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2013 - 2014


BOOK OF ZIMBABWEAN WOMEN E3

ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE MAY 3 TO MAY 9, 2013

Z MBABWE NDEPENDENT NDEPENDENT EXECUT VE UNE 28 TO ULY 5 20 3

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ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT APRIL 26 TO MAY 2, 2013

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PROFILE OF THE WEEK

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

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evelopment, I repreneur away“As a wr er and fi mmaker ove o ween a person and wha hey Qu ck Fac sidered myself moves Me a Kamban neverthea k o peop e observe and earn rom wan rom e s o en he w eder,norm, they identify soRumb Ka edza M D M refute the level o ry and he a h o be eve orm INDEPENDENT he s or mes em and possibilities to the hem Peop e nZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE JUNE 14 TO JUNE 20, 2013 E3 hat men have at Founde and D e o o and hese s or es and fi ms w be here s poss b e ” olf clubs.” ges in environment, H M A m Ma a F mthey OF THE WEEK or u ure genera ons o read andAwaPROFILE ch PRO O H W K ys solution oriented, a ong a er am gone M ” m ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE JULY 19 TO JULY 25, 2013 E3 Wa Fe a D e o o m m PROFILE OF THE WEEK Quick Facts orkerZ mbabwe and a nleader.” “I started this line of work w m m m e na ona F m H

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veteran banker, and a rtist”, Dr Charity Jinya d history in February 2010 t woman to head up this on.

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ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE MAY 31 TO JUNE 6, 2013

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m w A m m m m M m w w m w m w H mmW m � m m m “Succe w R m Qu k EXECUTIVE when one businesses I ZIMBABWE enter into I INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT ickcandid Facts ous, and virtuous. w 5 TO JULY 12, 2013 E3 K m wJULYm mm w O vlike there P ndarewnno Dh n new e been a facilitator and It would seem mm regrets or even summits to o con manage bu emo ow w m te description impact Re pis the en o wo Na for ona conquer suchA a woman, yet she confesses, “I have not always ated platforms for people m k Limited. “When I joined nfluence e u ha ead o been good at balancing work and family, and over the years I

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Jean Cornneck through a calling fromPROFILE above.” OF THE WEEK

Fe a W ours degree in Economics cade of her career devoted to developingH nderland, UK and is a w m Bankers Zimbabwe. preneurship and excellence in young Ho d a Ma e npeople ector at a local listed bank es andDirector schools over Managing at Fhigh mmak n all om GoAfrica, d m hLena and later Managing only beUganda. described as a pioneerCo of innovative rough knowledge e e Limitedmy She has of

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D ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE JULY 26 TO AUGUST 1, 2013 E3 Runs m The work o ean Cornneck serves as a es amen o m m W other of“My Peace Commun ty PROFILE OF THE WEEK m K m personal vision is to seepure devo on she s one o he rare nd v dua s among m n Mutoko my fellow beings develop to zangare us who s no dr ven o succeed or her own mmed -

an woman has recentlyMe been appointed PROFILE m the R M make change.” AwaC d achieve ough some difficultgreater times heights, their

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men erm o a pe a he e be or eong ga on n her e s a voca on of Capacity Building for Enactus Worldwide E3 dr ven by own goalsng ands my celebrate oneam “F mmak pass on uckyn ha p overy ec hcompany ace y ” e emen a by some h ng ph rsees six Regional Managing Directors (Eusome ng r onspknew ca another OF THE WEEK ENA and French speaking as well as ed o be a fi mmaker so uPROFILE qu e ear unconditionally.” ynations) on ha wan y osoph ca y p a n and ye comp ca ed – some h ng el fundraisingmmersed strategy for the international myse n he ndus ry a er co ege ” ENT EXECUTIVE AUGUST 16 TO 22, 2013 ENT INDEPEND INDEPEND ZIMBABWE ormerly known as Students in Free Enterprise s mp y unders ood bu or mos Succe mee ng o you e goahard andwon ge ng– Cornneck a ac on s is the world’s best-known youth entreprew hby youa pe o mance o ehose u mak ng a d ffe he s dr ven need o see around herence cono en MINING tive which helps university students create y and peop e a ound you and eav ng a ma k her ro commun e n e– o serve o hers by prov d ng a sense o mpowerment projects.

became more conscious of this. I therefore make a deliberate K m m ZIMBABWE ffectiveness. It was crucial f DDH&M effort to make time for my family and my spiritual growth. My INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE JULY 12 TO JULY 18, 2013 anese writer Haruki Murakami wrote, “If you engbank was operating and w and talented, it’s like you have wings.” children are grown A up which has made it easier. A lot of factors ine Ngwenya typifies this rative in helping to statement bring with her m need to A be considered, such as C family and youthful vigour that have seen her quickly msupport and how your in tothe hasprofession.family rperson of �isof her ing thebusiness. higher echelons A m K handles your absence from home. However,meach person m w w m competent exceptionally skilled Chartered l. As theand market has been H well for them NUas there is no single has to assess what works m w m w m m m w m tant, Ngwenya has seven years post experiddapting Alliance and anticipating solution for of us.” Dr Jinya served on the boards ofm ith two of the largest blue Widely chip companies in regarded asallone of the tophas media gurus m R K w w w A m w O gntry; allshe colleagues are aware of Zimsun, ARDA, Bindura University of Science and Technology, is fuelled with a drive to continue m in country, Praxedes Dzangare enjoys a ca- w m m A m mm gand and accredits her successes passion, disciw m m K m its customers andtothe the Waddilove Schools and Sandringham Methodist School. Because w m nd faith. reer that is vividly coloured with all the strokes Zimbabwe O m M M m ht now we are on a growth w m A D U R m K of the communities m of her passion to see the advancement around m w m U ber 2012 Ngwenya was appointed to theinto posi- making a powerful portrait of a that go DR A m O w m�N her, Dr Jinya serves on various communityw boards which include m m w w m Accredited Finance Manager at RioZim Limited. RioZim mN m H m m A woman standing steadfast an thatAfrica. w w m d, a listed mining conglomerate, owns one of Christian Care, Junior in Achievement and Pro �industry mm �mmm w N m mm N dvertising est resources in Zimbabwe. Ngwenya doubt sifted through her was rew mm w relentlessly demands fresh vision and constant mm to assist inand the group’s financial restructuring w W m Y w unique worthwhile. w SheWith has anover eye for excellence which won her several Barclays m period of successive lossesinnovation. and huge debt over K m w A wm mm thirty years of experimM G U w m peaking about her new appointment, NgweBank Leadership Awards, as well as the chairmanship position m O m Am s she enjoys learning about the mining ence in sector advertising and marketing, m Dzangare w In 2011, Dr Jinya was Member ofwhat m K m in the Institute Of Bankers Zimbabwe. m ns. When I get oys the challengeIoffail, lies ahead. “I moved w W has demonstrated her ability to consistently listed company that was doing fairly well toconferred, a 1st runner-up Business Woman of the year by the m w Publicity K m ompanyitgoing through challenging bem w m rom and move on times m m w Zimbabwe Chamber of Commerce (ZNCC) and wasR named A m one K of w build strong, w m don’t easily shy away from challenges.” Ngwe- motivated and enthusiastic teams m Kwm w w M m (APC) w top 20 business personalities in 2012. olub believes challenges produce opportunities for H that igniteZimbabwe’s the think-tank of onem of Zimbabwe’s ailure,” m mm m K m m w w m m m m al growth and change. w K leading advertising agencies. m her reply m m m m m m m any unfulfilled ambitions, difference. Without us the When asked whether she has w m experiences Time things that I could have done m m A w m w m w kerLife suits, but wehave bring colour,was astounding, “Yes, I have m m N m D m in community work D A M rnational levels of Born intobetter; a large in peri-urban Dommyfamily key unfulfilled ambitions are more m w HA w ward, APC A m N m K H AA rmth is part of who we are. m M Aw Nappears H mw H of a few Zimbabweans I desire toattributes do more in this area.” It are no boshawa,and Dzangare elements ofmher that there w K m m w A peace.” K wK m m mm hbring an Honorary N m m m ards 2005 Doctorate limits for Dr Jinya as long as she has breath in her body. She also successes to her upbringing. Her grandfather M w HA m w w m w m m egnback by to Sther Linus University ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE SEPTEMBER 13 TO SEPTEMBER 19, 2013 E3 A naturally gifted presenter, Ngwenya has spoken and presented on a number urges Zimbabwean bankers to embrace integrity. “You are the warea, w m w mw roots Ngwenya recounts how 8, 2013 E3 2 TO AUGUST was abut well-known farmer in athe andImara her EXECUTIVE INDEPENDENT of platforms – she has been speaker at the annual Investor Conference, INDEPENDENT K m ZIMBABWE entscontribution came from poor rural families stillcustodians to society in m K w m w m w A budgets w mandAevaluated of depositors’ funds, money is not yours. Put God the marketing and communications monitored mthe m ker successful paper onm Sustainable Investments m from w m w ed to lift themselves out of poverty and provide and most notably presented a W Finance, Business and first in everything you do.” not surprising she attributes K campaigns. �ese years were very exciting for her, a Zimbabwean perspective at the�is annual Eastern and Southern African Penm and she W w M ives forThe their children. She recalls her parents promotional H ism R Nas m m Chitungwiza bred Memory BanderaRwampsion Conference Mombasa, Kenya. is also a voluntary speaker for and Administraeagement one of the first [blacks] to buy into the whiteher success to herinfaith. “I desireNgwenya to beOF more and WEEK more likew Jesus m w m m m m m PROFILE m mrecalls Girls Development Initiative, awork, group professional women providing leader- even Enemy mofpeople, mTHE m appearing m winma very popular radio series, “Dr. Bobo, wanyi perfect example of howwith hard mo-the low density suburbs ina 1981.” And she takes she shares theisrevered Christ. He worked diverse good and the ship mentoring for girls from disadvantaged backgrounds. Along with the bad latter yet hievement as one of the inspirational points H W � m V m w tivation, and giftedness can lead tois remained achievement M where m she starred M m of the Bad” as Sandy alongside Hilton Mambo. m Mamsuch mentorship, Ngwenya actively involved in an internationally recognised hetostill got results and true toR himself. Success isand being d legends on the compass of as her Billy development, “I said � stuck m w m m m accredited Christian as a leader as as in mentoring if they could move from poor to middle class w m of dreams. Despite her age, Memory isR the Depnd Prime Minister Morgan Rwell A saysand m –m bo’s character was the villain Dr Bobo a name that affectionately the best you can be organisation according to God’s purpose,” DrleaderJinya. ship development and training. I must also grow in leaps and bounds.” m A ived similar awards across uty Director, Programs and Special Projects: Inm W mof his life. with him for the rest e did just that. �rough secondary school she m m m ww mm m easd inalso faith isthis an integral partpassionate of her life and and She sites leader her studied various academics and athletics. After high school H ww w w m In theNgwenya’s meantime, fierce, determined willw w ternational Law Institute-African Centre for w Legaldevelopment. w w with the University South Africa (UNI- church and the Bulawayo Junior City Council as giving her the opportunity to lead hip courses whichofinclude, continue forging ahead at MBCA Bank Limited with as well mw m mm m from an earlyin age. Her senior pastor, mentor and founder of Woman Unlimited, sdolled Excellence (ILI-ACLE) based Uganda. She also G m attained a Bachelor of Accounting Science, wNgwenya’s mheart K m m mw Eight has played an important role in faith life,environment “Not only is she a go-getter, heryears passed at Lintas. And just as Dzangare was beginning to feel ool er thatExecutive - an Honoursdevelopment Bachelor of Accounting as good old down-to-earth in an where the administers the COMESA Enhancing Procurement W m K m � passion love and warmth inspire me.” When dealing with her challenges Ngwew w m w She then took a financial management speee.Business the urge of moving again – Peter Dearlove, head of Adwrite, approached School Senior financial services sector has been accused of poor service delivery. w w m M nya(EPRCP) says she seeks the mentors, while embracing the love and acm m m A ourse and completed Capacity her qualifying examinaReform Project inwisdom theKof19herCOMEw m m m w w Lead to Win’ and the ceptance of hernot family; and throughthe her religion shestandards finds inspiration and “While I would generalise service ofher all solace, financial m w with a proposal. Dearlove had been looking formsomeone with Dzanith the Institute of Chartered Accountants of M w w w w w SA Member States and is also the founder and Di“Tough times don’t last, but tough people do. Jesus learned patience through the we, which she lists as one of the achievements m m w on for Women in Business. m m M w w institutions, I can confirm that at MBCA Bank customer serviceexperience A help m w m M mshe would gare’s – and asked if start up a media dethings he Uganda suffered.” most proud of. Ngwenya then joined Ernst & U w M m w rector of Girl Child Network among a lot of e father, a headmaster schools, brought w w m wexpectations W andKthe is at the heart ofatallseveral we do,m and exceeding customer m m W in his w m She accepted K m D A m as an audit senior department m department started up very w inin the auditing ringing partment outfit. projects ischildren responsible for. Memory has proved Jaqueline Ngwenya’s journey is far from complete, is a careerofmarked with m m attainment K “Progressing towards the of one’s t seen as great mV mA remained for sevenshe years before joiningis anup Wm M m imperative for us. recognise the needs customers his with strong Catholic ideals that Wthat mher’s W w � m w values ple w itsWe tshe M promise that will reach zenith and inspire many others after her. Asked how “It was just three of us when we initially started.” andexists footwear small, recalls. �eir m swe’s theleading glassclothing ceiling w goals in w mshe herself over theretailer, years through hard work and an w vision and life through wattainment w mof m m are constantly changing and becoming more complex. As ausresult she encourage other Zimbabwean women today, Ngwenya reminds of m helped carve thewould rigid mental and moral regithe travel Malong W ND m w W ND N � ND ND m m SucM N was XUthe CU m they mlanded m w m women inbegan leadership M client Hotel,m after that a parttrials oneof is faced the of success,responsible she also reminds us of the stoiwfirst mthen Sheraton O O sobabwe each the member the-team isroutes personally for delivering O unquenchable Bandera Rwampwanyi tof Edgars thatexshe to notice the spirit. imporconcrete and tangible results is success. m m w mm wis part ofw m w w keptcalher fixed her path. Dzangare balances leadersto embrace, “Don’t pain, pain the growth w w nd gravity attached to hermen position, “Whenexcellence”, my view thisacannot be that m by, m with the retail giant Edgars, says Drmust Jinya. With suchavoid excellence already ably m nership “As time went we realised we � Aof m holds Bachelor of IArtsprocess. in International Relations cess encompasses not only themattainment Am In the journey to success be sure to take someone along. Remember The e. as thetwo youngest member of the senior sEdgars Amore, m Aw remembers having forego attending school m m wpromise m to serve. of competence nor fact m to demonstrated their leader, who canaless.” doubt this leadership is by influence, nothing nothing � the A but m M m team, I looked at my the decisions differone’s personal goals, also them and Complex Organisations from Mount Holyoke were getting bigger – andwwwe looked around and saw opportunity todevelopkeep ce to dement w w m m wm w m w as theytheir were decisions could affect rupt careersthat when closer tothehome in Domboshawa becauseinof their w m K m m Has K m Fair-m m w ofopportunity othersmin the South Hadley and a Master of Science partner withMAdveritas.” �is wasment a great the Roger overIt aCollege, thousand employees.” Mprocess.” w es. is up to us women Gladys is ammotherwere of four, faith, “We had from a school very close to home, ya is conscious of the people who surround When of the women of this wm w G m m K m International Suffolk University, m m generation m lie outfit, Adveritas, involved with the filmstory and documentary. When onscious this as we SheRelations h in and out of of the workplace. is pasis told, there are women whose stories will be m pur-has but we couldn’t instead we walked and ins m w w one girl and three boys Boston in the Statesgoofthere, America. Sheyou is Dr pasm w about people and a desire toUnited see people’s �ank Jinya 15 M m w ffi y affecting the need for Kachievements m Adwrite and Adveritas eventuallymore merged – Adwritebecause changedtheir its name to celebrated, lemployees,” anged for the better. She says her God-given because the nearest Catholic school warmth ious kilometres � w w m w w w w sionate about human rights, and economic m w You aresocial the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you! says Dr Jinya. m m ment is to inspire people to dream, believe and DDH&M –mmthe name originating from eachbeofoverlooked. themsurnames of the cannot Mutyavaviri is m M She w Gladys m amalm m their dreams through being examples apresence. was thatothers farBandera away from home.” Dzangare development issues. - Rwampwanyi hasstillin Zimbabw K mw w Aw my Gold and knowing that 13 million people p oud o h m mmone ofKthose m women. her ingenuity mM Through K w m gamation’s founders. Langa, ofand She is w a devout Christian ow aspire to.an She is particularly passionate w m A m inspired by fondly the teachings and ideology of the for m w the thinks of the school and is grateful and hard work she has risen to one of the most m w � w ouths,been especially young women pursuing their m w m m m w m m w oun y wh hund d o m on ound h wo d w h n y K y m w to become great leaders. “It pains me when Mwalimu I Nationalist Julius Nyerere prestigious positions in the global communi- w m who R m m education she received, “�ey instilled a very w From the onset business w m w daughngestAfrican w M w mm eneration lacking passion, vision andh foresight. boomed until the economic meltdown at thething w d b n mom n h won h fi O ymp Go d h o p oud o b cation industry. The most striking about believed that a person’s education is not only supShe is the Regional Coorw � m when I meet teenagers who are dreaming big m mm m w She attended good discipline within us, the nuns,they taught w m w w Myears. m w in century. persisted through the numerous turbulent king big, because then that as they dis- person or their Gladys, is not only the successes youymp Jacqueline Ngwenya posed liberate family, d to fiI know o– we’ll hthat mo nd v du�ankO m d m outurn o ofwthe m Southern nBuththe hagency o y � m moving efore w but mfor w m well.” dinator and themselves to achieve thisus desire have m M w w m A hertoworking butfrom the she is informed You are the “Heartbeat our nation” - we salute you! theiro survival a policycareer, initiated the beginm m way eringthen nation.” m A cannbe attributed m villages, towns failofm to ga ed owent h O ympand countries. nd h v nIf they h mo O use ympm m dmAnd ou h about the world her. From the conspicm around Eastern within the w m aligned m M � –a mpolicy of remaining Eveline ning of theAfrica agency’s formation intimately ontotheir education for the greater good then they are W W W K w uous to the obscure, she has a deep understandAfter completing secondary D w with fhool.a She nd mm but K obligation. y school w “IDzangare d by h to Otheir ymp h Postal oand n their m clients m w� A m D professional acm m clients’ w pservicing at- h Universal Union needs, traitor, it is not aw choice an was ing of how systems function. wa departmen- m m w mm m m m mm wm landed first job nd graduated m h m on n n education onwith O Sanders, ymp Comm A curacy. h Comm on Th of Zimbabwe’s privileged to hget her a good in prestigious Gladys economist by profession and holds DDH&M leading advertising agencies m is now mone m mis an mZimbabwe m ffi been 14 � years m m Child D where O she N R mbeen K well asMan K Science and tal store, manned front has the Girl Network has m BSc and MSc Economics degrees as uon y bou h h v v dthe h m desk, v Ithonou ADzangare u asfirst osince on with its Managing Director. agency is proud to have an w�e m M m m wO m m w ff clientele m the % %h She was woman elling at Uni- answering phones and directing A from mgirls to formed the andclientele it has benefited approximately onemwon million in East, MBAhave obtained the University of Zimbabwe. m w West % elite in its books, the agency major awards and run hde-h appropriate o b n departments. honou d by b om n m mb o h n n on O ymp egwinning also various professional Managing Director of Zim-partShe and Southern Africa. The favourite of Memory’s work with ChildqualificaEven at this early age m holdsremembers w G w Girlwas m � Year. er of the successful campaigns. One an w Her K w h Network mability m wo M m tionsDzangare obtained locally andwell internationally. Comm – vhadyanp inklingou honou on ypost, 0 ism mb dw d campaign the to work independently. She has the leeway to choose � mm w w m m Dzangare that she was meant as well as first woman w achievements m affected w gious Durban academic theHIV/ professional w and w � M K m campaign highlighting the plight of H people by m m m and H instead to in direct contact with beneficiaries w implement misuppo K y to be somewhere on h uppo oup whnot nmfoundthe dmwprojects hanti-stigma h Africa n to h appointed else, but just tered Zimbam had m experience gained from thethe various executive in be K well Aids, campaign did very because it� resonated people”. w with m m w A in told “�e what to withMILI-ACLE allows herprivate to splitand interm mof being ceived special W O M Y O O H M through positions she held public, om h thefiopening n m to o step h p n that nd wo oIt was h mm onfid n oudo. dHerocurrent wfor m work mw K m wm �portal. mm m m mthe as Regional Adviser Because of her personal in Athe campaign, Dzangare formed time between creative andinvolvement organisational tasks. She m loves having indi�m praise which through a friend of her father’s that the first her national organisations that she has worked for, real m m m W w m n nd m y Th mo mpow n h n viduality o mrelationships mb o and h ondv �English wk m developed a deep empathy with the people involved. because when stuck the creative stuff she can switch gears and Model Agency speaking spurred her to success. Gladys has had an excitM W W w m w m � m m w introduce to an industry that mIt k w ingher career, spanning over the thirty the Miss o Unio h door buopened wh ntoyou m k herdm on K nobody o you hwithin dvallows was a year when dominated theuse Ngoma six years. do the organisational stuff which to bothAwards, sides ofwinning herlast brain. m w Africancountries m DDH&M w institutions inwould the US and Iin feel thatday. it is�e mydoor re- that remain to this the she is grateful for support presenting In of Alannm Kay, “the best wayMutyavaviri to predict the future isw to the invent it.” thatm she outmof 15 catagories. DDH&M won the overall Campaign of Year mthe w Cov n yto use k landed hher n the up position on book m the words om nmh p m also my knowledge forFthe benefit ofnd Memory UPU received from her husband, when she went coming out of her work, changing people’s livelihoods in different comas receptionist her own opened chedsponsibility minventing a brilliant are Bandera -yRwampwanyi has been thelate future she wants we get,Award wom initiative m and’ oohs’ forwanother - You and though theuniversity stigmatisation campaign ‘ahh’s the trial, munities and believes that hard work, commitment, professionalism, inmakeup do acontinent.” wethis and h o o h op n on h mpo n p h through her education. She managed the room my m country and for From a young nd dressed � nk y u Rum K and d at Advertising Promotions Limited clim (APL). w m happy m Her an toextremely see. vision is torunner-up use herself asman example tothree impact positive attitudes as seeingAnd satisfying tegrity confidence in oneself, are pre-requisite qualities for success. nothing There’s us. to brought in the prize Dzangare believes it changed a lot of feedback to acquire degrees when she was already beLanga 98 age Memory knew what wanted towh become. nno ent. hAPL op oshe you mIt’s ninyou dREGIONAL con-m COORDINAthemotivate w w does, m to w itbwas that Dzangare’s interest broadmakeup what amazing inspire and to discover and develop their life. is fabulous. Y upotential h inH n n wcareer u was y unot without challenges. “My experience at transformation The at married. Her husband was very supportive and uMutyavaviri’s people’s by others changing our perceptions to HIV/Aids. in ‘Zimbabwe Growing in she attended Prospect unique mlives uses she care Zimpost taught me that, as the head of the organisation, whether man or skin w casting and really began, “IWstarted a woman.” to h K yup n Chitungwiza, pitburgeoned d by mo hIn her nd M hrangeThus ObTOR m some K work y whas mo h a living ou htestimony nd FOR SOUTHERN AND far, her been of her vision. brings fidence this helped her to effectively manage her mulm cells’ m m Primary, Zengeza 1 High and St. Mary’s Secondary; woman, we need to have a clear vision for the organisation first and foreMelon’ which protects skin the ‘Kalahari like

