountain met at the Country Café on Main Street in Schoharie, another Phoenix that rose not from ashes but from the

muddy waters of the terrible August flood that ravaged the beautiful valley of Schoharie, and beyond. Still following the tradition, by now possibly two billon years old, the OFs met on Tuesday, June 12, at the Country Café, and were treated like kings — maybe not kings but princes anyway. The OFs came away recommending the Country Café to any and all space travelers, and so, as all the OFs are a little spaced out most of the time, the conversation with all will be on an interplanetary level, no matter who the OFs come in contact with. MIB I, II, and III are all true you know. Raising kids Over the months of conversations, the OFs have rarely attempted to discuss how they were as parents. The OFs do mention how other OFs brought up their kids but do not discuss how they brought up theirs. When the subject is broached, there seems to be a mental block. The OFs can’t remember if they would be considered bad parents or good parents, strict or lenient, conservative or liberal, worried and concerned, or just blasé about the whole process — proud or, darn, here is another mouth to feed. Now, at the breakfast, most of the OGs brag about their kids, and grandkids, pictures are passed around the tables, and the embellished stories start. Using the OFs as a guide, the

methods of raising kids can be from “Spare the Rod and Spoil the Child” to “Let the Kids Rule the Roost.” The kids will turn out all right, just like the OFs’, only the OFs say the “Spare the Rod and Spoil the Child” is the only one any of the OFs knew. One OF said it is too early to tell about “Let the Kids Rule the Roost” because they are not 70 or 80 yet (if they ever get that far) but the OFs still did not really come up with the type of parents they were. The only thing they did agree on is that, as far as they knew, their kids were brought up to respect what they had because at the time the OFs were kids, and young parents of the OFs were all poor, but since everyone else was poor also they didn’t realize they were poor. Those OFs who have their space capsule parked out behind the barn and who attended the breakfast at the Country Café in Schoharie were: Joseph Lubier, Art Frament, Roger Chapman, Robie Osterman, George Washburn, Ted Willsey, Jim Rissacher, John Rossmann, Frank Pauli, Carl Slater, Miner Stevens, Harold Grippen, Jay Taylor, Bob Benac, Harold Guest, David Williams, Bill Bartholomew, Steve Kelly, Mike Willsey, Roger Shafer, Jack Norray, Gary Porter, Mace Porter, Arnold Geraldsen, Don Moser, Gerry Chartier, but not me.


7

The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

With A Can-Do Attitude, Girl Scouts Mark 100 Years

The Enterprise — Michael Koff

Centennial celebration: On Tuesday, over 150 Guilderland Girl Scouts gather at Twawasentha Park to form the number 100 in honor of the 100th anniversary of Girl Scouts. The girls are brandishing canned goods for St. Madeleine Sophie’s Food Pantry and later formed the cans into the shape of 100, too.

Albany County Sheriff’s Office is going back to school at Clarksville By Tyler Murphy CLARKSVILLE –– Starting in July, the vacant halls and classrooms of the closed Clarksville Elementary School will again serve the public, but not the students it was originally designed for. In an unopposed vote, the Albany County Legislature on June 11 approved Sheriff Craig Apple’s proposal to lease the building from the Bethlehem School District for up to five years. The sheriff said he’ll close stations in Cohoes and Voorheesville to consolidate services at the school. He estimated the move would save the county $47,000 in the next fiscal year. In a split vote of 5-to-2 and against the advice of the Bethlehem superintendent at the time, Michael Tebbano, the district’s board of education closed the school in March 2011, citing a district budgetary shortfall. “My first choice would have been a school. The community is outstanding in Clarksville and the school was perfect for them,” said County Legislator Herbert Reilly Jr., a Democrat representing the 33rd District who voted in favor of the lease. “But Bethlehem made a choice and, instead of leaving it vacant, they have a five-year lease,” he said, in reference to the district’s decision to close the school 15 months earlier. Though the district may save about $355,000 through rent and expenditures in the next five years by leasing the building it will also have to continue making payments for bonds issued in 2006 to renovate the building.

That project, just for the Clarksville renovations, will cost taxpayers about 1.86 million in that same five-year period, reported Bethlehem’s Chief Business and Financial Officer Judith Kehoe. “It’s good for the local community and overall they’re making the best of a bad scenario,” added Reilly, “The other option is to leave it empty and get nothing.” The rural Clarksville Elementary School first opened in the hamlet in 1948 and is the only district building in the town of New Scotland. Five elementary schools are located in suburban Bethlehem, as are the middle and high schools. In 2003, voters in the Bethlehem school district approved a $93 million bond issue to address increasing enrollment by expanding the Clarksville school, completing projects at the middle and high schools, and building a new elementary school, Eagle School, in 2008. Of that bond, approximately $4.1 million was spent on renovations at Clarksville, said Kehoe. At the time, the district’s decision to invest in the building was debated and came after officials also considered possible closure. Kehoe said the bonds were issued in August 2006 and had a maturity of just over 15 years. She reported payments are made every six months and add up to about $372,000 annually. She said state aid pays for most of the amount with the district directly responsible an annual payment of about $112,000. Facing community protests last year over the closure, Teb-

bano pledged the district would retain the unused property and remain open to the possibility of one day restoring the school, if enrollment increased and finances improved. The current Superintendent is now Thomas Douglas. However, district spokesman Bill Devoe repeated that pledge last month, saying the district was still interested in revitalizing the Clarksville school, some day. “You always hope it’ll one day open as a school. If the student population comes back, you always want to keep that door open,” said Devoe. Devoe said though the lease is for a five-year term, a clause in the agreement could allow the school to cancel the contract after three years, if the board determined enrollment justified the move. School’s next life The sheriff ’s office first began looking into the prospect of using the building in October 2011 after it was determined the school would be unable to occupy the property for the next several years at least, said Apple. The sheriff said personnel would begin moving into the building in the beginning of July pending a mandated environmental impact review. “This is a really good venture for Albany County, the Bethlehem School District and the community of Clarksville,” said Apple. The sheriff ’s office is looking to relocate a significant amount of resources to the “centrally located,” Clarksville school, including patrol and criminal

investigations units, the Stop DWI program, emergency management operations, information technology operations, fire coordinators, drug coordinators, search and rescue, an in-house gym for officers, and ambulance services. “The hamlet of Clarksville is about to get every discipline in emergency services out there,” Apple said. The district had installed upto-date technical infrastructure, such as optic cables, that are better than what’s available at the Cohoes or Voorheesville offices, said Apple. “The building’s electronic infrastructure is in good shape,” he said. He also said the building offered more space and was more accessible to those with handicaps than the other sites. The sheriff said an emergency generator would be placed at the school using a grant from the Department of Homeland Security, along with security fencing and a surveillance system. The playground and property surrounding the site will remain open to the public. “Instead of a vacant building with tumbleweeds blowing past it, we want the kids to come and use the playground,” said Apple. The sheriff also said he was willing to work with the local community in allowing other public uses of the building or grounds. “People understand the need to work together,” he said. Justice gymnasium The New Scotland town board voted unanimously March 21 to

endorse a memorandum of understanding with the sheriff ’s office, setting forth the town’s intention to rent space in the Clarksville school’s gymnasium or auditorium to hold town court. Dolin said the town proposed paying a $1,000 a month in fiveyear lease to rent court space. Apple also said he received queries from other towns, such as the town of Berne, which is considering relocating its local courts to the site for similar reasons as New Scotland. New Scotland has two justices who typically convene court every Thursday between 4 and 7 p.m. In addition, the town employs two clerks and pays a sheriff ’s deputy to act as a court constable during proceedings. During the proceedings, the court currently hears cases in the town hall boardroom. Dolin, a former town judge, said there’s scarcely any space available during court, which can involve attorney conferences, private client-attorney discussions, holding and transporting prisoners, or occasionally seating a jury. An assessment of New Scotland’s court facilities by the state Unified Court System in February 2009 highlighted a number of issues not meeting current safety guidelines. Some of the assessments’ concerns involved space problems, such as keeping court officials, inmates and the public in areas designated specifically for them. For the full story go online at www.AltamontEnterprise.com and look under the New Scotland Archive for March 29.


8

The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

GCSD serves healthy food

Rising To The Occasion

By Melissa Hale-Spencer G U I L D E R L N D — S ch o o l board actions this month will mean changes in Guilderland’s cafeterias in September, both in what kids are eating and how they’re paying for it. On Tuesday, the board agreed to purchase a computer system, Primero Edge, that will centralize the district’s data for food services. “We’ll no longer have tickets,” said Linda Mossop, the food service director. Parents and students will be able to pay online or input at the register,

sold a la carte must fall under the Choose Sensibly guidelines; no candy or gum will be sold on school grounds during school hours; a choice of two fruits or vegetables will be offered at any location on school grounds where food is sold; and the only beverages allowed are plain water, 100-percent fruit or vegetable juice, and 1-percent or fat-free white milk or fat-free flavored milk. Also, the policy states, “Snacks brought into school during the school day should make a positive contribution to students’ and

“We’ll no longer have tickets.”

The Enterprise –– Michael Koff

Happy smiles all around: During Tuesday morning’s school visit, Scott Gray and Dave Dickerson, holding the check, from the Middleburgh Central School Technology Department finally met Dorine Phelan’s second-grade class who raised $1,100 to help in efforts of rebuilding after Tropical Storm Irene. “We did this project under the umbrella of our second-grade curriculum on ‘Communities,’” Phelan explained, “emphasizing how communities are connected and help each other through community service when the need arises.”

The Enterprise –– Michael Koff

Can I see? Second-graders in Dorine Phelan’s class at Westmere Elementary School cluster around a plaque made by students and teachers from the Middleburgh Central School’s Technology Department and presented to the second-graders on Tuesday. In December, Phelan’s class held a Gently Used Toy And Game Sale — dubbed GUTAGS — to raise funds to help Middleburg students ravaged by the remnants of Hurricane Irene. The sale raised $1,100, which Middleburgh will use for a tool cabinet and supplies.

she said. “Parents can go online and put in, say, $100…and that would stay in the system until a child comes through the line and punches in a four-digit identification number.” The first year, the system will cost $13,130 for licensing, training, set-up, and installation with an annual support fee of $9,360 after that. Mossop recommended Primero Edge out of the three systems she reviewed since, she wrote in a memorandum, it has “the lowest initial cost, greatest number of modules, and fully integrates data across all modules.” The system offers modules for recipes, menus, production records, inventory, online review for the State Education Department, a point-of-sale system, ordering, bidding, recipe and menu costing, online payment, nutritional analysis, parental access, financials and reconciliations, application processing for free and reduced-price meals, application scanning, a data base from the United States Department of Agriculture, time cards, and bidding. Mossop went on, “Primero Edge also has the ability to scan free and reduced [price meal] applications right into the system and populate data fields.” For the past 20 years, she said, her department has manually processed the paperwork required for the Child Nutrition Program, providing meals to students from low-income families. “I feel taking an integrated approach is the way to go because it will cut down on labor hours across the district both for food service and clerical staff,” Mossop’s memo concluded. “It will save labor and time,” she told the school board on Tuesday. Mossop also said that other districts in the area were on their second or third systems. “We didn’t jump when a lot of people were jumping,” she said. The wait was worthwhile, she said, because, four years ago, systems cost about $80,000 and now are more integrated. Healthy foods The school board this month also adopted an updated wellness policy for the district. At the elementary level, the policy says, “All snack foods (100% without exception) sold must fall under the Choose Sensibly guidelines.” The guidelines require foods have no more than 7 grams of fat, 2 grams of saturated fat, 15 grams of sugar, and 360 milligrams of sodium. “Students will not have access to vending machines before, during or after the school day,” the policy says. At the middle and high schools, 95 percent of all snack foods

staff ’s diet and health….Classroom, club, team celebrations and parties, to the extent that they are food events, should reflect the school district’s policy promoting healthy food choices.” If food is used to reward students, it, too, should be healthy. The district also encourages “physical activity and appropriate non-food rewards, and discourages the use of unhealthy, sugary, high-fat snacks particularly as daily token rewards,” the policy states. And finally, it states, “Fundraising/bake sales centered solely on high sugar, high fat, low nutrition food items that present no healthy alternative or choice are specifically discouraged.” As the board, at its June 5 meeting, approved a series of bids to purchase cafeteria foods, Assistant Superintendent for Business Neil Sanders said all the snacks and beverages complied with the wellness guidelines. Board member Judy Slack asked if the prices had increased in order to meet the requirements. Citing many new requirements, Mossop responded, “We have not totally come out of the hole…I’m hopeful we’ll get out of the hole.” Sanders told The Enterprise this week that, through the end of May, the self-funded school lunch program had a deficit of just over $23,000. The expenses and income over the course of the year for the program total about $1.1 million, he said. Asked if the healthier foods were causing the deficit, either because they cost more or because fewer kids were eating them, Sanders said, “It’s hard to pinpoint.” He cited a variety of factors: the price of food in general has gone up; with the recession, not as many students are buying school lunches; and repairs play a role. Most years, the school lunch program has a slight surplus, he said, and there was a major equipment repair this year. Mossop told the school board that Guilderland was offering kiwi fruit and fresh green beans, which other schools are not touching. “Our consumption of fruits and vegetables is on the rise,” said Mossop, “so the cost has increased.” The new requirements call for a half-cup of legumes a week, said Mossop. “We started with a black-bean salad, which is being consumed quite well and we do a three-bean salad,” she said. The recipes use oil, lemon juice, and fresh parsley. “It’s delicious,” chimed in Altamont Elementary School Principal Peter Brabant. Meeting the criteria may cause (continued on the next page)


The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

… and centralizes data (continued from previous page) lunch prices to go up six cents, Mossop said. School lunche currently cost $2.35 at the elementary schools, Sanders said this week, and $2.60 at the middle school and high school. The prices for meals next year will be set by the board at its July 10 reorganizational meeting. “We haven’t determined how much they’ll go up or if they’ll go up,” Sanders said this week. “Our goal is to continue to have a self-supporting program.” Fond farewells As the school board prepares to swear in its three newly elected members on July 10, it said good-bye to the three members who are leaving — Emilio Genzano, Denise Eisele, and Richard Weisz. School Board President Colleen O’Connell commended Genzano for his cost-management

Weisz for his “steadiness and fairness in dealing with fellow board members.” Weisz praised the district administrators and the other board members and said, “This is a model of what I thought democratic government was growing up.” He also said, “We are definitely in challenging times and no one of us has the basis to claim we know everything.” Weisz said that, while making decisions on the board, he always thought back to “a kid whose parents could not afford an encyclopedia…What would his parents have needed?” Other business In other business at meetings this month, the school board: — Learned that the Guilderland High School Masterminds team advanced to the championship game for the fifth year in a

“Our consumption of fruits and vegetables is on the rise, so the cost has increased.”

skills, which were valuable as the district took on a capital project. She also praised him for helping to fund freshmen sports, in the midst of budget cuts, by helping to found and lead the Friends of Guilderland Athletics, which has raised money from the community. Genzano, who was not at Tuesday’s meeting, served on the board for three years, due to two separate appointments and an election; he lost his bid for re-election in a four-way race for three seats. Eisele, a nurse who was first elected in 2006, served on the board for two three-year terms before stepping down. O’Connell lauded Eisele for her “common sense” and for her “wonderful perspective and depth of knowledge.” She encouraged Eisele to run again when the demands in her personal life allowed for it. The board’s vice president, Gloria Towle-Hilt, commended Eisele for her work and expertise with special-needs students. Eisele, in turn, warmly praised the other board members — “You guys are so committed,” she said — and the district team, which she described as “just amazing.” Weisz, a lawyer, was elected in 2000 and was on the board for 12 years, five of them, from 2006 to 2011, as president. O’Connell said, “There was a lot more testosterone in the room” when she was first elected eight years ago and she appreciated Weisz’s welcome. She praised his “fine questioning,” his “ability with numbers,” and his leadership as president “during really difficult times.” She described his leadership during an uprising over the transfer of two high school teachers to the middle school as “a profile in courage.” O’Connell said, “Sometimes you just have to do what is right in the face of screaming mobs of 250 people.” O’Connell read proclamations from the state’s Assembly and Senate recognizing Weisz’s service. “You knew the numbers cold yet it was the children you were concerned with,” said Slack. “You always put kids first,” agreed Towle-Hilt. Barbara Fraterrigo, the board’s longest serving member, praised

row, to face off against Bethlehem for the third consecutive year. Guilderland came in second out of 26 local schools, finishing with a record of 18 wins and three losses; — After considering proposals from seven banks, agreed on First Niagara Commercial Bank as the district’s depository bank; — Heard congratulations for Cydney Betton, a Guilderland senior who was among 10 young women nationwide chosen as 2012 Ann Power Fellows, selected among thousands of applicants for the award from the Ann Taylor clothing company and Vital Voices Global Partnership. Betton is a mentor at Girls Incorporated of Schenectady and the Trinity Alliance in Albany and also has taken girls to volunteer at the Ronald McDonald House and the Capital City Rescue Mission; — Learned that the high school’s art department partnered with Jim Miller’s Desolation Road Studios in Altamont for a June 20 Senior Art Show; — Received for review three state-mandated plans that must be updated annually — for shared decision-making, professional development, and Project SAVE (Save Schools Against Violence in Education). In the Project SAVE Plan, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction Demian Singleton highlighted revisions to Guilderland’s Code of Conduct, mandated by July 1, to fit the demands of the Dignity for All Students Act, requiring a safe environment free of discrimination and harassment. Although the substance of Guilderland’s code has not changed, the language has been altered to match that required by the new law, said Singleton; and — Heard praise for Fraterrigo’s work as head of the board’s policy committee in shepherding through policy changes to comply with the Dignity Act. Weisz called it a “Herculean task.” O’Connell said the district could have paid the New York State School Boards Association to do the work as many districts have. She told Fraterrigo, “Because you’ve cared so much about this, we’ve saved a lot of money.”

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The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

Every Dog Has Its Day

T

he National Agility Championship was held this weekend on two coasts — Altamont and Richfield, Wash. More than 650 dogs competed at the Canine Performance Events trials at the Altamont fairgrounds including the black Labrador retriever, at top, carefully crossing the fulcrum on a teeter-totter. The Weimaraner, at right, leaps over the last jump in its agility trial while, at bottom, an Australian shepherd, left, emerges from a tunnel; an intent border collie clears 20 inches; and a Shiba Inu named James, at the finish, licks his lips as he perhaps envisions a treat from his handler for lying down to complete the competition. Photographs by Michael Koff


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The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

Rezone nixed for traditional housing development handle 15 homes. By Jo E. Prout “They really didn’t come in GUILDERLAND The mixedage 68-unit condominium project with a design that I felt would proposed for Old State Road last handle the storm drainage,” he year was revamped into a 10-lot said. “The water table has been single-family subdivision request rising. There are some serious at the planning board meeting issues. It isn’t just this piece,” here last week. Developer Carver Runion said. He referred to Laraway claimed disappoint- drainage problems in other arment, and a loss of $200,000, for eas, including Willow Street and the reduced proposal he said was parts of McKownville. Traffic concerns for how the due to the complaints of only a few people, including a compet- intersection of Old State and Carman roads would handle 80 ing builder. “ I ’ m r e a l l y d i s a p p o i n t e d additional homes were also a that the townhouses didn’t go factor in why the rezone to multhrough,” said planning board tiple residence was not approved, Runion said. member Terry Coburn. Nicholas Costa, of Ingalls and “We’re disappointed, too,” said Laraway. He said that three Associates, proposed a plan for town residents and local builder 10 homes along 100-feet of road Angelo Serafini spoke against front with two keyhole lots. “This is a minimal developthe project at a May 2011 town board hearing to rezone the prop- ment. The lots are huge,” Costa said. erty from single“It’s a mining family residenoperation distial to multiple guised as a subresidential and division,” said business non-replanning board tail professional. Chairman SteAccording to p h e n Fe e n e y. minutes from the “How much sand public hearing, are you removing Serafini provided from this site?” photos of floodCosta had ing on the parcel no answer, and and asked the Feeney said that town to require the project would that ditches on be subject to the property be New York State maintained. mining laws if it The 23 acres were not a housare known locally “Guilderland needs ing subdivision. for drainage and another subdivision “You’re basiflooding issues, cally stripping and traffic on like a hole all the trees off ” Old State Road in the head.” and “making no is also substanattempt to work tial. The previous with the site,” proposal of 68 Feeney said. condominiums Coburn asked with a third of if the property them dedicated would be subto seniors inject to flooding cluded on-site with the new drainage and a proposal. connecting side“A s l o n g a s walk to a nearby they don’t make school. Many it worse, we can’t residents spoke compel them to in favor of the make it better,” project, including Feeney said. those looking for Laraway said sidewalks, drier that the site basements, and would be graded senior housing. “within itself ” to “We’ve spent $200,000 on engineering,” Lar- prevent run-off. The board granted concept apaway said last week, referring to the previous project. “If this is proval with the conditions that what they want, we’ll do single- the developer reduce the number family housing. Guilderland of curb cuts onto Old State Road needs another subdivision like and provide a grading plan. Other business a hole in the head.” In other business, the plan“There’s a pretty solid group of neighbors that have been deal- ning board: Approved a request by Mark ing with these drainage issues,” Supervisor Kenneth Runion Seus to subdivide 8.3 acres near told The Enterprise this week. Sheffield Avenue into two lots. “The main issue is legal ac“They talk to one another and they’re pretty vocal. Serafini is cess,” said Feeney. “That lot does a neighbor of the property. [He] not have legal access.” The proposal included a driveis advocating for his property, way behind homes on Empire which he has a right to do. “There hasn’t been steady Avenue. Board member Paul Caputo maintenance on the current drainage patterns on the prop- described the drive as “an awful erty,” he went on. “We kind of long driveway to be behind that asked [the developer] to make many houses. Do something difsome change. Neighbors have ferent,” he said. “I’m not a big been so flooded out by this proponent of keyhole lots”; Voted to support a ban on property not handling things appropriately. The neighbors feel hydraulic fracturing, and to refer single homes would be better construction of the local law to the New York State Association than townhouses.” Runion said that the project of Towns. Board member Michael had shifted several times in the Cleary abstained from the vote. Board members Coburn, Caputo, past few years. “They’ve come in with three Feeney, Herbert Hennings, and of four ideas for this property,” James Cohen voted in favor of he said. “The last plan they the ban. Member Thomas Robert brought…couldn’t effectively was absent; and Approved a site plan for handle the drainage.” Carver Realty proposed 68 optometrist Michelle Hall, who units and senior housing, Runion requested a special-use permit to said, but came back later and open an office and retail glasses asked for 80 units with mixed- shop in a vacant space at Carage housing. Runion said that, at man Plaza. a maximum, the property could

Weather concerned: Nick Johnston, of Guilderland, works at his desk at WRGB 6 as its morning meteorologist. Previously, he reported on weather in Witchita Falls, TX and Burlington, VT. Johnston came back to the Northeast because he missed the snow.

