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AFNAN AL-RASHID

Architectural Science I Ryerson University 647-867-7047 l aalrashid@ryerson.ca


Self-Introduction

Why I Chose Architecture My Aspiration for Architecture

A. Design Projects A1 Housing Center For Homeless Youth................5 A2 Biologist Cabin................15 A3 Edwards’ Restaurant.......20 A4 Toronto Public Library......24


Self-Introduction Why I chose Architecture I sketched light as broken glass. Triangular pieces of red and orange. I painted red and orange triangles on my bedroom’s window with acrylic paint. I meant for translucent glass paint, but it was expensive. The sunlight was blocked by the acrylic patches of triangles, leaving sunlight to shine only through the linear gaps between the triangles. The lines of light moved around my room during the day and seasons, changing colors from white to yellow, then orange and pink. What was my bedroom before I painted the window? It was my bedroom, my private hide, but the sunlight was not rendered. It wasn’t broken to the sun’s hot colors during the different seasons and daytimes. It was my room but time and sun shared space with me. I own the room but I don’t own the space. I painted the window in the summer of 2012 and I realized that space has many layers to be explored, so I applied to architecture school.


Self-Introduction My Aspiration For Architecture My aspiration for architecture is to use it as a tool to foster communities within the built environment. Understanding human interactions, feelings and perceptions of the built environment, and fostering a sense of community through the designed space are my long-term goals in pursuing architecture. I have volunteered in different organizations where I was exposed to different scenarios of social issues:

I helped Syrian newcomers with learning English. Through my interaction with them, I learned that the verbal language is not the only obstacle newcomers face, they also face difficulty in navigating and finding their ways in the building as their perception of space and the their predictability of space differ. I learned accessibility was not only related to physical limitations, but it was also related to cultural understanding of the built environment.

I mostly worked with architects in founding the chapter. Through our discussions of the chapter’s goals, I realized that designers are reluctant in approaching social issues on a human scale. Designers approach it from social issues from an architectural perspective, and limit their services to the physical design. During the formation of the chapter’s goals, we were confronted with our limited skills of approaching the public and understanding their needs of the built environment.

I participated in different design projects, such as creating an edible garden, and painting art work on a playground for an elementary school. Such small scale projects created interesting dialogue between the designers and the public, as the public would come in and watch us create the design outdoors, and they would ask us about the project. Having such interactions encouraged the public to use the designs and have a sense of ownership toward them after their completion.


A. Design Projects


A1

Housing Center For Homeless Youth

Software: Rhino. Revit. AutoCad. Photoshop. Illustrator

214 Church St., Toronto

Concept The concept of the housing center is fostering a community through dierent communal spaces. The communal spaces provide a medium for the residents and the public to interact and form a small community within the building. Such communal relationship is created through the programing of the building that encourages the public and the residents to interact through recreational activities. The ground oor is transparent along Church St. and McGill St. to encourage the public into the recreational spaces. The residents residing in the houses along McGill St. are attracted to the building through the adjacent urban farm.

Site plan 1:500 (The urban farm is highlighted in green, and the houses are highlighted in red)

View of the building along McGill St.

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A1

Housing Center For Homeless Youth 214 Church St., Toronto

The drawing is an experiential section of the building to illustrate the narrative of a resident moving between the different programs and communal spaces of the building. The tree space is where the residents and the public interact through recreational activities while enjoying the atmosphere of a tree. It is an expression of fostering a community under one tree. The cave space is where the residents from different floors interact. The exclusive atmosphere inspires belonging and solidarity to the residents. Experiential Section 1:50. A resident entering the building, moving up to his unit, and to the common cave space

Experiential Section 1:50. A resident leaving her unit and coming to the common tree space

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A1

Housing Center For Homeless Youth 214 Church St., Toronto

Section 1:100

The tree atmosphere is created through a tree sculpture that consists of suspended tree branches from the skylight. The tree sculpture is viewed from different levels and experienced mostly in the common space where the sunlight coming through the skylight is filtered through the suspended branches. The cave atmosphere is created in the basement where the community kitchen is. The sunlight is reduced to the frosted glass floor.

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214 Church St., Toronto

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A1

Housing Center For Homeless Youth

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The common area that overlooks the play space

Ground Floor Plan 1:100

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A1

Housing Center For Homeless Youth

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214 Church St., Toronto

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The common area in residential oors.

The seats are designed for individual and couple seating. The seats are individualized as the residents in the crisis level are newcomers to the building and tend to be vulnerable with a preference to spending time by themselves

Typical Crisis Units Floor Plan 1:100 Alrashid

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214 Church St., Toronto

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A1

Housing Center For Homeless Youth

The seats are grouped as the residents in the transitional units level become familiar with the residents,and the sta, and they begin to form social groups as they grow more comfortable in the building.

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Typical Transitional Units Floor Plan 1:100 Alrashid

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A1

Housing Center For Homeless Youth 214 Church St., Toronto

The concept of the residential units is giving freedom to the residents in modifying their spaces by having curtains as barriers between the rooms. The residential units consist of crisis units and transitional units. Crisis units are dedicated for the new residents. They provide basic living conditions of providing a bed and bathroom. The transitional units are dedicated for the residents who grow more independent and require advanced conditions of living, such as kitchens and home oďŹƒces. Each of the unit types has an accessibility version that complies with AODA guidelines.