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PROFILE OF THE WEEK “I have sat on many boards and I have FILMMAKER Quick what I wanted to do. sa Facts e y connever en men and peace approached my appointment to a -its her passion for youth development to the Florence as a woman. When they choose a fashion designer. I Ziumbe board dlessons teamsthey have continued to upholdtherefore a fine tradi- I do not modeled ownresult parents, see Moun ability, is by anher end as well as a�e Zimbabwe Enactus s “Success Abeing heplaced ooinme, othe Mu emwa a n nplatform Mu oko s Mo htion of top five onfor this being highly competitive tory for year before I journey andathe definition falls upon apologise there.” - one’s personal values. For President HEALTHCARE of Proweb since Zamchiya handed the reigns over to current country leader Saliwe me, success er o Peace Commun y where Cornneck ves w h e. espective spheres influence ty, to beofsure.” i is just in 2010. In Mtetwa’s tenure, Chinhoyieternal Uniself-satisfaction when you and achieve/Mtetwa, a BOOST alumni, ‘CONTENDED wife and mother, optimist

ORPHANAGE

d reach your target or accomplish stages of over a hundred orphans The se ng o he commun y wereaplaced second in 2011 and Midlands StateFlorence Zimentorship I was able to obtain the versity of Technologyand conservative Christian’ is how e part of your bigger dream.” s qu e and dydescribes c rewarding heherself. compound s houses nea and University placed third in 2012. “It’s to seeShe Saliwe come ona captivating umbe presents ment to excellence establishedCorporate a Humanitarian, a unique de-boardLawyer and hand over the BOOST leadership baton. She was on our first message, one which is compelling, precisely be-aderesh y pa n ed he ch dren we groomed and uccess factors in the pursuit of h people all classes isthe something I enjoy a cause iscontinued enrichedtoby her experiences pilot programme in 2001 and it has walk with us along her of growing at aptlyofdescribes Sakubqua e y dressed The a mosphere s re axed ye perked rse, through my work, I enjoy seeing camup a rural the area. Her humble eloquence and rich professional journey. I aminconfident and programming gner Joyce Nyasha “MyChimanye. pu po e o have ve nfluence on oleaves heorganisation authenticity with a lasting impression ke wa po h a2 sense o produc onone Agr cu ura schemes ir inception through to fruition. I love the activities, with the current board, will go from strength to Ziumbe is and has women nmarried he echn ca fie dlevels o osupport e of aofpthe o erent fashion house in 1994, a culdiff are there of what it means to overcome humble beginnings believe “I strength and continue thriving and effecting positive changes in the lives of anyshe project and thethroughadrenaline alstages achievements has experienced bee and ous hor cuFlorence ura pro ec s ne pe about ence ocu ha d wo k da andry ayou en eachieve o var en oydaughters and a son and to one’s dreams. is a lawyer being passionate fashwhen is of young people within Zimbabwe,” says Zamchiya. success l are a success worthy attribute to this experience. As ines bring.” . Persona men naffair he fie das” he per phery o he proper y Two decades agoof one by profession having studied at the University en some kind of love nd past Chief Executive Officer of the BOOST to INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE SEPTEMBER 20 TO Zimbabwe. SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 have taken steps you E3 of the areonproud started out as to a family lawyer with woutodhernever have mag ned he sense ranqu y demanding career,She Zamchiya continues nurture o her ortunities Student Talent) Fellowship, Zam- isIn addition Cassini, “To be well dressed METALLURGY feel Scanlen and Holderness before she started her own you joy inner at Th goal. your ISING reach passion for leadership empowerment. Having read two degrees with visory council for the joint UNDP/UNESCO Quick Facts ha occup es h sFlorence Eden as a Christian does not seperate She has sat on more than 40 ove.” Joyce wanted to be that practice. being S isOF Defiance College (BA) and Howard University (MBA) she has supported Africa’s Futureattainin Leadership, aimed leader- SUCCES a atgoal. Gladys Mutyavaviri THE WEEK after her achievements from God. “WhenE3 I look at my boardsachievement rments madeg people feelPROFILE her professional with ongoing education. To date she has atfor youth.that Furthermore programme usI see fent conscio past God written all over. If God could take goal, being us oftheyour conscio hssful themselves. tained a certificate from the Executive Education under the TransformaNow 80 years o d Cornneck reca sherded he firs partnerships with ICRISAT, Central PROF me from the rural areas where I cattleyears and o LE OF THE WEEK applyand goal LCollege, that tional reach to assignment steps the Leadership Management Skills Development from FAO and Future Search Zambia. “Success she he ab and ywent o see heh sky nd of their passion, school he to do much commun ytow awithout cand ar yshoes, ha(TLMSDP) w is able be hard o erase University Pennsylvania’s School’s Aresty Institute Busi- be here.” of sthose n to and attentio haeach he of sky heWharton m ”imagined more. I never ever that Iofwould arlying age,focus but Joyce knewknow that rom her no m nd “Every mon h we bur up o hree ness. She is currently working on her Life Coach Certification in the ed areaorganizaeads entrepreneurship, mentorship, and Florence was involved with a Christian your manage ernance fashion industry. At askillfull youngofyLeadership If you can steps. and Performance Management from the I-Coach academy as well as community empowerment ch dren Ation ways ears and AShe hegrateful me that ears ” before she went to ears college. is find you will she dy fortoyour herself goal n toward in Johannesburg. attentioclothes ss 10making Zimbabwean universities and date came to know the Lord ‘Girls sometimes she says remember ng how hethen. scourge o he H V/

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

and b anke s or her e pa en s Unaware a he me h s wou d become a e ong voca on end ng o he A er secondary educa on Cornneck became a cer fied nurse and or a mos or y years worked w h n he hea h sec or w h pos ngs around he coun ry and a we ve year s n w h n he Un ed K ngdom

Alpha Media Holdings, the publishers of NewsDay, Zimbabwe Indepen-

Accord ng o Cornneck was a er re r ng the romStandard he hea h and sec orSouthern ha her rea dent, Eye is proud to launch the first edition voca ona ourney began Cornneck had begun ak ng n s ree ch dren ba h ng of the “Book of Zimbabwean Women”, a collection of profiles of women and eed ng hem n her fla n he avenue s “Dur ng w n er hey wou d be so co d from all walks of life. Th e theme of the 2013 edition is “Heartbeat for hey wou d be shak ng ke eaves They wou d be up a n gh ook ng a er peothe Cornneck Nation.” eThshe is anthology will celebrate and recognize the tremendous p e s cars or very e money ” A hough was do ng God s work tive for women would change. Most women know how to manage money, – she s being wansent edaway o do more orforhe ch dren and was even p ann ng oare approach contribution women making towards the development of our Florence recalls from school non-payment of fees andthat her mother would reach money would he Depar meninto o her Socpetticoat a We and aregive o dev se she some sorhave o scheme o ge he ch dren country, Zimbabwe. saved for mother never went to school, hey but she knew how to E3 n o offa rainy he s day. reeHer s and a home where cou d be cared or and augh sk s plan for the occasional bad day. Yet an epitaph of many a Zimbabwean wom-