Nick Johnston fascinated by Mother Nature while Johnston and his partner By Jordan J. Michael GUILDERLAND –– While were covering Irene. They had learning his letters as a young nowhere to go and almost got child, Nick Johnston was more trapped twice. Johnston was interested in natural disasters. wearing a full rubber suit as So curious, in fact, that he helped he got real-time updates and his parents make up an ABCs of pictures for the web. “It had the greatest impact,” natural disasters. Johnston, now 30, can’t recall said Johnston. “It reaffirmed how the entire list, but knows that fragile life can be. Nature can “E” is for earthquake, “T’ is for just wipe everything out.” Chasing tornadoes was “fun,” tornado, and “H” is for hurricane. The Guilderland native is fasci- said Johnston, but he moved back to the Northeast because nated by the power of nature. He first reported on the weath- he missed the snow. He’s a er as a student for the Guilder- thrill-seeker, once getting mild land High School news show. frostbite on his face from climbHe recently joined WRGB 6 as ing a Colorado mountain during its morning meteorologist after a blizzard. In Texas, snowfall is apocalypdoing similar work in Witchita tic. In the Northeast, tornadoes Falls, TX and Burlington, Vt. “It’s almost a weird obsession,” are scary. “The force of nature can Johnston said this week about his relationship with weather. “I strike fear in your heart, but was captivated from an early age that depends on where you’re because weather has a great deal from,” Johnston said. “People in Texas aren’t bothered by severe of power and capability.” Johnston has chased tornadoes, storms, but they’re absolutely covered the snowiest winter on unprepared for snow.” The winter of 2009-10 was record, and been trapped in the middle of the wrath of Tropical the snowiest on record. It was Storm Irene. He said he’s never followed up by the least snowy witnessed anything as powerful winter on record. How do you explain that? as Irene. “There’s no real studies to “It was exciting and tragic at the same time,” Johnston said. prove anything and no direct “It struck fear. I watched houses correlations,” said Johnston. “Weather patterns are cyclic.” get washed away.” Global warming isn’t Rutland, Vt. became an island6/13/12 DP_1stMonthAd_AE_6.435x3.qxp 11:20 AM Page 1 John-

ston’s department. “I focus on the day-to-day,” he said. “Over the last decade, a lot of records seem to be getting broken. It’s an exciting time for meteorology.” Weather is an inconsistent science. Does Johnston hear complaints about his daily report? “I think people realize that I’m their guide,” said Johnston. “I try to be as honest and clear as possible. When I say ‘mostly dry with a chance of storms,’ people hear ‘mostly dry.’” Social media has helped meteorology become more direct; WRGB 6 has the most viewership in the Capital Region. “It’s like having a bunch of mini weather stations,” Johnston says of the viewers who chime in. “They fill the gaps with more information.” Johnston told The Enterprise that it’s been one of the hottest springs on record, so unless the pattern breaks, it’s going to be a hot summer. The temperature reached 95 degrees on Wednesday. Weather rarely follows the rules. “This air that we breathe is usually doing nothing at all,” said Johnston, “but it’s the same air that can form a tornado and pick up a train.”

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12

The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

Empire Avenue resident protests as barrier remains because construction is not complete By Anne Hayden GUILDERLAND —  Three years ago, more than 30 residents of the Essex Woods, Crimson Park, and Logan Manor subdivisions off of Carman Road debated removing a traffic barrier on Empire Avenue. The barrier is still there and one of the residents, Angelo Muccigrosso, so strongly objects to it that he said this week, “I have a heart problem and have advised my family to bring suit against the town of Guilderland in the event that I die prematurely due to short-sighted planning by the town.” His wife, Diane, spoke at a planning board meeting in Feb. 2009 and said, “The town has said it’s a temporary barrier; the question is, how many years that will be. Will it be 10, 15, 25 years before it comes down?” The barrier was put in place in 2002, when the suburban homes were built, to block excess traffic from flowing from Jean Place out to Ronald Place. The barrier was meant to mitigate the impact of extra traffic on the neighborhood, but residents were concerned it could delay emergency response vehicles if they came in to the neighborhood on the wrong side. After a fire on Empire Avenue in 2008, during which backup vehicles approached the barrier from the wrong side, the town’sTraffic Safety Committee worked with emergency services to develop a swing gate that can be opened with a security code. All emergency personnel in town are trained on the gate and provided with the code, and are also informed to break right through the barrier if a delay would be inadvisable. Still, Diane Muccigrosso felt the barrier should be removed completely. “The town’s position is that the barrier won’t be an impediment, but it already has been. A barrier is a barrier, and the whole purpose of it is to restrict,” she told The Enterprise in 2009. Since then, Diane Muccigrosso was diagnosed with cancer, cared for by hospice, and died. Her husband said that, during her illness, he had to call an ambulance twice, and both times, the vehicle was guided to the wrong side of the barrier by a Global

Enterprise file photo — Anne Hayden

The barrier still stands: A temporary barrier on Empire Avenue is still up three years after residents pleaded for it to come down. Jan Weston, town planner, says the barrier will come down when construction and development is finished. There is no timeline for the construction, she said. Positioning System. “I don’t think she died any sooner because of the delay, but her period of pain and suffering was unnecessarily extended,” he said. Nurses and home health aids also had difficulty finding the Muccigrossos’ house because of the barrier. “The understanding was that the barrier would come down when construction on the subdivisions was completed, but, after it was finished, the town refused to take down the barrier,” he said. The town planner, Jan Weston, said this week that the construction is actually not finished.

“The barrier will come down when Empire Avenue is extended to Fuller Station Road,” said Weston. There is one parcel of land that hasn’t been developed, and there is no current plan for developing it. The land is owned by Angelo Serafini, of Serafini Builders, Weston said. “There isn’t much development going on right now because of the economy,” Weston said. Muccigrosso would like to see the issue brought to attention again because of the recent issues with emergency response vehicles. Curtis Cox, captain of the Guilderland Police Department and

chairman of the Traffic Safety Committee, said he had not been made aware of any recent incidents with emergency services. “I am not saying that it didn’t happen, but I don’t have any knowledge of it,” said Cox. He said there has been no change and no update on the barrier since 2009. “We made several improvements to the barrier and those still stand,” Cox said. A suggestion was made at the planning board meeting in 2009 to change the street names on either side of the barrier to East Empire Avenue and West Empire Avenue, so that motorists and

emergency responders wouldn’t be confused, but Cox said no measures have been taken to make that change. Muccigrosso said he thinks the real reason the barrier isn’t coming down is that some residents feel the street is safer for children with it up. “The idea that dead-end streets are safer is not true,” he said. “Before moving to Guilderland, I was chairman of the planning board in Niskayuna, and we had three deaths on dead-end streets there.” The plan, said Weston, is still to remove the barrier eventually; it is not considered permanent.

Under new law, New Scotland will regulate lights by using sensor By Tyler Murphy NEW SCOTLAND –– A new local law regulating the amount of light crossing property lines is, unlike a previous law, passed on measurements. Following a comment-less public hearing on June 14, the town board unanimously passed the law after council members received complaints from a Clarksville resident. “The process began with a complaint from a resident who felt he was suffering from a problem with the lighting coming from an adjoining property,” said New Scotland Supervisor Thomas Dolin. The law’s architect, Councilwoman Patricia Snyder, added that a number of people had approached her with concerns as she was investigating the issue and developing the law. “Generally, when people are compelled to reach out to you, they feel their quality of life is being impacted in some way,” she said. Board members visited the Clarksville resident’s home fol-

“The process began with a complaint from a resident who felt he was suffering from a problem with the lighting coming from an adjoining property.”

lowing the complaint and decided it had merit. Dolin said the town then took the preventative step of updating the town’s lighting law to help avoid future public nuisances.

Snyder said she met with engineers and investigated other lighting laws in the region before developing New Scotland’s. “We wanted a standard that is measurable,” she said.

In developing the new law, town officials used a light sensor called a photometric light meter, to record the amount of light at the property line. Unlike a previous law, the new law bases enforcement on recorded readings from the meter, said Snyder. The law designates the maximum amount of light allowed to cross a property line at .01 foot-candles, with some exceptions, including seasonal holiday lights, light fixtures required by federal state or county agencies and emergency or construction related lighting. The law also permits a code enforcement officer the power to order homeowners to use lower wattage bulbs, erect light shields or issue other light minimization practices for external fixtures. The law defines a foot-candle as follows: “A measure of light falling on a surface. One footcandle is equal to the amount of light generated by one candle shining on one square foot of surface located one foot away.”

Though the town had a lighting law and other zoning laws regulating light levels, the new law will offer a uniform standard, she said. “Really, what we ended up doing was giving more substance to what we had out there,” Snyder said. She also said that code officials would not be testing light levels at property lines unless they receive a specific complaint. The town planning board also endorsed the law last month with board member Robert Stapf saying, “I think the law is 300 percent better than the previous one; it just has a couple minor issues.” Planning Board Chairman Charles Voss said any alleged violators would receive written notice and have the right to an appeal –– just as they would with any municipal citation. In developing the law Snyder said the town took “the common sense approach.”


The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

Mud Mania

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“P

lay in the Mud” proclaims the shirt of a kid who was doing just that on Saturday during Guilderland’s second annual Mud Mania, held at Tawasentha Park. Costumes were encouraged — Batman and Superman attended along with the blue-faced Smurf crawling through the mud, above. Some took the races very seriously, like the man, at bottom, in Army fatigues. Over 1,000 people attended, according to Linda Cure with Guilderland’s Parks and Recreation Department, which sponsored the event; 900 adults raced and 300 kids competed in children’s events. Donations were accepted for local food pantries, and proceeds — Cure estimated over $10,000 was raised — will go for improvements at the children’s playground in Tawasentha park. “It was just wonderful,” she concluded. Photographs by Colleen Ingerto


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The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

Two days after release from jail, Middleburgh man gets arrested for felony DWI — Felony driving while inBy Zach Simeone toxicated; KNOX — A Middleburgh man — First-degree aggravated was arrested in Knox last weekunlicensed operation of a motor end for driving while intoxicated, vehicle, a felony; just two days after being released — Consuming an alcoholic from jail. beverage while operating a veOn Sunday, June 17, at about hicle; and 4 p.m., Christopher Crapser, — Speed not reasonable or 28, was driving on State Route prudent. 443 in Knox when he failed to After the crash, a portion of navigate a curve and struck a Route 443 had to be closed for cement porch, according to a about an hour. release from the Albany County “In order for the car to be Sheriff ’s Office. towed, we had to close the road, “He wasn’t supposed to be drivbecause it blocked both lanes of ing, because he had a suspended traffic, and it was just after the license,” said Inspector Mark Decurve there,” said DeFrancesco. Francesco of the sheriff ’s office, Albany County Sheriff’s Office “So, the danger of letting traffic as Crapser had been arrested in Christopher Crapser through, with ambulance and the past 10 years for DWI. He fire crew there, was too much of added that Crapser was drinking an alcoholic beverage in the car who saw him running and con- a hazard.” Crapser had been released at the time of the accident. And, vinced him it was the wrong witnesses say he was driving idea, and he went back,” said from the Fulton County jail on Friday, June 15, but DeFrancesco “at a high rate of speed” when DeFrancesco. did not know he lost control what he was in and left the jail for. roadway, acCrapser was cording to the arraigned at release. “He wasn’t supposed to be driving, the Berne Town A passenCourt on Sunger in the car because he had a suspended license.” day, and sent suffered “mito the Albany nor injuries,” County jail in the release lieu of $1,000 said, and was cash or $10,000 brought to ElCrapser then failed a field solis Hospital in Schenectady. briety test, and his blood alcohol bail bond. DeFrancesco did not know Crapser was not injured, De- level was determined to be .15 Francesco said. percent at the sheriff ’s station, whether or not Crapser had made bail by press time. Crapser attempted to flee the according to the release. scene, but “it was the neighbors He was charged with:

Westerlo man pleads guilty to aggravated DWI WESTERLO — Ivan Cruz, of Westerlo, pleaded guilty Tuesday to aggravated driving while intoxicated, according to the Albany County District Attorney’s Office. On April 11, Cruz’s girlfriend reported to the Albany County Sheriff ’s Office that Cruz, 34, “had taken her father’s pickup truck without authorization, and that he was intoxicated,” according to a release from the district attorney’s office.

Cruz pleaded guilty to aggravated DWI, a felony, on Tuesday, in front of Judge Joseph C. Teresi. The case was prosecuted by Mary Tanner-Richter, bureau chief for vehicular crimes. Sheriff ’s deputies found Cruz parked at a Stewart’s in Voorheesville, the release goes on. “He appeared physically intoxicated, and his license had already been revoked for a previous DWI conviction,” the release says. When brought to the sheriff ’s

station, Cruz had a blood-alcohol level of .2 percent; this was his third DWI offense since 2006. Cruz could be sentenced to one-and-two-thirds to five years in state prison; and he may have to pay over $2,000 in fines and surcharges; have his licensed revoked; and have an Ignition Interlock breathalyzer installed in his car for three years upon release from custody. He is to be sentenced on July 24, 2012.

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Blotters Anthony W. Carpenter, 20, of 3620 Caramel Ave., Apt. 56, Port Orange, Fla., was arrested on May 28, at the intersection of Coons Road and Gregory Lane, for failure to obtain a peddler’s license. According to the Guilderland Police report, Carpenter was arrested for violating a town ordinance and was making sales with several other individuals without obtaining a permit; Carpenter was told to leave the property, and was located again 15 minutes later still attempting to make sales. **** Dominic L. Dunnzelmann, 25, of 10 Lakeshore Drive, #2A, Watervliet, was arrested on June 11, at the Guilderland Police Department, for third-degree criminal mischief and first-degree criminal contempt, both felonies, and second-degree harassment with physical contact, a violation. According to the Guilderland Police report, an officer was called to Crossgates Mall for a domestic violence complaint; the victim stated that Dunnzelmann, during an argument, took a shopping bag and threw it over the railing, then grabbed the victim by the arms and squeezed. When the victim tried to call for help, Dunnzelmann grabbed the phone and threw it over the railing, destroying it, the report said. **** Robert W. Compani, 27, of 30 James St., Gloversville, was arrested on June 14, on Crossgates Mall Road, for driving while intoxicated, first-offense, a misdemeanor. According to the Guilderland Police report, Compani was parked at the mall, and he was observed drinking from a glass bottle that appeared to contain an alcoholic beverage; an officer confirmed it was an alcoholic beverage, and a check showed Compani had an active warrant from the city of Amsterdam for failure to appear on a driving while intoxicated arrest. **** Joshua J. Gray, 24, of 1 Camp Terrace, Albany, was arrested on June 8, at 2446 Western Ave., for aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle, a misdemeanor. According to the Guilderland Police report, Gray was inside Stewart’s when a witness came in and said a car had rolled out of its parking spot and hit a light pole; Gray left before police arrived, but his license plate number was given, and he was contacted and asked to return to the scene. A check showed Gray’s license was suspended for failure to answer a summons, the report said. **** Jillian L. Griesbeck, 29, of 3265 Pangburn Road, Duanesburg, was arrested on June 14, at the Guilderland Police Department, for aggravated harassment, a misdemeanor. According to the Guilderland Police report, Griesbeck was arrested based on a complaint that she made a threatening phone call.

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Matthew J. Hart, 20, of 64 Ford Road, Troy, was arrested on June 10, on Crossgates Mall Road, for fifth-degree criminal possession of marijuana and endangering the welfare of a child, both misdemeanors, and unlawful possession of marijuana, a violation. According to the Guilderland Police report, Hart was in the driver’s seat of a car parked at the mall, and was observed acting suspiciously; he appeared to be handling a bag that contained loose marijuana. When an officer approached the vehicle, Hart attempted to place the marijuana and a glass pipe under the seat; he had four grams of loose marijuana in his possession, the report said. A minor was in the back seat of the car, said the report. **** Jessica M. Szady, 19, of 6966 Route 158, Altamont, was arrested on June 8, at 2563 Western Ave., the Tailgate Tavern, for giving or selling alcohol to a person under the age of 21 and a prohibited sale of an alcoholic beverage, both misdemeanors. According to the Guilderland Police report, Szady sold and served a bottle of beer to a person under the age of 21, and failed to ask the individual for identification. **** James M. Roth, 28, of 891 Mercer St., #2, Albany, was arrested on June 8, at J & A Prep Kitchen in Crossgates Mall, for giving or selling alcohol to a person under the age of 21 and prohibited sale of an alcoholic beverage, both misdemeanors. According to the Guilderland Police report, Roth sold alcohol to an undercover informant who was under the age of 21. **** Christina M. Spizowski, 27, of 812 23rd St., Watervliet, was arrested on June 8, at 1620 Western Ave., Hana, for giving or selling alcohol to a person under the age of 21, and prohibited sale of an alcoholic beverage, both misdemeanors. According to the Guilderland Police report, Spizowski sold and served a beer to a person under the age of 21 and failed to ask for identification. **** Jacob E. Shank, 23, of 104 Main St., Altamont, was arrested on June 6, at 115 Main St., Altamont, for operation of a motor vehicle with a suspended registration, a misdemeanor, and operation of a motor vehicle without insurance, an infraction. According to the Altamont Police report, a mobile plate reader indicated that Shank’s registration was suspended for an insurance lapse. **** John R. Wilkinson Jr., 48, of 126 Prospect Terrace Apartments, was arrested on June 2, for false impersonation, a misdemeanor. According to the Altamont Police report, an officer responded to a landlord’s request for support while he confronted a tenant, and Wilkinson originally gave a false name and date of birth.

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The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

A Salute To Those Who Serve R

emembering the fallen: On Saturday, June 16, fellow veterans, residents, and officials held a memorial service organized by the town’s historian, Alice Begley, at the Prospect Hill Cemetery to honor fallen service members and living ones. Lawrence Wiest, a Vietnam War veteran, spoke of the need to make time to honor fallen veterans and remember their sacrifices. Annie and Ray Wilson, bottom left, pay their respects by wearing red, white and blue. The Altamont Veterans of Foreign Wars honor guard, top, offer a gun salute during the ceremony and Guilderland High School students provided patriotic music. Rachel Young, bottom right, sings the national anthem and Jake McGrath, at left, prepares to play taps on his trumpet for the gathering of about 100. Photographs by Tyler Murphy


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The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

Out & About Alex Boccio honored

Guilderland Town Band plays for ‘young people of all ages’ cipal Trumpet for the College of By Anne Hayden GUILDERLAND — The Guil- Saint Rose Orchestra and the derland Performing Arts Center University at Albany Orchestra, is kicking off the 33rd season of its plays with the Scotia-Glenville Thursday Night Summer Series Community Band, and is a tonight with a performance by private music instructor at the Patrizio Center for the Arts. the Guilderland Town Band. In addition to the requirements The band, in its 43 rd year, will present the “Annual Young of being a high school senior or People’s Concert” at 7:30 p.m. in college student actively enrolled in coursework; being a resident Tawasentha Park. The Guilderland Town Band is of the town of Guilderland; being intergenerational, according to a present student or graduate of Hillary Fink, the publicity chair- the Guilderland School District; and performing for at least one woman and a clarinet player. “Members’ ages range from season with the town band, high school students to people scholarship applicants had to in their 80s,” said Fink; the band complete a musical audition. The scholarship is named has nearly 100 members. It’s also a family affair, she after the founding member and said. There are many couples who original conductor of the band; play in the band together, as well Webster retired in 2001. Boccio, having been selected as as parents and children. the recipient, “We have a will perform family with as a soloist on four siblings the trumpet who all play,” playing Trumsaid Fink. “This is a close-knit group peter’s Lullaby The town and we have a lot of fun.” a c c o m p a n i e d band, which by the band. performs only Girl Scout in the sumTroop 1085 will mer, beg i n s make a spepracticing two weeks before Memorial Day. The cial appearance at the concert, pieces the band plays differ every holding flags on stage during the National Anthem, in honor summer. “There are some pieces we will of the 100th anniversary of the repeat, but not two years in a Girl Scouts. row,” said Fink. “This is a close-knit group and The band’s conductor, Kath- we have a lot of fun,” said Fink. leen Richards Ehlinger, picks “For me, personally, it’s what I the music, said Fink, and does a look forward to every summer.” “fabulous job.” Summer schedule “She’s a wonderful conductor, June 28: The Electric City and we all learn so much from Chorus her,” said Fink. July 5: Funk Evolution Ehlinger has worked with the July 12: Guilderland Town town band for several seasons, Band and is also the band director at July 19: Across the Pond, a Guilderland High School. Beatles Tribute Band On Thursday evening, the July 26: 3 Minute Pop! music selections will be geared August 2: Guilderland Town toward a younger audience, but Band Fink said the concert is really for August 16: The Brian Patneude “young people of all ages.” Quartet Pieces will include “The Best August 23: Hair of the Dog of Journey,” Michael Jackson: All performances begin at 7:30 Through the Years,” “Snakes,” p.m. in Tawasentha Park, located and “Trumpeter’s Lullaby.” off of Route 146 in Guilderland, The concert will also feature and are free and open to the Alex Boccio as a recipient of the public. In the event of inclem2012 Donald E. Webster Scholar- ent weather, performances may ship. Boccio, who will be a senior be moved to Guilderland High at The College of Saint Rose in School on School Road in Guilthe fall, is in his third season derland Center. Call 456-3150 with the Guilderland Town Band. for more information or weather He has held the position of Prin- updates.

Oversized Dutch clog sculptures, painted by regional artists, like this one by Mitchell Biernacki, will be on display during the Sculpture in the Streets exhibition, Stand in the Sole of Albany, put on by the Downtown Albany Business Improvement District. This free annual public art exhibition and walking tour highlights Albany’s heritage, illustrating both past and present expressions of the capital city. The tours begin on June 15 and run through May 2013. Walking tour maps will be available at area merchants, the downtown Albany BID office at 40 North Pearl Street and online at www.downtownalbany.org.

Dutch Settlers Society members don garb to reflect heritage for garden party celebration By Joan Burns

Community correspondent

Albany was founded in 1924 to perpetuate the memory of those individuals who resided here during the time it was a Dutch Colony.   The group’s mission is to preserve historical and genealogical records of these early settlers. New officers The Dutch Settlers Society of

The Dutch Settlers Society of Albany was represented at the Downtown Albany Business Improvement District’s Sculpture in the Streets Garden Party on Friday, June 15, celebrating the opening of its yearlong exhibit of huge Dutch clogs decorated by local artists. This year’s Sculpture in the Streets is called “Stand in the Sole of “Stand in the Sole of Albany.” Albany.”   Six individual clogs and four pairs of clogs have been installed at various downtown Albany held its annual meeting Albany locations and will remain on Saturday, June 16, at the until next spring. They reflect Wolferts Roost Country Club.  A Albany’s Dutch history and brunch menu was served and culture. the speaker was Matthew Kirk Representatives from the of Hartgen Archaeology.   His Dutch Settlers Society of Albany topic was the archaeology of the were dressed in their traditional Quackenbush brickyard (1640Dutch costumes.  Those attend- 1746) as revealed in the construcing were:   Jay Jakovic, Dr. Ted tion of the Quackenbush Square Wright, Jon Van Derpoel, Gloria parking garage. Van Derpoel, Rich Vitkay, and These new officers for the myself. forthcoming year were elected: The Dutch Settlers Society of — President Jay Jakovic;

— First Vice President Linda Dingman; — Second Vice President Peter Goebel; — Third Vice President Jim Schermerhorn; — Treasurer Patricia Hickey; — Registrar Cheryle Webber; — Corresponding Secretary  Jonathan Van Derpoel; and — Recording Secretary Pamela Hannan. Members of the executive committee are: — Dr. Theodore Wright; — Darlene Nielsen; and — John G. Wemple. The society has just published its yearbook. It is a publication that contains many facts about the organization but also many articles of various subjects such as history, genealogy, art, and music and as related to Dutch culture and history. Information on society membership and the new publication may be obtained by going to the society’s website:  www.dutchsettlerssociety.org. 