Typical Crisis Unit 1:50

Typical Accessible Crisis Unit 1:50

Typical Transitional Unit 1:50

View of The Kitchen Inside The Accessible Transitional Unit

Typical Accessible Transitional Unit 1:50

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A1

Housing Center For Homeless Youth

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214 Church St., Toronto

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Community Kitchen

Basement Floor Plan 1:100

The community kitchen has the cave atmosphere as it is exclusive to the residents engaging in a domestic activity which is cooking. The rough concrete texture is used to imitate the aesthetics of a cave. The broken glass tiles are created by the residents as every new resident is given a glass piece where they can write their names on it and stick it to the concrete wall. Participating in such activity embraces a sense of belonging to the building and the residing community Alrashid

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A1

Housing Center For Homeless Youth 214 Church St., Toronto

Exterior View Along Church St.

Form The form of the building reflects the contrast between the public and the private spaces. Channel glass wraps around the public space on the fround floor, and the rigid rough concrete texture reflects the private spacesof the residential floors. The broken glass windows are a metaphor for broken pices being mended in the housing center. The different window shapes also give residents individuality as each new resident is given a glass piece that corresponds to the given unit’s window shape. Alrashid

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A1

Housing Center For Homeless Youth 214 Church St., Toronto

North East Elevation, Church St 1:100

South West Elevation, Toward The Urban Farm 1:100

The windows are externally aligned and the frame is covered with the rough textured concrete to give the windows the appearance of a glass piece direclty stuck to the building.

South East Elevation, McGill St 1:100

Window Detail 1:5

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A2

Biologist Cabin Evergreen Brick works, Toronto

Software: Rhino. Revit. AutoCad. Photoshop

Concept

The cabin is located in Evergreen Brick works site where Toronto’s wild life is introduced to the public. The cabin is an addition to Brickwork’s commitment to sustaining Toronto’s wild life . The interior space is where the biologist’s needs for performing research, wild life watching, and living necessities are accommodated. The exterior extension of the cabin is dedicated for the biologists to display their findings, and wild life information to the public.

East Elevation 1:50 Alrashid

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A2

Biologist Cabin Evergreen Brick works, Toronto

Floor Plan 1:25

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A2

Biologist Cabin Evergreen Brick works, Toronto

North Elevation 1:50

South Elevation 1:50

East Elevation 1:50

West Elevation 1:50

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A2

Biologist Cabin Evergreen Brick works, Toronto

South section 1:25

The slanted roof directs wind coming from east toward the cabin’s ventilation openings.

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A2

Biologist Cabin Evergreen Brick works, Toronto

1. White Pine trunks installation 1:75

4. SIP Panels are driven into the trunks’ grooves 1:75

2. Floor structure installation 1:75

5. Roof SIP panel installation 1:75

3. Studs Installation 1:75

6. Roof finish and ventilation supply grilles 1:75

the innovation in the cabin’s construction is that it is constructed in a way where labor and machine operation are reduced by implementing SIP walls instead of sawing tree logs in creating the walls.

7. Wood sidings are nailed 1:75

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A3

Edwards’ Restaurant Harbour Square Park, Toronto

Software: Revit. AutoCad. Photoshop

Concept

The concept is a response to the site of Harbour Square Park and the restaurant’s chef’s philosophy. Harbour Square Park is noted for its urban and natural features that consist of high rise buildings, and Lake Ontario. The chef’s philosophy is that a successful restaurant design consists of an intimate atmosphere that also reflects the freshness of his served food.

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A3

Edwards’ Restaurant Harbour Square Park, Toronto

In a response to the site, the design consists of two wings. One of the wings is directed toward the urban side of the harbour (the Toronto Star building, and the Westin building), and the other is oriented toward Lake Ontario. The intimate atmosphere in the restaurant is created through the elongated narrow spaces where tables are brought close to each other

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A3

Edwards’ Restaurant Harbour Square Park, Toronto

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INVENTORY STORAGE/DISH WASHING SINK WALK-IN FRIDGE UP

STAFF LOUNGE ROOM

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DRY FOOD STORAGE

Ground Floor Plan

Basement

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A3

Edwards’ Restaurant Harbour Square Park, Toronto

North East Elevation 1:100

North West Elevation 1:100

INVENTORY STORAGE

South West Section1:50

South EastSection1:50

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A4

Toronto Public Library 299 Queen St. West, Toronto

Software: Revit. AutoCad.Photoshop. SketchBook

Concept

The library is located on Queen St. which hosts art and media centers. The library project is sought to be an opportunity to be a cultural hub where visitors are exposed to history , and community development on Queen St. through the dierent forms of information medias.

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A4

Toronto Public Library 299 Queen St. West, Toronto

North Side Entrance

Ground Floor Plan 1:150

On the ground floor, visitors are greeted by a gallery that is dedicated to displaying films of artwork and archived photographs related to the development of Queen St.

Threads expressing the network of shared information through the different medias

Gallery Alrashid

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A4

Toronto Public Library 299 Queen St. West, Toronto

2nd Floor plan 1:150

South Section 1:100

The central light well works as a unification between the library’s spaces, and creates a unified lighting atmosphere for the library’s users.

3rd Floor Plan 1:150

Reference Area on the 3rd Floor

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