mates. Chimanye studied make mistakes at that stage in life; some of the projects iness Southand Africa,fulfi Zambia and at ” llment. happin ied pilot Lenafeels Zamchiya sitslistenonmistakes the boardscan of Southern Central, a privateshe equity be fatal’. However, is indebted to projects incorporate group andTechteamtalk, like nmmunity Academy of Clothing Chirima to Carol Listening the Christian anchored and mirrored firm inour Value-Ed, whichleaders strives towho support and establish inspire possibility oriented worldviews cultihowtime,and of Zimbabwe hers n, South Africa, worked for 3 philosop the of one ing to ageneration woman her at such an impressionable age. They a we a sense of personal leadership within the youth of South Africa. “For me helped p ng o of leaders and innovators. e this leanings, hicalAND philosop hasLAWYER in she Harare before onufacturers c ea v y though cou age ever, her to keep the straight narrow through and conentrepreneurship is also about social on leadership. As muchand as businesses PROFILE OF THE WEEK with a motive of o change and a hunger for a oun the a is nhead She mind. h married hope business le protheir guidance. others were partying, she aaisformidab has er own. Joyce andWOMAN woman BUSINESS must be profitable, they must also addressWhen social challenges like unemengagement and participation and enjoy cability ea edto a career, aajob. I want to a leading suppliwhave h he g ea e not o Incorpor was safely hidden in Christ. ated, Baztech ployment.” of ork. I driver, believe the opportunity for radzi and Tapiwa. eflec on othat God hea The influence everyone I meet in an e people ffie by Ziumbe believes that she was called to women ce and attendan time says Zamchiya. ce ups serves as catalystofor and c e biometri heainnovativ hea a innovation woman ern of Zimbabwean flag across the se and child issues. “I saw the educatan o be a wa obiometri and e n a un que y systems, IPempowerment ativity,” control access c systems, an would most probably ill ed being divorced, the beautiful, the good and the PROF cased Afri-She is also a and LE OF THE WEEK read: Worked so hard, but died so poor. “When one Each o uher ha work a un quein pa most o for SMI (Success Motivation Institute) Africa, Tripod Full height Sales Associate systems, CCTV harder surely, fairness dictatesathathe they rewarded. only value my het bad, I saw thePROF law change.” do not control works A ngand aanalogue geAustralia. and good ome h ng LE OF THEWomen WEEK a end ng mass Cabeho c Ca The hedra n Harare Cornneck had an enS Recently she which is a pioneer and leader in the personal and professional develae, o turnstiles u mum has rides on my success, she doesn’t have a car or money in the bank ome h ng Zimbabw ou e. In a world of technologin dange opment industry, she attributes her success in SMI to the professional in the Plus coun er ha wou d change her e drama ca y A s s er rom one o Mo her Theressful during her time with the yhowcase ng partnership o Andher ha work ome h ng yet she worked hard all her life.” move was when I had my first baby. I Baztech, “My Aha moment without any doubt like es business ent, advancem ical h na mentorship of Nigel Chanakira. Having received his guidance in honon ship wasShe withand Enactus. Since 2005 she has eek. also been invit“Legal essa practice taught me to respect those ostensibly wto EASTERN m ingredients s homes wasrespect: v s ng he coun ry that rom Ko ka adon’t nd a Cornneck an adm rer tiple rolesand as a mother, wife, student with and a pronatural offhas at reception, then ranks evolving. is the bthe bcountry nthat nd h rose nthrough b nthe v nworld nAnd b against o hfree h Thin h yfamily, AFRICA WITHIN lines the was the one to go University my Ihas graduated along over the years in Dzangare’s career, one thing remained conhathe an mechanism Memory believes her background influenced before bringing the rest of the organisation on board. Attainment of nna defense e ‘voices’ cstructure ea natural ve their eak increasing herto decision making skills, she counts herself privileged to have had by nfirst fessional woman. believes that to International World Cup competitions. DNA m a with w mas Gladys Born family of four, Memory in family a corner stone of women most, do inand the and from there Iing deserve it. Even theinwoman undeserving of any hyOil’ tangible results our respective careers or whatever else kindness has something k Brooklyn another in ‘Mongongo hnew n ny ogh hstudio own hisa v m nworked hNutin oUNIVERSAL pits oud o the hspends dbroadcasting. d most om believes hm and the career she chose. She vividly recalls visit to UV light THE POSTAL stant –up her passion for She looks back at as hermuch, twentyto years to ranga, exposure by have to work twice prove them- concrete and in caused enin he radicals, ca Carol, which ng summed o Mo her Theressa s char ab e work approached he he best a w m a one’s development. She of her time with her husband, famin purpose her m on various sponsored series.” Dzangare rememFor the opportunity to access such keen insight and wisdom in the area of working flying colours, however the emotion I felt at achieving this comes nobeen we do, also helps ‘’woman at the top’’ to gain the necessary recognition has nt is held once a year with competing teams Langa properties. good to offer. Each person is amazing in their own way and we all benefit s s er embraced her and and and climb thealone, corporate ladder. Women Parliament in 1993. She was inspired just regenerating Radio One with pride, “You satselves in that little knew drating, uppo vmale hbe mo hrestructuring du n by hseeing d ffishe uA matlaunching A uppo nc ohad mo UNION e she She skin hewill ly andds She likes watching movies and reading as well asbut travelling ark bparliamentarians ah n the beh theof not be on nd gender, but on Spacebefriends. pandem aken ho dcubicle and affec he will Your M Hand y not able to parbers dominated environment she was and market life local“I the normally take qualities at ed family levelcounto and respect that we deserve . The focus should onto purpose product her nd the getting women and she thought to on think Rosten, youdwere masses out there.” Andtheir though her shifts were Leo-C ross the world showcase their community from explains affirmation.” need each other, structure of past so- you are do ng ” Cornneck sa d Mutyavaviri. “YouWomen do know me s& sthe er bu ove herural work words results.” Oneno of her major achievements during and learning about peopletoand different cultures. This she says makes children nto h nde d n otoo P nherOb m no bspeaking wh htheatheir w hou school to near what Ileadership. felt when I became mother. When I had my first educates I want .o Langa ampo ch ec meantime, uof thewould aline working in at gn the “At APL atdwant one time, it wou September. cominwhere � m Langa self that when she grew up,time, sheIn to long, atwas various hours ofdthe evening early mornings – she feels the the period that she worked as the Managing Director of they Zimpost, was the her very e, demonstration appreciate Zimbabwe Bandera - and Rwampwanyi has had the priviher Inher have the capacity makeup. be whonorabl wmore. m wear to le, correctly ry “ fficu a he me here was no rea to how on cieties allowed women to bond when went to water in the as river ctsadoes to ais prestigious group ofthe international busiresponsib h b vac n –o nd uppo n h m Wom n h ou h h nn n h be and to “Women are the heartbeat of the nation. Without women, things fall apart. deM gn just me only lady.” Here she worked Bu No Your Background useful, ewas vcorporates be ce tonot be among the important women. Whilst Memory m a H w a - be enhancing instead successful wen turnaround of the organisation from a loss makingyou position to fetch distractive. on o ask “Why don have a home here we ?” A coup e Derek and being of time spent was fulfilling and electrical, “�ose radiowait days were the highchild, my for my career diminished, I couldn’t to get home. lege of travelling the world and meeting many influential women and many shouldpassion makeup w m m that is m d v n by h n k n on h m emphasis Women build families, which in turn build the nation. Educate a woman and with upcoming –harsh who would enjoy Qu ckthe Fac istrips. not aw parliamentarian, her of ov m h ha nd p broadcasters hm hIt ow h all, n on a ‘kurwizi’. viable commercial entity. As the they UPU Regional TUniversity Th n achievements npursuance h binnom As acy Lena Zamchiya continues seekbecause new frontiers in developing leaders tonto be Whilst there, wouldCoordinator, counsel being eachinother and the whole exeve Kezi inmy matter �e ofThe Zimbabwe’s team was first to programme yone se prevailing community after k is social is her paucithe lights of life” says, waso like second nature me.” left an indelible mark. Memory of Rebecca Zeigler-Mano by Fa ionate. hereve up on compass High be rea men ”was hto smake cr s stotheir ha Mo her tokoget m pohave b nd h the nsheowas o n“Broadcasting w speaks educate nation. Mothers go outohighly of their way sure children MBABW ND PofND Nse ND P ND N Syde X with CU V D C cultures MB D Cs MB R and E3 charge several African countries, different andO differm w m n hthe ka n vative solutions to social problems hasK made her the great in– theirI own rights –25 James Langa gives This orphans. for Before had baby, my focus different.” aA dy which bou hin uand n oschool yw v dthe hyou hschool. wou d her k current fees Van der w R hurban s er hefrom s s er rep ed ha p ans were unnot o nCup pays esuccesses he supports who is the Education Advisor atgoals, the US Embassy, Public Affairs, Diane ob perience was therapeutic. Florence urges women to learn rural o Asked about Dzangare replies, seecaring more inwork- ent from next generation, she says, “We need avery sense of“To purpose to women beAnci, ocould win the World 2005 against 44 teams No hando Ndebe e ways ofLdoing business, comes with its were only challenges. Of he this exgo to Bysome nature most women are enduring, and hard m my b wh n m d n w h mo made uku a w m n w k h n wh h n n have envito g, force to be reckoned with. Her work has impacted ever-changing an in shand have worsened the plight of somethin Makamba, Wellington Mbofana, Patrick Bajila for education of talk those stand in the to hough Though count, satisfaction. of Admissions Holyoke College andaherymother Dorcas o many y w no mm nk Aand my ZHe mb bw h Langa w om hbringing peducann oat Mount wfamilies.” mm ny was omost m o Commun es ab advertising heading advertising agencies.” perience, Gladys for the Universal psound acen ing, in up their n hdunder n able M women whocommented, bandotogether. When there isPostal anfuneral 10km away, they go, expressed not about strongly hbDirector n hPeace nk npotential hand nd feels African continent. to unleash our �is is annongoing process as shed parofwthe to some, only 8on heand world. Other teams her leadership antiquated and Ishmael Kadungure. may derway se“working some h within ng up ZUnion mbabwe Cornneck her des re o know ronment Bandera who have been herand roleZsuccess. models. brought me into the multicultural environment the organization Carol at all.” d und lived m w m h needed nsomeone the In you nby hishong Kgift yn hm dm nletmp n wbelieves mm n du nothat u mb Heart a word athe that education.” be used to get much itwh nach na erence aven diff to money; get sign menvery control give existed An mp v words on nthey d don’t ntheu workplace, h the dtoimportance you here andcheques you and find value them com- itself one “Ifbthere tion, empty handed, ifWhen it’s aonelittle inWEEK a bowl. Theyis value rela- we use to describe bravery; heart is life, courage, spirit, the UNeven worksmealiein aLE multicultural endthe nd success ishnd not achieved overnight. Recognizing PROF OFmeal THE rds as “Rookie “Spirit of ar or affec cwork, ed ch dren Through to can you n ofMandela, h no m n h weapon powerful Mm Wh ND ND N ND ND N enduring, X CU D C and M within Oimportant D Cabou M system. mtheir most for isnthe u such eHer vision mited to hardworking, an “Education emo journey began inthe the 90s when she co founded E3 ona huseand m n p on y and No naffl bw bu n A HYear”, OC m mb oncu ARwampwanyi hy omm oned m nhome. and of Nelson beto n e vironment, it is to understand the different cultures in differaspires more he pro ec when was underway Be ore ng hey exchanged one what commercially competitive good quality garments. Many young indigenous finances in the A visit to the maintenance In the late seventies Dzangare felt it was time to nes defi Bandera describes herself as a positive, inspiring social envision Zimbabwe hChild h w (GCN) nLanga h hard Vision tionships. “As women we should look formandate valueeffecin others. The problem is that depar Women ronal trips from corporate organiWorld with othe opersonal closely the honest, courageous, self-sacrificing and caring. ent chose worked anga w mo invaluable world.” the of work and tapping into the resource of existing wisdom No hando a Ha va d and change Girl Network in 1999 and led the Champion awards. countries, to enable one to be able to carry out their on do Nd b no h n ho n u Th Y o he c en drive and passion. who inspire and achieve transformation in o g ve a h w p n h o h wo d bu p fi y A n A h we child trepreneur. She is n acourt role model young people and hopes to makelining ang life-and they on fromduring moved to SSCB Lintas, launched She nAPL and minyour he ear ne esfor he burden dea h doon Zimbabwe. Miss Mutyavaviri is o the Regional Coordinator for but move ash vaincampaign her reign she is and reveals that the bulk ofsuffer those up for values charities other“It and tively.” dreams first child Zimbabwe. CUR CO we not celebrate each or build platforms to support each other. Until es designers the bar low thus they are beaten quality by imports, symboliz wom n po hhelp n b lives. yond doub h and persona de a other s come. ne herpcharity Ox oahou dG adua around will access organic However, we must always and through impression onset their Having aSouthern positive attitude has helped her get m against mthe nprogramme kyasabuse h n ne “Joining nlong and Eastern Africa within the UniverVision agency media planner. ofwjoining World nd mm hn across h h hZimbabwe mp d hov ommentorships. don for dhe message sponsorship Mutyavaviri devotes her personal time to her family and to church acThison campaign took her the country and maintenance are women. Yet empowerv nintuition h nof charity wom n yn on b she u money ood PROF LE OF THE WEEK love This ghed instituothers. sal Postal Union (UPU), which is a specialised help us n ffi w h h could we learn to speak together and amaze each other, we will go round in circles which through challenging situations and is always pursuing innovative solu, the Lintas she prestigio much how ed unshine we heav he ounders o he commun y Ga realised various eway and Langa exposed me to other media. My responsitivities. She also loves travelling overseas with her children when she from H work gh reason their areas of infl uence and expertise will naturally pump new life back Schoo years of 3 in o balance htowidely wou d nka ho of mo nd mo blaunched k op n wdmm Z mb bw Awards to see possibilities us,you that we United gain access tothe 7soluwith however this will ensure training they get will enable them to requires 2006, the Vice President Enactus Africa was publicised inwith the media. response w m m honored Ed-n been has Trust. Leaf agency ofDzangare the Nations, which is responm n hLifeline b allnaproject haround pas onway she nbility m h her Dand nrecommend N seek h ptions 2011 put inThe �ank Praxedes is and urpose to social problems. stayed vacation. Gladys was chiefly influenced by her late mother who has ing woman, empowers the that nation. A woman is takes work v educa MBA and portfolio was tony plan anda remain thelevels. same.” and he pnoverwhelming oceedin from the was so ap Girls Chamber mm wChirima wwo sible w trust based for postal development acno uon n w mm bu m bthat k op w n life.” h w vw n h h om education National non-profit, ak of ispurpose them kvictims k n(LEAF) n Zimbabw Fund ytmaking tions.” nd omp vpersevered d oand n coordinating of inspired her on,many Sheemade her the woman she is today with Directors Advancement of sense ucation mchiya to the Enactus Africa strategic advisory your Institute bu s hey kep on – dr ven by he r into the taps of African that focusinclude make world class garments. The project is set to kick start in Zimbabwe and which to various houses for placement in both tions a mother first before she is anything else. She has underprived isDe tivities world wide. She joined the UPU in 2006 and At natural, Risk Unit, which provides 24hour support to gn orphans of Cen e mm m m w education n the into these areas, and in so doing they revive as well as encourage a pasohanne in nmedia fi m n n D n h n all Florence’s presidency of Proweb is somehow the zenith of her career. It is One Sunday a knock came a he door o her fla To Cornneck s surpr se was investing ct to limited resources. “As a widow, my mother managed to raise her eleven UK, dedicated the on valso m n b nk to nYou hoher qu pthe nation” Inand exhortation Zimbabwean women, MemoryAdviser says, “Ifor encourage aabuse Manag ngHer ec itare sfellow as Regional English-Speaking others. print and electronic media.” At Lintas she fundraising efforts among see Enactus programmes in Swaziland, Bothe “Heartbeat ofmour -heart. we salute you! ent, ofShe as well as victims work makeManagem (11) successfully. I cherish the values and social norms that she about mineral w nD h nisoon-going hofshe n of continent. v girls y at0passiona Zimbabwe. te in ca children whe Institute ileged erisk the he gsexual the welfare of everyone at and adua ce ed w other women to ao sense ofof direction and towards achieving their h Baztech, Commer aconsider hheartyAs me wen by aswork peop e became educa ed hopefully will spread to the other parts offirstthe anchildren expression of der the has for generous women. stands for Pro-o coffee he Van der Sydes nis K y d d n hHead onw d In ou oOit’s Z mb bw hlaughter n have ou hoo n hAfrican countries and she was the woman e old the Fora marincalculated in the family. She passion was a veryshe hard working, andPROWEB the the Trust. was born out of this initiative. addition of ct onabuse, O Wregardless n h hher mgood success the to and Re ea ch key on. I do not focus on are M circumstances he Van Sydes She nv ed hem n and over a cup , travelling sotho. Four years later, Enactus recognized her as Honou experigoals of what their are. For most women now, it well of as n No h ndo M n n D o nd H d years n in Africa, to be appointed to this challenging and e 15 family o sion for excellence. Zimbabwe’s women are the nation’s heartbeat, and safe. De and and over gn happy son are With It was no walk in the park for Florence when it . her they with loving woman.Women, She was rewarded for her hard work, through her chilThat long time heart. have s thatto ucareer’s h nthat oun v first by says h nJoyce h hbemoaned d d no y h the vRO state melts nfrom n o w myher nMo hdlaugh fessional Women Executives and Business Women’s Forum. The this Bandera - crowning Rwampwanyi led the Womchildren enjoys Chirima H of W Kattain the fashion industry which one point thrived prestigious position within thedespite Universal Postaldark apparent isna priority issue and they degrees and new affordab ehn orea sasmspending emerged – a he Rena ance Cap a kobjectives onisA nquantitativeRthat education h Rto CO p both in mmun and dren who have at successfully progressed in different professional fields. m en ou Deve opmen mineral rushed n to the programme promoted h h hyour Langa For fresh as y Role Models inhe Zimbabwe the balancing apmen career well as raising famenjoying , Chartered o her abou a Accountants, Sou AEconomists, r can woman executives Bever y Oand bers who rece ved messagmod hmsuccess dprogram Km is achieving yand ou ogoals n which p hb d dTenacity, nage dor m b came nd R o now afternoon Union. As the Regional Coordinator, she mm w m Sunday initiative was in 2005 tohenable professional, a lazy discipline, their marriage the future of UPU Zimbabwe Bandera - on quality. Within thespoke family we established have several relaxing right and the ”mmitments noexported ohm nn bucommitments.” n Of C number and wrong, right movies goTmo The qualitatively. watching ydion and ly n n wh h h n m n acy hen came now provides school fees for marginalised girls. In back akin to the biological, emotional and metaphorical heart, our women home and its produce. Major textile companies have folded and exports manages a portfolio of twenty one (21) counfrom cow mo will are the Engineers and women successfulsinging. businessmen,” Gladys reminisces. hopes the upcoming elections be peaceful, p the onEnactus Wom h honesty, v n country mp onenvironment ou on om o hsease v ily. to hats and efficiently cnn oud o he dShe began dmany ss pa esky “credible nand abou 2005 respect and a Zimbabwe roperties! isProfessionher, nv mqualities ntime b that nk omhas u dhad ontries mwear for is vo focus, Th business to an speak with one voice in and specifically n Zimbabwe nnTariro: hand NHealth hforkthe h Rwampwanyi birds the 2003 she co-founded Hope for spending in Southern and Eastern Africa. Prior to ally tolooks and wo listening ked esand hrough nner ce One he messages was otobu d an orphanage n Z mahard anwork, personal ee the her ye Foof, bisoppo she up to Charity Jinya who moulded her to be a greatoexecnd fion enjoys w y peace watching She and domiand transparent to way all professionals business people in difsuccess. for air essential are into believes she norphans nance nAs n it hyou un y heff o orts h bu n v h hnawill oppo un h for nd mpave kmarket hA h youn yflooded o and gional President, African Region, Enactus all oece put joining the Universal Postal Union, she worked manage each role. “When Iwith appear in court, theclothing ceased. The is imported textiles. Though Zimbabwe’s to address the needs of orlooks an artLangaM utive. Charitythe is great, currently the Managing Director of the MBCAnBank in harness talents and skills of its members to contribute towards the imred. ofcountries glass over e family oVice and e your Sleek inspiratio ahaving friends Revlon, ng l, businesswoman.” with W Spacewo laugh draws ferent to come back and develop our beloved country, Zimbabwe. serve to feed the fl ow of growth by maintaining the pulse of the nation. a good he who e rend o a y changed W h rea men he Carol k Abe mcareer hbeen w without m nsister has done for Zimbabwe Postsa(Pvt) Ltdg. (Zimpost), forshe six Zimbabwe. xp ntheFac n fin n “ndam omb nwn of She ha a daugh mo he einand daugh eWhile ” neither ay distressin wom nhas om A you h v o wo keh dQu o ck ptoov you wh ngreat you do Oprah Her has not Gladys is alsoan inspired and holds Nyaradzayi Gumbonzvanda iconic way babwe orphanage or ch dren affec ed by A ds Cornneck says she was s ruck and late mother loyal are s3andjudge isnva not interested me a mother, thisphaned role shechildren. responsible 10 Enfrom women women many tobeen up ence ha provement of the social and economic well being hLaw m Tho ed n her n dear m Th n 2005). She appointed as the onNDEPENDENT ma the government has a oas high customs tariff onthe imported clothing toWomen nfor .” the Secretary General of the World YWCA (Young Christian As- of Zimbabwean society. wo kyou n nTO m p v imposed qu(1999 ya to more focused on great EXECUT ANUARY FEBRUARY 6when 20 4 Mujuru, challenges. Memory recalls an which t, Joyce strong is full faces is designs Su an Mako eyears ked de cwas be he emake Langa world Presiden eNDEPENDENT theher her, Vice uona din you m h noincident hofin o inspirational, nVE ondea dhwwomen vm bu you n E3 Forn Winfrey. include first Managing Director of Zimpost, following these ra e dropped o our or five or he who e year m ABC BBC W and mh too am I a mother in the boardroom.” She had to women pa sociation) in high esteem. Spiritually, Gladys gets a lot of inspiration from other programmes Africa (Egypt, Ghana, Kenya, nation e from abou the up bring he they ec nd qu y Florence believes that women can do more. While she does not loathe the nation, o the w of she worked with former child soldiers and had has mothers that the are market h Women he nMudimu orma on “When came o me asked why hey had come and hey models. the unbundling of c the Posts andeTele- her Susan Makore N role hkto k h hp om hbody nthem the CUR CO gh fly nghas de pformer on o hePastorlocal industries, this not discouraged imports. “The and ook b mgrow; nd hthem dd dnation. ok oa puaHyou friend by Mrs. Virginia whom she says is a devoted Christian, all are hey ontinues she is faced Amakes woman de chprotect many eed gem women theby of ese “Th heartbeat . clothing omight a deDeuschle be o bbed du d ayexpec om v awhich dh wdea h one found well wishers tothe put school. o Bonnie things work, meant hiring two maids at the he are ma Qu ck Fac snthisnthrough there onation, and conher communication Corporation. Before co, Senegal, South Africa, Swaziland, Tunisia and a, little that women given, the future generations mshe nremains n Nd h By Gadzikw k ed on Eve who goes out of way are to help and support other people in times ofhave to do better. Women 2009 here were no hsshe– and we vejoining had Mrs ciency, humble. effi and and enmp w h Langa ocon ch he many ade he ha co -thenone fiGDP bn uShe nout hlevel you you h n you m yma nd ommu excellenc of local much, the �ank you Lena Zamchiya -rating has and ce on he nen on a ahigh The well wishers pulled after aempowe year and she and Blevel-headed A nvo Eintellect onom m n um h acco postal sector, worked in the banking, enerW m m w w w ence an o Ze000 mbabwean sa dher he person hey were ook ng oris wou d bewhy hethey ma ron o h s in p ace he of Zimbabwean Women” all inspire o nThough he n n Th m nphenomena nea Asked textile industry is the industry to promote, because we actually grow the cotand Qp uachieved all.” u57 Th women celebrated theand “Book ove above time. “It was avud huge struggle; Isectors. had towa multitask, do need. he that administrative and manageGod and ve we know come and m they n personality con isW and ). �e programme has students h ac being run homes and companies and they excel at it, there noereason wtheir dauntis h anhuman ahead domains sustains what erent wmSadza diff Langa gy and agricultural To in had no up to continue funding these l Pro essor Hope nEnactus y back Kff ym plan m beduca b ok n down n o h mpo n v u b ec ed ove me Neve he e no o o nd d h Un v y o Ox o d successfu on P o e o Hope Sad a a u y -u Gladys is convinced that her daughter Emily is an upcoming woman to n wh h continue to has still career her Law rom hthe swh ness presen day ”cathinks on sheaims ha enand awhat undeveimpact achieved ked asked N M cannot has on fortitude When pare thing, oM“Heartbeat wdescribes mwo ec away.the Baztech You are ofo our nation” -work. we salute you! haob be Gladys’ vision ton progress to the highest posPROF LE THE WEEK we school go to When ICornneck look back atsays ehe nn umen being aisone young people. moment as hecotton “watch”, as she follows in her mother’s footsteps. At the age ofw 32 she continue We meant to add value to as opposed to exporting raw cotton cannot succeed in areas ofto responsibility. ma ron needs ogreater be a person hhasa background n hea hareas ” Aga they n sheare asked why Furthermore in regards to the roles w She m ntaken Th m k “It’s D hton. ed in 39 countries all year Rhod hotoOF nand dn MBA wants she anpHumb competencies she was that write n you wo kquick h round. dto nd p v me – say, you kleavepothers you w u hcruns don Wh say ema kab eopmen Wha obab y mo to e and cha m ng wou d no gue will Iwoman quick to is for Wsay, w wnot not Carol challenges withrue goals, sible level in her career and in the process posiis ee she deve current made, her new life in the active. She eca dh since acquired three University degrees, two at Masters Level; a Masters biometri a in me od God he m m n m anleadershi w ked omthathonour on heonMachangu models market dpeople om d Bu I don’t know how Iamanaged,” she remitsI guess perceived h nestablish ing oback as Th w abou not from amnm w hon aque sense ewoyhoo gra enduhe rea men sbecome now Iou tively impact the livelihoods ofhe communities Florence’s experiences as divorce lawyer priceless when it comes to qua fied She responded Susan snp marr ed he no onha y he on theare kand drelevant, b h one! yn airhead yng ymp n Hum n that notime Are n in hey hynab woman bor nhe a Baztech, he mto o us provider Ne, she tapsM w in e-Business degree obtained from thea University of Japan solution Pen which is processed brought as clothes.” Joyce suggested u aO a complete nCreative, noepitaph h wW C m w nCov n and fin amb float Chimanye Tall.then hey had come oInternational her and stheir mp mansions y asked she was wh Kind asn wa nMo M o and h opo ohe h bvisionary n and hcountries behind a describes uden in the within the Southern andto Eastndhexperiences gh wordswLanga The s mandard the Sou to be.” In hdemeano high pa hHtime g o hexce inisces. Nowadays things are different because of and an MBA from the University ofsaw Cape it Town. “Watching myleft oAchildren. u can nherself a vcompany n odeliverin ea yAn bu ha he keep m women issues. Ziumbe Women with only a nnsystems, h onby attendan AB