Learn home canning at Cooperative Extension CHOICES 301, INC. and ALBANY COUNTY STOP DWI Invite You to An

Open House

June 24, 2012, 1 - 4 PM Beacon of Hope, 6378 Gun Club Rd, Altamont, NY This is a free event. Refreshments will be available. Representatives from the legal profession, New York State Police, local law enforcement, and other representatives will be on hand to answer any questions you may have. Questions, Contact: Ed Frank at 518-423-8426 or email edfrankchoices@nycap.rr.com

NEW SCOTLAND — Cornell Cooperative Extension of Albany County will be hosting its first home food preservation class of the season on Tuesday, June 26, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the extension office at 24 Martin Road in Voorheesville. Participants will learn how to make strawberry rhubarb jam, and take a jar home. Samples and recipes for other jams will also be offered. All materials will be provided. The program fee is $15, and requires pre-registration by June 21. Several more classes on food preservation are scheduled at the extension in Voorheesville this summer and fall. A class on freezing and drying will be held from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on July 17. It will cover ways to freeze

foods for best quality and how to dry fruit, vegetables, and meat. Samples of dried foods will be available for tasting. Tomatoes 101 will be offered on Aug. 14 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Participants will learn how to can crushed tomatoes using a boiling water bath canner, make a delicious salsa, and take a jar home.  On Sept. 27, an Introduction to Water Bath Canning will cover all the basics and include pickled dilly beans as a class project to take home. The final class will be an Introduction to Pressure Canning, on Oct. 4. Participants will learn how to can vegetables, soups, stews, and meat, and will can some soup to take home. All of these classes require preregistration several days ahead

of time by calling Sandra Varno at 765-3547. The fee is $15 for each class, payable at the door. The extension has expanded its offering of canning classes over the past several years in response to increased interest. When asked why they were interested in learning about canning, last year’s participants reported a concern about the economy, an interest in saving what they grow in the garden, more control over food safety and quality, and enthusiasm about carrying on an enjoyable tradition. In addition to the food preservation classes held at the extension office and at various other locations in the community, canning demonstrations are planned at Williams Sonoma on June 19, and at the Altamont Fair on Sunday, Aug.19. 


17

The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

Summer services at Rensselaerville will center on the meaning of truth By Mary Ann Ronconi Community correspondent

RENSSELAERVILLE — The Rensselaerville Presbyterian Church has chosen as its theme for this summer’s services the question “What Is Truth?” Between June 24 and Sept. 2, eleven distinguished religious leaders will take the pulpit of this fine old church listed on both the National and State Registers of Historic Places. The Rev. Alexandra S. Lusak will be the first this Sunday with a sermon titled “The Gospel Truth.” Rev. Lusak is moderator of the Rensselaerville Presbyterian Church and the First Presbyterian Church of Watervliet. Services start at 11 a.m. The tradition of summeronly services at the Presbyterian Church in Rensselaerville stretches back more than 100 years.  For a short period in the second half of the 19th Century, the village was a lively industrial town as the first site of the Huyck Woolen Mills.

When mill founder and Presbyterian Church member, F. C. Huyck Sr., moved his mill to Albany, he did not sever ties with the village or the church. But as jobs left with the mill so did many of the village residents, leaving the church without enough members to maintain a year-round pastor. However, the Huyck family returned each year to vacation and provided for a pastor during their stay. It was F. C. Huyck Sr.’s granddaughter, Katharine Huyck Elmore, who in the middle of the 20th Century expanded the vision of the summer services to other faith traditions and invited ministers, rabbis, priests, and nuns to speak from the pulpit. The Rensselaerville Presbyterian Church, a nationally recognized example of Greek Revival architecture dating from the 1840s, is currently in the process of restoring its distinctive steeple.

Five Rivers seeks volunteers to monitor Monarch larva Five Rivers Environmental Education Center is looking for volunteers to help conduct monarch larva monitoring at the center at 56 Game Farm Road in Delmar. The monitoring will take place each Wednesday beginning at 1 p.m. from June through September. Volunteers survey a small milkweed plot and record any monarch eggs, larvae, or adult monarchs found. All training, equipment, and supplies will be provided. Participation can be as minimal as a one-time observation or as often as available.

The Monarch Larva Monitoring Project is a citizen science project developed by the University of Minnesota to collect long-term data on larval monarch populations and milkweed habitat. The goal of the project is to better understand how and why monarch populations vary in time and space, with a focus on monarch distribution and abundance during the breeding season. For more information, e-mail John Lawrence, project coordinator, at j2lorence@verizon.net or call Five Rivers at 475-0291.

Opportunities Pop Up

The ties that bind: In 1976, the Knox Quilters sewed the town’s history into a quilt, in celebration of the Knox bicentennial.

Knox celebrates its Bicentennial Quilt KNOX — In 1976, twentysix ladies of Knox stitched a quilt with 48 squares featuring homes, industries, and natural features of Knox. This treasured quilt is on display in the Saddlemire Homestead (the Knox Historical Museum) on Route 156 in the hamlet of Knox. The Knox Historical Society will celebrate this quilt and

Also on July 8, in conjunction with the celebration of the Bicentennial Quilt, the Knox Historical Society is sponsoring a “Quilts of Knox” quilt show in the Knox Town Hall, adjacent to the Saddlemire Homestead, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Heirloom and modernday quilts will be displayed. Admission is free.

Operation Overboard runs from June 25 to 29 By Dianne Luci

Community correspondent

NEW SCOTLAND — The First United Methodist Church of Voorheesville invites all children to get ready to dive into fun at Operation Overboard: Dare to Go Deep With God Vacation Bible School. Explore and experience God’s underwater universe.

The fun begins on June 25 and ends on June 29; classes run from 9 a.m. till noon at the church, located at 68 Maple Ave. in Voorheesville. For more information, call 765-2895 The adventures include regular Deep Sea Voyages into Bible fun and creative crafts, snacks, recreation, drama, water

science, and great music. The cost is $25 per child. Each child receives a T-shirt and a compact disc of all of the music. To be a part of all the excitement at Operation Overboard, call the church office at 765-2895 or visit its website at  http://overboard. cokesburyvbs.com/fumcv

Summer in Medusa will be filled with communal art and rollicking music By April Caprio

Community correspondent

Botanical Illustration: An adult workshop in botanical illustration led by botanist and illustrator Sandy Orris, who made this picture, will be held Saturday, June 23, from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m., at the Huck Preserve in Rensselaerville. This workshop will focus on techniques in botanical sketching using colored pencils. A basic kit of a sketchbook and colored pencils is available with preregistration for $20. To register contact Dawn O’Neal: dawn@huyckpreserve.org”dawn@huyckpreserve.org.

its quilters with a ceremony on Sunday, July 8, at 3 p.m. A “Living Museum,” with student re-enactors portraying residents of some of the homes featured on the quilt, and “Music on the Porch” will be a part of the celebration. The Saddlemire Homestead will be open from 2 to 4 p.m. for visitors. Admission is free, and refreshments will be served.

MEDUSA — What a spring!  We in Medusa have vowed.  There will be no more hospital visits.  No more illness.  No more injuries.  No more firemen in jail.  We’re paid up for a while — at least for the summer. I’ve personally decided that life is pretty amazing despite the angst and upset of the last months.  I’m counting my blessings, so to speak.  The Medusa Council, filled with bubbly realists and hardnosed optimists, have constructed a full agenda for the summer.  We have a lot going on, folks, and we’d love to see you join us. There will be music on the porch every Saturday.  Except if it’s seriously rainy and nasty, we’ll be raising a ruckus with a good old-fashioned hootenanny.  Robert is our Medusa troubadour, a wild-eyed long-time friend of the Medusa family, who often drags along several neighbors for accompaniment, or joyfully conscripts his audience. He’ll play anything you want.  Last time he played a special song for our new babies, which, in typical Robert style, he calls the fire twins.  So far, he’ll be playing June 23, July 7 and 21, and Aug. 4 and 18. We’ve also been planning for several other bands — Lumen Chichester’s group will be back,

LuCh,i and BRB, Locked and Loaded.  Playing an eclectic mix of new and classic rock, they are a fabulous addition to Medusa’s venue.  We’re hoping Just a Bunch of Guys and Gals will return from Knox, and that we can get Peckham Hollow here again, too. We’re also hosting Mad Medusa Art nights — a crazy, Seattle-ish brand of community art making, just to prove we’re just as imaginative on this coast.  We provide materials and tables and maybe a teensy bit of inspiration and you make amazing art.  Open to all ages.  So far, we’re planning for June 29, July 27, and during our end-of-summer Gathering.  We have some cool folks coming to help out; if you are interested in volunteering, give me a shout or email me at april.roggio@gmail.com. By popular demand — and that’s the only reason, honestly, because I’m not sure if these events are quite our thing — we are hosting a cruise-in.  We’re going to serve food and drink, and find a band.  It’s scheduled for Tuesday evening, July 10.  Please spread the word! And — this time by popular demand and because we just had such a blast at our pre-Irene blowout last year — we’re having another end-of-summer festival.  Rumor has it that the firehouse dislikes our decision to call it

a festival, so we are happily renaming it our end-of-summer Gathering.  It’s very community-centered and feels like it embraces our localism flavor.  We’re planning to showcase local farmers and artisans again, make art, eat food, and listen to great local music.  Great kid fun is planned, too!  The great Gathering is tentatively planned for Saturday, Aug. 25; if you’d like to participate, give me a shout. We started a little late in the season, but we wanted to do some hamlet beautification, in a shameless rip-off of neighboring Preston Hollow.  The plan is for some hanging flowers on poles, to be replaced with other seasonal decorations I would really like to do something about that ugly bridge, too.  If anyone has any ideas for hamlet beautification — maybe some community art projects? — let me know. Last, my personal thanks to everyone who has been there for us over the past two months — between a tough late pregnancy and then unexpected twins, my family, our council, and many friends, have been running ragged.  We could not have done it without you. Editor’s note: April Caprio owns the Medusa General Store and founded the Medusa Council on the Arts and community.


18

The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

Community Thursday, June 21 “Parm Night” Wednesday Nights Chicken Parmesan $8.95 Eggplant Parmesan $8.95 Chicken Sorrento $10.95 Includes: Soup or Salad and Choice of Sides

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Science Lecture Series — Landfill Restoration: Balancing the needs of society and human development with preservation of natural areas can be a very difficult task, but by working to bring these two groups together, we can take substantial steps forward in providing important services and lasting ecological benefits to the community. In this presentation, Christopher Einstein, principal planner for Clough, Harbor & Associates, and Nathan Carlton, restoration ecologist for Applied Ecological Services will discuss the evolution of the Albany Rapp Road Landfill Restoration Project, where it fits into the mission of the Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission and the current status of the project. Meet at the Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center at 195 New Karner Road, at 7 p.m. The fee is $3 per person or $5 per family and registration is required; call 456-0655 to register. — Photo by Sandy Orris

Friday, June 22 The Voorheesville Farmer’s Market will start its 4th season and will continue through Sept. 28. We hope everyone will stop by each week and support our vendors. The June 22 market will feature Two’s Company Music and Berkshire Farm Center and Services for Youth. Four Seasons, Four Years —  The Civil War: A Musical Journey is a new and exclusive production featuring 11 singers and musicians performing a selection of songs extant in American between 1850 and 1865 at the Altamont Fairgrounds. Tickets are $25 and may be purchased by called 765-2815 or at the gate.

Star Party Program and Dudley Observatory at 8 p.m. at the Octagon Barn, 588 Middle Road in Knox; star gazing to follow, weather permitting. All are welcome. Amateur astronomers and families are encouraged to bring binoculars or telescopes. Free refreshments will be available. Call 872-1879 for more information.

A Fern Walk, led by biologist Wes Testo, on Saturday, June 23, from 10 a.m. to noon, at the Huyck Preserve will include basic methods of identification and insight into the natural history of ferns. Participants should wear sturdy shoes and bring water and sunblock.

Saturday, June 23 Stream Study Set at Five Rivers: A family-oriented exploration of the ecology of the Vlomankill will be conducted at the Five Rivers Environmental Education Center, 56 Game Farm Road, Delmar, at 2 p.m. During this interactive study, center naturalists will lead an “in depth” investigation of the aquatic insects and other fauna of the Vlomankill, a picturesque wooded stream which bisects the center property as it flows to the Hudson River. Special attention will be paid to “indicator species” such as mayflies and caddisflies, whose presence indicates high water quality. This program is open to the public and free of charge but space is limited; call 475-0291 to register. Charity Car Wash: Advanced Car Wash, 48 Voorheesville Ave., will hold a car wash from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. to benefit Victory Baptist Children’s Vacation Bible School. Donations will be accepted. There will be a drawing for prizes.

Geology Walk at Thacher Park: Join other geology enthusiasts for a traverse along the Helderberg cliffs in the newer, northwest area of Thacher State Park. In this first of a serious of geology walks, Dr. Chuck Ver Straeten, New York State Museum geologist, will give perspectives to observations and questions along the way. Wear hiking gear for trail, brush, and rock outcrop walking. Afterward, Ver Straeten will identify your rocks and fossils. Meet at the Thacher Nature Center at 10 a.m. to carpool to the walk location. Call 872-0800 for more information.

Bringing it Back Restoration Hike: Come witness the transformation of the Pine Bush. Through habitat management, the Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission is restoring the Pine Bush to an open pine barrens. Join us for a hike along the trails and learn how the commission is bringing this globally rare community back. We will be hiking approximately two miles over moderate terrain. Meet at the Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center at 195 New Karner Road, at 10:30 a.m. The fee is $3 per person or $5 per family and registration is required; call 456-0655 to register.

Nuisance Goose Control Seminar: The Albany County Cornell Cooperative Extension and the New York State Wildlife Management Association will present at the William Rice Jr. Extension Center, 24 Martin Road, at 9 a.m. The presentation is primarily directed toward what the property owner can do to minimize the problems caused by nuisance geese and the methods they can employ to legally discourage them from an area.

Summer Solstice Flower Walk: The Summer Solstice observance draws attention to one of the Earth’s most noticed and globally observed natural events. The solstice is an excellent reminder of the finely combined and balanced phenomenon that make Earth habitable more than any other planet. Meet in the Pine Bush Discovery Center parking lot at 9 a.m. for a walk with experienced wildflower expert Amy Reilly.


19

The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

Calendar Saturday, June 23

Sunday, June 24

Youth Fishing Program at Five Rivers: A family-oriented catch-and-release fishing program will be conducted at Five Rivers Environmental Education Center, 56 Game Farm Road, Delmar, at 10 a.m. At this outdoor how-to clinic, environmental educator Fran Martino will discuss everything you need to know about fishing gear, techniques, regulations, consumption advisories, and good places to go fishing. Following a safety briefing and casting demonstration at the Research Ponds, children can try their luck at landing a big one, and then releasing it back unharmed. The program is open to the public and free of charge, but registration is required; call 475-0291 for more information.

National Airport Art Workshop: The Albany International Airport will host the American Association of Airport Executives Arts in the Airport Workshop from June 24 to June 26. This three-day event will bring increased visibility to and appreciation for not only the airport, but the broader Capital Region.

Sunday, June 24 Sunday Four Poetry Open Mic: Old Songs Community Arts Center, 37 South Main Street, Voorheesville, will hold an open mic at 3 p.m., featuring Bernadette Mayer reading from her new book Helens of Troy. Hosted by Dennis Sullivan, Mike Burke, and Edie Abrams. Aerial Acrobats: Powerful, talented and gentle giants of the Pine Bush, hawks and owls are year-round residents. Learn why the Pine Bush is an important habitat for these birds of prey. There will be an indoor presentation followed by a hike. Binoculars provided. Meet at the Albany Pine Bush Discovery Center, 195 New Karner Road, at 1 p.m. The fee is $3 per person or $5 per family; call 456-0655 to register. Operation Safe Summer: Choices 301, Inc. and Albany County Stop DWI invite you to an open house at 6378 Gun Club Road, Altamont from 1 to 4 p.m. Representatives from the legal profession, New York State Police, local law enforcement, and other representatives will be on hand to answer any questions you may have. Please join us as we open our doors to highlight this valuable community resource. Come and meet your local officials and learn what you can do to increase awareness of the issues that are in the news on a daily basis. Visuals, handouts, and demonstration will be available on issues such as highway safety, motorcycle safety, state approved child restraints, and proper use of seatbelts.

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Tuesday, June 26 Altamont Community Tradition’s Annual Strawberry Social: The event will be held in Orsini Park from 6 to 8 p.m. Resident “fun guy” Stu Linendoll will be there with his parachute and games to entertain all ages; we also have our very special clown, MacIntosh, to create wonderful balloon art to delight all of the kids. Save room after dinner for our wonderful strawberry shortcake made with homemade biscuits. The treat is free, as is the event itself. Bring a blanket or a lawn chair and enjoy the evening with your neighbors and friends.

Thursday, June 28 Split Estate, an Emmy-award winning documentary on hydraulic fracturing, will be shown free of charge at 6:45 p.m. in the Helderberg Room at the Guilderland Public Library; sponsored by Guilderland Neighbors for Peace.

Gal Beckerman will talk about his book, When They Come for Us, We’ll Be Gone: The Epic Struggle to Save Soviet Jewry, at 11 a.m. on June 21 at the Albany Jewish Community Center at 340 Whitehall Road. A book sale and signing follows the kosher lunch. Drawing on newly-released Soviet government documents and hundreds of oral interviews, Beckerman tells the story behind the 1989 Operation Exodus rescue of three million Jews trapped inside the Soviet Union since the end of World War II, unwanted by the Stalinist state but forbidden to leave. Beckerman is a journalist and opinion editor of The Forward. Cost for this lecture-lunch is $13 for a JCC member and $14 for a guest. Prepaid reservations are required; call 438-6651, ext.112, or e-mail ClaireS@ saajcc.org.

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Friday, June 29 Vo o r h e e s v i l l e Fa r m e r ’s Market featuring Cornell Cooperative Extension soil evaluations for $3 each, and 31 Gifts.

Saturday, June 30 Five Rivers Program on Animal Intelligence: A program on animal intelligence will be conducted at 56 Game Farm Road, Delmar, at 10 a.m. In this indoor/outdoor study, center naturalists will present an overview of the ways scientists measure animal intelligence and will discuss which animals score the highest worldwide. Afterward, center staff will lead an outdoor search for wildlife, discussing how local species rank on the intelligence scale. This program is open to the public free of charge; call 475-0291.

Saturday, June 30 Five Rivers Offers Family Program on Spiders: A familyoriented introduction to spiders will be conducted at 56 Game Farm Road, Delmar, at 2 p.m. Spiders have unique methods for getting around, capturing prey, and eluding predators. At this indoor/outdoor program, center naturalists will present an overview of the natural history of spiders, illustrated with games and crafts. Afterward, participants will venture outside to look for these fascinating creatures and to investigate the world in which they live. This program is free of charge, but enrollment is limited. Please call 475-0291 to register by June 27.

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20

The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

...Money in scrap metal

The Enterprise — Michael Koff

Expansion? Roger Hannay, the town’s biggest employer, at Hannay Reels, offered a piece of his land, which abuts the transfer station at its northern edge, to the town, on the condition that it be integrated into the transfer station. While the extra land would make for a more spacious operation, elderly residents are particularly interested in Hannay’s offer because of the drop-off onto his property, which they say would make garbage disposal more convenient for senior citizens.

Hannay waits for response on land offer for Westerlo transfer station By Zach Simeone WESTERLO —  A year ago, Roger Hannay, the town’s biggest employer at Hannay Reels, offered the town board a piece of his land, which abuts the transfer station’s northern edge, to be integrated into station. Whether he would sell or donate the land is yet to be determined, but Hannay said this week that his offer still stands. “I think, in either event, I’d at least expect the town to pay for the survey prior to the transfer, which we would then take a look at, and approve or disapprove of,” Hannay said Wednesday. “At this point, the cost of the land is undetermined.” Senior citizens from Westerlo

told The Enterprise this week of their interest in Hannay’s offer, as the drop from the transfer station onto his land would allow for easier waste disposal by older residents, though they said that Charles Benninger, the transfer station operator, provides help to those who need it. “They thought they could improve their situation because of the natural drop-off of our land abutting their land,” Hannay said, “and have a station where certain things can be dropped into containers, and less human material handling, so to speak.” Hannay was unsure of whether or not the land would require any reconstruction. Hannay hopes the board dis-

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cusses his offer at its meeting in July, he said, “Because I don’t want to blindly give a piece of land to the town, or sell it, and have it sit there unused,” he said. “I’m trying to encourage a little action on their part because, if they don’t use it to improve the physical situation, then I’m not interested in transferring the land.” Supervisor Richard Rapp said that the town board has been unable to respond to Hannay’s offer, as it awaits funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency for repair projects needed after Tropical Storm Irene. “We haven’t gotten anything,” Rapp said. “Not a dime.”

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(Continued from page 1) and sees his business as a serand scrap metal sold by the vice to residents who can’t make Hilltowns — show that Westerlo trips to the station on their own. has, for years, been getting less Further, all of his customers are money for more scrap metal than Westerlo residents, he said. “I’ve only got 80 or 85 people, the neighboring Hilltowns. Figures also show that West- and it’s mostly older, or handierlo has paid for more garbage capped people; people who can’t per person at the city’s Rapp work or can’t drive; housebound Road landfill, which serves a people,” Stipe told The Enterprise consortium of 14 municipalities, Wednesday. “And everybody’s in including the city of Albany, and town, so it’s going to get there one way or another.” the four Hilltowns. Crosier said this week that Over scraps For more than a decade, West- he had learned of private haulerlo has sold scrap metal to Rens- ers’ using town transfer stations when he was first elected selaer Iron and Steel. At the start of 2011, Westerlo as Berne’s supervisor 10 years was getting $50 per ton for scrap ago. The town changed its policy metal; in the spring and fall, shortly after, and saved about the town was getting $70 per $20,000 annually as a result, ton, with the exception of an he said. “I was sitting outside the Oct. 26 delivery, for which is got $45 per ton; and, in December, transfer station,” Crosier said of it got $110 per ton. This totaled one evening in 2002, “and I see a commercial hauler $4,235 from 58 tons come up with his of scrap metal sold own key, open up the to Rensselaer Iron transfer station, he and Steel, averaging backs in, and dumps $73 per ton last year. his garbage. I say The town has been to highway superingetting $110 per ton “Most of the tendent, ‘How long’s this year as well. garbage that the that been going on?’ A t l a s t w e e k ’s Berne Town Board guy had dumped He says that he’s meeting, Supervisor came from other probably had a key for 10 years.” Kevin Crosier told municipalities.” They reached into the crowd that, afthe compactor and ter canvassing local began opening up vendors, the town garbage bags, and would be selling its what they found was scrap to NHKelman surprising, Crosier Inc. Scrap Recycling went on. in Cohoes for $240 a “Most of the garbage that the ton — more than twice the rate that Westerlo was paid in its last guy had dumped came from other sale; nearly five times what the municipalities,” he said, as bags town was getting early last year; contained mail that had been and nearly four times what it got delivered to addresses outside of Berne. “You’d be surprised what last the spring and fall. “Vendors will take advan- you find in the garbage. When I tage of you,” Crosier said this was down there digging around, week. “You have to look at this I was surprised the amount of stuff constantly, because things personal information that people change,” and towns should re- were throwing out, and it wasn’t view their operations on an an- hard to figure out where the garbage came from.” nual basis, he said. He went on, “So, we eliminated Private haulers: commercial tipping in our facilA cost, or a benefit? In a letter to the Enterprise ity immediately, and when we editor this week, Milner writes did that, we started saving the that, since the amounts of waste town $20,000 a year. There’s brought to the landfill from the no way you can control what a Hilltowns in recent years have commercial hauler puts in your been disproportionate for their compactor, because he’s out respective populations, he thinks picking it up all day long. We’re that the two private haulers that responsible for what we bring to use the town’s transfer station the landfill.” But, when determining the are bringing in garbage from other municipalities, explaining source of the garbage, Stipe thinks that people’s mailing adthe skewed figures. In 2010, Westerlo, with its dresses can be misleading. “My mailing address is Green3,500 residents, spent $92,097.72 hauling 1,771 tons of garbage. ville, so, you open up my garbage, That same year, Berne, with its it says Greenville,” Stipe said, 2,900 residents, spent $44,148.52 though he actually lives in Westhauling 849 tons of garbage. And erlo. “I have people from Lake Knox, with its 2,700 residents, Onderdonk, and their mail says spent $54,254.72 hauling 1,043 Berne. There are actually three or four different places where, if tons. I n 2 0 0 9 , We s t e r l o s p e n t you open it up it, it says a dif$100,624.68 hauling 1,960 tons of ferent town. So, my mailing adgarbage; Berne spent $45,614.40 dress might say Greenville, but hauling 877 tons of garbage; it’s not. I’ve always advertised and Knox spent $55,354 hauling Westerlo only.” He added, “If anyone wants 1,065 tons. I n 2 0 0 8 , We s t e r l o s p e n t to ride with me sometime when $93,856.36 hauling 1,804.93 I go out, they can…I’m a town tons of garbage; Berne spent taxpayer, too, so I’m not going to $44,532.80 hauling 856 tons jack up my own prices.” MJ Westerlo Rubbish Removal of garbage; and Knox spent could not be reached for com$58,127.16 hauling 1,118 tons. Milner thinks the town’s two ment, but Westerlo Supervisor private haulers — Ronald Stipe, Richard Rapp said this week that who has been hauling garbage he is “not convinced” that private there for 25 years; and MJ West- hauling adds any significant cost erlo Rubbish Removal — should to the town. Knox Supervisor Michael bring their loads straight to the Hammond said that Knox has Rapp Road landfill. Private haulers, like Stipe, never allowed private haulers to are sometimes given their own use the town transfer station. “The fact of the matter is, most keys to the town’s transfer station, and their tonnage is not private haulers charge a fee to calculated separately from the pick up the garbage,” Hammond rest of the garbage that town said, “and they should be taking residents bring in on their own. that directly to the landfill site They pay $50 a year to use the in Albany, and not asking the town to be a partner in their transfer station. Stipe refutes Milner’s claim, venture.”