Commun ca on Though hedren Mce m w and three the ‘nation’ that she covers. She believeshere e,children to soldier he they encompass in cultural, social, political and economic sectors they ve nZimbabwe’s Dwo ueked h“When Bo nk qu ng y ern h region, Zimbabw inall. wa ava ab you ook ch oday do mon by bringing up their systems grow and progressing in their various careers gives me great pleasure as a ce n eAfrica oWa oour attendan ome and o that relationships with the other governments should be technihe time c w Chu h ersevere biometri mn n he goa m n sand D n kn w h n management product o e o Sadza ma ed m and d eam ng and figh ng o he emanc pa on flexitime and flexiplace which allows some emindustry and she was created as a woman for a purpose, “I pos ve y and agreed o o n hem r gh hen and here obsecurity or the impede un ve hmen peak handbag afterthe many years of marriage. “The that a woman failed in her Ano her coup e Norman pn va esolutions that mother. Witnessing graduation ceremonies for my two sons,fact Tatenda y owned n 99 exceed b o T acy o unob n had n Gou dm n heun h accomp gThabove any andective positively and M and cost he oppo h circumstances wm n wneff h m m home yworking udytoH he was created as ao woman, undertake the cost mulUquality customer ways encounter exceed that obelieve When me w h aP oimport Sad a and Tawanda, was a very uplifting experience to me to as abe mother, who solutions ective eff ployees to chose fexible hours as well as n our commun y ch dren who are V pos ve and Thch I wthat wn cal London nher 000 h o n d nv and where we their expertise and not their products. wto dw en wwo p women opo d ffe en o y To da e Su an ha he d mquality ed high commun they live in.hm As such, strongly g able compete in an ever marriage does not mean that she has a destitute. She is entitled to eat, give it their best and endeavor to succeed. In our selection process, 30 y m wh hits wn n n deve deliverin by opmen tiple roles that I do as a mother, a worker and and env onmen a mpac o leaderrough s.yATh and Sybgrow,MacDona d a.obeaming nedGladys o make he group five watched from boys to men,” said. of m expectati wa no mp eM edDay by he ach PRO Wthese K children n pheevemen Townpo n 004 posG Hons h w customer w hs a to ah role model for other women. In view of OThe Seven h heShe Bulawayo p oon work from home. Florence that ifmed Zimbaec oa-ard shape their po an onbe n he Zbelieves mbabwean aopen She m in w pen on top branch however, ten-month old grandson Isheanesu much Baztech aHcherry oC live in ashe decent home, take her children to school. She is still a human being, me to ea ea ch ng also env She isnhe not the only passion that Joyce indulges; is alsoisinher passionate onmen he ons. ahopes a children.” on rea men and compare hem ofamily, hose ch dren owhave he expectati Itaeship must felt like being can concommy multifaceted role in the in the workm a wjoy to be a grandmother,” she w w Fashion m mb nd pme n o A n wh bu bycommun he en the uck has Zimbabweee. Onhe nwoman O Wpound who makes her heart melt. “It’s such Caroline , wyguided guidance and and oman ndu y and he on a numbe o boa d ob women were identifi ed across a range of categories. These women exem bweans were wealthy, many women would opt to p e en on hemon Adven sh she nopportunities hnvwfinew k Constitution D n h u and amount failure that.” ec mh mde mgnhwa m n w khe forowill anyone In her workshops, focuses om he W m Ch about p m off pprovides qu nda aW wemforandevelopment n ebe adds. o unkempt. turn an to W ntry mo ywho ng and engag ng “The aPen lot teachofy and This the plight disadvantaged children. sheno feels is offor part ofchanges her aspherself ob nem M Dwh rough p and to learn to rm mend the hedm n h hadua ffed nand n n oThe company are nega – you he dand fference through Sheh had to paytop for fees till sheac Su an ghof w a Bache oe A aemmhaving D the n n nnand sailed he and p has high hopes Zimbabwe for coming five years, Apart m Thn stay home for some raise their children. ed the o time to ec b ng nbo po o vMba nve ou h Apncan nh never pany wa du powerment of women politically, economically socially. constitution is Gladys When asked who she looks upthe to, her re response isshumbling. She says Id have Hope Sad ahawa ncove andob ed eopo HaFrom here on Cornneck a es a ory o a h and v ne gu dance O ber s mesChild Network Unganda ingastating. basic grooming and n nh CUR CO hCFA m n and n m n amSng nud wh Manag ng D rector Founde and V ce n From n that D netiquette. w nGirl h from the constitutional changes; Zimbabwe is a signatory to the UN Conmobilised funds. experience she learnt me he d hibit the four pillars of leadership; aspire, plan, inspire and execute. This ed he ex en po g adua e D p oma n Med e om n u on m k No h ndo h o wh gender-sensitive and thus the role played by women into political deto ch delife, signment purpose in be able give helping hand when needed. gn ha economy g ea However, since that ishy not they have toa vention hecase, e’s M o co powengnwhplan Zimbabw in ec he years w w A nthe a e oHe he wa ahand eache and heenhances ano such “I the goodAgainst everybody; I’m blown away by every cult on theperson. Elimination ofsee Discrimination Women. The rehdiffi h w order hob hey are amand v gorous ynkbe ”to most carefully programs and not to accept fundenand your oorganisation w o is vemo Christine big on is of the opinion that pW andtokeep r Chance em cision making through the introduction theha quota for ho d nTh nd h ow u dw Rjob expo you Memory Bandera edown Law oHead Women on he Un yhea oncoZnof mbabwe be nohe e awomen end parliang was exp c VanaVn sinde adownwards s The he commun y was o be ound n eve quirementssage emanating from this protocol have cascaded to oca on o n nho hve h D n ha hesystem de without ped gn w h n h a bu mof the no déco w h & hold aaxand earn an income. Deing thinking through thehe future ne man who owned auThank flee o of Research techhigh woman. Many women have transformed their lives, some began as secrebest the To realize this goal, she founded an Orphanage in Chegutu called of mentarians and senators. In economic decision making, the new requirements one g mpac style as contemporary. The M becomin m C p m n book on A onomy he ndu and different levels. The Gender Policy which is now in place brings a lot of y by prosper n campaign was complimented by profi les of these women in the Zimban n fi n n h h w m n n h n h oduc ng a h gh anda follows mind. Along organisational d o a-exce he ve yAonation” Na Sou hA ca whe You are superb the “Heartbeat of eour we you! on ence bu many ha absoshe peop m esuccess eAmorganised She achoo ended he Un ve y pnan unwa awith Ch ood o Un oned board appointments give women an hope Florence defines success innsalute simple terms, “the efact for women in Zimbabwe. The establishment ahey Gender CommisTh Fhn on Th onand y B recruitments hnnd eand yproject. ndependen oca en gocan ngShe agabusiness he nMba h doors w into senior hpositions, n in taries, others got they decided to make something he requirements nor hpregnant eas nas teens athe yofyet go wrong and ound aofp ace n Ch shawasha A be on mowed Sibanda ny market Langelihle aBnthe you in ea eshe oeache Thank de they gn m clients which opened its orphans 2001. The house that shelters solutions Aafter m e security and he ob ain ned anm Ma e mto n IaMed a children, and Cu u -andI sion when sntha the Afro-Gipsy, Eco wear, nology in line with in the new constitution provides an instiequal opportunity on appointments. Socially, number of restrictions hem skills; determination and a-edu love for what one does are qualha omon Wadd ove co ege h hvo nu n h home, Egn onom R on HIboard u 2014 Mg into W humility, m that am a happy have that 20 4 hou d do no do“Heartbeat a Go ha o and ou you! our salute n we e comes o Un vers es o Z mbabwe Th o De Or g na y ounded by five nd v dua s he s ory o he our nation” of me themselves. I am an eternal optimist. Most women do not tell their stories to a ma the are bwe Independent over the past eight months. and You an undeve tutional framework that should go a long way in promoting the interest of oped N practices that previously y wnnsuffered de hmed n gne N h k Ma h ca hQ Zmmbamremoved.” determin Seaud e women He ee awere ha mmed love, mhe abelieves er be ng correc ed he group ed a ur her 130 k ome res nor h eas eng yto b My dp d belongs mna x omother w nd dndu nand eP othat Sad dchildren adiscriminatory BSc and akoAs Ma deg ee Opanned to David Whitehead, they been generous to aware let the Carol way known ha any h wais po b epeace, pu place. ities she considers that one needs succeed. of three mp brands. Afro-Gipsy a mix inmZimbabwe. In parting, Gladys encourages women was of Zim- red rec m me bwe and am blessed to have, spiritually at peace ishave suc-m women Qu kTh FaTho m acy ha had ow pend n apu wNa n wh hw nnd hwn h w h uninspire, so we are not of ortheirthe accomplishments.” Florence does not a ng Th en a whewnoundw w to w c Rene and a ww mdeco ame he Q hou peUn od 5place, yea Mako a nI live ed Puband c Adm ncommun on yk ewTh n stand up and be counted, “Pursue your goals and do not give up y shadeptly ound ng spo one grounded nminwou N that inhtheknowing community and inself the babwe qualities m nahe hvembelieves ho de m mtion, ww fundame mhntal hw nh ny nthat h n one n are mphanage joy w m she and eon and cess.” who you are, pu mbenefi children, found that there ishe great need be organized Emm und po ehn oherMu oko nare Mu oko he group se upwoman a heexperienceprosy co ony over ooked by he ouShe he use it. The orphanage time fed over a hundred children daily. ndu Mto w communities w at onbelieve your dreams. Continue to dream more, about bigger and better things Ano challenges unique; it’s what every career he d Eco wear isThHAfrican toned a pa cha enge that Ia work for in other countries, “ disciplin hope have ped peop e unde and he nve men oppo um dd eoname h M ou a we a a PhD om he Un ve y p whe e he w o e o week y Du ban w oha w been Th m m w n CUR CO mm n n m n n hmmhe hob Cyn na he h h h v qu d nd h b n m w that you can do. Do not be limited by your gender, culture, education, he bu M ng spirit and I ndu wish develop myself towhat full potential and uc enduring w m mha belief and passionate about you are on ers andndeveryone hvec w hhed Cornneck storo ng vmy-work a nwo o todo he comasw At m needed y Me abe m Thhome Wmbabwe op as p De edom in to run aowell where has gn aready succeed h ha D n n es. She however has tothe balance heryou. roles. “Husbands are not interested tonem w ob-mm Z ngu he e different n efficiently enco oump con nen a bma be ean athe econ ha b being ack women w w new pape n ub equen yea m order number of well wishers has decreased; the state of econfinancial status or whatever circumstances around Be focused and Moun h and vpresent, b app nhew my lines, wShe ohn Bradburne shr ne on Ch gono a n where hey s ayed or over a year is a testament, a guide and a marker carries to wear be in aThposition to excel in myhe andked make mw nan y e ndu w B y w h a Th e “Book ofinisZimbabwean Women” women h ffi n w h k n n wh n h h p aye m gne engage wm and n n Organization m nce m an n e w oD can no ha preconditions for success. Ziumbe believes a way work towards thein attainment your dreams.” too Real need wise words de life m afirmly ances n pub emv ng wo ked o am a difference in other people’s lives, O hav m W lawyers but a wife. of The children theirfrom mother,” she says. Family circumst do any ob haea men can h nk oab enuma easy an amTh wc schedule and involves planning as to avoid emkev on and ad She o ecthrough u edythe negative the overcom mun es shmen surv va and con nu ean y Bo wOn w kehas be n n wmy nso w ntoo PhD h h believes woman m m awdo nnoaes w k routine. hes m w nomy man a woman who has succeeded in a cut throat masculine environment, wo not made it get donations. the upside, the orphanage has d Th howeve work that I do,” she said. She that it which is creation of ha owcouture m no m that D A m m n oCnomm mCornneck and her co egues began he c ear ng process on he r own down n he ve human that nothing is impossible to someone who bep be o gove nmen m e un he ea y obshed and wy o indispensable to Florence, However, in the boardroom, she is a board memn erde MBA mM n was Un Zplan n she nm he con nen ” a he Un ve mbabwe and Z mn h o Uwhenm nPub m wmwr without losing her femininity. da ed m ba ffi ado M h Law God’s that landed in this regiondisappointments. m w on who m m e m of what can be achieved by women if given the opportunity. We hope it ned o e w m Th pec and mW mo n was ea1933 a it, agned Tbrings. acy he en oy Ra y Cornneck o sm she rher cthrough ho cit.parOne o he ng be ng MBA m dw A e emen ue he a Open ngborn aUn anahwo n to O Mmound m w hho wpu managed to purchase anposition, piece ofwhom land donations from leives, ifUn someone can do then too can do al which enables toCa serve not only mn made order for specific babwe venshe y ber and a mother wife. She expressed concern onlyemwa 1 out of Moun a n “ was a bush kh w URO URG mON &hpersonal mn equa m mh recogn zed ed orh neam vanot ey –businesswomaway rom he also co ony a he oo that o Mu Thank youand Gladys Mutyavaviri work Chimuka’s experiences are alot backdrop against A m h w which km D h wbut the h ofm hard aCoventry nThgaW naoocompany mu ed n ve n yKirsty h oa o ohe w w un w Zimbabwe other twenty countries she de requires wManagin m gn women m wa being m mbe Thank you Florence envisions the woman God created ec o he Z mbabwe m PRO OGladys Huepr W K “ wan o be o ce o eckoned w hT acy AU HOR ha a deep 10 board members is a woman. Women need to get more involved. n n n n Aw m n n h w ove w W h u h nv u b xp n No h ndo o covers. enjoys seeing concrete results You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” we salute you! he en in Harare. Part of the plan for the land is to build a youth centre, housing wh m h w n n m n ou en s From an ear y age he b n o re g ous mowill encourage and inspire women (and men) to excel and continuously doo and shas garments for different occaove pend ng he Th m m aywwerejuvenated ve ha he Skona a ng a herself Un women wa u - yh other powe and reinvented the Seeing for work mm mm tonyover and horny rees” She remembers fina y eav as ngrelaxing he eprosy co ony and v ng n had has m n h m n d n A ve pe Carol and D n are nc wM nn ce pve vyo on oyears. b hand bhe nm a me nlong he ndu owcommun be o - ome h ng sacrifi w the “Heartbeat of our nation” -n co-wo we salute you! h on am ke nwn lamented Pub For recreation Florence loves to go away with her family as well heh-chu ch o e vaand ym psyche She ue nuYou pe hoeout m m w m and ma chas ng o pp Hope Sadnscr ewo M m mn ywas k hsa w no m n k h n wland m for orphans and the remaining for income generating projects which m neup nhe imanye the ra y bed o Cornneck s he p gh bhmotivated oWh h and hund dhpn n nd women reach for the stars encouraged ChrisA scarcity fiown ook and o mom ha w n a e and eave a a ng egacy deadline whom meet to s he strive to attain the highest levels of merit and excellence. ay encou weekend aged he m w kon m W at home with husband. upwere on a farm, and hard and hey re ed upon caravans near s e hey c earshe ngloves Thefarming, work was npo w nA wh hn wh n dnot onm we veAdm involvement with women from all walks of life taught to beum mm whon henme m hours Spacewo k n hm nincluding h ca ee n nn bu n p n A n h her w hhe v nGrowing ka “My on and he amPub cmSe a mm o n o hy m k ng dmake ff n wa on horphanage nH n oday m M n nK he nndu bywn he pahas m wself he will the to donitpall ohm po eound y on A advance yack n deve none n ke beyond measure. Her divorced tooready comfortably op Thmm n mw wh h m etine in which cha m nwhem Mo mm Law b sufficient. n b eve oI can’t n Funding ndstand m n o youn opthis n hhowever ndu ydreams A is still on boaZimbabwe be somehow oGwmonnComm he was ahong was ng finds sanative. Florence of a Zimbabwe in which women see value Th oCO vinevitace and Pa ais he ouCUR time. hmother o managed h aeatm p n ac Asome n because on projects m h ng m she complete look down on a woman who I’m divorcing Managemen n says he co-wo m CUR CO w h fi m he he p o he surround ng commun es Cornneck spen our years v ng n a ke W a m mm m Samba m a have a d eam o e ng up a co ege ha w We salute these incredible women! an upcom d m y h nd d wo o h wo d d n un v n ng woman pu market o wa w w n poaefamily raise that proved to be a worthy inspiration. been bu nd bJoyce nHaving fficu po onpthat womdreams hit elusive. of anchooses world where all are failure. protected and haveshea would want to hold hands with other beyond Before she dies, mwomen no m n fi A h n n chn Th mn M n dhe m ss because n mnproduct hand nof hoacknowl nfi edges wnDMopn She time. de gn family ndu “When was perhaps hree or our o aphachildren ay apone w m ng ywwomen m n wh hbad oud n h p on h h bu G o non Mh M into her en am pa but not look down ayeach woman who toused stay in ffi m mm ona he ac ca he med nepabou w hop no No hwfor ndo op nbetter up anda dh novo w egacy exce hraised m w hfied m hd ff kn -own an k my n ait, m malso O six QM cand eto no many we ew qua e family how caravan and wa ched he n a sthat ruc up itone by one hey ormed he aMa last born and having been the AW m m and doygreat things. She acknowledges theures era ofgo going alone Th da w in M on h p ence o on women n n ov m ny dethat gn level field. and be between he ricing. However, is not to M on w n hew hquham y n y nce balance om omplaying heve h napu hwomon po ehm h ohmade n ewchallengi nw that mo fiond w 20 4heo u ed to du y w e nde empha on mDn d w ngof gn aw D dcan oo ed w wn e m choo om hma be Th he o que why on y o wed m ove marriage. We are strong in different ways.” Mw w edm te dren w h do s some rom dr ze cobs w passiona areI not they B d h mo who d No h ndo o b fi h nd d es w m w m is long gone. Her prayer is, “May forget where I came from, whosecare I amo by he commun y he business n h n n h h m p women into M life w part ofQnher by had its share of Soand nMMmother w n kh venture oown o hha dchallenges. m Aewom nencourag od phan to m he TnHe acy women encou e M mher mw age mm w e m commun y w h houses and ch be ng aken Z mbawean would “I adequa e y cove ed ” ay A an women . k o ffiout m m manages en u he ed he ud find ng she somehow not try to go of their way n hom h b wh d by h b nn ou h because n hI saw o ook up oM mphof women w h and k change ncareer, n w hw n o you family beyet m o he pnbeds opeam p oud ffin he mmHo were the days goodness God in my life.” In parting Florence gives a or un m om m K who woo ear chmfid he y age andhave who Cw used nto h w ciety and female run homes. wou make eUnfortunateand pre mak gone ng he cthemselv because academ cdabout Su wa nh umen n cyand aeshe e-a Hend M W n m nd ma eTh women dtalked no me h n stigmatises R mph C n-beondo G s M h 0 are N othe Okon o when w W m k still wvea Th limit mn ha ffi n and mu when you n nd no o be, ubachieving w yn an o her mnot she m ammlittle her to given purpose oned advice k aM ub ou m shared ustom made. In comparison, Mdeve w m wTh also of results if you choose not to be difCarol w nto wChristian ny og oo oum ah v onGod sm m n BwSpacewo n wthat m m m change commun w Th upgrade Op W naep Chamme n Lneed dword M empowe y advice: p nd Ton will Mo give on be andbitter o go oou becau e oW amm yopmen ewkgive pon -cu ng he cu heOhMed es you lydweven some people inmhnachurches are supposed m choo themselv r“Life om yTh oen Lu y identifi o m w GCEO mowwere to AB W Women n men. he pa s s eep ng ” Cornneck wou d ake e over with C n h m n w m ed m oca ing at peace with herself. 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It is against this background that Christine made up world.” You are the “Heartbeat of our nat on” - we sa ute you the and Thank you Florence Ziumbe o u ound my w h po you n w n n n h continue to with the same is-he wbecause mm n h n she h wants kn a wm h m gv around w m educa on On he o he tohand women o struggle ahou happenin tter, but strong brand come out of ZimbaThcu w w todsee what know toedrecurring cu been mo noudy e noogo oand women who w h ow No hem o ways m re wproud early noM get h h m is nn h u on p and fia d h ndo my Annwsuccess den ne n m w y w nmvr I mmremembe hw nm hhad nd um ycounter –ype p ohave m w wfl D leader. better behhoathat mind will be her portion sovv that she ong me nowwMduring ouppo mode o nd ook up omo d. - we salute you! sues such as financial wishes the narraMr. Price have survived in orientate m we that ocould he ade on alack. he eShe and c aneaehas need oentrustwor dedicated wnot w that You theyand “Heartbeat of our nation” ov pmore on m h hthy, d u h are m nd result o ea me conven o w hem M nda ve mpha hcompete n n at h h level. m Dw pm who b wcan n o my n h eher women of thinks be ww Carol M we m whave eve time s regarding client aon gu He n heo umen anare with gdance consultin h odp ee on po o cpast, h when D nAfrica h m n are w mchildren days damaging raised in female run m m P not oaugmen hope abm Zcembabwe wh pch he e ou who hexgovM he o homes. be ed by ac n n ofn hgeneratio utendi feels that women inabout media the African hfind v mng nwp hoved hcontinent vwM uy h nSad wa nd managed to raise nthe that part ofperceptions kept wm m w m ence mbabwea m of mm nW mOnhexper ffiTh m m ww w n example nd vk that nmothers ond o women y mn w m e ns w Un-– m m good Ayweight m w m vmm yto oimpress kbattled boare ommy Th on w y om tend w hAfrica e nmen ookis ndh yw owa ah mo ho n o couway w m would m w Christine is onMAfricans ahopmen healthy living campaign. She with isand celebrated. InmhISouth there few names N managem n m Ament h systems, m wh m w m big mBu w same Pystill n Ggove pp hnmen nd w NoV o come yo Lway u nTh my v eve w n qualities Carol ese m nMw m wup mnd wour s that elds. drespected South are sm fi deve the m wdoub walso in h you k h down m hard very worked ed he ha a ong n y ng o he yet children n w n h h w n n our w w w w M and mnot wby earth maccorded m a w heaven m n of Tsitsi w w them wm w fflmthey tsues theym are the respect deserve. hopes o h w hey hm nn br o ng du h wo d bou d ff n A n oun ering in the past but through disciplined regime eating healthy off clients n on n mm xpbea you b na om on m mo “Women are he oearn hesomeonpthat because endtoexp ove he hwY nwZ n h h ves ayand ng fie o apply women bu he mooe ou han can be done evmbamhear m w w d nd family. and arments thought they haven’t business w be w day no sa sfied w h wha you now S r ve o m m haveon mM w h w d y v n p op h b day to also can h w y up To ov om h h n Somebelieves, ons. the more women be honoured and recognized. m mto expectati m their mm a m m Besides w y mlose exercising she 20kg 6owmonth period. To her, a hodes exceed m over mfuture would w m FTh nance pec aare heruc uve e woman mo we P o o ha hou d have g ea e e u n o services as wha nan awill na on s rare who do v - who we bus managed o ego eouaomono am g eaon e goa d nmand NoV om hedup n educa w m m No h ndoye yfind d o can uwomen d never nd Th w m w m w m w m on w here w m M u ound d w P g se some hwo ng you do no know We an empowe men you g ve am wpe gerian level. When dressing, and direction m w m kHmeof recognition, Tsitsi acknowledges the same path who that God and Sad ha e hecanno cho a and h pgives ng seek w w wwo h ked O hto n y ho ge m oc he h d ou u wisdom who healthy body equals healthy mind.She to travel and spending ash promised go m m women m w m w m not advise would y uMyoma eh yand he chw udh en a we “IW things wloves hmwalking pm,op dor hou s ave and d vethat women swho un y a Tha women y o uM times ham been o ha edge m r ve msrup m e my know w n enough ” m self-doubt, w m w w h mif ou doub my v n oy On n u h y h ov den and ho e ha canno affo d o pay o educa on Among ome nsistently is a challenge. However, one overcomes to seek the advice of stylists. M w m w o d uppo n wo k you u n h God. nough Su danvour gdown asteps e un voare heo ordered upponh baby e he ha Ie pec a y om he D d helped eave trustwor m w o thy, m time family and friends entertaining into action her beand m wand to l kwas mm m putting m wrong he mewith individua m a m ma w an believe me I and w work oge her or s each her s percep on crea ed by ask has who nd on no h n b n nu those to y a umn he hu V ceband P e Mdenon oyce u eu and finm n m k u h oo he nd un ve w into m mn b m erything else place. nwoffe wm To W befalls The eMu we me he had o alife k he am y membe mWearZim chmMu dmfamily onhmm n thebng project. This hamHer h h ny By mm culinary skills. and friends have been encouraging to n auusbd oom K epbeneu un n he ndpw ope undand yy9bu m m Ou I wTh Muk ds hbest nservice n he nway ycan.” va nm nn h xher w wcon m no E m md my the er mp on On o my o u h off upon w and mpav m abe h Magaya ng en ne nt grace men hey do o ro us hey wou d ra her have v ded m transpare ness o hap ng and ng o Women faithful e who eh wedabout of hwGod m n mthe n h mwealth, name hen asked importance o hoake hece m testimo awas m m wchw d m en o he doc o becau e o a hec c wo k chedu e W bm dTsitsi’s wn h L dyHope o ny Lou dm aGods’ n Bu wna yo on d m m of hhm h bu n nvwRum h am onwhHresponse d mNo ndo M wve mca gowan on cooking competition Ma ay Sad de cho She enbw oy ohe openourage Zimbabweans to supfi m ha hm hprograms. h wyWhen h nmm Un A mm m ma m m O M o han un ed women are done ran ng and rav ng hey wan eave m m k No h ndo b v h h h m o Z mb m k h nd o m M “ ha been a ou ney o mak ng ac fice and ha d cho ce have w m at of a sage. “Wealth iswnmessential tohMargaret the of k p hnmn nd p on yb Th wo w n kwh ndon m klongevity b nlasting ylegacies. hne w w guidanc twhis wnmother hm ww nm Th o Mhnothing hed oc and eva ng h ghh eveN oe.” e ona n m withou m m Im dam H he A h know edge Hope Sad a and e mselflessChristine looks up to for her T acy dm e yG on b p vM o ng o pdkoon W vnon abou be-her w w h Nyirenda wm ncan wh M and putriches made m wedd chen pa e une a and o he mpo an amwn m ww ”med monZimbabwean ware n hshort npeace nm n w hn short put m Wh h and bun when n nyou mymHe they m short, term lived and buy nice U hAma V k A m o ewnmode nc ude u bu ed and more and ted he e v e v ce d m o mb n oMu om nG aca Mache v n w hThe n he wo on w mn focused wweemed w po w on orienta m n he c M m he ha onw mo e be de ffi n h h w w w w he ness, courage and for being the best mother for her family. She also m m y ngp devo nev ab he yn peop m nwwis y and n h Thlived. y have n bu b ve m un vW m w w you “Succe know ngdnm ha had a apo and en mA m AL ngm o mov w om w ww Th d women acco P e h ombuHope Sadhea dhave ed ism long term long Wealth buy ffngs. line for the project Buy me u ga h n ve oue we e d appo n ed bu u ma e y o off he ca asking andm ook pcan unge he b great m add h w of ng oWealth w h mh wo d and and fie dhyour “We d onnevnhe a vw Th mm A np oon WecmLhem kMachel h han unmulti-t nyou nndespite h y tragedy pp he d of nh nher Adelcoun o unde and ou” fiy the is inspired by Graca who the first We on awwwan ffi m have pw gncu u e cu nd n bh he bu op n ou up doo ohou figh ea good and ou women h power we ho he Wpac av ng nown andwm”your he Women Unlosing ve and -owcreeat grandchildren ugh mcommunity m Th m m gnn conv m m ngwma w e-w Med a m de wm envisions a nn Zimbabwe Th w m nced n neducation, nd m ewhere fi change he ob ec ve enhanc ex Th flwShe m d AW ffe en ngonomy om ow he hh ndu e The e a pe cep on ha nwng nm y he nd hum na en p oy nv m nngno oand boo ou w chance. wThe m Un om pove Hope Sad oc a pend me same the are husband, was willing to give love another She also has a huge y n A ca WUA wa bo n ve y home at w m w e m w m an apply nd v dua can punpo a viable income a business family wea woom mdma ne eve ebasis women om ples w handw nfor wh millions. o h oom As d h changp AW n mon ao eyoun op ona n band n o a ona n he way hey ead o gany h o dhoo aanand Need n aw am d d women o pemo w m b n y hMwo hTn you you baff wg y products. the end, w a co po w amIed ww hmon m N maexudes N h k wif m office and m ma w also enIn pu po heart and and wisdom. Maureen Shana is anothedignity Fo h hmao omm n WUA Too do won no v m wom eave orientated toward anbuy lasting business will continue toSadawhaany m building e pec n ho med change n bw n that n da F yom mhope m wcoun “A ah w woman you a ne and shelps P expand na oddo he e ny and hope oway on gua d and wan o p ove ha w on mm m hngxp busines e the Danc nge This h uab nng h environ h ment.” w yknLW in ply comp men 2002 WUA opened doo heBa mo va mw n” n he h add n w bn v y k y n d n o Th ysweet D spirit N u asyoun h Th nkhand on uy mine too. keep you m Th m Tthe m Lv w hon m m No M w er woman that Chimuka revers for her elegance and xp n ndo b Ubun CUR CO h n k wh h mpower and create more money for our family community echno ogy mpac ndu y g ow he uden body o abou 5000 Howeve he cau on you a e ough and ma bu ahawomen we a e no w ed ha way ” n w w m Th wngW m co po om a h eYou unde uden hmm n Th w a ewm w n mn 50 e o each o khe w m Y H eem w w mm Ow W m m n m humhm y Ziumbe d vm n pgen on b wPomp m y wealth oo ou n vha onsharpened m w That Su an w a o ed academ c m mw ow hmyou ha gowom be accompan ed hmkp qua y ed Landa deen a ea mo e d acon an han men becau e wy and w g. uand woed ww well as in. Grace Muradzikwa Florence for their W H w ed reside ismmtrue to us.” he wo ace women a e ma e pon e pu e o Sad a To h n o Z mb bw h v w wo v you own w w m m w w n h p qu w Th v on nd w m

hen you look at our children today, here in our mmunity, children who are HIV positive and on atment, and compare them to those children who negative – you can never tell the difference, they all vigorously healthy.”

DESTINY

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ElizabethMagaya

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DESTINY“Heartbeat of a Nation”

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ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT APRIL 26 TO MAY 2, 2013

5

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts

Dr Charity Jinya

Her career began in the Ministry of Economic Planning and Development as a research economist Dr Charity Jinya’s middle name is Chiratidzo She was the first black female economist to join the Chamber of Commerce She was appointed to lead MBCA Bank Limited in February 2010

BANKING

“In my career development, I have never considered myself in terms of gender, nevertheless one cannot refute the level of interaction that men have at places such as golf clubs.” A woman of substance, a veteran banker, and a renowned “turnaround artist”, Dr Charity Jinya made MBCA Bank Limited history in February 2010 when she became the first woman to head up this leading financial institution. Dr Jinya holds a B.A. Honours degree in Economics from the University of Sunderland, UK and is a Fellow of the Institute of Bankers Zimbabwe. A previous Executive Director at a local listed bank now known as ZB, then Managing Director at Barclays Bank Zimbabwe and later Managing Director of Barclays Bank Limited Uganda. She has been described as tenacious, candid and virtuous. �e testament to this astute description is the impact she has had at MBCA Bank Limited. “When I joined the bank, it had gone through some difficult times in terms of operational effectiveness. It was crucial to re-engineer the way the bank was operating and the team has been cooperative in helping to bring about the desired change in the business. �is has been crucial to its survival. As the market has been changing we have been adapting and anticipating these changes by ensuring all colleagues are aware of expectations by the bank and its customers and the need to be proactive . Right now we are on a growth path,” says Dr Jinya. Her recipe for success, no doubt sifted through her 30 year career, is simple, unique and worthwhile.

“I never look at success in terms of material gains. When I fail, I get up, dust myself off, review the situation,learn from it and move on while doing my utmost not to repeat the same failure,” �e lessons learnt from her experiences have garnered attention at international levels of academia. Dr Jinya is one of a few Zimbabweans to have been awarded with an Honorary Doctorate in Business Administration by St Linus University (2011) in recognition of her contribution to society in the fields of Banking and Finance, Business and Research, as well as Management and Administrative affairs. In this regard she shares the revered company of international legends such as Billy Graham, Maya Angelou and Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai who have received similar awards across varying fields. Dr Jinya has also studied various Management and Leadership courses which include, �e Chicago Business School Executive development Programme, the London Business School Senior Leadership Programme ‘Lead to Win’ and the Harvard Leadership session for Women in Business. “Women are generally not seen as great networkers. In some cases the glass ceiling exists as evidenced by statistics of women in leadership roles and boardrooms. In my view this cannot be explained away by a lack of competence nor the fact that women need to interrupt their careers when they look after their babies. It is up to us women in leadership to also be conscious of this as we recruit while not adversely affecting the need for qualified and competent employees,” says Dr Jinya.

It would seem like there are no regrets or even new summits to conquer for such a woman, yet she confesses, “I have not always been good at balancing work and family, and over the years I became more conscious of this. I therefore make a deliberate effort to make time for my family and my spiritual growth. My children are grown up which has made it easier. A lot of factors need to be considered, such as family support and how your family handles your absence from home. However, each person has to assess what works well for them as there is no single solution for all of us.” Dr Jinya has served on the boards of Zimsun, ARDA, Bindura University of Science and Technology, Waddilove Schools and Sandringham Methodist School. Because of her passion to see the advancement of the communities around her, Dr Jinya serves on various community boards which include Christian Care, Junior Achievement and Pro Africa. She has an eye for excellence which won her several Barclays Bank Leadership Awards, as well as the chairmanship position in the Institute Of Bankers Zimbabwe. In 2011, Dr Jinya was conferred, 1st runner-up Business Woman of the year by the Zimbabwe Chamber of Commerce (ZNCC) and was named one of Zimbabwe’s top 20 business personalities in 2012. When asked whether she has any unfulfilled ambitions, her reply was astounding, “Yes, I have things that I could have done better; my key unfulfilled ambitions are more in community work and I desire to do more in this area.” It appears that there are no limits for Dr Jinya as long as she has breath in her body. She also urges Zimbabwean bankers to embrace integrity. “You are the custodians of depositors’ funds, the money is not yours. Put God first in everything you do.” �is is not surprising as she attributes her success to her faith. “I desire to be more and more like Jesus Christ. He worked with diverse people, the good and the bad yet he still got results and remained true to himself. Success is being the best you can be according to God’s purpose,” says Dr Jinya. In the meantime, this fierce, passionate and determined leader will continue forging ahead at MBCA Bank Limited with heart as well as good old down-to-earth faith in an environment where the financial services sector has been accused of poor service delivery. “While I would not generalise the service standards of all financial institutions, I can confirm that at MBCA Bank customer service is at the heart of all we do, and exceeding customer expectations is an imperative for us. We recognise that the needs of customers are constantly changing and becoming more complex. As a result each member of the team is personally responsible for delivering excellence”, says Dr Jinya. With such excellence already ably demonstrated by their leader, who can doubt this promise to serve.

�ank you Dr Jinya You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE MAY 3 TO MAY 9, 2013

E3

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts “An entrepreneur moves away

Lena Zamchiya from the norm, they identify soVice President of Capacity Building for Enactus Worldwide Co-founder and past Chief Executie Office of BOOST Lena sits on the board of Southern Central and Value-Ed Holds an MBA from Howard University Lena is also a Sales Associate for SMI (Success Motivation Institute)

BUSINESS

lutions and possibilities to the challenges in environment, they are always solution oriented, a team worker and a leader.”

With over a decade of her career devoted to developing potential entrepreneurship and excellence in young people from universities and high schools all over Africa, Lena Zamchiya can only be described as a pioneer of innovative leadership. �is Zimbabwean woman has recently been appointed the Vice President of Capacity Building for Enactus Worldwide where she oversees six Regional Managing Directors (Europe, Africa, MENA and French speaking nations) as well as a corporate level fundraising strategy for the international programme. Formerly known as Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE), Enactus is the world’s best-known youth entrepreneurship initiative which helps university students create community empowerment projects. Zamchiya credits her passion for youth development to the values and life lessons modeled by her own parents,

“My parents were leaders in their respective spheres of influence and through their encouragement and mentorship I was able to obtain the tools for my success. �eir commitment to excellence established a standard of hard work as the key success factors in the pursuit of reaching my goals.” �e professional achievements she has experienced throughout her career are a worthy attribute to this experience. As a co-founder and past Chief Executive Officer of the BOOST (Building Opportunities on Student Talent) Fellowship, Zamchiya sat on advisory council for the joint UNDP/UNESCO Foundation for Africa’s Future Leadership, aimed at leadership development for youth. Furthermore the programme has held successful partnerships with ICRISAT, Central Johannesburg College, FAO and Future Search Zambia. BOOST spearheads entrepreneurship, mentorship, and corporate governance as well as community empowerment initiatives across 10 Zimbabwean universities and to date has implemented pilot projects in South Africa, Zambia and Malawi. �e community projects incorporate group and team tasks geared to inspire possibility oriented worldviews cultivating the next generation of leaders and innovators. “I value group engagement and participation and enjoy promoting teamwork. I believe that the opportunity for people to work in groups serves as a catalyst for innovation and stimulates creativity,” says Zamchiya. Her most successful partnership during her time with the BOOST Fellowship was with Enactus. Since 2005 she has led five teams to the International World Cup competitions. �e tournament is held once a year with competing teams drawn from across the world to showcase their community outreach projects to a prestigious group of international business leaders. �e University of Zimbabwe’s team was the first African team to win the World Cup in 2005 against 44 teams from all over the world. Other teams under her leadership have won awards such as “Rookie of the Year”, “Spirit of SIFE” and National Champion awards. In September 2006, the Vice President of Enactus Africa nominated Zamchiya to the Enactus Africa strategic advisory council to oversee Enactus programmes in Swaziland, Botswana and Lesotho. Four years later, Enactus recognized her efforts and commitments to the programme and promoted her office position from the Enactus Zimbabwe country coordinator to Regional Vice President, African Region, Enactus Worldwide. In this role she has been responsible for 10 Enactus Country programmes in Africa (Egypt, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Morocco, Senegal, South Africa, Swaziland, Tunisia and Zimbabwe). �e Enactus programme has 57 000 students in projects based in 39 countries all year round.

�e Zimbabwe Enactus teams have continued to uphold a fine tradition of being placed in the top five on this highly competitive platform since Zamchiya handed the reigns over to current country leader Saliwe Mtetwa, a BOOST alumni, in 2010. In Mtetwa’s tenure, Chinhoyi University of Technology were placed second in 2011 and Midlands State University placed third in 2012. “It’s rewarding to see Saliwe come on board and hand over the BOOST leadership baton. She was on our first pilot programme in 2001 and has continued to walk with us along her professional journey. I am confident the organisation and programming activities, with the support of the current board, will go from strength to strength and continue thriving and effecting positive changes in the lives of young people within Zimbabwe,” says Zamchiya. In addition to her demanding career, Zamchiya continues to nurture her passion for leadership empowerment. Having read two degrees with Defiance College (BA) and Howard University (MBA) she has supported her professional achievement with ongoing education. To date she has attained a certificate from the Executive Education under the Transformational Leadership and Management Skills Development (TLMSDP) from University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School’s Aresty Institute of Business. She is currently working on her Life Coach Certification in the area of Leadership and Performance Management from the I-Coach academy in Johannesburg. Lena Zamchiya sits on the boards of Southern Central, a private equity firm in Zimbabwe and Value-Ed, which strives to support and establish a sense of personal leadership within the youth of South Africa. “For me entrepreneurship is also about social leadership. As much as businesses must be profitable, they must also address social challenges like unemployment.” says Zamchiya. She is also a Sales Associate for SMI (Success Motivation Institute) Africa, which is a pioneer and leader in the personal and professional development industry, she attributes her success in SMI to the professional mentorship of Nigel Chanakira. Having received his guidance in honing her decision making skills, she counts herself privileged to have had the opportunity to access such keen insight and wisdom in the area of leadership. As Lena Zamchiya continues to seek new frontiers in developing leaders from the next generation, she says, “We need a sense of purpose to be able to unleash our potential and success. �is is an ongoing process as success is not achieved overnight. Recognizing the importance and value of hard work and tapping into the invaluable resource of existing wisdom around will help access organic mentorships. However, we must always seek to see possibilities all around us, as that way we gain access to solutions.”

�ank you Lena Zamchiya You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE MAY 10 TO MAY 16, 2013

E3

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts “As a writer and filmmaker I love to

talk to people, observe and learn from them. People inform the stories I tell, Founder and Director of and these stories and films will be there Mai Jai Films for future generations to read and watch Was Festival Director of long after I am gone.”

Rumbi Katedza

Zimbabwe International Film Festival

Holds a Masters in Filmmaking from Goldsmiths College Recipient of two National Arts Merit Awards

In October 2011 Rumbi Katedza’s first feature film, Playing Warriors, was premiered at the 7 Arts �eatre in Avondale, Harare. �e film, which explores the lives of four modern women, marked a turning point in our cinematic history; Playing Warriors portrays Zimbabwean women in a way that had not yet been captured by other Zimbabwean filmmakers of present and previous generations. �ough the impact of the film is still being imparted, one can say without restraint that Rumbi Katedza is one of Zimbabwe’s most talented filmmakers whose work will endure and change the landscape of Zimbabwean cinematography.

“Filmmaking is my passion. I am very lucky that I knew quite early on that I wanted to be a filmmaker, so I fully immersed myself in the industry after college.”

FILMMAKER

Rumbi Katedza spent her formative years in the United States and Japan. It was in Tokyo that she discovered her love for film. �rough her adolescence she aspired to be a filmmaker, and after attaining her first degree in English, Film and Communications from McGill University in Canada, she returned to Zimbabwe and began her journey to be a leader in her industry. A gifted storyteller, Rumbi Katedza has been working in the film industry for over seventeen years. Her passion and drive are evident in all the projects she has undertaken. Katedza’s work is as interesting as it is varied; her film credits include: ‘Danai’ – nominated for Best Director at the National Arts Merit Awards (Nama), ‘Tariro’ and ‘Big House, Small House’ both recipients of Namas for Best Film Productions, and ‘Asylum’ – which won the Best Short Film award at the Images of Black Women Film Festival in London and the Best Short Film award at Human Rights Nights in Italy. Katedza has also directed a number of music videos for some of Zimbabwe’s top artists, including Rocqui and Leonard Mapfumo, Sanii Makhalima, Roy and Royce, Achuzi and Jazz Invitation. She has also made a successful television series and her documentaries have been shown to audiences around the world where they were received with critical acclaim. Katedza is also a talented writer, many of her short stories about contemporary Zimbabwean life have been published, most notably: ‘Snowflakes in Winter’ which is part of Weaver Press’ ‘Women Writing Zimbabwe’ collection, ‘�e Corpse’ published by the prestigious literary US based journal Illuminations, and the award-winning ‘Billboard Smile’, which won an Anglo-Platinum Short Story Award.

“Success is the ability to see the sky and know that the sky is not the limit.” Embracing new technologies and seeing opportunities arising from the constant changes in her field, Rumbi is enthused by what the future holds, “�is is a very exciting time in our industry with developments in new media allowing us to document information, images and stories for a larger audience through the World Wide Web.” Katedza looks forward to seeing a steady flow of content from Zimbabwean filmmakers and believes the use of digital technology is vital – making film production more affordable. Since Katedza founded her film company, Mai Jai Films, she has developed scores of projects and worked with hundreds of people around the globe. Speaking about her craft Katedza says, “�e process of filmmaking espouses the true essence of teamwork to create a shared vision. �at¹s what I love about filmmaking.” Katedza continues by stating that she loves the power of being able to create something from a mere idea, to visualise every aspect of the idea and elicit an emotional response from millions of people around the world once the film has been produced.

Self-belief, a strong vision, and the ability to uphold and defend that vision are some of the qualities attributed to her successes. Katedza equally believes in patience, tolerance and the ability to empathise with others. Relating to her career, Katedza has been fortunate to work with some prominent figures in the African film industry, filmmakers like Idrissa Ouedraogo from Burkina Faso, Monique Mbeka-Phoba from the DRC and Benin, Peace Anyiam-Osigwe from Nigeria, Bridget Pickering from Namibia and Seipati Bulane-Hopa from South Africa, filmmakers who have achieved great successes in their respective industries. But Katedza laments that we, as Africans, do not know much about filmmakers from our continent, “Our audiences are exposed to mostly American content which does not speak to our experiences.” she says. “We have a lot more work to do to build our cultural industries, celebrate them and get to a stage where we are exporting our culture to the rest of the world instead of the other way around.” Around the turn of the century, when the Zimbabwean film industry was losing a lot of its business to South Africa, Namibia, Kenya and Australia, Katedza was part of an impetus pushing to save the industry; filmmakers were forced to redefine their roles and make their own films to tell Zimbabwean stories. At that time Katedza was festival director at the Zimbabwe International Film Festival (ZIFF), “We ran workshops and Master Classes through our Film Forum and produced and premiered scores of short films through the Short Film Project. �ese films still air on ZBC TV today and are available online. �ose short films launched countless careers.” Her work with people is a very important aspect of her career, particularly in film where teamwork is essential. “I am most proud of the projects I have done that have led to the continued success of the people in my team. I am very proud of Tongayi Arnold Chirisa and Monalisa Mupambawashe who I worked with when I ran ZIFF.” Charisa has gone on to achieve great success in the US, while Mupambawashe has fast become a prominent TV producer in South Africa. Katedza is also proud of the youngsters she worked with on her youth film project, Postcards from Zimbabwe – an audio visual and life-skills training programme for teenagers. “Although I produced their films, they ended up teaching us adults a lot about life: appreciating the small things in life, the kindness of people, sharing a laugh, a smile.” Looking to the future, Katedza has a number of projects that she’s developing, including a second feature film. “My goal is to make films and to keep making films. Akira Kurosawa and Federico Fellini, some of the biggest names in film history, went on making films well into old age, and talked about how even though they were considered the ‘Masters’ of filmmaking, they always had new things to learn and to share.” Filmography: Danai (2002); Postcards from Zimbabwe (2006); Trapped (2006 – Rumbi Katedza, Marcus Korhonen); Asylum (2007); Insecurity Guard (2007); Tariro (2008); Big House, Small House (2009); �e Axe and the Tree (2011); �e Team (2011); Playing Warriors (2011).

�ank you Rumbi Katedza You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE MAY 24 TO MAY 30, 2013

E3

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts “�e only thing that stands be-

Merissa Kambani tween a person and what they want from life is often the will Managing Director of Medical to try it and the faith to believe Investments Limited it is possible.” Holds an MBA from the Eastern and Southern African Management Institute, Tanzania President of Private Hospitals Association of Zimbabwe Sitting President, Rotary Club – Harare West

It is said that the ultimate measure of a person is not where they stand in moments of comfort and convenience, but where they stand at times of challenge. At the height of the country’s economic crisis Merissa Kambani was appointed Managing Director of one of Zimbabwe’s largest private healthcare consortiums, Medical Investments Limited. It is a period in her career’s history that remains fresh in her mind. With unwavering faith and determination, Kambani commanded the helm of the organization and steered it through the straits of those challenging years with noteworthy results. Since then Kambani and her team have not looked back and have overseen growth in hospital occupancy, turnover, capital and asset base and have continuously posted good annual results.

“Success is meeting of your set goals and getting satisfaction with your performance or results, making a difference to the community and people around you and leaving a mark.”