21

The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

Experts say: Most times, fawns don’t need human rescue, let them be By Anne Hayden GUILDERLAND —  Fawns are born every year between mid-May and mid-June, and local experts say countless people stumble upon them and make the mistake of taking them out of the wild, assuming they are abandoned. “If you find them, leave them there — that’s the message people have to try to understand,” said Dr. Edward Becker, who owns the Guilderland Animal Hospital and is a licensed wildlife rehabilitator. Two fawns were brought to his office last week. One was gravely injured, died, and was sent to a Department of Environmental Conservation wildlife pathologist for rabies testing. The deer did not have rabies. The second fawn was brought to the Guilderland Animal Hospital on Friday, and, after a thorough examination, Becker determined it was healthy. The man who brought the fawn to the veterinarian had found it wandering in the Pine Bush Preserve, off of Route 155, and Becker asked that the deer be brought back to that location and released. Although the fawn may have been abandoned, it was more likely, according to Becker, that its mother had left it alone and would be coming back for it later. “I can’t count the number I’ve fawns I’ve tried to bottle feed and raise over the years, but the sad fact is, a deer raised in a rehabilitation facility doesn’t have the right skill set to survive in the wild,” said Becker. Unless he has absolute confirmation that the animal’s mother has died, he is hesitant to keep and raise a baby, he said. There are a number of reasons

The Enterprise — Melissa Hale-Spencer

On the beaten path: A fawn was found wandering along this trail in the Pine Bush Preserve last week, and was brought to the Guilderland Animal Hospital, with concerns that it had been abandoned. The fawn was deemed healthy by Dr. Edward Becker and was returned to this path with the hope that its mother was looking for it. a mother deer would leave her fawn alone for hours at a time. Legal perspective “A fawn doesn’t have a scent, but a mother does, and she may leave the fawn hidden somewhere and go away for a while so she doesn’t attract predators

with her scent,” said Thomas Caifa, a lieutenant with the Department of Environmental Conservation Police. A mother deer may also leave her fawn to go hunting. “Sometimes, when you see a baby deer, the mom might be

very close by,” said Becker. “If she could jump up and down and yell, ‘That’s my kid!’ she would.” If there are humans around, a does will not approach her fawn, he said, but will wait until they are gone. “You may think you have the best of intentions when you rescue a wild animal, but it is best to let nature takes its course,” said Caifa. It is against the law to possess certain animals, and transporting a wild animal to a different location is also prohibited, Caifa said. “If someone is truly concerned, other than leaving the animal alone, the best thing to do would be to call someone from the Department of Environmental Conservation,” said Caifa, particularly if the animal in question is sick or injured. “We can give advice, and, if the animal is truly injured, we have a list of wildlife rehabilitators we can call,” Caifa said. A DEC officer can come to the location of the animal to check it out and safely transport it to a rehab center if necessary. “A lot of these wild animals get used to people and that’s not good and shouldn’t be encouraged,” said Caifa. “Never approach a wild animal and never feed one.” If there is a case where someone is concerned about a potentially dangerous or diseased animal, said Caifa, the local police department or even 9-1-1 can be called. “If you’re really scared of an animal, definitely called law enforcement,” Caifa said. “If the animal is threatening public safety, it doesn’t matter who you call, just get someone over there.”

Risk of disease Animals that should be considered a high risk for disease if they are acting abnormally include foxes, skunk, and raccoons. Deer, Caifa said, are not considered a vector species for rabies, although they can contract and spread the disease. “It is pretty rare for deer to have rabies,” said Becker, although if a deer is sick and has had contact with humans, it should be tested. “The health department is the lead agency on rabies, and they are good about taking questions and making sure an animal is tested,” Caifa said. “The best advice is to just leave an animal alone unless you’re being threatened or it has a gross injury,” Caifa concluded. “If you come across an animal that you think has been abandoned, check to see if you can see any bruising, lacerations, broken limbs, or other obvious injuries,” said Becker. “If you don’t see anything, it is best to let it be.” His office, he said, explains to people that most animals they’ve picked up need to be brought back to where they were found. “This whole theory that, if an animal has been touched by a human, it will be rejected by it’s mother isn’t true,” said Becker. “Our scent is everywhere; animals are used to human scent and they would not let it stand in the way of them being with their baby.” Becker said he reminds himself every year that, around the Fourth of July, he will start to get inundated with people bringing in baby deer that they think have been abandoned. “Nine times out of 10, the baby is perfectly healthy, and all the person needs to do is keep on walking,” he concluded.

...An enterprising reporter tracks down the deer that made her a human salt lick (Continued from page 1) My first call was to Guilderland Animal Control. The person who answered listened to my story and told me to call the Department of Environmental Conservation, because animal control deals mainly with domestic animals. He gave me a number to call. The dispatcher for the DEC listened to my story and told me to do absolutely nothing. Just leave the deer there, he said, and the mom would probably return for it that night. It had probably approached me because it had gotten used to humans since the trails are a high-traffic area, and people may even have been feeding it, the dispatcher said. When I asked about rabies, he told me to call the Albany County Health Department, but that it was rare for deer to have rabies, especially young deer. Before calling the health department, I called the Albany Pine Bush Preserve Commission, to ask if it had received other reports about a fawn approaching humans. Yes, someone from the commission told me, they had received other reports earlier in the week. The commission had also contacted the DEC, and was given the same advice — just leave the deer alone. I was worried, though. If there had been other reports earlier in the week, it would mean it had been several days, and the doe had not returned to its baby. I called the county health department, and was asked to give details about my wild-animal encounter. I was asked if I’d been bitten, if I’d been licked in the

I immediately asked a pair of area of an open wound, or if I had gotten wet saliva in my eyes runners if they had seen a fawn somewhere on the trail, and they or my nose. I answered “no” to all of the said yes, they had, but a cyclist questions, but I was still nervous had picked it up, wrapped it in a blanket, and put it in his car. about my possible exposure. The DEC police officer was A very patient man from the health department informed me not happy to hear the news. An that deer are not considered vec- ordinary citizen removing an tor species for rabies, and that, animal from its natural habitat although they can contract and was inadvisable, he said. The runners said a friend of spread the disease, it is rare. On top of that, I would have had to theirs had assisted the man as he get saliva into my bloodstream carried the fawn out of the trail, in order to become infected, and they provided the friend’s if the fawn were even rabid. phone number, which the officer He promised he would call me if the health department were Once I got home, notified of any I began to worry once more about rabid deer in the Pine Bush. Slightly reassured, but not quite satisfied, I set about con- called immediately. The woman who had helped tacting various departments in the DEC, beginning with the with the fawn’s removal did not regional representative (we live know the man who put it into in Region 4.) I explained to him his car, but she said he had told what had happened, and he her he was going to take it to a agreed with me that it was an wildlife rehabilitation center. I parted ways with the DEC ofodd scenario, and that perhaps it ficer at that time, but he told me bore further investigation. Roughly two hours after mak- that he would call me if he heard ing my first phone call, I received anything about the whereabouts a call from an officer with the of the fawn. Once I got home, I began to Department of Environmental Conservation Police. He told me worry once more about rabies. he wanted me to meet him at the Everyone I had spoken to agreed trail, where I had seen the fawn, that a wild animal approaching a and he would check its condition human was bizarre behavior. The next morning, I called the and decide what sort of action health department again. The was necessary, if any. We arrived back at the Pine same patient man listened careBush approximately 3.5 hours fully as I told him why I was still after my encounter with the deer. worried, and he offered to check The trailhead was crowded at with some of his colleagues to see if anyone thought my exposure that point.

was considered a risk and to see if I should get the post-exposure vaccines. The only way to get post-exposure rabies vaccines is through a formal request from the health department. After I hung up with the health department, I called the DEC police officer, who informed me that he had contacted all the local wildlife rehabilitation centers, and none of them had received a fawn. “I hope whoever took it didn’t decide to keep it and raise it,” he said. That afternoon, the man from the health departrabies. ment called me back and said all the experts had decided my exposure was not a risk; again, he told me he would call me if there were any reports of rabid deer in the Pine Bush. All weekend, I reassured myself that the baby deer probably did not have rabies, and tried to deal with the fact that I would never know what had happened to it. Then, on Monday afternoon, the health department left me a voicemail. A DEC wildlife pathologist had reported rabies testing on a juvenile deer found in the Pine Bush. The rabies test came back negative. It was good news for me, the health department said, because it must have been the same deer that licked me; how many fawns could have been found in the Pine Bush last week? Well, more than one, as it

turned out. I called the wildlife pathologist that had tested the deer, and he told me it had come from the Guilderland Animal Hospital. I called the Guilderland Animal Hospital. I was informed that at least two fawns had been brought to their office last week. I asked which day the one that had died had been brought in and was told that it had been early in the week. I asked what day the other one had been brought in, and what had happened to it. It was brought it on Friday afternoon, by a man who said he had found it in the Pine Bush, right off of Route 155, on Thursday evening. Dr. Edward Becker, at the Guilderland Animal Hospital, said he had examined the fawn and determined it was perfectly healthy. It wasn’t starving, or injured, and seemed neurologically normal. Becker asked the man who brought him the deer to bring it back to the Pine Bush, where he had found it, and let it go. The fawn, he said, probably hadn’t been abandoned, and was just impatiently waiting for its mother to return. The best thing, he said, would have been for the deer to be left alone in the first place. Even if its mother never comes back, it is best to let nature take its course. Becker also told me that I should not worry about rabies, because it was rare in deer, and the fawn had seemed healthy. Which is exactly what the DEC told me last week. Now I know for next time.


22

The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

...Mayer ‘continues to invent new forms and new ways to appreciate reality’ (Continued on Page 1) realize I belong in the country,” she said. “There is a Helen across the road from me that I discovered had grown up in Troy. So I used to berate her from my front porch all the time about being Helen of Troy.” Although her neighbor poohpoohed the notion, Mayer eventually put an ad in The Troy Record looking for other women named Helen from the Collar City. “I found 15 Helens and I took their photographs and wrote poems about each one of them and then I wrote a history of Troy, New York in verse,” she said, adding, “I got one of them to pose nude like the mythical Helen of Troy.” Combining words with photographs is not new for Mayer. “I like to write from photographs,” she said, “because there are often things that you think you see but they’re in the photograph and you haven’t seen them so there’s more in the photograph.” Her early acclaim came from an exhibit called Memory made in 1971 in the month of July. “I took 36 pictures a day and made a gallery show of it and put them around the walls and I made a narration,” Mayer explained. “I kept notes at the same time and I combined the notes that I made from the photographs themselves. And the narration took eight hours so that, if you were to follow the whole work, it would be a day’s work,” she said, concluding, “It was just one month.” At the time, she was reading a lot of books about memory and was particularly impressed with Frances Yates’s The Art of Memory. “I wanted to create a space in the gallery, where, if you listened to the words and looked at the pictures, somewhere in the gallery would be what memory was. So that was my plan, and it worked.” Mayer recalled, “I wasn’t famous at the time. I got one good review from a New York City photography critic, A.D. Coleman.” Coleman, who wrote for The Village Voice, described Memory, which was published as a book in 1976, as “a unique and deeply exciting document.” Criss-crossing the boundaries between pictures and words does not seem radical to Mayer. “I had been involved in all kinds of conceptual art before and since,” she said, “so the idea of an idea being the way to germinate a work was not foreign to me.” “Clear insight into human nature” Dennis Sullivan, a scholar on justice who has helped to organize local poetry groups, is excited about Mayer’s upcoming reading. Through Alan Casline, poets who have shared their work for years every other Thursday at the Voorheesville Public Library were invited to Mayer’s home to read their poems and listen to hers. “She is an extraordinarily intelligent, astute person, with a clear insight into human nature,” said Sullivan who enjoyed the visit to Mayer’s home. Casline also organized a writers’ workshop, in which Mayer taught local poets for a half-

Stay apprised. Read The Enterprise

— Photo by Max Warsh

Bernadette Mayer will read from her newest book of poems, Helens of Troy, on Sunday, June 24, at 3 p.m. at the Sunday Four Poetry Open Mic at the Old Songs building at 37 South Main Street in Voorheesville. The reading is free and open to the public. dozen sessions. She has taught at her alma mater, the New School for Social Research, and also at The Poetry Project at St. Mark’s Church in New York City. On Sunday, she’ll read for half an hour and then answer questions for a quarter of an hour, said Sullivan. “I can’t think of her giving a reading in the last five or six years,” he said. “This is really a treat.” Sullivan also said, “We’re thrilled to have a great poet in our midst, to read and answer questions about her inventiveness. She continues to invent new forms, and new ways to live with and appreciate reality.” Sullivan has one of Mayer’s books on his kitchen table — Midwinter Day. She wrote the 119-page poem in Lenox, Massachusetts in one day — December 22, 1978. It was published in 1982 and republished in 1999. “It’s an epic poem about daily routine,” said Sullivan, marveling at Mayer’s ability to compose it in a day.

a newspaper from that day and I put it all together afterwards. “The last section was the time of day that I had to write in so I just wrote the last section in the moment. I was happy with it.” Why December 22? “I had chosen the day beforehand…the shortest day of the year — it was just kind of a joke,” said Mayer. “Mayer cancels the boundaries Sullivan is hopbetween prose and poetry.” ing that more than the usual score of listeners will come to Mayer’s poetry reading. The microsmall actions confirms the notion phone is open at the Old Songs that seeing what is is a radical building in Voorheesville on the fourth Sunday of each month. human gesture.” “I decided it would be interest- The largest audience ever at the ing to write a work in one day Sunday Four Poetry Open Mic so I had to prepare a little bit,” was to hear Mimi Moriarty who said Mayer this week, recalling read poems in tandem that she the experience. “Because I knew had written with her brother, a the first section was going to be Roman Catholic priest. About about dreams, I had to practice 35 attended that session, said dreaming. I did funny things — I Sullivan. He went on about the stature of hid a tape recorder in my closet so I could speak to it without be- Mayer as an avant-garde writer ing embarrassed.” She cackles at who “hung out with the beat the memory and goes on, “I kept poets” and concluded, “She’s not “In a language made up of idiom and lyricism,” wrote Fanny Howe about Midwinter Day in the American Poetry Review, “Mayer cancels the boundaries between prose and poetry…Her search for patterns woven out of

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a diamond in the rough. She’s a diamond in the jewelry shop but the jewelry shop happens to be in East Nassau.” More to say What lies ahead for Bernadette Mayer? “I decided my next book will be called Income Equality,” she said. Mayer explained the title: “I just figured out in the United States how much money is earned, which is something trillion. If that is divided by the number of people — 312 million — it turns out, if everybody had the same income, it would be $20,100... So could you live on that?” Mayer recalls her youthful naiveté. “When I was about 20 years old, there was serious talk about everybody getting a guaranteed income so, young as I was, I believed it could happen, and now I don’t understand why it hasn’t happened yet.” She hasn’t devoted her life to writing poetry and prose for the money. She has lent her insight to American ills. In 1987, she published a poem titled “The Tragic Condition of the Statue of Liberty,” which she wrote was “A collaboration with Emma Lazarus.” It begins with Lazarus’s famous lines that are etched into the base of the statue, “Give me your tired, your poor/ Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,/ The wretched refuse of your teaming shore….” Mayer then adds 14 lines of her own, each beginning with the words “give me” as in “Give me your gentrificatees of the Lower East Side including all the wellheeled young Europeans who’ll take apartments without leases” or “Give me the doctor who thinks his time is more valuable than mine and my daughter’s & the time of all the other non-doctors in this world” or “Give me the known & unknown big important rich guys who now bank on our quaint neighborhood” or “Give me, forgive me, the writers who have already or want to write bestsellers in this country.” Her poem concludes, “Together we will go to restore Ellis Island, ravaged for years by wind, weather and vandals/ I was surprised and saddened when I heard that the Statue of Liberty was in such a serious state of disrepair & I want to help/ This is the most generous contribution I can afford.” Asked if the poem was meant as a call to action, Mayer said, “That poem I don’t think had any purpose but to call attention to the way that story was talked about…People were talking about the deterioration of the Statue of Liberty as if that meant something. “So what does it mean actually? That the people who have come to the United States are not welcome anymore? Could be. So we want to go there.” **** Bernadette Mayer will read from her book, Helens of Troy, on Sunday, June 24, for the Sunday Four Poetry Open Mic at 3 p.m., held at the Old Songs building at 37 South Main Street in Voorheesville. The event is free and open to the public.

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23

The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

Maple Leaf donates cribs Maple Leaf Childcare, which has a branch in Guilderland, has donated 40 gently used infant cribs and mattresses to a local not-for-profit organization called To Love A Child. The donated cribs are no longer usable as of December 2012, due to new federal regulations that apply to all cribs manufactured and sold in the United States. Several months ago, Maple Leaf began its search for an organization outside the United States that could benefit from the use of these cribs. While attending the Infant/Toddler Expo last month in Saratoga, Linda Moran, executive director and founder of Maple Leaf Childcare, found Cindy Schmehl, executive director of To Love a Child. Based in Clifton Park, To Love a Child was established in April 2009; it is a not-for- profit organization created by individuals dedicated to helping children around the world. “We are so happy to find an organization that has the need for our cribs,” said Moran in a release from Maple Leaf. “Not only will our donation keep these items out of landfills, but it will help families who have no other means of giving their infants safe beds to sleep in.” In addition to the cribs, Maple Leaf has purchased 10 new infant carriers, to be included in the shipment to Haiti at the end of May.

For Those Very Special Occasions

The Enterprise –– Michael Koff

Ready for the red carpet: Cindi Siata, center, held a grand opening for her new store, Apropros Prom and Bridal, at 1789 Western Ave. in Guilderland last Friday afternoon. Sales staff, modeling the latest in formal fashions, are, from left: Rebecca Stroud, Molly O’Bryan, Michele Tiberid, Lexi Peliptier, and Shannon Sowards.

Blood drives — On Tuesday, July 3, from noon to 6 p.m. at the Guilderland Public Library’s Helderberg Room, 2228 Western Ave., Guilderland; — On Monday, July 9, from 1 to 6 p.m. at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church’s hall, 16 Elsmere Ave., Delmar; — On Tuesday, July 31, from 1 to 6 p.m., at First Reformed Church — Friendship House, 1663 Helderberg Trail, Berne; — On Tuesday, July 31, from 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., at New Visions gym, 334 Krumkill Rd., Slingerlands.

Brundage joins Coldwell Banker

Business Corner

Rose Brundage, a licensed real estate salesperson, has joined Coldwell Banker Prime Properties. She will work from the office at 1801 Western Ave., formerly Century 21 Rural Estates. Brundege lives in Duanesburg and has been selling real estate for more than four years.

Stuyvesant holds sidewalk sale GUILDERLAND — Stuyvesant Plaza merchants will bring their goods outdoors during the plaza’s first sidewalk sale of the season on Saturday, June 23. Stuyvesant Plaza will open at 9:30 a.m. to accommodate shoppers and will remain open

until 6 p.m. For more than 40 years, Stuyvesant Plaza has celebrated summer with two sidewalk sales; almost all of the 60 retailers in the plaza will participate. The second sale is planned for Aug. 4.

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The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

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Emergency Transport Animal emergencies are frightening for owners and their pets. The most common situations requiring emergent attention are seizures and unresponsive or paralyzed animals. Knowing how to safely and efficiently transport your injured or ill pet can increase the chances for a favorable outcome. Remember that a frightened and injured pet is more likely to bite or scratch you, so take great care when moving them to a safe location. Make every effort to handle your pet as little as possible. If your pet is having a seizure, never reach into their mouth. They will not swallow their tongue. Monitor their activity and notify your veterinarian if the seizure lasts longer than 5 minutes or if two seizures occur in a 24 hour period. If your pet is unconscious or paralyzed, place it on a firm, transportable board such as an ironing board or table leaf. Gently secure it with tie down material to help minimize movement and prevent further injury. Place it into the car and drive to your veterinarian’s office or the Capital District Animal Emergency Clinic.

If you are transporting small animals and pocket pets, place them in their carrier and cover it with a blanket. Make sure you call the veterinary hospital to inform them of your arrival. Once you arrive at the hospital, your pet will be taken into the triage room and assessed. Once it has been stabilized, the veterinarian will come and talk to you about your pet’s condition and circumstances leading up to the emergency. Although pet emergencies are frightening, staying calm will make the process much smoother.