HEALTHCARE

Courageous, optimistic and realistic are the three qualities best suited to describe Kambani. Born into a large family Kambani grew up in Mbare Police Camp where her father served with the police force. She remembers that time as an important period that grounded her in terms of principles, “If your father is in the force, your whole family is in the force.” Kambani says, recalling the rigid regime of discipline instituted by life within the camp. And with most leaders, discipline is an essential ingredient to success, discipline and selfbelief, “To achieve real success, I have told myself to be real, to believe in myself, to see or view myself not as a woman but as a person, and as we say in Shona “Isa meso ako pagejo” which means to be unwavering in pursuit of your goals.” Kambani held her first solid managerial position in her early twenties, working for Zimbabwe’s leading clothing and footwear retailer, Edgars. After four years with the blue chip company, Kambani left the retail industry and entered the health sector when she joined Medical Investments Limited in the finance department. Medical Investments Limited, trading as �e Avenues Clinic, runs �e Avenues, St. Clements and Montagu clinics in Harare. Kambani rose through the ranks to her current position after previously being the Finance Manager and Company Secretary. Kambani’s personal vision is to leave behind a legacy of empowerment. She believes in the communal benefits of success and would like to see her successes and achievements contributing to the success, happiness and growth of the people around her and the organisation she belongs to. During her 19 year tenure at �e Avenues Clinic she has made remarkable accomplishments, personally and professionally, “One of my biggest triumphs was to sail through the 2007/2008 hyper-inflationary period. �ings were bad and many organisations folded. It was tough but the hospital’s doors remained open.” And during these challenging times Kambani was

brave enough to tenaciously pursue the organisation’s vision and mission statement of providing critical healthcare to all clients with total professionalism; and in 2008 the hospital was the first private hospital in Zimbabwe to be certified by the Standards Association of Zimbabwe on ISO 9001 of 2008 – to which they remain compliant to this date. In 2010 Kambani was also instrumental in the birth of the B Braun-Avenues Dialysis Unit. �e dialysis centre offers treatment to patients with renal failure who need haemodialysis. �e Zimbabwe National Chamber of Commerce (ZNCC) awarded her the Business Woman of the Year award for 2012, citing her leadership qualities and business acumen. Kambani has spearheaded the shift in her organisation’s strategic focus from a defensive strategy to a growth strategy by pursuing various options on new products for the future like alliances, joint ventures and medical tourism. Commenting on her impact on the health industry, Kambani believes that she has, “contributed in making the industry more visible both locally and regionally.” She says that this visibility has also strengthened the Private Hospitals Association of Zimbabwe (PHAZ) and its relationship with institutions and associations in the industry. Kambani is the current President of PHAZ. In recognition of her leadership qualities, Kambani has been appointed to several leadership roles and sits on boards of various organisations and bodies. She is a compassionate humanitarian who has been a Rotarian for six years and is the sitting president of the Rotary Club of Harare West. “I am very passionate about the compassionate ministry. I love giving and I feel satisfied if I give and restore hope in someone’s life. As a Rotarian I always think service above self.” Goals are imperative to planning for the future from a personal and professional perspective. “Written goals are magical.” Kambani says, “�e achievement of those goals is attracted. I am focusing on growing the business regionally and continuing my professional development for a doctorate.” Kambani’s pursuit of a Doctorate of Philosophy in Administration is a vision and a dream she wishes to attain in the not too distant future, she sees it as something that will bolster her confidence, “When setting goals, you need to achieve your personal goals which will give you the confidence to achieve your professional goals.” Faith and family are important to Kambani, “I value spending quality time with God and my family.” she says. Kambani is a devout Christian, and her mantra is always to do everything according to the word and principles. She is a loving mother of three children – a son and two daughters and Kambani also proudly boasts of having two grandchildren. Always insightful, her final remark was, “�e only thing that stands between a person and what they want from life is often the will to try it and the faith to believe it is possible. It is possible, zvinogoneka as her spiritual father, Apostle Raymond Mujeyi, always says”.

�ank you Merissa Kambani You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE MAY 31 TO JUNE 6, 2013

E3

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts “�rough my knowledge of

Jacqueline Ngwenya the businesses I enter into I Finance Manager RioZim Limited Holds a Bachelor of Accounting Science Holds an Honours of Accounting Science A member of the Institute Chartered Accountants of Zimbabwe First female chairperson of Matebeleland Chartered Accountants Society

have been a facilitator and created platforms for people to make change.” �e Japanese writer Haruki Murakami wrote, “If you are young and talented, it’s like you have wings.” Jacqueline Ngwenya typifies this statement with her vision and youthful vigour that have seen her quickly ascending to the higher echelons of her profession. A highly competent and exceptionally skilled Chartered Accountant, Ngwenya has seven years post experience with two of the largest blue chip companies in the country; she is fuelled with a drive to continue learning and accredits her successes to passion, discipline and faith. In October 2012 Ngwenya was appointed to the position of Finance Manager at RioZim Limited. RioZim Limited, a listed mining conglomerate, owns one of the largest resources in Zimbabwe. Ngwenya was recruited to assist in the group’s financial restructuring after a period of successive losses and huge debt over hang. Speaking about her new appointment, Ngwenya says she enjoys learning about the mining sector and enjoys the challenge of what lies ahead. “I moved from a listed company that was doing fairly well to a listed company going through challenging times because I don’t easily shy away from challenges.” Ngwenya also believes challenges produce opportunities for personal growth and change.

“Women are unique, we bring difference. Without us the world would be grey and black suits, but we bring colour, we make a difference. Our warmth is part of who we are. We are unifiers of families, we bring peace.”

FINANCE

Looking back to her roots Ngwenya recounts how her parents came from poor rural families but still managed to lift themselves out of poverty and provide better lives for their children. She recalls her parents being “one of the first [blacks] to buy into the whiteowned low density suburbs in 1981.” And she takes this achievement as one of the inspirational points marked on the compass of her development, “I said to myself, if they could move from poor to middle class – then I must also grow in leaps and bounds.” And she did just that. �rough secondary school she excelled in academics and athletics. After high school she enrolled with the University of South Africa (UNISA) and attained a Bachelor of Accounting Science, and after that - an Honours Bachelor of Accounting Science. She then took a financial management specialist course and completed her qualifying examinations with the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Zimbabwe, which she lists as one of the achievements she is most proud of. Ngwenya then joined Ernst & Young as an audit senior in the auditing department where she remained for seven years before joining Zimbabwe’s leading clothing and footwear retailer, Edgars. It was at Edgars that she began to notice the importance and gravity attached to her position, “When I joined Edgars as the youngest member of the senior management team, I looked at my decisions differently – as they were decisions that could affect the lives of over a thousand employees.” Ngwenya is conscious of the people who surround her both in and out of the workplace. She is passionate about people and has a desire to see people’s lives changed for the better. She says her God-given assignment is to inspire people to dream, believe and possess their dreams through being examples others can follow and aspire to. She is particularly passionate about youths, especially young women pursuing their dreams to become great leaders. “It pains me when I see a generation lacking passion, vision and foresight. I love it when I meet teenagers who are dreaming big and talking big, because then I know that as they discipline themselves to achieve this desire – we’ll have a prospering nation.”

A naturally gifted presenter, Ngwenya has spoken and presented on a number of platforms – she has been a speaker at the annual Imara Investor Conference, and most notably presented a successful paper on Sustainable Investments from a Zimbabwean perspective at the annual Eastern and Southern African Pension Conference in Mombasa, Kenya. Ngwenya is also a voluntary speaker for Girls Development Initiative, a group of professional women providing leadership mentoring for girls from disadvantaged backgrounds. Along with the latter mentorship, Ngwenya is actively involved in an internationally recognised and accredited Christian organisation as a leader as well as in mentoring and leadership development and training. Ngwenya’s faith is an integral part of her life and development. She sites her church and the Bulawayo Junior City Council as giving her the opportunity to lead from an early age. Her senior pastor, mentor and founder of Woman Unlimited, has played an important role in Ngwenya’s life, “Not only is she a go-getter, her passion love and warmth inspire me.” When dealing with her challenges Ngwenya says she seeks the wisdom of her mentors, while embracing the love and acceptance of her family; and through her religion she finds inspiration and solace, “Tough times don’t last, but tough people do. Jesus learned patience through the things he suffered.” Jaqueline Ngwenya’s journey is far from complete, her’s is a career marked with promise that will reach its zenith and inspire many others after her. Asked how she would encourage other Zimbabwean women today, Ngwenya reminds us of the trials one is faced along the routes of success, she also reminds us of the stoical balances leaders must embrace, “Don’t avoid pain, pain is part of the growth process. In the journey to success be sure to take someone along. Remember leadership is influence, nothing more, nothing less.”

�ank you Jacqueline Ngwenya You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE JUNE 14 TO JUNE 20, 2013

E3

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts “My personal vision is to see

Praxedes Dzangare my fellow beings develop to Founder Director of DDH&M

greater heights, achieve their own goals and celebrate one another unconditionally.”

Chairperson of Zim Brand Alliance Widely regarded as one of the top media gurus Chairperson of Zimbabwe Association of Accredited Practitioners in Advertising Honorary Life Member of the Advertising Publicity Club (APC)

in the country, Praxedes Dzangare enjoys a career that is vividly coloured with all the strokes that go into making a powerful portrait of a woman standing steadfast in an industry that relentlessly demands fresh vision and constant innovation. With over thirty years of experience in advertising and marketing, Dzangare has demonstrated her ability to consistently build strong, motivated and enthusiastic teams that ignite the think-tank of one of Zimbabwe’s leading advertising agencies.

Recipient of a Life Time into a large family in peri-urban DomAchievement Award, APC Born boshawa, Dzangare attributes elements of her Advertising Awards 2005 successes to her upbringing. Her grandfather

was a well-known farmer in the area, and her

“Interacting with people of all classes is something I enjoy a lot – and of course, through my work, I enjoy seeing campaigns from their inception through to fruition. I love the implementation stages of any project and the adrenaline that crazy deadlines bring.”

ADVERTISING

father, a headmaster at several schools, brought his children up with strong Catholic ideals that helped carve the rigid mental and moral regimen that kept her fixed to her path. Dzangare remembers having to forego attending a school closer to home in Domboshawa because of their faith, “We had a school very close to home, but we couldn’t go there, instead we walked 15 kilometres because the nearest Catholic school was that far away from home.” Dzangare still thinks fondly of the school and is grateful for the education she received, “�ey instilled a very good discipline within us, the nuns,they taught us well.” After completing secondary school Dzangare landed her first job with Sanders, a departmental store, where she manned the front desk, answering phones and directing clientele to the appropriate departments. Even at this early age Dzangare had an inkling that she was meant to be somewhere else, but just had not found the opening to step through that portal. It was through a friend of her father’s that the first real door opened to introduce her to an industry that she would remain in to this day. �e door that opened landed her the position as receptionist at Advertising Promotions Limited (APL). And it was at APL that Dzangare’s interest in broadcasting burgeoned and really began, “I started off at reception, then rose through the ranks to do ‘voices’ in the studio and from there I worked on various sponsored series.” Dzangare remembers the male dominated environment she was working in at the time, “At APL at one time, it was just me – the only lady.” Here she worked with upcoming broadcasters – who would enjoy great successes in their own rights – James Makamba, Wellington Mbofana, Patrick Bajila and Ishmael Kadungure. In the late seventies Dzangare felt it was time to move on from APL and moved to SSCB Lintas, joining the agency as a media planner. “Joining Lintas exposed me to other media. My responsibility and portfolio was to plan and recommend media to various houses for placement in both print and electronic media.” At Lintas she also

monitored the marketing and communications budgets and evaluated promotional campaigns. �ese years were very exciting for her, and she recalls even appearing in a very popular radio series, “Dr. Bobo, Enemy of the Bad” where she starred as Sandy alongside Hilton Mambo. Mambo’s character was the villain Dr Bobo – a name that affectionately stuck with him for the rest of his life. Eight years passed at Lintas. And just as Dzangare was beginning to feel the urge of moving again – Peter Dearlove, head of Adwrite, approached her with a proposal. Dearlove had been looking for someone with Dzangare’s experience – and asked if she would help start up a media department in his outfit. She accepted and the department started up very small, “It was just three of us when we initially started.” she recalls. �eir first client was the then Sheraton Hotel, after that they landed a partnership with the retail giant Edgars, “As time went by, we realised we were getting bigger – and we looked around and saw the opportunity to partner with Adveritas.” �is was a great opportunity as the Roger Fairlie outfit, Adveritas, were involved with film and documentary. When Adwrite and Adveritas eventually merged – Adwrite changed its name to DDH&M – the name originating from each of the surnames of the amalgamation’s founders. From the onset business boomed until the economic meltdown at the turn of the century. But the agency persisted through the turbulent years. And their survival can be attributed to a policy initiated from the beginning of the agency’s formation – a policy of remaining intimately aligned to their clients’ needs, and servicing their clients with professional accuracy. DDH&M is now one of Zimbabwe’s leading advertising agencies with Dzangare as its Managing Director. �e agency is proud to have an elite clientele in its books, the agency have won major awards and run successful campaigns. One campaign Dzangare remembers well was an anti-stigma campaign highlighting the plight of people affected by HIV/ Aids, “�e campaign did very well because it resonated with the people”. Because of her personal involvement in the campaign, Dzangare formed relationships and developed a deep empathy with the people involved. It was a year when DDH&M dominated the Ngoma Awards, winning six out of 15 catagories. DDH&M also won the overall Campaign of the Year Award for another initiative - and though the stigmatisation campaign brought in the runner-up prize Dzangare believes it changed a lot of people’s lives by changing our perceptions to HIV/Aids. And over the years in Dzangare’s career, one thing has remained constant – her passion for broadcasting. She looks back at her twenty years at Radio One with pride, “You sat in that little cubicle alone, but knew you were speaking to the masses out there.” And though her shifts were long, at various hours of the evening and early mornings – she feels the time spent was fulfilling and electrical, “�ose radio days were the highlights of my life” she says, “Broadcasting was like second nature to me.” Asked about her current goals, Dzangare replies, “To see more women in advertising and heading advertising agencies.”

�ank you Praxedes Dzangare You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE JUNE 21 TO JUNE 27, 2013

E3

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts “Success is when one

Olivia Pindeni Dhlamini manages to contribute to, or Plant Chemist, Renco Mine Attained a Bachelor of Applied Sciences Chemistry Honours (NUST).

MINING

influence, results that lead to the betterment of a person, project, company or place.” From the sweltering mineshafts to the air conditioned boardrooms of heavyweight conglomerates – the image of the mining industry is predominately squarejawed and masculine. Over the centuries very little has changed in this field where the muscle of heavy machinery shifts the earth with seismic exploration, all for corporate gain. Even today the mining industry is still a field where women enter as pioneers, having to prove their worth above the measure of the ordinary. Olivia Dhlamini is one such pioneer who has set her focus with pinpoint accuracy to help turnaround one of the biggest gold mines in the country. By 2010, the blue-chip mining giant, RioZim, was deep in the manoeuverings of a corporate restructuring scheme it could not avoid implementing. Emerging from the economic turbulence of the previous decade, RioZim had to scrutinize the operations of all its concerns to save them from economic degradation and closure. Among its concerns was Renco Mine, a gold mine situated in the heart of the lowveld. Renco Mine started operating in 1982 with production peaking during the period leading up to 2000 when the economy’s growth flat-lined before rapidly plummeting. As the conglomerate began its restructuring, Dhlamini was appointed as Plant Chemist to help

“My purpose is to have a positive influence on other women in the technical field, to foster a spirit of persistence, focus, hard work and a sense of enjoyment in the field.”

METALLURGY

resuscitate Renco Mine’s plant processes. Dhlamini vividly remembers the initial impression of the task ahead, “When I got to Renco Mine, the metallurgical research laboratory was totally dysfunctional.” �at was not the only thing impressed upon her, the environment she had entered stared back at her with a matter-of-fact of directness few could ignore – she was the first and only woman to work within the process at Renco Mine. Instead of focusing on the challenges, Dhlamini geared herself to achieve the goals set for her. Although it was difficult at first exploring the dynamics of how best to work with her team, Dhlamini simply relied upon the old maxim of performance translating to results, “It took time for people to accept me and see the value of what was being added. But as the results came in, people understood that a woman could work in this role.” And over the past three years of dedicated effort, Dhlamini and her team have brought the metallurgical laboratory at Renco Mine back to life. �e team have implemented procedures that were not in place before, turning the laboratory into an effective and efficient unit. �e team have successfully improved gold recovery from 70% to 90%, resulting in an increased gold production at the plant of 30%. Born in Chivu, Dhlamini is the first born of four children. She was raised in an academic environment – her father an English teacher, her mother a mathmatics teacher, both parents fostering and encouraging education. “We read a lot, there were books everywhere at home.” �e family home was a rich space for learning, her mother was enthusiastic about the subject she taught, and Dhlamini is grateful for the passion with which her mother guided them as children, “She encouraged us to do maths, we were encouraged to love the subject.” At secondary school Dhlamini was a bright science student, excelling in mathematics, physics and chemistry; she displayed her talents in the sciences by achieving ‘A’ grades both at ordinary and advanced level examinations. After high school Dhlamini pursued her passion by enrolling in the fledgling institution dedicated to sciences – the National University of Science and Technology (NUST). At NUST she attained a Bachelor of Applied Sciences Chemistry Honours.

Dhlamini’s first placement as a chemist was at Zimchem Refineries in Redcliff. Here, she worked at the processing plant, processing benzol into different solvents such as toluene, benzene and xylene, the company also processed coal tar into road tar and creosote. “I found the job very exciting and also took up a research role in the lab, then I eventually went into processes – that’s where my interest in plant processes began.” Dhlamini stayed with the refinery for three years then moved to the capital of Midlands province, Gweru, where she joined Powercell as a laboratory controller. At Powercell she was employed to oversee the laboratory as a service department to the process; Dhlamini identified and renewed analytical methods, she also designed, implemented and sustained an environmental monitoring system. Her work saved the company significant revenue by increasing the performance of one of their batteries by forty percent, and increasing the battery’s shelf life from six to 18 months. After her tenure with Powercell, Dhlamini entered the mining industry through a family owned concern, Emperor Mines. For five years Dhlamni worked with her husband, a geologist by profession, mining chrome from underground. Dhlamini was in charge of the quality of the chrome produced and all legal compliances with respect to environmental issues. �ough the venture went well, Dhlamini was keen to return to her line of work – chemistry and the processing plant; and so when the position at Renco Mine was offered to her – she accepted and took on the challenges that she continues to iron out to this day. Dhlamini’s appointment at Renco Mine has been one of learning and growth. “�e past three years have been very exciting.” Dhlamini says, “I have found a place for myself in the mining industry. I really find the mining industry a place I can grow and thrive in.” Dhlamini is grateful for the support she received from mentors when she entered this field, mentors who guided her through the metallurgical aspects of the job. And since her appointment as Plant Chemist at the mine, Dhlamini has been giving back to the youth, mentoring graduate trainees who have come to the plant. “My best moments are when I impart my knowledge and experience to young professionals and students.” she says, and goes on to mention that two girls, with a third on the way, have already been to the mine. �ese trainee programmes work with symbiotic success, giving the graduates that important initial experience; and for Dhlamini – she is able to appreciate the quality of her worth, “I’ve found a lot of joy in doing this. It has also crystalized the amount of experience and knowledge I’ve accumulated over the years.” Asked about some of the goals she is most proud of, Dhlamini anchors her reply with a touching, personal response, “I have been able, alongside my husband and friend, to raise my children to be confident, articulate, hardworking and focused and they are on their way to making positive impact in the world.”

�ank you Olivia Pindeni Dhlamini You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE JUNE 28 TO JULY 5, 2013

E3

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts “I started this line of work

Jean Cornneck through a calling from above.”

Runs Mother of Peace Community in Mutoko

Orphanage houses over 100 children

ORPHANAGE

The work of Jean Cornneck serves as a testament of pure devotion, she is one of the rare individuals among us who is not driven to succeed for her own immediate or long term gain, her life is a vocation driven by something intrinsically elemental, by something philosophically plain and yet complicated – something simply understood, but for most hard won – Cornneck is driven by a need to see those around her content; her role in life – to serve others by providing a sense of safety, contentment and peace. At the foot of Mutemwa Mountain in Mutoko, is Mother of Peace Community where Cornneck lives with over a hundred orphans. The setting of the community is quiet and idyllic, the compound’s houses neat and freshly painted, the children well groomed and adequately dressed. The atmosphere is relaxed yet perked with a sense of production. Agricultural schemes like beef, dairy and various horticultural projects line the periphery of the property. Two decades ago, one would never have imagined the sense of tranquillity that occupies this Eden. Now 80 years old, Cornneck recalls the first years of the community with a clarity that will be hard to erase from her mind, “Every month we buried up to three children. Always tears and tears. All the time tears.” she says remembering how the scourge of the HIV/

“When you look at our children today, here in our community, children who are HIV positive and on treatment, and compare them to those children who are negative – you can never tell the difference, they are all vigorously healthy.” Aids pandemic had taken hold and affected the country. “It was very difficult at the time, there was no real treatment.” It was because of this crisis that Mother of Peace Community was initially established, particularly for affected and afflicted children. Through the early nineties the burden of suffering and death weighed heavily on the founders of the community, but still they persevered and kept on – driven by their faith. As time went by, as people became educated and new affordable treatments emerged – the dark cloud of the disease began to dissipate. “In about 2005 the whole trend totally changed. With treatment, the death rate dropped to four or five for the whole year. By 2009, there were no deaths – and we’ve had none from this illness to the present day.” Cornneck says with a sense of relief, grateful for the treatments now available. “When you look at our children today, here in our community, children who are HIV positive and on treatment, and compare them to those children who are negative – you can never tell the difference, they are all vigorously healthy.” Originally founded by five individuals, the story of the community’s founding is one grounded in the founders’ faith, with Cornneck’s role being vital to the communities establishment, survival and continuity. Jean Rally Cornneck was born in 1933 to strict Catholic parents. From an early age the blueprint of religious morality was inscribed into Cornneck’s psyche; the plight of the ill was already something she was tackling, “When I was perhaps three or four, I used to play alone with little dolls, some made from dried maize cobs. I would make little beds of earth and pretend the dolls were patients sleeping.” Cornneck would take leftover materials from her mother’s sewing and make sheets

and blankets for her little patients. Unaware at the time, this would become a life long vocation, tending to the ill. After secondary education, Cornneck became a certified nurse and for almost forty years worked within the health sector with postings around the country and a twelve year stint within the United Kingdom. According to Cornneck, it was after retiring from the health sector that her real vocational journey began. Cornneck had begun taking in street children, bathing and feeding them in her flat in the avenue’s. “During winter they would be so cold, they would be shaking like leaves. They would be up all night looking after people’s cars for very little money.” Although Cornneck felt she was doing God’s work – she still wanted to do more for the children, and was even planning to approach the Department of Social Welfare to devise some sort of scheme to get the children off the streets and into a home where they could be cared for and taught skills. After attending mass at the Catholic Cathedral in Harare, Cornneck had an encounter that would change her life dramatically. A sister from one of Mother Theressa’s homes was visiting the country from Kolkata, India. Cornneck, an admirer of Mother Theressa’s charitable work, approached the sister, embraced her and said, “You do not know me sister, but I love the work you are doing.” Cornneck went on to ask, “Why don’t you have a home here as well?” A couple, Derek and Lise Van der Syde, were with the sister and the sister replied that plans were underway to set something up in Zimbabwe. Cornneck expressed her desire to know more about the project when it was underway. Before departing they exchanged personal details. One Sunday a knock came at the door of her flat. To Cornneck’s surprise, it was the Van der Sydes. She invited them in, and over a cup of coffee the Van der Sydes spoke to her about a South African woman, Beverly Olbers, who received messages through an inner voice. One of the messages was to build an orphanage in Zimbabwe, an orphanage for children affected by Aids. Cornneck says she was struck by the information, “When they came to me, I asked why they had come and they said the person they were looking for would be the matron of this place, and the matron needs to be a person with a background in health.” Again, she asked why they had come to her, and they simply asked if she was qualified. She responded positively, and agreed to join them right then and there. Another couple, Norman and Sybill MacDonald joined to make the group five. From here on, Cornneck relates a story of faith and divine guidance. Olber’s message was explicit in its details. The location of the community was to be found in the north east. Initially they got it wrong and found a place in Chishawasha. After being corrected, the group was redirected a further 130 kilometres north east to Mutoko.In Mutoko, the group set up at the leprosy colony overlooked by the John Bradburne shrine on Chigono Mountain, where they stayed for over a year. Cornneck and her collegues began the clearing process on their own, down in the valley – away from the colony, at the foot of Mutemwa Mountain. “It was all bush and thorny trees”. She remembers finally leaving the leprosy colony and living in caravans near the site they were clearing. The work was hard and they relied upon the help of the surrounding communities. Cornneck spent four years living in a caravan, and watched the intial structures go up one by one, till they formed the community with houses and children being taken care of by the community.

Thank you Jean Cornneck You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE JULY 5 TO JULY 12, 2013

E3

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts

Kirsty Coventry A member of the International Olympic Committee on the Athlete’s commission

She started learning to swim at 18 months Her middle name is Leigh Kirsty holds a Bachelor of Human Science Hotel and Restaurant Management 4 Time Olympian 7 Olympic Medals

OLYMPIC ATHLETE

“In order to succeed, you have to sacrifice many things because you will need that time to focus on your goals. Hard work is easy but continuously working hard is difficult – you have to persevere. People will not believe you will succeed and because of that, you need to believe in yourself. That will carry you in the most difficult of circumstances.” Affectionately known as ‘Zimbabwe’s Golden Girl’, Kirsty Coventry is a household name in Zimbabwe and one of the world’s most remarkable athletes. Representing our small, landlocked country, Kirsty has taken the world of swimming by storm earning more medals than any other athlete in all of Africa and breaking seven world records along the way. The road has not always been easy, but Kirsty’s single-minded determination has resulted in achievements beyond anyone’s wildest dreams. Kirsty holds a Bachelor of Human Science Hotel and Restaurant Management degree from the Auburn University Alabama in the United States of America. Her purpose is to give a voice to those who do not have the chance or the courage. Though she is passionate about swimming and Olympics, Coventry is also passionate about promoting women. In explaining her passion she says wherever she goes she asks the questions, “How many women have you involved in this project or in your organization? How many of those are in a decision making or leading position?” Kirsty is a firm believer in giving back to the community and is also particularly passionate about helping children.

“Success is not only measured by coming 1st – it is also measured by the goals you set and the work and effort you put in to accomplish those goals. The more effort you put in, the better that feeling of success will be. However, don’t relax once you have succeeded at something – let the goals you have accomplished be the foundation of your future, greater success.” At the age of 9, Kirsty declared that she wanted to go to the Olympics and win a gold medal. Her father smiled and encouraged her, saying that it would take commitment and sacrifices. Kirsty’s natural desire to persevere far exceeded all expectations. She was committed to achieving her goal and nothing was going to slow her down. After years of hard work and dedication, Kirsty’s efforts paid off and she was accepted to Auburn University in Alabama (USA) on a full scholarship. This was a brilliant opportunity to train in a challenging and stimulating environment with like-minded people. The year that Kirsty joined the University’s team, they won the biggest title in US Swimming (the NCAAs) and, with Kirsty in the squad, continued to do so for the next two years. When she was just 16 years old, Kirsty’s dream came true as she attended the Sydney Olympics. Unbeknownst to her, these games would be the first of many to come. The experience was overwhelming and surreal, but Kirsty kept her focus and made it to the 100m Backstroke semi-finals: further than any other swimmer from Zimbabwe. Though she didn’t get the much coveted Olympic medal, she was well on her way to doing so. Coventry believes that sacrifice, perseverance and self belief are the key ingredients necessary for success. The road to success was not without hurdles for Kirsty. She remembers a time that others did not believe in her. She was teased at school and made fun of all the time because she would put the work in, rather than cut class or do less laps than was expected. “Its amazing how many of the same people who used to tease me suddenly became ‘my friends’ after I had realized my goal by winning Gold in the 2004 Olympics in Athens.”

my Gold and knowing that 13 million people in Zimbabwe were proud of their country whilst hundreds of millions around the world watching,” says Kirsty describing the moment she won her first Olympic Gold. She is also proud to be tied first for the most individual Olympic medals out of all females in the history of the Olympics and having the most Olympic medals out of all African athletes (and she is a swimmer!). Kirsty was elected by the Olympic athletes to represent them on the International Olympic Committees’ Athlete’s Commission. There are only about 15 that have received this massive honour. As a result of the election, she has also been honoured by becoming a member of the International Olympic Committee – a very prestigious honour with only 105 members worldwide. Kirsty relies on her support group when faced with challenges. She gets support from her fiancé, coach, parents and two or three confidantes outside of swimming and family. “The most important thing to remember is to seek the advice of others but when you make a decision, nobody makes it for you,” she advises. Coventry likes catching up on Facebook and messages from fans in her spare time. She also is of the opinion that rest is important especially for athletes. “You cannot be at the top of your game when you are tired.” Kirsty is inspired by her mother and Michelle Obama. Kirsty’s mother fought and beat breast cancer and has since been given a clean bill of health. This she says is greater than any of her own achievements. She is also proud of her dad for the support he gave her mother during that difficult time. A supporting role is more important than a leading role. President Obama would not be where he is without Michelle believing and supporting him. Women, through their inner strength, love, warmth and spirit are the heartbeat of the nation. Asked about her current goals, Kirsty revealed that she would like to start a Swimming Academy in Zimbabwe that will become the pinnacle of swimming. It’s undeniable that Kirsty has made an impact in swimming, not just in Zimbabwe but in Africa. Her role as an IOC member on the Athlete’s commission means she will represent athletes all across the world but specifically African Athletes and Swimmers. She says though she has impacted sport, she is far from done. She would like to see more and more black people in swimming in Zimbabwe, not just in swimming but many black people win races, that will give her some satisfaction. In 2013, Kirsty did a nationwide tour of Zimbabwe, reaching out to schools in the rural areas of the country. Motivated by the fact that she did not really have a role model as a child, Kirsty set out to inspire children to dream big and follow their passions. “Women have a great impact on our nation, some are to have a greater opportunity than others but nevertheless that opportunity is still there. As young women from Africa you have to work harder to prove yourself and when you do succeed, you might still not get the recognition you deserve but you can at least look back, smile and help somebody else”. She added, “It is okay to put yourself first because in strengthening yourself, you strengthen your family and community.” Kirsty’s message can be broken down into three important values: believe in yourself, work hard and persevere – if you keep at it, you will succeed. When asked to describe herself, Coventry says; Olympian. Humanitarian. African.

“I also have a great thirst for competition and will be spurred on by any challenge – if I cannot win, I have to at the very least prove that I can do it. ” Among the goals she has achieved that she is most proud, winning her first Olympic medal and then winning her first gold stand out the most. The emotion and elation of winning is something that Kirsty holds dear. “ Listening to our national anthem play and watching our flag being raised after receiving

Thank you Kirsty Coventry You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE JULY 12 TO JULY 18, 2013

E3

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts “Success is an end result as well as a

Memory Bandera Rwampwanyi A founding member of the Girl Child Network Zimbabwe She is a beneficiary of the United States Achievers Programme

Bandera is passionate about children and women’s issues Founder and Director of Girl Child Network Uganda

FOUNDER & DIRECTOR

journey and the definition falls upon one’s personal values. For me, success is self-satisfaction when you achieve/ reach your target or accomplish stages of part of your bigger dream.”

The Chitungwiza bred Memory Bandera- Rwampwanyi is a perfect example of how hard work, motivation, and giftedness can lead to achievement of dreams. Despite her age, Memory is the Deputy Director, Programs and Special Projects: International Law Institute-African Centre for Legal Excellence (ILI-ACLE) based in Uganda. She also administers the COMESA Enhancing Procurement Reform Capacity Project (EPRCP) in the 19 COMESA Member States and is also the founder and Director of Girl Child Network Uganda among a lot of projects she is responsible for. Memory has proved herself over the years through hard work and an unquenchable spirit. Bandera - Rwampwanyi holds a Bachelor of Arts in International Relations and Complex Organisations from Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley and a Master of Science in International Relations from Suffolk University, Boston in the United States of America. She is passionate about human rights, social and economic development issues. Bandera - Rwampwanyi has been inspired by the teachings and ideology of the African Nationalist Mwalimu Julius Nyerere who believed that a person’s education is not only supposed to liberate that person or their family, but villages, towns and countries. If they fail to use their education for the greater good then they are a traitor, it is not a choice but an obligation. “I was privileged to get a good education in prestigious

“Waking up every morning with a motive of change and a hunger for success is what gives me the ability to have a career, not a job. I want to be a motivational leader and influence everyone I meet in an affirmative way.” institutions in the US and I feel that it is my responsibility to use my knowledge for the benefit of my country and for this continent.” From a young age Memory knew what she wanted to become. Growing up in Chitungwiza, she attended Prospect Primary, Zengeza 1 High and St. Mary’s Secondary; Memory believes that her background influenced the career she chose. She vividly recalls a visit to Parliament in 1993. She was inspired just by seeing women parliamentarians and she thought to herself that when she grew up, she too would want to be among the important women. Whilst Memory is not a parliamentarian, her pursuance of innovative solutions to social problems has made her a force to be reckoned with. Her work has impacted many on the African continent.

GCN Vision - We envision a world where girls are empowered and enjoy their social, economic and political rights and walk in the fullness of their potential.

Her journey began in the 90s when she co founded the Girl Child Network (GCN) in 1999 and led the first campaign against child abuse in Zimbabwe. This campaign took her across the country and was widely publicised in the media. The response from the victims was so overwhelming that a Girls At Risk Unit, which provides 24hour support to girls at risk of sexual abuse as well as victims of abuse, was born out of this initiative. In addition to this Bandera - Rwampwanyi led the first Women as Role Models program in Zimbabwe which now provides school fees for marginalised girls. In 2003 she co-founded Tariro: Hope and Health for Zimbabwe’s orphans to address the needs of orphaned children. Her career has not been without challenges. Memory recalls an incident in which she worked with former child soldiers and had found well wishers to put them through school. The well wishers pulled out after a year and she had no back up plan to continue funding these young people. She describes the moment as dev-

It has been 14 years since the Girl Child Network Zimbabwe has been formed and it has benefited approximately one million girls in East, West and Southern Africa. The favourite part of Memory’s work with Girl Child Network is the ability to work independently. She has the leeway to choose the projects to implement and is in direct contact with beneficiaries instead of being told what to do. Her current work with ILI-ACLE allows her to split her time between creative and organisational tasks. She loves having individuality because when stuck on the creative stuff she can switch gears and do the organisational stuff which allows her to use both sides of her brain. In the words of Alan Kay, “the best way to predict the future is to invent it.” Memory Bandera - Rwampwanyi has been inventing the future she wants to see. Her vision is to use herself as an example to impact positive attitudes to inspire and motivate others to discover and develop their potential in life. Thus far, her work has been a living testimony of her vision. Born in a family of four, Memory believes in family as a corner stone of one’s development. She spends most of her time with her husband, family and friends. She likes watching movies and reading as well as travelling and learning about people and their different cultures. This she says makes her appreciate Zimbabwe more. Bandera - Rwampwanyi has had the privilege of travelling the world and meeting many influential women and many have left an indelible mark. Memory speaks highly of Rebecca Zeigler-Mano who is the Education Advisor at the US Embassy, Public Affairs, Diane Anci, Director of Admissions at Mount Holyoke College and her mother Dorcas Bandera who have been her role models. Bandera - Rwampwanyi describes herself as a positive, inspiring social entrepreneur. She is a role model for young people and hopes to make a lifelong impression on their lives. Having a positive attitude has helped her get through challenging situations and she is always pursuing innovative solutions to social problems. In exhortation to fellow Zimbabwean women, Memory says, “I encourage other women to have a sense of direction and work towards achieving their goals regardless of what their circumstances are. For most women now, it is apparent that education is a priority issue and they attain degrees despite their age or marriage commitments.” Of the future of Zimbabwe Bandera Rwampwanyi hopes that the upcoming elections will be peaceful, credible and transparent to pave way for all professionals and business people in different countries to come back and develop our beloved country, Zimbabwe.

“Naturally, women nurture the ‘nation’ by bringing up their children. Women are capable of rising above any circumstances and positively influence the communities they live in. As such, I strongly believe that women have the capacity to shape their children.” astating. She had to pay for the fees herself till she mobilised funds. From that experience she learnt to carefully plan programs and not to accept funding without thinking through the future of the project.

Girl Child Network Unganda

Thank you Memory Bandera You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE JULY 19 TO JULY 25, 2013

E3

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts “I knew exactly what I wanted to do.

Joyce Chimanye

A Founder of Zuvva Fashion House

I wanted to be a fashion designer. I worked in a factory for a year before I went to university, just to be sure.”

FASHIONISTA and Humanitarian, a unique description but one that aptly describes the Sakubva born fashion designer Joyce Nyasha Chimanye. Joyce formed Zuvva fashion house in 1994, a culmination of years of being passionate about fashShe was born and bred in ion. It must have been some kind of love affair as in the words of Oleg Cassini, “To be well dressed is Mutare a little like being in love.” Joyce wanted to be that person who made garments that made people feel great and in love with themselves. Not many comprehend their passion, assignment and purpose at an early age, but Joyce knew that Her middle name is Nyasha her calling was in the fashion industry. At a young age, Joyce was already making clothes for herself and for her schoolmates. Chimanye studied at the Southern African Academy of Clothing Technology in Cape Town, South Africa, worked for 3 leading garment manufacturers in Harare before Joyce Chimanye is a branching out on her own. Joyce is married and co-founder of the Vana has two sons, Munyaradzi and Tapiwa. has lifted the Zimbabwean flag across the Vedu Ophanage Joyce globe. She has showcased her work in most African countries, the U.S and Australia. Recently she has been invited to showcase her work in the Plus New York fashion week. She has also been invited to a fashion week in Brooklyn and another in Kenya. Unfortunately she will not be able to participate because she does not have the capacity to fund most of these trips. The prevailing harsh economic conditions have worsened the plight of many designers who used to get the much needed support to fund their trips from corporate organi- commercially competitive good quality garments. Many young indigenous designers set the bar low and thus they are beaten on quality by imports, zations. however this project will ensure that the training they get will enable them to “My brand is contemporary, fashion that is a hint of African that focus- make world class garments. The project is set to kick start in Zimbabwe and hopefully will spread to the other parts of the continent. es on natural fabric, especially Zimbabwean cotton. I do not focus on a Joyce bemoaned the state of the fashion industry which at one point thrived particular race, I make garments for every race.” and exported its produce. Major textile companies have folded and exports “I am an artist, not a businesswoman.” As an art- ceased. The market is flooded with imported clothing and textiles. Though ist, Joyce has been more focused on her designs the government has imposed a high customs tariff on imported clothing to however, as Zuvva continues to grow; she is faced protect local industries, this has not discouraged imports. “The clothing and with having to make administrative and manage- textile industry is the industry to promote, because we actually grow the cotrial decisions, which competencies she was not ton. We are meant to add value to cotton as opposed to exporting raw cotton trained in. To stay afloat and relevant, Chimanye which is then processed and brought back to us as clothes.” Joyce suggested has taken courses in management and product that Zimbabwe’s relationships with the other governments should be techniimprovement to be able to compete in an ever cal where we import their expertise and not their products. evolving marketplace. It must have felt like being Fashion is not the only passion that Joyce indulges; she is also passionate thrown into the deep end and having to learn to about the plight of disadvantaged children. This she feels is part of her assignment and purpose in life, to be able to give a helping hand when needed. swim. Joyce describes her style as contemporary. The To realize this goal, she co- founded an Orphanage in Chegutu called VanaVZuvva House carries the Afro-Gipsy, Eco wear, edu which opened its doors to orphans in 2001. The house that shelters the Graffitti and bridal brands. Afro-Gipsy is a mix children belongs to David Whitehead, they have been generous to let the orof African styles and Eco wear is African toned phanage use it. The orphanage at one time fed over a hundred children daily. down. Whilst she carries ready to wear lines, At present, the number of well wishers has decreased; the state of the econJoyce’s strength is in couture which is creation of omy has not made it easy to get donations. On the upside, the orphanage has custom fitted clothing made to order for a specific managed to purchase a piece of land through donations from businesswomcustomer. She makes garments for different occa- en in Harare. Part of the plan for the land is to build a youth centre, housing sions and events. Chimanye lamented the scarcity for orphans and the remaining land for income generating projects which of disposable income in Zimbabwe which inevita- will make the orphanage self sufficient. Funding to do all this however is still bly promotes the mass market product because of elusive. Joyce dreams of a world where all children are protected and have a its relatively cheap pricing. However, that is not to level playing field. say Zimbabweans do not try to go out of their way to have garments custom made. In comparison, West Africans, particularly Nigerians have clothes custom made. This explains why the mass market clothing chains like Mr. Price have not survived in Nigeria. Designers in that part of Africa are kept busy. Joyce observed that South Africans also are into custom made garments thought they haven’t yet reached the Nigerian level. When dressing, South Africans tend to seek the advice of stylists. Joyce is working on the WearZim project. This project seeks to encourage Zimbabweans to support local designers and put on Zimbabwean made garments. The pay off line for the project is Buy me buy you. The project envisions a Zimbabwe where everyone buys local products. In the end, if I buy your product, you buy mine too. This helps keep the money circulating.