By Sue Hoadley Our 2012 summer reading program will officially kick-off on Tuesday, June 26, at 1 p.m., with a very special family program.  Together with the Berne and Rensselaerville libraries we will present award-winning storyteller, Regi Carpenter’s Soaring Stories.  Regi’s program will feature the 2012 summer reading theme, Dream Big.   Since 1993, Regina Carpenter has been motivating and inspiring audiences throughout the country with a diverse repertoire of world stories, folktales, myths, music, and personal stories of her hometown Clayton, N.Y. on the St. Lawrence River in Northern New York. In each story and with each telling, Regina mixes mirth, music and everyday events into myths and muses about life, death and nothing in particular. The program will be held at the new Westerlo town hall (the old Westerlo Elementary School) on County Route 401. Display case For the month of June, the family of Franklin Loucks is sharing his John Deere collectibles in his memory in the display case at the lLibrary.  Don’t miss this enchanting display of tractors, tins, vignettes of farms and John Deere dealers, and more.  One of the world’s most recognized corporate logos, the leaping deer trademark has been a symbol of John Deere products for more than 135 years. He once said, “I will never put my name on a product that does not have in it the best that is in me.”  Children’s program Toddler and preschool age children’s story time will be on Tuesdays at 3:30 p.m.  Join Miss Lee for stories, songs, games, and movement activities. Technology Walk-In Wednesday 

Do you need to brush up on your computer skills or obtain basic skills?  See Amy on Wednesdays between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. for free, personalized, oneon-one, hands-on instruction on how to work the mouse, navigate the Internet, set up an e-mail account, use office automation programs, and more. Book discussion The book discussion group will meet on Thursday, June 21, at 7 p.m., at the library.  We will discuss The Sight of the Stars by Belva Plain.  Across a teeming canvas of history, through world wars and the close of a century, The Sight of the Stars tells the story of family and forgiveness, guilt and redemption. Please join us.  New members are welcomed. Art for all ages Express yourself at the monthly arts and crafts program on Saturday, June 23, at 10:30 a.m.  All ages are welcome, but children 5 and under must be accompanied by an adult who can help them with the projects. 

Regi Carpenter will tell Soaring Stories on Tuesday, June 26, at 1 p.m. to kick off the 2012 Summer Reading Program at the Westerlo Town Hall on Route 401.

Middleburgh

Altamont

By Anne LaMont On Tuesday, June 26, at 3:30 p.m., Indy is back again at the Middleburgh Library as a reading buddy to your child.  Children ages 4 to 12 are encouraged to visit the library and read aloud to Indy. Dogs make perfect pals because they are non-threatening, promote trust, and encourage children to take risks in learning by reading aloud, which enhances self-esteem by improving literacy. Knitting circle On June 28, at 7 p.m., the friendly ladies of the Knitting Circle (men are welcome, but we haven’t seen any yet!) knit and crochet, embroider and quilt, and more. You can learn a new skill or share your own special talents with others.  Drop in anytime. No registration is required. Dinner and a movie On June 29, at 5:30 p.m., the library will show The Artist rated PG-13. Step into the era of Old Hollywood as we watch this Academy Award winning movie. The library will supply the pizza, salad and drinks and you can bring a dessert to share. Registration is required. Please note that this film is rated PG-13 and is not appropriate for young children. For added programs, visit our new web site at www.middleburghlibrary.info.

By David Warner Zorba hasn’t signed up for next Monday’s Greek potluck dinner yet.  But he’ll likely wish he had.  The sign-up sheet is nearly filled.  Lots of delicious sounding foods are promised. Don’t you wait too long to sign up. The dinner is scheduled for June 25, at 6 p.m., at the new Altamont Free Libra Hooray            School is out!  Everybody’s gonna jump and shout!  And read!  The library’s annual Summer Reading Program is steadily simmering, and fliers supplying all the information are available at the library.  The upshot is an exciting, fun-filled time for everyone. Cluck Cluck The library’s annual BBQ in the Park fund-raiser was a wonderful success.  Close to $2,000 was added to our building fund, thanks to a devoted crew of volunteer workers, and a most supportive community. Final Word   A former Altamont resident donated a sizeable sum to the train station/library construction project.  He gave the gift in memory of his mother.  In response to our message of thanks he told us: “My mother loved the library.  She didn’t travel, and liked to say that the library was her window to the world.”

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The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

Library Notes Berne

Voorheesville

By Judy Petrosillo All of the trustees on the board are hard-working proponents of the Berne Public Library.  Mary Kinnaird went beyond her duties to ensure that the town found a larger location for the library.  Because of her outstanding effort in 2011, she was nominated for the Upper Hudson Library System (UHLS) Trustee of the Year.  Mary was the co-recipient of this award along with Trustee Tony Kossman from the Altamont Free Library. Their awards were announced at the UHLS annual dinner on June 13.  Congratulations to Mary and Tony.

Guilderland

By Maura Lynch Tonight, June 21, from 4 to 7 p.m., come to the Voorheesville Public Library for a digital download open house. Drop in and learn about the library’s digital ebook and audiobook collection from Overdrive. Small group sessions will start every half hour. Bring your own Nook, Kindle, iPod Touch or iPad for hands on help with downloading library ebooks and audiobooks. You may also sample the library’s Nook Color, Nook Touch, iPad, iPod touch, Kindle Touch, Kindle Keyboard, and Literati ereaders. Summer at the museum Summer’s here and the time is right for going to a museum. The library has visitor’s passes for museums near and far. Visit The Arkell Museum at Canajoharie, The Clark Institute, Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, Hancock Shaker Village, Hyde Collection, Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, Norman Rockwell Museum, Schenectady Museum (with Planetarium pass) or the USS Slater Destroyer Escort Historical Museum. Our newest pass for the Guggenheim is also good for admission to the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Currier Museum of Art in New Hampshire and several other museums nationwide. Use your library card to check out passes for three days. There are no renewals and passes are not able to be reserved. Most passes cover admissions for two adult and two children. Visit our website at www/voorheesvillelibrary.org for more information. Ice cream social On Tuesday, June 26, from 6:30-7:30 p.m. I scream! You scream! We all scream for ice cream! Come enjoy a summer passion — ice cream sundaes — with help from our neighbor at Stewart’s. They provide the refreshments, while we provide book talks, reading suggestions, and dreamy stars, or soaring bats to decorate for summer nights.

By Mark Curiale The referendum on the Guilderland Public Library’s proposed expansion is on Tuesday, June 26, from noon until 9 p.m., at your local elementary school.  You are encouraged to vote in this important election as it charts the future of one of our community’s key services. Over the last several months, a lot of information has been provided about the potential expansion. If you still have questions, you might want to visit the Building Referendum information page on the library’s website at www.guilpl.org/expansion.  A series of frequently asked questions (FAQs) will more than likely provide the answer you’re looking for. The two public briefings about the building referendum were well attended. You can view and listen to the briefing by going to www.guilpl.org/expansion, and clicking on the Public Briefing Presentation link.  “Dream Big: READ!” Now  Sign-up for the library’s 2012 Summer Reading Club – “Dream Big: READ!” This program began on Wednesday, June 20, at 6 p.m. for residents of the Guilderland Central School District, and will start at 10 a.m.; on Saturday, June 23, for non-residents. The program consists of two parts: reading done at home and shared activities and programs at the library. You can get details on Summer Reading Club at http:// bit.ly/GPLSummerReading.  Library info For more information about the library, call the library at 456-2400, or e-mail us at info@ guilpl.org.  The library is located at 2228 Western Ave., Guilderland. Visit the library’s website at www.guilpl.org. Check out the “unofficial” library stuff at facebook.com/Guilderland.Library, follow the library on Twitter @ GuilderlandLib, and get music information and downloads on the library’s Freegal page. It all starts at guilpl.org.

We hope that all the graduates will be life-long readers. 

Congrats grads Congratulations also to the graduating classes of 2012.  We hope that all the graduates will be life-long readers.  It is no coincidence that many of the topranked students are avid users of the library.  Summer reading program To prevent a decrease in reading skills over the summer, join the Summer Reading Program (SRP) at your local public library.  The three Hilltowns libraries are sponsoring a SRP kick-off event at the Westerlo Town Hall, at 933 Route 401, in Westerlo.  On Tuesday, June 26 at 1 p.m., Regi Carpenter, a professional singer and storyteller will be performing an interactive program for all ages.  The admission is free.  Sign-up for the Berne SRP at the kick-off event or anytime after Saturday, June 23 at the library or online at www.bernepubliclibrary.org. This year’s theme is nighttime. Preschool children should sign up for Wee Read and intermediate readers ages 5 to 12 should sign up for Dream Big.   Keep track of your reading minutes to earn a gift bag. There are also weekly programs for these two groups. The first Dream Big program is on Thursday, June 28, at 11 a.m.   The group will be exploring Native American moon lore using the book Thirteen Moons on a Turtle’s Back by Joseph Bruchac. Make a silver moon ornament during the program. Teens should sign up for Own the Night and complete the library quest before the end of the seven weeks. The first teen program is Friday, June 29, from 8:30 to 10 p.m. at the town hall.  The Helderberg Paranormal Society will help teens look for the ghosts rumored to be in the building. Book club The adult book club meets on Sunday, July 1, to discuss Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter by Tom Franklin.  This would be a good time for adults to sign up for Between the Covers, Summer Reading Program.  Read books on weekly topics and submit book reviews to enter the drawings. There really is something for everyone at the library.

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Beat the heat at your library ALBANY COUNTY — A heat advisory is in effect, according to a release from the Albany County Executive’s Office, which states hot temperatures and high humidity will combine to create a situation in which heat illnesses are possible.  The elderly and those with chronic health conditions are at the greatest risk for heat stroke. To avoid being overcome by the heat, these precautions are advised: — Take frequent cool showers or baths; — Wear light-weight and losefitting clothing; — Drink plenty of water and eat fruit to replenish fluids in the body; — Eat light meals; and — If you don’t have an air conditioner, keep your rooms well ventilated with fans and open windows. Close south facing curtains to keep the sunlight out. Citizens are advised to knock on the doors of elderly neighbors and ask how things are going as people may not realize they are suffering from heat exhaustion. The signs of heat stroke include flushed face, high body temperature, headache, nausea, rapid pulse, dizziness, and confusion. If you recognize any of theses symptoms in an elderly person, take immediate action and call

9-1-1, the county advises. Temperatures inside the home should not exceed 85 degrees Fahrenheit for prolonged periods of time. Invite neighbors into airconditioned spaces, offer to take them to an air-conditioned movie, mall, or senior center. Transportation is available for people over 60 by calling 4375161.  For more information, call Albany County NY Connects at 447-7177. Libraries are cool The county lists these local libraries as good places to cool off:
 — Altamont Free Library: M –Thurs 9 – 8 pm, F- 9 -5 Sat. 9-12 Sunday, 2-5pm; — Berne Public Library: Monday, 4-8 pm, Tue 9-6pm Wed. 4-8pm, Thurs 9-8pm Sat. 9-1pm; — Bethlehem Public Library: Monday - Friday:, 9am - 9pm, Saturday10- 5pm; — Guilderland Public Library: Monday through Friday: 10 am to 9 pm, Saturday: 10 am to 5 pm; — Voorheesville Public Library: Monday – Thursday 10:009:00pm, Friday 10:00 - 6:00pm, Saturday10:00- 1:00pm; and — Westerlo Public Library: Monday – 2 – 6 pm, Tuesday – 2 - 8 pm, Wednesday – 9 – 2 pm, Thursday – 3– 8 pm, Friday – 4 – 8 pm, Saturday – 9 – 2 pm.

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The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

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DENTAL TREATMENT AND MEDICAL CONDITIONS The mouth can be a two way street when it comes to your health. Not only will dental disease affect other systems throughout the body but disease elsewhere can often show as signs or symptoms in the mouth. Remember that the mouth is the only part of the inside of the body that can be viewed directly from the outside. But dental treatment need not affect other aspects of medical care. For most dental appointments, whether for a checkup, fillings, or other work, you need not interrupt your medical routines. You should never discontinue normal medications or interrupt your normal diet for dental appointments. It can make treatment much more difficult if you have a late morning appointment and you choose to skip breakfast. Your body is hypoglycemic (lacking enough sugar) and you can’t feel comfortable in general. Skipping normal medications can lead to poor medical outcomes. This includes

anti-coagulant medications. Many people today take a daily aspirin to help prevent blood clots that can lead to stroke. At one time it was common to discontinue these medications for dental appointments as it was presumed that increased bleeding would result in the mouth. The fact is that nobody bleeds seriously from a dental procedure, including a tooth extraction. But a stroke resulting from missing medication can be life threatening. Never change your normal routines without first talking to your physician and dentist. For more information on this and other topics, visit our web site at www. AltamontGeneralDentistry.com. Presented As A Public Service By The Offices of:

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My older sister recently celebrated a milestone birthday. We traveled to North Carolina to help the family celebrate. Of course, it is more difficult to get all of the family together for any reason. One niece just finished college and went to the beach with her fiancé and family. One of the nephews was moving into a dormitory for a crash study course prior to taking the state bar exam. But we were able to take Nancy out for dinner and then had a family get-together at breakfast the next day. Family times are like taking a history exam. One person will say,” Do you remember when...?” and follow that with a question about something that had happened in the past. Sometimes the responses were funny and other times they brought back sad memories. There were even times that someone failed the exam. After the question and answer someone would say, ”where did you hear that?” or, “when did that happen? I don’t remember that!” Then the discussion would get lively and there was even more laughter. After the parties are over, the memories (history) remain. My sister had a chance to re-read all of the cards and look at all of the gifts. Among the gifts that we gave my sister was a video tour of our hometown, Fairhaven, Mass. This was a great way to take a walk down memory lane and show her friends and neighbors where she grew up. Fairhaven had a multi-millionaire who was the town’s benefactor in many ways. He had built and donated the Fairhaven High School, The Millicent Library, Tabatha Inn, The Presbyterian Church,  town hall and the Masonic Lodge. All of these buildings are still in existence and are all on the national historic register. Memories can be wonderful. Nancy called the other day and said that she wanted to get the cell phone numbers of our daughters so she could say thank you to them for the birthday wishes. For the next couple of hours we could not get anything done but repeat memories, laugh and exchange phone numbers. When we were finished talking, she called Cindy.  Then Cindy called us and Christa called us.

Then Christa called  Cindy and Elizabeth, and Elizabeth us. (oh well, I’ve  lost track of who called whom, but you get the point (I’m sure). This round robin of phone calls was possible because of the cell phones that everyone owns. Thinking back to our youth is something else you do as you hit a “Milestone Birthday”. The marathon of phone calls reminded us of the first telephone our family had (that I could remember). It sat on a table by itself with a neat crocheted doily under its round stand base. A twelve-inch tube held the phone head that you spoke into. On the side, sitting in a cradle, was an

Family times are like taking a history exam. earpiece to listen to the voice coming over the wire. When you lifted the earpiece off of the cradle, it would activate a signal at the switchboard and an operator would ask what number you wanted to call. Some areas did not have telephone lines and people could not make phone calls. Other areas had limited numbers and when you received a call you had to listen to the number of rings. These party lines often had four families on one number but the rings would identify when you got a call. We went from that to a rotary phone, which was used for many, many years until the onset of wireless technology. Now you can make and receive calls from almost anywhere in the world. Signal towers and satellites determine whether you can make calls or not. Today cell phones, nano technology, microchips, holograms, and all other types of electronic technology are changing our means of communication on a daily basis. Today, we don’t need an operator to connect us to someone or to some group, but we do need some common sense as to when and how we use this new technology. Enjoy — be safe — use it wisely. Fifth grade ceremony The fifth grade ceremony at the Altamont Elementary School will be held on Friday, June 22, at 9 a.m. Early dismissal Students at the Altamont Elementary School will be dismissed early tomorrow, Friday, June 22, at 11:30 a.m.   Pool opens The village of Altamont has announced that the pool at Bozenkill Park will open on Saturday, June 23.  Strawberry social Altamont Community Tradi-

tions (ACT) will hold its annual strawberry social on Tuesday, June 26, in Orsini Park from 6 to 7:30 p.m.  In the event of rain, the event will be held on Wednesday, June 27. Village exhibit The Knowersville and  Civil War exhibit at the village hall will be open during the summer months.  This event is supported by the Community Arts and Altamont Community Traditions. Guilderland movie The movie Hugo will be shown at the Guilderland  Town Hall on Thursday, June 28, at 10:30 a.m.  Guilderland seniors interested in attending are asked to register in advance by calling 356-1980, ext. 1094. Pyramid Lake Parishioners and friends of St. Lucy/St. Bernadette Church are reminded it is now time to register for the annual Pyramid Lake weekend, July 28 through July 31.  For additional information contact Judy Seery at 861-5961 or e-mail her at jseery@nycap. rr.com. Vacation Bible school The Altamont village churches are once again sponsoring the Vacation Bible School. The dates for this year are August 20 to 24.   VBS is open to children who  have completed 3-year-old preschool through grade 5.  Again this year VBS will be held at St. John’s Church on Maple Avenue.  For additional information or to register, contact Leah Kedik at 861-5810. Science fair This is a reminder to students and parents that there will be a science fair at the Altamont Fair this summer.  The dates for the Fair are Tuesday, Aug. 14 through Sunday, Aug. 20. Judging will be by grades as follows:  Kindergarten through second grade; third, fourth and fifth grades; sixth through eighth grades; and ninth through twelfth grades.  Additional information can be obtained by calling the Altamont Fair at 861-6671. Anniversaries Happy-anniversary wishes are extended to: — Sharon and Dwight Mathusa on June 23; — Helen and Bob Reals on June 25; and — Mike and Gail Munroe on June 27. Birthdays Happy-birthday wishes are extended to: — Tim Farley, Andy Stauffer, and Doug Stauffer on June 22; — Darlene Wilson on June 23; — Kathy Davis on June 24; — Butch Bastiani, Christina Buckey, and Richard  Michael Buckey on June 25;                                                            — Mildred Atkins, June Franklin, and Ruth Pollard on June 26; and —  Jim Caruso on June 27.                                                                       

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The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

Correspondents Thompsons Lake By Lora Ricketts 872-1691

It’s Monday morning and very cool. It’s 65 degrees and was 52 degrees early this morning. The weather is very fickle. It’s supposed to be in the 90’s on Wednesday and Thursday. Saturday came and the plan was for Brandon and I to meet Nichole and Samson at 9 a.m. at Nichole’s T-ball game in Sharon. We found the town of Sharon all right but there are no good signs for the Little League fields. After one person telling us to take a right and another person telling us to take a left we found it. The school was always in the directions but that’s even on a different road but it was used as a marker in the directions. We actually drove down a road that had a sign athletic fields. We passed two fields not being used and way in the back, we noticed parked cars and found the field being used. Nichole loves to play ball. Her legs are getting longer and she can run like a racehorse. Samson’s game was 18 miles back in Cobleskill at 11 a.m. We had to hurry. We got there and found it would be at least a half-hour before the teams finished using the field. That’s when we were able to have a tailgate breakfast. On the way home after the games, we stopped at the Gas Up in Gallupville. We never get enough of doing things the old-fashioned way. Samson and Nichole love grinding the corn on the cob. I know it wouldn’t be fun if they lived fifty years ago and it was an everyday chore. We ate chicken barbecue while we were there. We came home, changed to bathing suits and headed for Uncle Dan’s pond. That water felt good after two ball games in the hot sum. After eating dinner we picked up Brandon’s sister, (my granddaughter, Kyra Swan), and headed for the big playground in Voorheesville to end the day. Sunday was similar except it was a holiday, Father’s Day. Samson and Nichole made memorable gifts for Brandon at school and then they made books at Sunday school. We came home and they gave their dad a certificate for “Best Dad” and gave him T-shirts with their pictures on them. Next we picked up Kyra and went swimming in Uncle Dan’s pond, again. I really haven’t been swimming much. I bask in the sun. Brandon, Samson, and Nichole love to jump in the water and play games. That was the end of our Father’s Day weekend, but we thought it was wonderful and memorable. I feel good we can have fun in these hard economic times. Everything we went to was free but some places do ask for donations and that can be what you can afford.

Senior News

Historical society Talking about entertainment in hard economic times, come to the next meeting of the Berne Historical Society on Monday, June 25, at 7 p.m., at the Berne town hall and learn about the History of playing cards. Refreshments will be swerved. I grew up in Vermont where we spent a lot of time playing Canasta. Then, when I was a teenager, we played a lot of Pitch. When I joined the Eastern Star, we played Pinochle. Of course, I have played many other card games. I played Old Maid, Fish and War with my children and grandchildren. I played Hearts and Rummy with my teenagers and Skip-Bo with my motherin-law. This meeting can be an evening of reminiscence for all of us. This meeting might surprise young people. We entertained ourselves without cell phones and computers.

Church fete NEW SCO TLAND — The Presbyterian Church in New Scotland, is celebrating 225 years of ministry this year. The church is planning a Homecoming Weekend for Oct. 6 and 7, and wants all former members and friends to join the celebration. To be included, contact the church office at 439-6454.

Hilltowns By Linda Carman The Hilltowns Seniors has a very special lady celebrating her 100th birthday. On June 27, Florence Zimmer will reach the age of 100 years young. She is still hooking and sharing her crafts. I hope everyone will send her a card. Her address is: The Alteri,  Mill Rose Court, Slingerlands, N.Y. 12159. Happybirthday, Florence from all your Hilltown friends. Remember We also want to remember Irene Tanner and Ethel Snyder who are convalescing from falls; and Lois and Ed Wood who are celebrating their 61st wedding anniversary.  Trip news  Our Ocean City trip was filled with lots of activity. When we got there we found it was June Bug Week. It’s not what you think. It was senior high school week. Thank goodness we were on the north end of the boardwalk. For those of us who ventured down, it was quite an experience. We were told 50 years ago we acted just like them, but I don’t think so. First of all, our parents would never let us go there on our own and we had George Northrup watching over us. We did have fun in New York City. Anyway back to our trip. The food was great. Not one bad meal and we left wanting more. The

weather was windy, but warm except for Tuesday, the day of our boat cruise. You guessed it; the day was rainy. We kept our sense of humor and adventure and came away drenched. Our last dinner was at a remodeled chicken coop and we  banged our way through all the crabs and sweet corn. Now, don’t feel bad because you missed a good time, you have

Now, don’t feel bad because you missed a good time, you have two more chances to join us. two more chances to join us. In August we are going to Rhode Island and September to Maine, although the Maine trip now has a waiting list. Also, in October we are going to Washington, D.C. June 29 we are having a card party at the senior center. The time has been changed to 7 p.m. We are hoping for more of the public to join us.  Also, our July meeting will be at the Knox town park for our picnic. Still remember to bring a dish to pass and your own drink and place setting. Remember:  you really know you are getting old, when you bend down to tie your shoes and you wonder what else you can do while you’re down there.  

Pickers And Players

“Music in the Hills of Knox”: The Knox Historical Society brought back the sounds of homemade music on Sunday, June 10, at the Saddlemire Homestead. Bill Frueh, Dan Driscoll, and other local musicians provided a pleasant afternoon of good old-fashioned American music. Familiar and unusual musical instruments were on display in the museum. The society’s next event is Sunday, July 8, from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Saddlemire Homestead — a celebration of the Knox Bicentennial Quilt. A “Quilts of Knox” show will run at the adjacent Knox Town Hall from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Helderberg The menu being served by the Helderberg Senior Services at the Hiawatha Grange on Route 32 in Dormansville next week is: Monday: Chicken Parmesan, spaghetti with sauce, Italian green beans, apple juice, and cantaloupe; Tuesday: Meatloaf with gravy, oven roasted potato, mashed squash, cranberry juice, and fruit cocktail; Wednesday: roast pork with dressing, sauerkraut, pineapple juice, and apple crisp; Thursday: Stuffed peppers with tomato sauce, romaine and spinach salad with dressing, and watermelon; Friday: Roast chicken with gravy, rosemary potatoes, broccoli, and strawberries over ice cream. All meals will be served at noon. Call ahead at 797-3652 for reservations. Funding is provided by the Albany County Department for the Aging and the New York Office for Aging.

Guilderland The Guilderland Senior Services is offering the following activities the week of June 25. Call the senior office at 356-1980, ext. 1048 for any questions or information. Monday: Scheduled shopping, aerobics at 9 a.m., senior fitness at 10:30 a.m., OsteoBusters at 10:30 a.m., and OsteoBusters at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday: OsteoBusters at 9 a.m., no luncheon, Federal office primary day. Wednesday: Scheduled shopping, OsteoBusters at 10:30 a.m., senior fitness at 10:30 a.m., needlecraft at 1 p.m., and OsteoBusters at 1:30 p.m.; Thursday: Scheduled shopping, OsteoBusters at 9 a.m., a movie Hugo at 10:30 a.m., Mahjongg at 1 p.m., Pinochle at 1:15 p.m. and Friday: Scheduled shopping, painting at 10 a.m., Bridge at 10:30 a.m., art show take-down at the library at noon, and quilting at 1 p.m. Moonlight Serenade VII Calling all singles, couples, and groups of friends. Plan to join us for an evening of dining and dancing. This event is on Friday, July 13, from 5 to 9 p.m., at Mallozzi’s Clubhouse at Western Turnpike. The evening will include complimentary hors d’oeuvres with a cash bar. The menu is a fruit cup, dinner rolls and choice of chicken breast with a vegetable stuffing and sauce, baked haddock with a breadcrumb topping and butter sauce, or sliced sirloin of beef in a mushroom gravy. The entrée will be accompanied by potatoes and vegetables, dessert with coffee, tea, and soda. The John Deane Duo will provide music. The cost is $27 per person; payable to the Town of Guilderland. The ticket deadline is July 6. Call the senior office at 3561980, ext. 1048 for any questions or information.

Keep up with the Seniors The Enterprise


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The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

Obituary Ronald K. Bates RENSSELAERVILLE — Ronald K. “Ronaferd” Bates was a loving father, grandfather, and great-grandfather, who enjoyed the fast life, and loved to make people laugh. “He was quick; he’d think of something, and just throw it out there, and you’d just start laughing,” said his son, Ronald “Joey” Bates. “Really quick with a humorous response; whether it was good, bad, sad — he got you laughing.” Mr. Bates died on Sunday, June 17, 2012. He was 71. “He liked being social, being out and about,” his son said. “He didn’t like to stay at home; he always wanted to be out doing something.” Born at home in Preston Hollow on Sept. 12, 1940, he was the oldest of Omar and Theresa (Cook) Bates’s four children. He was educated in a one-room schoolhouse, and later attended Middleburgh Central School, where he was an active member of the Future Farmers of America club.

“He liked being social, being out and about.”

He enjoyed hunting and fishing, and was known as a lover of fast cars, especially his black, 1962 Chevrolet Impala, “with a 409 engine, and a 4 on the floor,” his family wrote in a tribute. Later, he could be seen driving his 1986 Chevrolet IROC-Z Camaro. Mr. Bates also enjoyed going to the annual Harley Rendezvous in Pattersonville. “He looked forward to that every year,” said his son. “I think what got him into living the fast life was his first few years in the military. You never know what’s going to happen the next day, so, he chose to live life day-to-day, and have a good time.” Mr. Bates was a member of Greenville American Legion Post 291, and a past member of Tri-Village Volunteer Fire Company. While employed at GNH Lumber, Mr. Bates was drafted into the United States Army, and part of his duty was driving a USO tour bus across America. After he was discharged, he joined the Albany County Sheriff ’s Department as a road patrol officer, based at the Voorheesville substation, and then worked as a security guard at Albany International Airport, until he retired. He later worked as a bus driver for the Cairo-Durham School District, and then drove the Rensselaerville Senior Bus. Said his son, “He just loved being with the other seniors.” He will be remembered “for his keen sense of humor and sharp wit,” his family wrote. “He will be greatly missed by his family and friends.” **** Mr. Bates is survived by his son, Ronald “Joey” Bates and his wife, Wanda, of Medusa; and his longtime companion, Susan Quinn. Also surviving are his four grandsons: Kyle Bates and his wife, Erika; Keith Bates; Kenneth Bates; and Killian Bates. He is also survived by his great-grandson, Keegan Bates; his close brother, Randy Bates and his wife, Laura, of Medusa; his sister, Linda Mack of East Durham; several nieces, nephews, and greatnephews; and his special cousin, Dot Mickle and her husband, Keith, of Schoharie. His parents died before him, as did his sister, Roxene Corrigan; his nephew, Padraic Corrigan; and his niece, Becky Mack. Friends called at A.J. Cunningham Funeral Home in Greenville on Wednesday, June 20, and a Legion service was held that evening. A graveside service with military honors will be held today, Thursday, June 21, at 1 p.m. in the Brookside Cemetery in Preston Hollow. There will be a reception in the Bayard Elsbree Memorial Park in Preston Hollow following the service. Memorial contributions may be made to Bayard Elsbree Memorial Park, 2979 State Route 145, Preston Hollow, NY 12469. Friends and family may leave condolences at ajcunninghamfh. com. — Zach Simeone

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Local students earn honors… These local students were recently named to the President’s List at Hudson Valley Community College: — Amanda Ginder of Altamont, in the business administration academic program; — Maxwell Goodknight of Altamont, in the fine arts academic program; — Christopher LeClair of Altamont, in the automotive technical service academic program; — Sean Loucks of Altamont, in the business administration academic program; — Jamie Martin of Altamont, in the business administration academic program; — Erika McDonald of Altamont, in the chemical dependency counseling academic program; — Layla Prescott of Altamont, in the non-matriculated academic program; — William Stewart of Altamont, in the telecommunications technology- Verizon academic program; — Kristen Swider of Altamont, in the criminal investigation academic program; — Alex Vitale of Altamont, in the non-matriculated academic program; — Michael Ward of Altamont, in the business administration academic program; — Frank Zabinski of Altamont, in the electrical construction and maintenance academic program; — Ashley Berben of Berne, in the individual studies academic program; — Eric Hacker of Berne, in the heating/air conditioning/ refrigeration technical services academic program; — Jason Horvath of Berne, in the electrical construction and maintenance academic program; — Kelly Murphy of Berne, in the dental assisting academic program; —Travis Youngs of Berne, in the electrical construction and maintenance academic program; — Candace Dunham of East Berne, in the individual studies academic program; — Andrea Warner of East Berne, in the liberal arts: humanities and social science academic program; — Mary Frambach of Guilderland, in the non-matriculated

academic program; — Eun-Young Im of Guilderland, in the accounting academic program; — Ryan Jankow of Guilderland, in the non-matriculated academic program; — Justin Moran of Guilderland, in the liberal arts: humanities and social science academic program; — Keisha Providence of Guilderland, in the individual studies academic program; — Addison Brand of Rensselaerville, in the computer information systems academic program; — Kirsten Ackerman of Schenectady, in the liberal arts: humanities and social science academic program; — Nicholas Austin of Schenectady, in the mechanical engineering technology academic program; — Diana Ayala Bedoya of Schenectady, in the fine arts academic program; — George Beaudoin of Schenectady, in the business administration academic program; — Edward Beck of Schenectady, in the construction technology academic program; — Lea Bellai of Schenectady, in the liberal arts and science: math and science academic program; — Kayla Best of Schenectady, in the non-matriculated academic program; — Evelyn Bohl of Schenectady, in the individual studies academic program; — Michael Brenner of Schenectady, in the liberal arts: humanities and social science academic program; — Robert Briskie of Schenectady, in the criminal justice academic program; — Robert Calabrese of Schenectady, in the computer information systems: system and network administration academic program; — Timothy Columbus of Schenectady, in the business administration academic program; — Sherman Coonradt of Schenectady, in the individual studies academic program; — Tina DeSanto of Schenectady, in the non-matriculated academic program; — S t e v e n D e Va r n n e o f Schenectady, in the construction technology academic program;

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— Kayla Diegel of Schenectady; in the business administration academic program; — Dominic Domanico of Schenectady, in the civil engineering technology academic program; — Nathanael Greklek of Schenectady, in the criminal justice academic program; — Shipra Iyer of Schenectady, in the biotechnology academic program; — Anita Karungi of Schenectady, in the business administration academic program; — Lauren Kline of Schenectady, in the non-matriculated academic program; — Melanie Kraus of Schenectady, in the business administration academic program; — Emily Kuchis of Schenectady, in the individual studies academic program; — Jennifer Layton of Schenectady, in the health information management and technology academic program; — David Liburdi of Schenectady, in the nursing academic program; — Maci Martell of Schenectady, in the individual studies academic program; — Sheila McGee of Schenectady, in the animal advocacy academic program; — Nathan Miglucci of Schenectady, in the non-matriculated academic program; — Kersten Myrtle of Schenectady, in the criminal justice academic program; — Christine O’Brien of Schenectady, in the human services academic program; — Jesse Orsino of Schenectady, in the heating/air conditioning/ refrigeration technical services academic program; — Danielle Rojas of Schenectady, in the human services academic program; — LaMar Romeo of Schenectady, in the chemical dependency counseling academic program; — G e r a r d S a g l i o c c a of Schenectady, in the electrical construction and maintenance academic program; — Kaitlyn Sasso of Schenectady, in the business administration academic program; — Jesse Stead of Schenectady; in the business administration academic program; (continued on next page)

THANK YOU We wish to thank SPNRC (Villa) staff, Community Hospice, New Comer Cannon Funeral Home, Blessed Sacrament Parish, Father John Bradley, Sisters of Mercy and associates, family and friends for their kindess expressed at Ken’s passing. Your friendship, prayers and support will be forever remembered. The stories, tales and experiences you shared from Ken’s life we will cherish. The Miller Family

Read The Enterprise.


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The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

At HVCC (Continued from previous page) — Jaime Tucci of Schenectady, in the non-matriculated academic program; — Anthony Zimdars of Schenectady, in the heating/ air conditioning/refrigeration technical services academic program; — Stephen Adiletta of Voorheesville, in the business administration academic program; — Anton Andriyanov of Voorheesville, in the individual studies academic program; — Joseph Barone of Voorheesville in the business administration academic program; — Kirsten Carroll of Voorheesville, in the individual studies academic program; — Lyndi Cummings of Voorheesville, in the business administration academic program; — Ian Dittmer of Voorheesville, in the criminal justice academic program; — Christina Hoult of Voorheesville, in the liberal arts and science: humanities and social science honors program academic program; — Christopher Kirk of Voorheesville, in the criminal investigation academic program; — Andrew Robertson of Voorheesville, in the business administration academic program; — Donna Vogel of Voorheesville, in the individual studies academic program; and — Chelsea Koennecke of Knox, in the individual studies academic program.

Dean’s list These local students have been named to the dean’s list or received a similar honor from their college or university for the spring 2012 semester: — Leah Plant of Altamont at Johnson & Wales University in Rhode Island; — Christina Daly, a senior in marketing from Schenectady at Bryant University in Rhode Island; — Kathryn Janower of Schenectady, at Mansfield University of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education; — Danielle Elizabeth Heath of Schenectady, at the University of Rhode Island; — Gina Villano of Schenectady, at the University of Rhode Island; and — Joseph Mastroianni of Guilderland, a sophomore at Siena College, majoring in business administration.

Grads

— Photo from Cindy Quay

Posing in their handmade mortarboards are the 4-year-olds graduating from the Knox Nursery School. From left, in front are: Landon Kinal, Anthony Clements, Garret Hempstead, Justin Murphy, and Brandon Stevens; in back: Madysen Saddlemire, Sadie Poole, Emily Edwards, Brienna Lunde, Audrey Veltman, Lily Terrarzik, and Makenna Lunde.

Playland and pledge, letters and a big red dog were all part of the fun at the Knox Nursery School this year By Cindy Quay

Community correspondent

KNOX — Another successful school year at the Knox Nursery School has come to an end. Since our last update, the lions and lambs, shamrocks and “pots of gold” have made way for colorful kites, flowers, umbrellas, and large blue raindrops suspended from the ceiling — “April showers bring May flowers.” April, even May for that matter, passed by much too quickly. The 3-year-olds and 4-year-olds completed the alphabet. To quote one of the 4-year-olds, “We’re done!” The Pledge of Allegiance has been mastered by the 4-yearolds. It was hard to tell who was more excited when the 2-yearolds presented their moms with a pot of tiny flower seedlings for Mother’s Day, the kids or the moms. Of course, the 2-year-olds had every right to be as they planted the seeds and watered them so that their moms would have this special gift. In early May, all three classes enjoyed a live performance at Proctor’s of Clifford, the Big Red

Dog. The hour-long presentation included lots of songs, audience participation, and of course the antics of a giant red dog! Close to 90 children, parents, and teachers from the Knox Nursery School attended the event. As the year wound down, several events took center stage. Hoffman’s Playland was the venue of our year-end field trip. This is always a favorite for kids of all ages. Once again, we enjoyed a beautiful sunny day for the Knox Memorial Day parade. Over 50 kids, parents, and teachers donned red, white, or blue T-shirts to represent the nursery school. If the cheers and clapping along the way were an indication of our marching ability, then we took first prize! Last, but certainly not least, were the year-end celebrations. Using a rainbow theme, the twelve 4-year-olds entered the room proudly wearing the colorful graduation caps they made and waving handmade paper batons sporting rainbow colored streamers. In front of a room full of parents, grandparents, and special guests, our “graduates”

enthusiastically sang “Mr. Sun” and “Arky, Arky.” A slideshow of their year in review and the passing out of certificates highlighted their last day at the Knox Nursery School. The younger grades each held a special last day celebration as well. On June 8, the nursery school once again became silent. Our thanks go out to each person who played a role in the success of the school. This includes the kids, parents, and teachers. Also, we thank the Men’s Group of the Knox Reformed Church who helped to keep our facility and playground equipment in good working condition. There are still openings available for the 2012-13 school year. We will again be offering our “Terrific Twos” program. The 2-year-olds meet two days a week, on Tuesday and Friday, from 9 to 11:15 a.m. The tuition is $70 for each six-week period. If you are interested in registering a 2-, 3-, or 4-year-old, please contact the school at 8722015 and leave a message.

These local students recently earned diplomas: — Lisa F. Taber of Guilderland received a Juris Doctor degree from Western New England University; — Natalie Bernardi of Altamont earned a juris doctor degree from Albany Law School; — Megan Boggs of Guilderland earned a juris doctor degree from Albany Law School; — Chelsea Cerutti of Guilderland earned a juris doctor degree from Albany Law School; — Vi c t o r i a D e S a r b o of Schenectady graduated magna cum laude, with a bachelor of science degree in childhood education from Elmira College; —  Andrew Sheehan of Schenectady earned a bachelor of arts degree in social studies from Elmira College; and — Jacqueline M. DeLuise, a Guilderland High School graduate, earned a bachelor o arts degree summa cum laude with honors from the State University of New York College at Cortland with a major in psychology and a minor in sociology. She was also on the president’s list this spring, having earned at least an A- in all her courses.

Awards and achievements These local students have recently distinguished themselves: — Nicole Das of Schenectady, a student at Guilderland High School was awarded the 2012 Saint Michael’s College Book Award for Academic Achievement with a Social Conscience; — Rachel Lee of Voorheesville, a student at Clayton A. Bouton High School was awarded the 2012 Saint Michael’s College Book Award for Academic Achievement with a Social Conscience; — Jordan Pantalone of Schenectady, a student at Notre Dame-Bishop Gibbons High School was awarded the 2012 Saint Michael’s College Book Award for Academic Achievement with a Social Conscience; and — Chancellor Cobb of Schenectady, won Brockport’s Honors Scholarship, awarded to a freshman accepted into the Honors Program at the State University of New York College at Brockport. To be accepted into this program, students must have a 92 or higher high school average and have scored 1,150 or higher on their SAT exam or 26 or higher on their ACT exam.

LEGAL NOTICE

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LEGAL NOTICE Notice of formation of ACTIVE 4 ADVENTURES, LLC filed with NY Secy. of State (SSNY) on 06/11/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 90 State Street, STE 700, Office 40, Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: any lawful activity. (4-49-1)

LEGAL NOTICE YGMY Consultants LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/18/12. Office in Albany County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201. Purpose: General. (7-49-1) LEGAL NOTICE Farino Films LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/18/12. Office in Albany County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Northwest Registered Agent, LLC., 90 State St Ste 700 Office 40, Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: General. (8-49-1) LEGAL NOTICE The annual meeting of the Woodlawn Cemetery Association will take place on Tuesday June 26th at the home of Ann Resnick at 12 Haluska Lane in East Berne. Lot owners meeting is at 7:30pm and a closed board meeting will follow at 8:00pm Ann Resnick Secretary (15-49)

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: Elmwood Real Estate Development, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 6/12/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, c/o Chris Wessell 12 Elmwood Road Menands, NY 12204. Purpose: any lawful purpose. (9-49-1)

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: Rosa Morena Innovative Solutions LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/25/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 224 Montrose Avenue – 1A, Brooklyn, New York 11206. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. (11-49-1)

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of formation of NISAC, LLC. Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS) on 5/17/2012, office location: Albany County, NS is designated as agent upon whom process may be served, NS shall mail service of process (SOP) to NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, NW Registered Agent LLC is designated as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful purpose. (10-49-1)

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of formation [domestic]/ qualification [foreign] of The Offor Walker GroupArticles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS) on April 20, 2011, office location: Albany County, NS is designated as agent upon whom process may be served, NS shall mail service of process (SOP) to NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, NW Registered Agent LLC is designated as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful purpose. (14-49-1)

LEGAL NOTICE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the Town Board of the Town of Rensselaerville seeks proposals for the restoration of the Mill Dam located in the Hamlet of Rensselaerville, along the north side of the Ten Mile Creek (Class C (+) steam) below the County Route 353 bridge. Specifications for the Project can be obtained at the Town Clerk’s office during normal business hours, Monday - Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday 9 a.m. to 12 Noon. 87 Barger Road, Medusa, NY 12120. Phone - 518-797-3798 or 2394225. Successful bidder must supply the Town of Rensselaerville with a Certificate of Insurance, $1,000,000.00/$2,000,000.00. The proposals must be received by the Town Clerk’s office by 4 p.m. on July 10, 2012. Bids will be opened on July 10, 2012 at 7:30 p.m. and will be awarded within a reasonable time thereafter. The proposals are to be clearly marked with the bidders name and bid subject in a sealed envelope. The Town Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Non-Collusive bidding certificate must accompany all bids. June 21, 2012 BY ORDER OF THE TOWN BOARD Kathleen A. Hallenbeck Town Clerk

LEGAL NOTICE 252 Himrod JW LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/7/12. Office in Albany County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201. Purpose: General. (5-49-1) LEGAL NOTICE Beach 121 Street LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/1/12. Office in Albany County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201. Purpose: General. (6-49-1)

LEGAL NOTICE

Notice: All legals that are scheduled or will be going to start in our June 28 and July 5 issues should be received by Friday, June 22, no later than Monday June 25, noon.


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The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012 LEGAL NOTICE

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LEGAL NOTICE Notice of formation [domestic] of SproutRoute, LLC. Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS) on August 25, 2010 office location: Albany County, NS is designated as agent upon whom process may be served, NS shall mail service of process (SOP) to NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, NW Registered Agent LLC is designated as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful purpose. (7-47-52) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of formation of CF Ventures LLC. Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS) on May 7, 2012, office location: Albany County, NS is designated as agent upon whom process may be served, NS shall mail service of process (SOP) to NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, NW Registered Agent LLC is designated as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful purpose. (8-47-52) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of formation domestic limited liability Company (LLC) Name: ORVELLA, LLC. Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS) on 11/14/2011, office location: Albany County, NS is designated as agent upon whom process may be served, NS shall mail service of process (SOP) to NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, NW Registered Agent LLC is designated as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful purpose. (9-47-52) LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: LIFE CENTERS USA COUNSELING, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/15/2012. Office location: Albany County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC,1843 CENTRAL AVENUE,COLONIE, NY 12205. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. (10-47-52)

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of formation of Prohibition Bakery, LLC. Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS) on 6/5/2012, office location: Albany County, NS is designated as agent upon whom process may be served, NS shall mail service of process (SOP) to NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, NW Registered Agent LLC is designated as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful purpose. (5-48-53) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of formation of INTERWEB CLOUD SOLUTIONS, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/31/11. Office in ALBANY County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 255 Washington Ave Ext, Suite 103, Albany, NY 12205. Purpose: any lawful purpose. (6-48-53) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of formation of SUNRISE CAPITAL PARTNERS I, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/31/12. Office in ALBANY County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 255 Washington Ave Ext, Suite 103, Albany, NY 12205. Purpose: any lawful purpose. (7-48-53)

LEGAL NOTICE FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY Notice of formation of HAPPY TAILS OF ALTAMONT, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on 02/23/2012. Office location: Albany County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of the process to the LLC at 6964 Dunnsville Road, Altamont NY 12009. No specific date of dissolution. Purpose: any lawful purpose. (23-48-53)

Specifications can be obtained from the Town Clerk during normal business hours, Monday - Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday - 9 a.m. to 12 Noon, 87 Barger Road, Medusa, NY 12120. Phone - 518797-3798 or 239-4225. The bids must be received by the Town Clerk’s office by 4 p.m. on July 10, 2012. Bids will be opned on July 10, 2012 at 7:15 p.m. and will be awarded wihtin a reasonable time thereafter. The sealed bids are to be clearly marked with the bidders name and bid subject on the envelope. The Town Board reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Non-Collusive bidding certificate must acconpany all bids. June 21, 2012 BY ORDER OF THE TOWN BOARD Kathleen A. Hallenbeck Town Clerk (12-49) LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SPECIAL DISTRICT MEETING OF GUILDERLAND CENTRAL SCHOOL DISTRICT, IN THE COUNTY OF ALBANY, NEW YORK NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a resolution of the Board of Education of Guilderland Central School District, in the County of Albany, New York, adopted on May 8, 2012, a Special District Meeting of the qualified voters of said School District will be held on Tuesday, June 26, 2012 from 12:00 o’clock Noon to 9:00 o’clock P.M. (Prevailing Time) at the following voting places: (1) Altamont Elementary School, 117 Grand Street, Altamont, New York, for those persons residing in School Election District No. 1; (2) Guilderland Elementary School, 2225 Western Avenue, Guilderland, New York, for those persons residing in School Election District No. 2; (3) Lynnwood Elementary School, 8 Regina Drive, Schenectady, New York, for those persons residing in School Election District No. 3; (4) Westmere Elementary School, 6270 Johnston Road, Albany, New York, for those persons residing in School Election District No. 4; and (5) Pine Bush Elementary School, 3437 Carman Road, Schenectady, New York, for those persons residing in School Election District No. 5; for the purpose of voting upon the following Bond Proposition: BOND PROPOSITION RESOLVED: (a) That the Board of Education of the Guilderland Central School District, in the County of Albany, New York (the “District”), is hereby authorized to construct additions and improvements to the Guilderland Public Library situated at 2228 Western Avenue, in Guilderland, New York, on one or more parcels of land currently owned or to be owned by the District (the “Project”), including: the construction of building additions to provide additional reading room, lobby, public and other space; interior reconstruction and space reconfiguration; improvements to the heating, ventilation, air conditioning, lighting, and fire safety systems; site improvements including the construction of a new garage and enlarged parking lot; and driveway, paving and drainage improvements; all of the foregoing to include the original equipment, machinery, furnishings, apparatus, and all ancillary, site, demolition and other work required in connection therewith; and to expend therefor, including preliminary costs and costs incidental thereto and to the financing thereof, an amount not to exceed the estimated total cost of $12,950,000; (b) that a tax is hereby voted in an amount of not to exceed $12,950,000 to finance such cost, such tax to be levied and collected in installments in such years and in such amounts as shall be determined by said Board of Education; and (c) that in anticipation of said tax, bonds of the District are hereby authorized to be issued in the aggregate principal amount of not to exceed $12,950,000, and a tax is hereby voted to pay the interest on said bonds as the same shall become due and payable. Such Bond Proposition shall appear on the paper ballots used for voting at said Special District Meeting in substantially the following condensed form: BOND PROPOSITION YES NO RESOLVED:

(a) That the Board of Education of the Guilderland Central School District is hereby authorized to construct additions and improvements to the Guilderland Public Library and the site thereof, and to expend therefor an amount not to exceed the estimated total cost of $12,950,000; (b) that a tax is hereby voted in an amount of not to exceed $12,950,000 to finance such cost, such tax to be levied and collected in installments in such years and in such amounts as shall be determined by said Board of Education; and (c) that in anticipation of said tax, bonds of the District are hereby authorized to be issued in the aggregate principal amount of not to exceed $12,950,000, and a tax is hereby voted to pay the interest on said bonds as the same shall become due and payable. The voting will be conducted by paper ballot as provided in the Education Law and the polls will remain open from 12:00 o’clock Noon to 9:00 o’clock P.M. (Prevailing Time) and as much longer as may be necessary to enable the voters then present to cast their ballots. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that personal registration of voters is required. The Board of Registration shall meet on Wednesday, June 13, 2012, from 8:30 o’clock A.M. until 2:30 o’clock P.M. (Prevailing Time), at the following places, for the purpose of preparing a register of the qualified voters of the District for said Special District Meeting, at which time any person shall be entitled to have his/her name placed upon such register, provided that at such meeting of the Board of Registration he/she is known or proven to the satisfaction of such Board of Registration to be then or thereafter entitled to vote at said Special District Meeting for which such register is prepared: SCHOOL ELECTION DISTRICT NO. 1: Place of Registration: Altamont Elementary School 117 Grand Street Altamont, New York SCHOOL ELECTION DISTRICT NO. 2: Place of Registration: Guilderland Elementary School 2225 Western Avenue Guilderland, New York SCHOOL ELECTION DISTRICT NO. 3: Place of Registration: Lynnwood Elementary School 8 Regina Drive Schenectady, New York SCHOOL ELECTION DISTRICT NO. 4: Place of Registration: Westmere Elementary School 6270 Johnston Road Albany, New York SCHOOL ELECTION DISTRICT NO. 5: Place of Registration: Pine Bush Elementary School 3437 Carman Road Schenectady, New York The register of the qualified voters of said School District prepared at the Annual Meeting and Election held on May 15, 2012, shall be used by said Board of Registration as the basis for the preparation of the register for said Special District Meeting to be held on June 26, 2012. Any person whose name appears on such register or who shall have been previously registered for any annual or special District meeting or election and who shall have voted at any annual or special District meeting or election held or conducted at any time since January 1, 2008, will not be required to register personally for this Special District Meeting. In addition, any person otherwise qualified to vote who is registered with the Board of Elections of Albany County under the provisions of the Election Law, shall be entitled to vote at said Special District Meeting without further registration. Any person otherwise entitled to vote at said Special District Meeting may register at the District Administrative Offices, 8 School Road, Guilderland Center, New York, June 13, 2012, between the hours of 8:30 o’clock A.M. and 3:30 o’clock P.M. (Prevailing Time). Immediately upon its completion, the register will be filed in the office of the District Clerk, located at 8 School Road, Guilderland Center, New York, and will be open for inspection by any qualified voter of the District to the day of the Special District Meeting, June 26, 2012, Sunday excepted, between the hours of 8:00 o’clock A.M. and 3:30 o’clock P.M. (Prevailing Time) with the exception of Saturday, June 23, 2012 when the hours will be by appointment only. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that applications for absentee ballots may be applied for at the office of the Clerk of the District. Completed applications must be received by the District Clerk at least seven (7) days prior to the Special District Meeting if the ballot is to be mailed to the voter, or the day before the Special District Meeting if the ballot is to be delivered personally to the voter. Absentee ballots must be received by the District Clerk no later than 5:00 o’clock P.M. (Prevailing Time) on June 26, 2012.

A list of all persons to whom absentee ballots shall have been issued will be available in the office of the Clerk on each of the five days prior to the day of the election, except Saturday and Sunday, between the hours of 9:00 o’clock A.M. and 3:30 o’clock P.M. (Prevailing Time). The boundaries of the school election districts are as follows: SCHOOL ELECTION DISTRICT NO. 1 - includes all of the lands contained within the boundaries of the Altamont Elementary School zone. SCHOOL ELECTION DISTRICT NO. 2 - includes all of the lands contained within the boundaries of the Guilderland Elementary School zone. SCHOOL ELECTION DISTRICT NO. 3 - includes all of the lands contained within the boundaries of the Lynnwood Elementary School zone. SCHOOL ELECTION DISTRICT NO. 4 - includes all of the lands contained within the boundaries of the Westmere Elementary School zone. SCHOOL ELECTION DISTRICT NO. 5 - includes all of the lands contained within the boundaries of the Pine Bush Elementary School zone. Only qualified voters who are duly registered will be permitted to vote. BY THE ORDER OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION Dated: May 8, 2012 LINDA LIVINGSTON District Clerk (30-43/45/47/49) LEGAL NOTICE Please be advised that the Town of Guilderland will hold a Public Hearing at the Town Hall, McCormack’s Corners, Guilderland, N.Y on a proposed amendment to the zoning law to prohibit hydrofracking in the Town of Guilderland on July 3, 2012, 7:30 PM. All those wishing to be heard, will be heard. Dated: May 15th, 2012 By Order of the Town Board of the Town of Guilderland Rosemary Centi, RMC Town Clerk (2-49-50) LEGAL NOTICE TOWN OF NEW SCOTLAND Resolution amending Resolution 12-106 Funding for a New Salem Water District Capital Project Whereas, the Town of New Scotland has established a capital project for the purpose of constructing a New Salem Water District, and Whereas, the New Salem Water District has not yet been formed for the purpose of raising rents for the payments that will come due during the process of formation and construction, and Whereas, the Town has revised an estimated budget for the engineering phase, and Whereas, the funds necessary to pay vendors are not available from the sponsor fund or the capital project, and Whereas, the project continues to require the Town to incur costs in advance of securing the funding of the project, Now therefore be it resolved, that the Town Supervisor is authorized to loan from the General Town-Wide Fund (A) to the New Salem Water District Capital Project Fund (HNS) the funds when necessary up to $90,000.00 with an initial interest rate of .5% per annum, said rate to be adjusted from time to time to reflect market conditions. Resolve that this resolution is subject to a permissive referendum pursuant to Town Law Section 191a and shall not be effective until the expiration of 30 days from adoption or, in the event of the filing of a valid petition for a referendum thereon, until approval at such referendum; and it is further resolved that the Town Clerk post and publish a copy of the resolution pursuant to Town Law Section 90. Diane R. Deschenes New Scotland Town Clerk The Town of New Scotland is an equal opportunity provider and employer. (3-49) LEGAL NOTICE RECORDING SECRETARY The Planning Board of the Town of Knox is seeking a Recording Secretary. The work’s scope is primarily focused on recording the events of each meeting of the Planning Board on the second Thursday of each month. The notes must then be transcribed and distributed to the Board members and other interested parties in the Town in a timely manner. Additional work relates to the on-going work on Town Ordinances. The applicant must be proficient in either WordPerfect or MS Word and be computer literate including the use of the Internet and email. The approximate time per month is typically 3 to 4 hours but can be longer if the Board is engaged in writing an ordinance. The hourly rate is $12.62 Please submit your resume to both Mike Hammond and Bob Price via email: mhammond2@nycap. rr.com gearknox@nycap.rr.com (13-49-50)

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of MA West, LLC Arts. OF Org. Filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/04/2011. Business location: Albany Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 24 Madison Avenue Ext., Albany, NY 12203. Purpose: any lawful activities. (14-47-52) LEGAL NOTICE Samsons Valley LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/23/12. Office in Albany County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201. Purpose: General. (16-47-52) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of formation of Manhattan Mind Metamorphosis LLC. Articles of Org. were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/31/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to NW Registered Agent LLC, 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, Albany, NY 12207. NW Registered Agent LLC is designated as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, Albany 12207. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. (2-48-53) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Mizrahi Partners LLC. Articles of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/24/2012. Office location: Albany County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Colby Attorneys Service Co., Inc., 111 Washington Ave., Ste. 703, Albany, NY 12210, registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. (3-48-53) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of formation of Heatherdown LLC. Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS) on 5/21/2012, office location: Albany County, NS is designated as agent upon whom process may be served, NS shall mail service of process (SOP) to NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, NW Registered Agent LLC is designated as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful purpose. (4-48-53)

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of 1064 Morris Avenue Two LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/29/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 25 Robert Pitt Dr. Ste 204, Monsey, NY 10952. The name and address of the registered agent is Vcorp Agent Services, Inc., 25 Robert Pitt Dr. Ste 204, Monsey, NY 10952. Purpose: any lawful activity. (15-48-53) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of 1168 Sherman Avenue LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/29/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 25 Robert Pitt Dr. Ste 204, Monsey, NY 10952. The name and address of the registered agent is Vcorp Agent Services, Inc., 25 Robert Pitt Dr. Ste 204, Monsey, NY 10952. Purpose: any lawful activity. (16-48-53) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of 1473 Teller Avenue LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/29/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 25 Robert Pitt Dr. Ste 204, Monsey, NY 10952. The name and address of the registered agent is Vcorp Agent Services, Inc., 25 Robert Pitt Dr. Ste 204, Monsey, NY 10952. Purpose: any lawful activity. (17-48-53) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of C & W Direct I LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 6/7/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 489 Harding Ave., West Hempstead, NY 11552. Purpose: any lawful activity. (18-48-53) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Hurley BM, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 6/6/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1672 51st St., Brooklyn, NY 11204. Purpose: any lawful activity. (19-48-53) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of OCO Supplies LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 6/7/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 878 E. 52nd St., Brooklyn, NY 11203. Purpose: any lawful activity. (20-48-53) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Park Avenue A, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 6/5/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1400 Broadway, Suite 1404, New York, NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful activity. (21-48-53)

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of IDM Consulting, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 4/3/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1926 E. 14th St., Brooklyn, NY 11229. Purpose: any lawful activity. (9-48-53) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of JDG Realty, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/31/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1232 55th St., Brooklyn, NY 11219. Purpose: any lawful activity. (10-48-53) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Nostrand Management LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/24/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: POB 192362, Brooklyn, NY 11219. Purpose: any lawful activity. (11-48-53) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of SYW Equities LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/22/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 12 Briarcliff Drive, Monsey, NY 10952. Purpose: any lawful activity. (12-48-53) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Vince Smith Jewels LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/25/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 935 St Nicholas Ave. Apt 6J, New York, NY 10032. Purpose: any lawful activity. (13-48-53) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Y&B Estates LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/25/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: PO Box 342, Monsey, NY 10952. Purpose: any lawful activity. (14-48-53) LEGAL NOTICE PUBLIC NOTICE OF HEARING THE TOWN OF NEW SCOTLAND ZONING BOARD Notice is hereby given that the Zoning Board of Town of New Scotland, New York will hold a public hearing pursuant to Chapter 190, Article IX, Section 190-73 of the Zoning Law on the following proposition: A Public Hearing for Variance Application #460 Area Variance #460: Application submitted by Alan Rudzinskas and Robert Houck to request twenty feet of relief from Article XIII, Section 190-99 of the town zoning law that states each buildable lot shall have no less then fifty foot of frontage on a public road. The parcel lies within the RA Zoning District, on New Scotland Road, and is Identified as New Scotland Tax parcel # 83.-2-3.1. Applicant will apply for a two lot subdivision if this application for relied is granted. Said hearing will take place on June 26, 2012 at the New Scotland Town Hall 7:00p.m. Adam Greenberg Chairman Zoning Board of Appeals The Town of New Scotland is an equal opportunity provider and employer. (1-49) LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Town Board of the Town of Rensselaerville invites sealed bids for chain link fencing for the Tennis Court for the Bayard Elsbree Park located at 3112 SR 145, Preston Hollow, NY 12469. Sucessful bidder must supply the Town with a Certificate of Insurance, $1,000,000.00/$2,000,000.00


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The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

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LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of 14 Maujer Realty LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 3/30/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 515 Rockaway Ave., Valley Stream, NY 11581. Purpose: any lawful activity. (1-44-49) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of DBPB 1174 LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 1/12/12. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1419 60th St., Brooklyn, NY 11219. Purpose: any lawful activity. (2-44-49) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of DBPB 955 LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 1/12/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1419 60th St., Brooklyn, NY 11219. Purpose: any lawful activity. (3-44-49) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of MYCHECK LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 2/13/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 25 Robert Pitt Dr. Suite 204, Monsey, NY 10952. Purpose: any lawful activity. (4-44-49) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of SatffMal, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 11/30/11. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 431 Beach 20th St., Far Rockaway, NY 11691. Purpose: any lawful activity. (5-44-49) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of StaffCRM, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 12/29/11. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 431 Beach 20th St., Far Rockaway, NY 11691. Purpose: any lawful activity. (6-44-49) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of StaffCRM-2, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 12/29/11. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 431 Beach 20th St., Far Rockaway, NY 11691. Purpose: any lawful activity. (7-44-49) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Qualification of TD Merchant Services LLC. Authority filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/27/12. LLC Formed in (DE) on 10/25/11. Office location: Albany County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 80 State Street, Albany, NY 12207-2543. Registered Agent upon whom process may be served: CSC, 80 State Street, Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE address of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Road, Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. Of Org. filed with DE Secretary of State, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. Purpose: any lawful activity. (8-44-49) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of formation of limited liability company. Name: Gambacorta Group LLC. Articles of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/29/2012. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC at 4 Valleyview Dr., Albany, NY 12208. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. (9-44-49) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of formation of CM Fox Senior Living LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/9/12. Office in Albany County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 2390 Western Ave, Guilderland NY 12084. Purpose is any lawful purpose. (10-44-49)

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Modi Ventures, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/01/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, NW Registered Agent LLC is designated as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. (11-44-49) LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: NORTHWAY TAXI, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/04/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 3 Broadway, Latham, NY 12110. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. (12-44-49)

LEGAL NOTICE ASCEND CONCIERGE SERVICES LLC, Articles of Or. Filed N.Y. Sec. of State (SSNY) 23rd day of April 2012. Office in Bronx County at 1035 Anderson Ave, Unit 200, Bronx, New York 10452. SSNY desig. agt. Upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1035 Anderson Ave, Unit 200, Bronx, New York 10452. Reg.Agt. upon whom process may be served: Spiegel & Utrera, P.A., P.C. 1 Maiden Lane, NYC 10038 1 800 576-1100 Purpose: Any lawful purpose (6-45-50) LEGAL NOTICE 2125 East 8th Street Holding LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/7/12. Office in Albany County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201. Purpose: General. (11-45-50)

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of formation of PithStudio LLC. Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS) on April 13, 2012, office location: Albany County, NS is designated as agent upon whom process may be served, NS shall mail service of process (SOP) to InCorp Services, Inc. One Commerce Plaza - 99 Washington Ave., Suite 805-A Albany, NY 12210-2822, InCorp Services, Inc. is designated as agent for SOP at One Commerce Plaza - 99 Washington Ave., Suite 805-A Albany, NY 12210-2822, purpose is any lawful purpose. (5-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of NY ATM Group LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/9/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 845 3rd Ave. 6th Fl., New York, NY 10022. Purpose: any lawful activity. (14-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of RBJ Harrison LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/3/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1220 Broadway, Suite 708, New York, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful activity. (15-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Silvershore Properties 22 LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/4/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1220 Broadway Ste 707, New York, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful activity. (16-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: BMCT Holdings LLC. Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS) on 04/26/12, office location: Albany County, NS is designated as agent upon whom process may be served, NS shall mail service of process (SOP) to NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, NW Registered Agent LLC is designated as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful purpose. (30-46-51)

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of HRB Management LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/11/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 25 Robert Pitt Dr. Ste 204, Monsey, NY 10952. The name and address of the registered agent is Vcorp Agent Services, Inc., 25 Robert Pitt Dr. Ste 204, Monsey, NY 10952. Purpose: any lawful activity. (11-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Kotel Properties LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/4/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 40 Pool Dr., Roslyn, NY 11576. Purpose: any lawful activity. (12-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of KSY Fashion LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/4/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1735 54th St., Brooklyn, NY 11204. Purpose: any lawful activity. (13-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of 2219 LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/16/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 2219 Coney Island Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11223. Purpose: any lawful activity. (18-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of 2264 2266 FDB, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/22/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 221 W. 38th St. Suite 300, New York, NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful activity. (19-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Autotech Oil, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/17/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 7 Rolling Hill Lane, Lawrence, NY 11559. Purpose: any lawful activity. (20-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Brick 57 Capital LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 4/23/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 381 Park Ave South, Suite 1001, New York, NY 10016. Purpose: any lawful activity. (21-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Pennsylvania Holdings LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/22/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 442 W. 54th St., New York, NY 10019. Purpose: any lawful activity. (22-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Popper Apts, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 9/8/11. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 181 Harborview South, Lawrence, NY 11559. Purpose: any lawful activity. (23-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Romeo de Brebeuf LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/22/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 168 Rivington St., New York, NY 10002. Purpose: any lawful activity. (24-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Tom’s Group LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/23/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 100 Beekman St. Apt 11K, New York, NY 10038. Purpose: any lawful activity. (25-46-51)

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of 95 Seigel LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/2/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 266 Broadway, Suite 604, Brooklyn, NY 11211. Purpose: any lawful activity. (26-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Beach 4th Funding LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 1/23/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 515 Rockaway Ave., Valley Stream, NY 11581. Purpose: any lawful activity. (27-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Rutland Farms 453 LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 9/27/11. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 453 Halsey St., Brooklyn, NY 11233. Purpose: any lawful activity. (28-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Sprain Brook 453, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 9/27/11. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 453 Halsey St., Brooklyn, NY 11233. Purpose: any lawful activity. (29-46-51)

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Qualification of Apercevue LLC. Authority filed with Secy of State of New York (SSNY): 2/21/12. Office location: Albany County. LLC formed in New Jersey: 12/13/11. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail service of process to registered agent at InCorp Services, Inc., 208 West State St, Trenton, NJ 08608-1022. LLC principal address: PO Box 2405, Princeton, NJ 085432405. Certificate of LLC filed with Secy of State of NJ, NJ Division of Revenue, Corporate Records Unit, PO Box 450, Trenton, NJ 08625. Purpose: Any lawful activity. (16-44-49) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of formation of DYT Advisors LLC. Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS) on January 23rd, 2012, office location: Albany County, NS is designated as agent upon whom process may be served, NS shall mail service of process (SOP) to NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, NW Registered Agent LLC is designated as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful purpose. (17-44-49) LEGAL NOTICE Kevin’s Swim School LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/27/12. Office in Albany County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Kevin M Kearney, 12 Hoffman Dr., Latham, NY 12110. Purpose: General. (12-45-50) LEGAL NOTICE 256 Jefferson JW LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/17/12. Office in Albany County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201. Purpose: General. (13-45-50) LEGAL NOTICE Sam Frankl LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/9/12. Office in Albany County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201. Purpose: General. (14-45-50) LEGAL NOTICE 3105 Seagirt Ave, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/8/12. Office in Albany County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201. Purpose: General. (15-45-50) LEGAL NOTICE M & M Properties NYC, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/16/12. Office in Albany County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201. Purpose: General. (16-45-50) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Qual. of Bli Rentals, L.L.C. filed with Sec of State NY (SSNY): 3/8/12. Office in Albany County. Formed in KS: 8/10/07. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served & shall mail process to: 1015 Scott St, Emporia, KS 66801. Foreign add: 1015 Scott St, Emporia, KS 66801. Arts. of Org. filed with Kris W. Kobach, Sec Of The State Of KS, Memorial Hall, 1st Fl, 120 S.W. 10th Ave, Topeka, KS 666121594. Purpose: General. (17-45-50)

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR AUTHORITY OF BACIC GROUP, LLC. Application for Authority was filed with the Secretary of State of New York on 04/30/2012. The LLC was originally filed with the Washington Secretary of State on 09/03/2007. Office location: Albany County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to InCorp Services, Inc., 1 Commerce Plaza, 99 Washington Avenue, Suite 805-A, Albany, NY 12210-2822. A copy of the LLC’s certificate of organization is filed with John Meisenbach at 1325 Fourth Avenue, Suite 2100, Seattle, WA 98101. The purpose of the LLC is to provide insurance services. (7-45-50) LEGAL NOTICE AA & BB LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/16/12. Office in Albany County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201. Purpose: General. (9-45-50) LEGAL NOTICE Synergy Energy Summit LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/16/12. Office in Albany County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201. Purpose: General. (10-45-50) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Qual. of JL Jewelry LLC. Fictitious Name: JL Jewelry NY LLC filed with Sec of State NY (SSNY): 5/2/12. Office in Albany County. Formed in DE: 5/1/12. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served & shall mail process to: PO Box 10873, Albany, NY 12201. Foreign add: Registered Agents Legal Services, LLC, 1220 N. Market St. Ste 806, Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. Of State Of DE, Div. of Corp., 401 Federal St, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: General. (18-45-50) LEGAL NOTICE ARTICLES OF ORGANIZATION OF KENDALL COMMERCIAL, LLC Under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Company FIRST: The name of the limited liability company is Kendall Commercial, LLC. SECOND: The county within this state in which the office of limited liability company is to be located is Albany. THIRD: The Secretary of State is designated as agent of the limited liability comapny upon whom process against it may be served. The address within or without this state to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the limited liability company served upon him or her is Kendall Commercial, LLC, 241 Delaware Avenue, Delmar, NY 12054 Philip T. Dunne, Organizer (19-45-50) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of a limited LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC): Name: J. C. TRIMARCHI LLC, Articles of Organization wer filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 2/17/2012.Offic Location : Albany County, SSN has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: c/o J. C. TRIMARCHI LLC, 48 Pinewood Road, Guilderland, NY 12084. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. Latest date upon which LLC is to dissolve: No specific date. (20-45-50)

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Qualification of EMEX, LLC, Authority filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/7/12. LLC formed in TX on 1/5/07. Office Location: Albany County. SSNY designated as agent against whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 99 Washington Ave., Ste. 1008, Albany, NY 12260: Registered Agent upon whom process may be served: 99 Washington Ave., Ste. 1008, Albany, NY 12260. TX address is 2825 Wilcrest Dr., Suite 656, Houston, TX 77042. Purpose: any lawful activity. (6-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of 118 West 137th Street LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/4/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 174 5th Ave. Suite 301, New York, NY 10010. Purpose: any lawful activity. (7-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Continental Equities LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/15/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 25 Robert Pitt Dr. Suite 204, Monsey, NY 10952. The name and address of the registered agent is Vcorp Agent Services, Inc., 25 Robert Pitt Dr. Suite 204, Monsey, NY 10952. Purpose: any lawful activity. (8-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of FNBB Investor LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/7/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1430 Broadway, Suite 1605, New York, NY 10018. Purpose: any lawful activity. (9-46-51) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Hemera LLC. Arts of Org. filed with NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 5/4/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 174 5th Ave. Suite 301, New York, NY 10010. Purpose: any lawful activity. (10-46-51)

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF FORMATION of limited liability company (LLC). Name: 687 PARK AVENUE LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/11/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: THE LLC 4010 14TH AVENUE, BROOKLYN, NY 11219. Purpose: any lawful purpose. (1-47-52) LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF FORMATION of limited liability company (LLC). Name: HMH IRON DESIGN LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/17/12. Office location: Albany County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: THE LLC 2054 57TH STREET, BROOKLYN, NY 11204. Purpose: any lawful purpose. (2-47-52) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of formation of Bek & Frohnert LLC. Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS) on April 27, 2012, office location: Albany County, NS is designated as agent upon whom process may be served, NS shall mail service of process(SOP)to NWRegistered Agent LLC@90StateStSTE700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful purpose. (4-47-52) LEGAL NOTICE Notice of qualification of OrthoPro, L.L.C. Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS) on May 22, 2012, office location: Albany County, NS is designated as agent upon whom process may be served, NS shall mail service of process (SOP) to NW Registered Agent LLC @ 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, NW Registered Agent LLC is designated as agent for SOP at 90 State St STE 700 Office 40, purpose is any lawful purpose. (5-47-52) LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY 1. Name of Limited Liability Company: Corbett and Ross Organizational Solutions, LLC. 2. Date of filing Articles of Organization: May 10, 2012. 3. The office of the LLC is located in: Albany County. 4. The Secretary of State has been designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process served against the LLC to: 477 New Scotland South Road, Slingerlands, New York 12159. 5. The purpose of the LLC is to: engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be formed under the Act and to engage in any and all activities necessary or incidental thereto. (6-47-52)


32

The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

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WANTED WANTED: DEAD OR ALIVE. Used riding mowers, snow blow­ ers, rototillers. Cash re­w ard. 872-0393. 32-tf WANTED: buying all kinds of toys - Cap Guns, Marbles, Gi Joes, Trucks, Cars, Airplanes, and kid related items. ONE item or an Attic Full. $Paying Top Dollar$ Dan 872-0107 tf WANTED: UNEXPIRED DIABETIC TEST STRIPS UP TO $26/BOX. PRE PAID SHIPPING LABELS. HABLAMOS ESPANOL! 1-800-266-07002 www.SellDiabeticStrips.com (NYSCAN)

MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $3997.00, MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N (NYSCAN) ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEC certified. Call 888-201-8657 www.CenturaOnline.com (NYSCAN)

872-9200

Loucks Brothers General Contracting Company

Your Home - Our Pride Additions - Garages - Decks Windows - Siding - Bathrooms Kitchens - Concrete Work Complete Interior Remodeling

Ted Loucks

364-7061

www.greenwoodrealty.biz

GREENWOOD REALTY Exclusive Dealer for Bill Lake Custom Modular Homes 689 New Salem Rd

Voorheesville Office open Mon. – Fri. 12N – 5 p.m. or by Appointment

THIS PLUMBER IS EASY TO GET Call Howard Brent – anytime 456-2560 Serving all areas evenings & weekends same price plumbing & gas heating repairs gas & electric water heaters Licensed - 54 years experience

Faucet Repair Special $99.50 + parts MC • VISA Accepted

Countryman home improvement vinyl and Wood replacement Windows

Vinyl Siding, Entry & Storm Doors, Storm Windows, Bathroom Remodeling

872-0610

Vacation Rentals Thompson Lake camp 2 Br, LR, Kit. Enclosed porch, row boat, swimming, $400/wk – no dogs. 466-0698 or 356-0798.  48-2t OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-6382102. Online reservations: www. holidayoc.com (NYSCAN)

Home and Garden Privacy Hedge, Windbreak, Cedar Tree, Evergreen Mail Order $7.50, Delivery, Installation Other Species Available! Services Available in NY, NJ, & New England. CALL 1800-889-8238 or 518-3141446 discounttreefarm.com (NYSCAN)

R E A L E S TAT E

Real estate 3+ acre building lot, Voorheesville schools, private drive off of Youmands Road, quiet country setting, successful perk test, great views, 518-475-0987. 49-2t 3 acres with well (Knox) Cleared building site, well, driveway in, approved septic design. Pretty, private setting on dead-end road. Minutes from Altamont. Low taxes. BKW school district. $32,500. Call 518-366-5909. 48-3t Will buy income property –look at all/any condition, call Jim 518-279-6111. 34-tf NY Land & Cabin Bargain Sale Classic Adirondack Camp 5 acres-$29,995. Cozy Cabin- Base Camp 5 acres - $19,995. Near 1000’s of acres of Stateland, lakes, & rivers. Access to snowmobile & ATV trails. Our best deal ever! Call 800-229-7843. See pics at www.landandcamps.com (NYSCAN)

autos 2001 black Ford Ranger, pickup, 4X4 automatic, A.C., cruise, good condition, $4,000. Call after 5p.m.. 439-3649. 48-2t

WE BUY HOMES FOR CASH! NEED TO SELL YOUR HOME FAST? Call Us Today for a Free and Confidential Consultation (Absolutely No Obligation)

CASH IN AS LITTLE AS 5 DAYS 2390 Western Avenue Guilderland, NY 12084 518-861-7030

OPEN HOUSE - Sunday, June 24, 11 am - 1 pm 1011 Coffee Dr, Guilderland ............... New Price ......... $435,900

Beautiful Colonial w/Victorian Touches & Over 2,800 SF of Living Space, 4BR’s, 1OFF, 2.5BA’s, Gourmet Kit w/Gran & Island, FDRm, FamRm w/ GFP, Master Suite, Sec Sys & More.

MLS#: 201210862 • Dorothy Fiori 495-7095

OPEN HOUSES - Sunday, June 24, 1 pm - 3 pm 185 Maple Ave Ext, Altamont ............. New Price ......... $209,000 Great 3 BR Ranch in the Guilderland SD! Nice Yard, 2 Car Detached Gar, Ctry Kit, 3 Season Rm LR w/WB Fireplace & Fnshd Bsmt.

MLS#: 201205065 • Leanne Royer 265-2203

4055 Western Tpk, Guilderland ......... New Price ......... $345,000 Unique Private Setting Farmhouse 6 BR/2.5 BA/2 GAR/2 Barns/15 Acres, Creek/IG Pool/Lg 3 Season Rm, Guilderland SD. Bring Your Toys + Horses!

MLS#: 201206034 • Mark Burlingame 424-5915 www.4055WesternTurnpike.com

FIRST OPEN, Sunday, June 24, 11 am - 1 pm 3077 New Williamsburg Dr, Guilderland....................... $419,900 Gorgeous 4BR, 2.2BA Colonial on a Beautiful Landscaped Lot w/IG Pool & Fncd Yd, Formal LRm & DRm, Gourmet EI Kit, FMRm w/GFP, Master Ste w/WI Closet & WP Tub.

MLS#: 201215372 • Troy Miller 527-6904

FIRST OPEN, Sunday, June 24, 10:30 am - 12:30 pm 605 Highwood Circle, Guilderland ................................ $199,000 Fantastic 2BR, 1.5 Townhome in a convenient location! Cath Ceil & loft in LR, FDR, Sec Sys, Newer Roof & HWH, Patio w/Priv Wooded Yard.

MLS#: 201214409 • Annette Mazzarello 701-9151

Weichert, realtorsÂŽ Northeast Group Independently owned and operated

oPeN houses sun 6/24, 1-3p.m.

70 Mill dam rd., Warner’s lake: Yr-round or seasonal. Totally redone. 2 -3 BR, 3 FBA, full base. Aux gener. Water/dock rights. BKW. ..................................$234,900 18 Pine Knoll ln, Warner’s lake. Yr-round 3 BR, 2 BA on cul-de-sac with water/dock rights. Totally redone with too many upgrades to list. A must see! BKW. ................... $279,900 11 circle dr, helderberg lake. Large chalet with 62 ft lake front. 3-4 BR, 3 full baths, garage under. Balconies overlook lake. New kit. Wood floors. Deck, patio, view year-round! V’ville Schls .................................................................................................................. $289,900 1396 helderberg trail, Berne Best Deal ON tHe Hill! Grandma’s house. Solid, new furnace, newer roof. 4-6 BR, 1 BA on 1 ac. Needs updates. BKW .................................. $119,900 6 Koko ln, Warner’s lake. 4-5 BR, 2 FBa with water/dock rights. Dble lot. 2-C garage, walk-out basement. Privacy on cul-de-sac. BKW ............................................................$179,900 1170 township rd, Knox. 31Ac for hay/horses. Solid old 3 BR, 2 BA house needs updating. 3-season, 2-car. BKW. .................................................................................................... $238,700 46 simons rd, Berne. Beautiful views, better house! 4BR, 3 BA custom cape on 21 ac. Hardwood fls. Oversized 2-car, workshop, gen hookup. BKW. ...................................$375,000

For more information, please call ZeNie Gladieux cell 518-894-8589 ZenieGladieux@gmail.com

518-380-6555 Complete maChine Shop and

Welding ServiCe equipment repairS Mfgrs. of Carriages • Wagons • Push Carts • Planters Restorations & Blacksmithing Service Joseph J. Merli MANUFACTUriNG Co. oF NeW YorK 2100 Western tpk., duanesburg, nY 518-355-6536 • FAX 518-355-6721

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U.S.A.

Help Wanted

Farm Workers and Crop Laborers South Hero, Vermont Area

2 temporary positions at Hackett’s Orchard. Workers needed to do orchard work, pruning and planting etc. for apple crop. Will also harvest crops. To start approx. 07/02/12 to 11/03/12. A great deal of heavy lifting, standing and climbing ladders for long periods of time. Guaranteed wage is $ 10.56 per hr. Prod. standards required. Work is guaranteed for 3/4 of contract period. Tools are provided without cost. Housing provided at no cost to workers who reside outside of the normal commuting distance. Transportation cost reimbursed after 15 days or 50% of contract period, whichever comes first. Contact the nearest Deptartment of Labor Office for application and referral. Job order # 119928.

HELP WANTED

Our third generation family owned company is seeking an experienced safety minded CDL-B DRIVER w/tank and hazmat endorsements to deliver to residential customers in the Albany/Schenectady market. We offer a comprehensive compensation package. SEND RESUME: PO Box 5306 Binghamton, NY 13902 or VISIT www.mirabito.com. APPLY IN PERSON: 14 South Westcott Road, Schenectady, N.Y.


33

The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

Services Available ALLSTAR PAINTING AND TAPING interior, exterior. Fully insured, free estimates, reasonably priced. Call Joe 872-0762. 48-4t JHI Enterprises, 2261 Western Tpke., Duanesburg. Rentals, Sales, Welding, Excavation, Landscaping, Chippers, Stumpers, Trailers, Trenchers. We buy and sell industrial and agricultural equipment. (518) 355-1709 43-12t (7/26) Custom Baths by Ryan. Locally owned and operated bathroom specialist. 518-817-5039. 48-tf THE HANDY GUY, Haytham Bajouwa; home renovations, kitchens & bathrooms, doors & windows, drywall taping & painting, plumbing, home maintenance & repair — Fully insured. Phone: 518-872-0434  22-tf

Business Opportunity ATTN: COMPUTER WORK. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1,500 Part Time to $7,500/ mo. Full Time. Training provided. www.workservices3.com (NYSCAN)

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34

The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

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35

The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

…Lucky to be kicking (Continued from page 36) was given two traffic tickets –– failure to stay in her lane and reckless driving. “I remember everything now,” said Dorch, “but the only part that I don’t remember that I wish I did was the helicopter flight.” The accident happened 500 feet from Dorch’s house. Every year, he walks to the spot, looks around, says “OK,” and then walks back to his house. “Now, it’s really nothing,” he said. “Just lower back problems.” However, after the first year, Dorch’s mother pushed him to the spot in a wheelchair and he saw a big dark stain on the road from his own blood. “I’m thankful that I’m still here and that everyone supported me,” he said. “Time just stopped” Laura Gross was instructing Dorch before he got hit, and now he’s one of her favorite students. Gross, her daughter, Shannon, and Dorch are going to Fort Lauderdale, Fla. together for Nationals on June 30. “I’m extremely proud of him,” said Laura Gross. “At one point, he couldn’t even hop backwards.” Dorch came back to Tae Kwon Do in February 2010. He couldn’t wait. It was something to look forward to. “We tried to work him back slowly, but he started throwing the kicks,” Gross said. “It’s like he never left. Time just stopped for him.” Gross said that Dorch is her prime example of perseverance, which is one of the tenants of Tae Kwon Do. The others are

modesty, courtesy, integrity, self control, and indomitable spirit. Dorch is a pretty good example of all those traits. “He overcame so much,” said Gross. “His commitment has been amazing.” Dorch is at Duanesburg Tae Kwon Do on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Saturday of each week either teaching or training. He’s helping Laura and Shannon Gross open a new place of business in Cobleskill. “I just have fun,” said Dorch, who will be getting his brown belt soon. “I like fighting, but it’s about being around everybody and being able to teach them and show them what you know and make them better at it than you are. I tell them everything.” While Dorch was in the hospital for three weeks, he received a package from Duanesburg Tae Kwon Do that included a BuildA-Bear dressed up like a fighter with the belts and everything. “They were by me the entire time,” Dorch said of his Tae Kwon Do comrades. Does his luck have anything to do with his name? Dorch’s father and grandfather have the same name, Lucky. His grandfather’s favorite cigarettes were Lucky Strikes. Also, there was Mr. Lucky, the showboat gambler. Dorch constantly hears about luck. “Everyone’s like, ‘Oh, you’re so lucky,’” Dorch said. Actually, he was unlucky to get run over by a Jeep. “I’m lucky because I lived,” said Dorch. “That’s what I say.”

DEC sets Free Fishing Weekend

The Enterprise –– Jordan J. Michael

Facing adversity: Suffering life-threatening injuries after being run over by a Jeep five years ago, Lucky Dorch (right) is now preparing for the Tae Kwon Do Nationals, which take place in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. on June 30. On Monday, Dorch spars with Shannon Gross at Duanesburg Tae Kwon Do.

Courtney Tedeschi competes at Nationals

Four Guilderland lacrosse players make All Star team

Berne-Knox-Westerlo junior Courtney Tedeschi placed 12th in the 2000-meter steeplechase at the New Balance Outdoor Nationals for track last weekend in Greensboro, N.C. with a time of 7:22.27. Tedeschi won a New York State title in the same event with a time of 7:00.29. She was ranked 12th in the nation going into last weekends race. The top eight finishers are considered All-American. Saratoga’s Keelin Hollowood won the national race with a time of 6:50.46.

Senior Kelly Camardo, juniors Jenna Walsh and Chrissy Bolognino, and sophomore Morgan Hardt were named to the Section II girls’ lacrosse All Star team for their efforts with Guilderland this season. Hardt, who plays attack, scored a team-high 65 goals. Camardo had 37 goals and 12 assists for the Dutch. Walsh and Bolognino

Guilderland fall sports sign-ups underway G U I L D E R L A N D – – Fa l l sport sign-ups are underway at Guilderland High School. Fall sports include cross country, field hockey, golf, soccer, volleyball, girls’ tennis, girls’ swimming/ d i v i n g, c h e e r l e a d i n g , a n d football. Students interested in playing a fall sport should pick up a sport sign-up packet from the nurses’ office and return the completed packet to the nurses’ office no later than Monday, July 31. The sport packet includes three forms: the School and Sport Physical Form, the Athletic Form, and the Health History

Form—all of which are also a v a i l a b l e o n l i n e a t w w w. guilderlandschools.org. Students will not be able to try out or participate in practices without a sports packet cleared by the nurse’s office. Students needing sports physicals should stop by the high school nurses’ office on either: –– Monday, July 16 from 4 to 5:45 p.m.; or –– Monday, July 23 from 4 to 5:45 p.m. Students will be seen on a first-come, first served basis (no appointment is necessary). Physicals may take up to one

hour, so plan accordingly. If applicable, please bring glasses or wear contacts for the eye exam. Students may have physicals done by their own doctor, but the physical must be completed on the GHS physical form and reviewed by the school nurse before a student can sign-up for a sport or attend practice. Physicals are also open to all students for working papers, tenth grade physicals, and new student physicals. For more information, please visit www. guilderlandschools.org or call the Guilderland High School nurses’ office at 861-8591, ext. 3030.

New Scotland girls’ soccer finishes record season The New Scotland girls’ U16 soccer team finished the Capital District Youth Soccer League spring season with a record of 8-1-1 in Division II. The team had the best defense, only allowing six goals. Coach Joe Santos, who also coaches the Voorheesville varsity team, said that Ashley Bates, Rachel Blow, Becky Bogart, Rachel Bogdany, Emily Cole, Christine DiVirgilio, Chelsea Duncan, Casey Greenwood, Lydia Parker, Jordan Pettograsso, Sarah Peltz, Joann Skinner, Rachel Treiber, and

Maggie Tryon are looking forward to the fall soccer season. These players, plus a few colleagues, are also involved in fund-raising for a trip to Portugal in April 2013. They will sight see, play four games, and visit a local school in Povoa de Varzim. Anyone interested in the trip is welcome. The cost of the flight is $891, and the cost of the four-star hotel room is 40 euros per night. Contact Laura Blow or Coach Santos for more information. Coach Santos was born and raised in Portugal.

were part of a Guilderland defense that allowed 5.32 goals per game, which was ranked 23rd in the nation. Senior Kelsey Michele and junior Kara Carman were named to the Second Team. Guilderland (18-1) went undefeated until losing to Shaker, 9 to 8, in a highly contested Class A final.

Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Joe Martens has announced that June 23 and 24 are designated for “Free Fishing Weekend” in New York State. DEC first held the free weekend in 1991 to give everyone the opportunity to sample the fishing in the state. Residents and visitors new to the sport are encouraged to attend one of several Free Fishing Clinics to be held across the state during the weekend. “This weekend offers a perfect opportunity to introduce someone new to the great sport of fishing, or to reignite interest among those who haven’t taken to the water in recent years,” said Commissioner Martens. “This is also an excellent time for visitors to sample all that New York has to offer to a freshwater angler. Both residents and non-residents can fish for free during this twoday period.” In addition to this weekend, DEC sponsors free fishing events where participants can fish without the need of a license at other times of the year. These clinics provide basic information on how to get started in the sport of fishing, and many provide loaner rods and bait for participants to use. A complete listing of 2012 Free Fishing Day Clinics can be found on DEC’s website at http://www. dec.ny.gov/outdoor/27123.html. Although a state fishing license is not required during Free Fishing Weekend, all other fishing rules and regulations remain in effect. Marine anglers 16 years of age and older are also reminded that they must enroll in the no-fee saltwater fishing registry to fish for migratory saltwater fish species or in the marine district. To register, anglers can go to the usual outlets for sporting licenses, or register online anytime at www.dec.ny.gov/ permits/6101.html. Anglers can also register by calling 1-86-NYDECALS (1-866-933-2257). Visit DEC’s “Places to Fish” page at www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/7749.html or contact a regional DEC office for recommendations on places to fish.

Berne-Knox-Westerlo Little League Scores Week 7 Majors Baseball Division Date

Home Team

Away Team

06/11/12

Fox Creek Market BKW: 10

DACC DLL: 9

06/11/12

D.J. Refuse MID LL: 1

Hannan’s Paving BKW: 17

06/14/12

Fox Creek Market BKW: 6

DACC DLL: 16

06/14/12 Proulx Mechanical DLL: 4 06/16/12

Duanesburg Fire: 14

06/16/12 Hannan’s Paving BKW: 19

Hannan’s Paving BKW: 6 Fox Creek Market BKW: 11 MTCO MID LL: 9

Minors Baseball Division Date

Home Team

Away Team

06/09/12 Turnpike Power Equipment Berne: 11 Countryside Mobil Knox: 8 06/11/12 Turnpike Power Equipment Berne: 12 Duanesburg Auto: 0 06/13/12 Countryside Mobil Knox: 15

Schoharie Fire: 7

06/13/12 Countryside Mobil Knox: 17

Laraways MID LL: 11

06/16/12 Laraways MID LL: 11

Turnpike Power Equipment Berne: 9

Minors Softball Division Date

Home Team

06/09/12 Helderberg Community Energy: 20 06/11/12 Cobleskill: 2 06/13/12 Helderberg Community Energy: 11

Away Team Middleburgh Aarons Electric (MID LL): 15 Mountainview Prosthetics: 13 Duanesburg Turnpike Glass: 15

Farm Baseball Division Date

Home Team

06/09/12 San Soucie’s Auto DLL: 5 06/15/12 Knox Bombers: 6

Away Team Knox Bombers: 6 Teds Floorcovering Westerlo: 12


36

The Altamont Enterprise – Thursday, June 21, 2012

SPORTS Lucky to be alive, kicking By Jordan J. Michael DUANESBURG –– One of the three creeds listed on the wall of Duanesburg Tae Kwon Do studio says: “I intend to develop myself in a positive manner and to avoid anything that would reduce my mental growth or my physical health.” For Lucky Dorch, a Jeep traveling at 65 miles per hour was unavoidable. It ran over him, diminishing his physical and mental health, and nearly taking his life. Now, five years after the horrendous accident, Dorch, at 15, is about to compete in the Tae Know Do Nationals. He doesn’t think of himself as an athlete, just as a respectful kid that takes Tae Kwon Do seriously. “If it hadn’t been for the Jeep, then I wouldn’t be as strong as I am now or the same person,” Dorch said at the Duanesburg studio on Monday. “I’d probably just be another…I don’t know. I don’t really think about it that much. It happened, and then I got over it.” On June 13, 2007, Dorch was out jogging with his brother on Route 30 near his Duanesburg home. They ran down to a stop sign, but Dorch fell, and, when he went to push himself up he looked back and saw something black speeding towards him. The

The original Since 1974

Jeep ran over Dorch, and came so close to his brother that it ripped the dog tags off of his neck. “Literally, the Jeep ran over my pelvis,” said Dorch, who was supposed to have a test for his yellow belt two days later. He said of the driver, “She fell asleep at the wheel because she had taken pills or something. I still haven’t gotten the full story.” Dorch suffered life-threatening injuries –– two skull fractures, a pelvis broken in 32 places, a broken right arm, a separated tail bone, and a broken right leg. He has a scar on his forehead from where the bumper of the Jeep hit him and he has a bulge on his right leg. One of Dorch’s skull fractures was bleeding so fast that it had clogged itself up. If not, he would have died. If he had been standing while getting hit, he would have died. “A lot of things went into it,” he said. “There was a lot to consider.” To repair his right leg, muscle had to be cut from the back of his leg and flipped to the front. Dorch said a skin graft was taken from “up here” and put “down there.” His main focus during physical therapy was gaining balance in his right leg. The driver of the Jeep paid all of Dorch’s medical bills and (Continued on page 35)

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Swift kick: Lucky Dorch, 15, of Duanesburg, practices his kicks at Duanesburg Tae Kwon Do on Monday as part of his training for Nationals at the end of the month. On June 13, 2007, Dorch was run over by a Jeep traveling at 65 miles per hour. He sustained life-threatening injuries, including two skull fractures.


The Altamont Enterprise, June 21st 2012 Issue  

http://www.altamontenterprise.com/images/pdf/Enterprise_6-21-12.pdf

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