FASHION DESIGNER

“When you walk into a shop you should have a choice to buy either the locally manufactured or the imported one. Quality should never be a deciding factor. Local should just be as good.” Another one of her projects is the Fashion Africa Initiative. From her travels across Africa, Joyce has noticed that there exists a training, mentoring and exposure gap between the established designers and the new entrants in the fashion industry. To Joyce Chimanye’s Designs close this gap, the initiative will introduce trainThank you Joyce Chimanye ing to empower young designers to attain a level You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you! of excellence that will enable them to produce


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE JULY 26 TO AUGUST 1, 2013

E3

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts

Florence Ziumbe

President of Proweb Corporate Lawyer Ziumbe is married and has 2 daughters and a son She has sat on more than 40 boards

LAWYER AND BUSINESS WOMAN

“I have sat on many boards and I have never approached my appointment to a board as a woman. When they choose me, they see ability, therefore I do not apologise for being there.” ‘CONTENDED wife and mother, eternal optimist and a conservative Christian’ is how Florence Ziumbe describes herself. She presents a captivating message, one which is compelling, precisely because it is enriched by her experiences of growing up in a rural area. Her humble eloquence and rich authenticity leaves one with a lasting impression of what it means to overcome humble beginnings and to achieve one’s dreams. Florence is a lawyer by profession having studied at the University of Zimbabwe. She started out as a family lawyer with Scanlen and Holderness before she started her own practice. Florence as a Christian does not seperate her achievements from God. “When I look at my past I see God written all over. If God could take me from the rural areas where I herded cattle and went to school without shoes, he is able to do much more. I never imagined ever that I would be here.” Florence was involved with a Christian organization before she went to college. She is grateful that she came to know the Lord then. ‘Girls sometimes make mistakes at that stage in life; some of the mistakes can be fatal’. However, she is indebted to the Christian leaders who anchored and mirrored her at such an impressionable age. They helped her to keep on the straight and narrow through their guidance. When others were partying, she was safely hidden in Christ. Ziumbe believes that she was called to women empowerment and child issues. “I saw the educated being divorced, the beautiful, the good and the bad, I saw the law change.” Women do not control

“My Aha moment without any doubt was when I had my first baby. I was the first one to go to University in my family, and I graduated with flying colours, however the emotion I felt at achieving this comes nowhere near what I felt when I became a mother. When I had my first child, my passion for my career diminished, I couldn’t wait to get home. Before I had the baby, my focus was different.” money; they don’t get to sign cheques men control finances in the home. A visit to the maintenance court reveals that the bulk of those lining up for maintenance money are women. Yet empowering a woman, empowers the nation. A woman is a mother first before she is anything else. She has the welfare of everyone at heart. It was no walk in the park for Florence when it came to balancing a career as well as raising a family. She has had to wear many hats and efficiently manage each role. “When I appear in court, the judge is not interested in me as a mother, neither am I a mother in the boardroom.” She had to make things work, which meant hiring two maids at the time. “It was a huge struggle; I had to multitask, do school runs and go to work. When I look back at that time I don’t know how I managed,” she reminisces. Nowadays things are different because of flexitime and flexiplace which allows some employees to chose fexible working hours as well as work from home. Florence believes that if Zimbabweans were wealthy, many women would opt to stay home for some time and raise their children. However, since that is not the case, they have to hold down a job and earn an income. Florence defines success in simple terms, “the fact that I am in a happy home, I have children, that I am blessed to have, and spiritually at peace is success.” She believes that knowing who you are, self belief and being passionate about what you do are preconditions for success. Ziumbe firmly believes that nothing is impossible to someone who beleives, if someone can do it, then she too can do it. Florence envisions being the woman God created

“My involvement with women from all walks of life taught me not to look down on a woman who says I’m divorcing because I can’t stand it, but also not to look down on a woman who chooses to stay in a bad marriage. We are strong in different ways.” her to be, achieving her God given purpose and being at peace with herself. Women issues are close to her heart and what agonises her is that women continue to struggle with the same recurring issues such as financial lack. She wishes the narra-

tive for women would change. Most women know how to manage money, Florence recalls being sent away from school for non-payment of fees and her mother would reach into her petticoat and give money she would have saved for a rainy day. Her mother never went to school, but she knew how to plan for the occasional bad day. Yet an epitaph of many a Zimbabwean woman would most probably read: Worked so hard, but died so poor. “When one works hard surely, fairness dictates that they be rewarded. The only value my mum has rides on my success, she doesn’t have a car or money in the bank yet she worked hard all her life.” “Legal practice taught me respect: to respect those that ostensibly don’t deserve it. Even the woman undeserving of any kindness has something good to offer. Each person is amazing in their own way and we all benefit from affirmation.” Women need each other, the structure of past rural societies allowed women to bond when they went to fetch water in the river ‘kurwizi’. Whilst there, they would counsel each other and the whole experience was therapeutic. Florence urges urban women to learn from rural women who band together. When there is a funeral 10km away, they go, not empty handed, even if it’s a little mealie- meal in a bowl. They value relationships. “As women we should look for value in others. The problem is that we do not celebrate each other or build platforms to support each other. Until we learn to speak together and amaze each other, we will go round in circles and remain the same.” Florence’s presidency of Proweb is somehow the zenith of her career. It is an expression of the passion she has for women. PROWEB stands for Professional Women, Women Executives and Business Women’s Forum. The initiative was established in 2005 to enable professional, executives and business women to speak with one voice in Zimbabwe and specifically to harness the talents and skills of its members to contribute towards the improvement of the social and economic well being of Zimbabwean society. Florence believes that women can do more. While she does not loathe the little that women are given, the future generations have to do better. Women run homes and companies and they excel at it, there is no reason why they cannot succeed in areas of greater responsibility. Florence’s experiences as a divorce lawyer are priceless when it comes to women issues. Ziumbe saw it all. Women left their mansions with only a handbag after many years of marriage. “The fact that a woman failed in her marriage does not mean that she has to be a destitute. She is entitled to eat, live in a decent home, take her children to school. She is still a human being, and no amount of failure changes that.” When asked who she looks up to, her response is humbling. She says I have no such person. “I see the good in everybody; I’m blown away by every woman. Many women have transformed their lives, some began as secretaries, others got pregnant as teens yet they decided to make something of themselves. I am an eternal optimist. Most women do not tell their stories to inspire, so we are not aware of their accomplishments.” Florence does not believe her challenges are unique; it’s what every career woman experiences. She however has to balance her roles. “Husbands are not interested in lawyers but in a wife. The children too need their mother,” she says. Family is indispensable to Florence, However, in the boardroom, she is a board member and not a mother and wife. She also expressed concern that only 1 out of 10 board members is a woman. Women need to get more involved. For recreation Florence loves to go away with her family as well as relaxing at home with her husband. Growing up on a farm, she loves farming, and finds it sanative. Florence dreams of a Zimbabwe in which women see value beyond failure. Before she dies, she would want to hold hands with other women and do great things. She acknowledges that the era of going it alone is long gone. Her prayer is, “May I not forget where I came from, whose I am because I saw the goodness of God in my life.” In parting Florence gives a word of advice: “Life will give you bitter results if you choose not to be different, lead and not follow.”

Thank you Florence Ziumbe You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE AUGUST 2 TO 8, 2013

E3

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts

Langelihle Sibanda Founder of House of Langa and Leaf Trust She is a former model Graduate of the University of Zimbabwe She grew up in Bulawayo

ENTREPRENEURIAL BUSINESS WOMAN

“My basic and humble upbringing in Kezi fortified my belief in simple values and virtues. The opportunity to travel the world and work outside Zimbabwe exposed me to a different culture. The two put together give me the balance to keep focused.” Langa Sibanda is a beauty with brains and purpose. The former model has infectious warmth and her tall frame has a charismatic presence. She is the mastermind behind the House of Langa, an upcoming cosmetic line. Langa was born in Kezi and is the youngest daughter of Pardon and Khiwa Sibanda. She attended Homestead Primary School in Kezi before moving to Bulawayo at the age of eight. Langa then went to Losikeyi Primary School moving onto Eveline High School and Townsend High School. She attended the University of Zimbabwe and graduated with an honours degree in Political Science and Administration. Langa started modelling at University and in 1994 she modelled the winning designer outfit at the Rothmans Designer of the Year. She later participated in the prestigious Durban July in South Africa. In 1994 she entered Zimbabwe Supermodel of the Year and received special mention from the judges with high praise which led to a modelling contract with G3 Model Agency in South Africa. Langa also entered the Miss Universe Competition for Zimbabwe, representing the country in Las Vegas. Sibanda launched her own clothing line called ‘Langa Design’ and dressed the country’s most elite women. In 1998 Langa became the first black designer to win ‘Zimbabwe Designer of the Year Award’.

“My vision is interwoven; it is the same as that of House of Langa, which is to build an iconic brand of beauty products primarily for dark skin and to grow the brand to an internationally recognised brand. I want to sit among the best of them.” Langa had long been frustrated by the paucity of products for black skin. She could not get the right shade for her skin even though in those days there were 33 shades of black and only 8 of white. This clearly showed that there existed a gap in the cosmetics market. Thus the vision for the House of Langa was birthed. Langa chose the route of self branding, not because she is vain but her name coincidentally conveys the message of the Langa brand: that of bringing sunshine on the faces of its customers. Sibanda’s purpose is to put a smile back on people’s faces, by making them feel and look beautiful. Her product is all natural, she immovably believes in natural mineral makeup against the conventional product on the market. Other products have chemicals that have long term effects on the skin but with crushed mineral products, there is no way one can go wrong, the natural product even has healing properties! The market that Langa wants a piece of, is dominated by big names like Black Opal, Revlon, Sleek to name but just a few and most women are loyal to these big brands. The challenge Langa faces is that breaking into a Zimbabwean market that has an affinity for foreign wares. This might be a deterrent for local products in penetrating the local market. However, though the task ahead is daunting, there is no doubt that if anything, fortitude will get Langa there. When faced with challenges Sibanda is head strong and assertive, she taps from a wealth of shared knowledge and experiences with others. “As a woman you have to soldier on regardless of challenges that may impede or obstruct your goals. In life you will always encounter

room and we do a makeup trial, the ‘ahh’s and’ oohs’ we get, are a brilliant feedback to us. There’s nothing satisfying as seeing an extremely happy client. The transformation is fabulous. It’s amazing what makeup does, the confidence it brings to a woman.” In her skin care range she uses some unique and natural ingredients like the ‘Kalahari Melon’ which protects skin cells’ DNA structure by increasing their natural defense mechanism against free radicals, caused by exposure to UV light and ‘Mongongo Nut Oil’ with its hydrating, regenerating and restructuring properties. Langa has been working on getting her product onto the local market and she will be launching the Langa line in September. In the meantime, Langa educates school children and corporates on how to correctly wear makeup. In her demonstration her emphasis is that makeup should be enhancing instead of being distractive. High up on her achievements is her social community programme in Kezi which supports and pays school fees for 25 orphans. This gives Langa the most satisfaction. Though the talk of education in an ever-changing environment may sound antiquated to some, Langa feels strongly about education, “If there is one gift you give to someone let it be education.” In the words of Nelson Mandela, “Education is the most powerful weapon you can use to change the world.” Langa worked closely with World Vision Zimbabwe and other charities during her reign as Miss Zimbabwe. She launched the child sponsorship programme for World Vision Zimbabwe and through her charity work Langa realised how much she could help others. This love of charity work has stayed with her and in 2011 she launched Leaf Trust. Lifeline Education Advancement Fund (LEAF) is a non-profit, education trust based in the UK, dedicated to investing in the education of orphans and underprivileged children in Zimbabwe. Her work is on-going and fundraising efforts are key to the success of the Trust. For her it’s the good old hearty laughter from children that melts her heart. That laugh says they are happy and safe. For Langa success is achieving your goals and objectives both in quantitatively and qualitatively. The right number and right quality. Tenacity, discipline, focus, hard work, honesty, and respect for the environment are the qualities she believes are essential for success. She enjoys spending her personal time having a good laugh with friends and family over a glass of red. Langa looks up to many women from her dear mother and late sister to the iconic Oprah Winfrey. For her, the world is full of strong inspirational, great women and role models. Women are the mothers of the nation, they bring up the nation and there are the nation, this makes them the heartbeat of the nation. Though Langa has achieved much, she remains level-headed and humble. To Langa what sustains a human being is personality and intellect and that cannot be taken away. When asked what impact she thinks her career has made, she is quick to say, “It’s not for me to say, I will leave others to write an epitaph on that one! I guess I am not an airhead as people perceived models to be.” In three words Langa describes herself as Creative, Kind and Tall.

“I am more than hopeful that the country will move forward in a positive sense and direction past the elections. I believe in the Zimbabwean dream. Within the next 3 to 5 years, this beautiful country will turn around. “ hurdles but you have to glide over and keep your focus.” Langa is passionate about people and she absolutely loves to see the faces of her clients after they do their magic. “Every time a client comes into our

Thank you Langelihle Sibanda You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE AUGUST 9 TO 15, 2013

E3

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts

Eve Christine Gadzikwa

Eve holds an MBA from Nottingham University A qualified Micro-biologist

Married with two children A Christian, actively involved in her church

DIRECTOR GENERAL

“As a business leader, I think going forward we need to reflect on what we want to see in the next few years. From where I stand we need to be able to give young people a hope for the future.”

A case of coincidence or of Providence, one can never really know, but Eve Gadzikwa believes it is not by chance that she is the first woman to be profiled after the announcement of election results. Her message is simple, it is that of hope, hope premised on what she knows Zimbabweans are capable of because of their giftedness. Eve is the Director General and Secretary to the Standards Association of Zimbabwe. She also serves as Chairman of the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange and Chairman of IODZ. “With 13 million people, the bulk of them unemployed, the future rests with the young people and our ability to transform their hopes, dreams, and aspirations into a better tangible future. As a Zimbabwean I ask, what things are the new administration going to do in the next 100 days that will impact the future?” With young people making up a significant percentage of the population it is time to custom make policy that targets the youth to harness their drive, gusto, skills and education. Our high literacy rates should give us a competitive advantage. The challenge lies in growing our base and changing our mindset from that of brick and mortar and take advantage of e-commerce. Policy makers need to formulate policy for the digital world which still remains very much intact. There is need for creation of virtual space that will enable young people to scale up their skills with a hope of creating an online entrepreneur. “Many platforms have arisen to market Zimbabwe to the world. The UNWTO General Assembly is such a platform. Such opportunities should be used wisely in branding our country. We need to

“I strongly subscribe to the belief that, “Customer is King” which has seen the Association gaining tremendous acknowledgement by its wide stakeholder base and has enhanced Zimbabwe’s competitiveness. Standards improve confidence in a nation and safeguard communities.” start asking questions pertinent to growing the Zimbabwean brand, the policy environment has to change for us to have a Zimbabwe that investors can be confident in.” Through the combined efforts of a National Code Project team, Zimbabwe is also set to launch a milestone historic National Code for corporate governance (akin to South Africa’s King III Report.). This is yet another platform for changing perceptions and reinventing ourselves. “Zimbabweans deserve a better quality of life, they deserve employment. It is time to encourage foreign direct investment and engage the world.” Besides her deep passion for her nation, Eve believes that, the work of promoting quality standards is a calling and this is evident in her passion for promoting good business ethics & quality standards in corporate settings. She enjoys what she does because she can contribute to the welfare of all communities and interact with all sectors of the economy. Gadzikwa sees herself as a servant leader doing a national service but with an opportunity to learn, teach, network as well as inspire. However, she stresses the importance of walking the talk as an exemplary captain of industry as well as not underestimating the influence she has as a female in a position of high authority. Eve has had her share of challenges. She says her solution to all this was to stay focused, knowing her purpose and limitations and leaving the rest to God. On the road to success, Eve has learnt numerous life changing lessons from sharing with the underprivileged, the value of relationships, knowing oneself, having a positive attitude to the realisation that money is not everything. Mentoring has been a priceless lesson for Gadzikwa as she climbed the corporate ladder she has had people come to her

her. It was quite funny because at that time she could not see what the fuss was about and how she could have made such an impact on my career development. But I knew exactly what I wanted. It is ironic that, many years later, I now find myself serving various boards with her.” For Eve the morale of the story is that before you can become a success in life, you need first to know what you want. You need to answer the questions, what is it I want from life and what determines my success? Who can help me get there? Eve has made significant strides in empowering women and mentoring young executives to positions of authority and leadership. Gadzikwa encourages women to read and stay current. She is convinced that if women devoted as much time as men in getting to know what is going on around them, Zimbabwe would be a much more progressive place. ”Let’s read books, use social media and other forms of information channels to get to know what’s going on in and around Zimbabwe. For instance, I have learnt that, in capital markets, share prices can be affected by what is happening in another part of the globe very far from the source of trading for example gold prices, demand for platinum and level of industrialisation in the developing world markets affects share prices around the world. The lesson in this: Get connected! Knowledge is power!” she says. Eve is a family woman who enjoys quality family time, playing golf with friends, going to the gym as well as leading a ministry for disadvantaged girls at her church called Rafiki Girls Centre. Eve has faith in womenetics, by virtue of large numbers women can drive a nation. “Women make up 52% of the population and the National Constitution recognises the tremendous contribution and potential of women. Women need to realise that, for Zimbabwe to be transformed to a $100B economy, they need to take up their rightful place and play their part.” Eve Gadzikwa hopes to complete her PhD in the next three years and dreams of leaving a lasting legacy of quality and standards by upholding principles which enrich the quality of people’s lives, improves profits and protects the environment. Doing it right the first time is her mantra.

“Zimbabwe has all it takes to be able to leverage on its natural resources through carefully and strategic value addition and import substitution. The little resources must be channeled appropriately to those areas where we have comparative and competitive advantage. We need to leap frog on our human capabilities to achieve this, accelerate and scale up development within the next 5 years post elections.”

Success is not something that can be defined by someone else’s yardstick. You should define your own success through your own journey. I am a strong believer in the word. The bible clearly says, when God created everything, He saw that it was good but when God created woman He rested. To me that speaks volumes about the woman. Humility and gratitude are indispensible for success. See good in others. We miss opportunities for success once we become self-centred. Give a lot, love a lot, and share a lot. asking to be mentored. She was tempted to say no but she has benefited from mentoring to be where she is today. She remembers approaching Grace Muradzikwa years ago. “When I approached her, she never thought anything of it. I had identified her as being a successful woman. A woman worth emulating! I made an appointment and went to see

Thank you Eve Christine Gadzikwa You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE AUGUST 16 TO 22, 2013

E3

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts

Caroline Chirima

Managing Director of Baztech Incorporated P/L

She has a son, Shingi

“I believe there are different levels of success. Personal success is when you are proud of the steps you have taken to reach your goal. That inner joy you feel after attaining a goal. SUCCESS is being conscious of your goal, being conscious of the steps to reach that goal and applying focus and attention to each of those steps. If you can skillfully manage your attention toward your goal you will find happiness and fulfillment.”

Listening to Carol Chirima talk, feels like listening to one of the philosophers of our time, however, though she has philosophical leanings, this woman has a formidable business mind. She is the Carol was born in a family of driver, of Baztech Incorporated, a leading supplier of innovative biometric time and attendance five systems, biometric access control systems, IP and analogue CCTV systems, Full height and Tripod turnstiles in Zimbabwe. In a world of technological advancement, businesses like Baztech, move the country along the lines the world is evolving. She is a Christian For Carol, her purpose is best summed up in the words of Leo-C Rosten, “I think the purpose of life is to be useful, to be responsible, to be honorable, to be compassionate. It is after all, to matter to count, to stand for something, to have made some difference that you lived at all.” Carol believes that TECHNOLOGY personal vision defines what one aspires to become. “It symbolizes your dreams and values and requires a balance of reason and intuition, which has been honored with 7 Awards in 3 years from various prestigious institutaps into your sense of purpose of life.” Chirima tions which include the Institute of Directors, Zimbabwe National Chamber is passionate about Baztech, she considers it her of Commerce and the Institute of Management, among others. career’s crowning. With over 15 years of experiChirima enjoys spending time with her son and family as well as travelling, watching movies and relaxing on a lazy Sunday afternoon, enjoying the fresh “When you work hard and put all your efforts into it you will find peace air and watching the sky and listening to the birds singing. This for her, is a great way of distressing. While she has done great, Carol draws inspiration in whatever you want to do.” from other women too and these include the Vice President, Joyce Mujuru, ence and a high level of excellence and efficiency, Mrs Eve Gadzikwa, and her Pastor- Bonnie Deuschle. “These women are all Baztech has achieved and still aims to continue successful in their different domains and they know God above all.” Asked establishing its market leadership in biometric on her current goals, Carol is quick to say that she wants to continue being time and attendance systems, by delivering high the visionary behind Baztech, to become a complete solution provider in the quality and cost effective solutions that exceed the security industry and biometric time and attendance systems in Zimbabwe, expectations of its customers. Through her leader- by delivering high quality and cost effective solutions that exceed customer ship and guidance, Caroline has guided the com- expectations. She also hopes to open a Baztech branch in Bulawayo. pany to the top and sailed through the rough and most difficult years in Zimbabwe’s economy to prosper and becoming one of the best high technology security solutions businesses in the market place. Carol believes that peace, love, determination, discipline and joy are fundamental qualities needed to succeed as well as an enduring spirit that overcomes the negative circumstances life brings. Managing a company requires a lot of hard work and sacrifice and Carol has had to work for long hours including weekends to meet deadlines and complete projects on time. This has somehow eaten into her family time. She acknowledges that it can be challenging to find that balance between family and career, yet somehow she manages. “I would encourage women to venture into businesses they are passionate Carol also shared a little advice when she talked about and not limit themselves because gone are the days when women were about making wrong decisions, “Sometimes mak- identified with men. Women need to empower themselves and upgrade ing wrong decisions in business can equip you to themselves by getting an education. Reading and travelling are excellent be a better leader. I remember during my early ways to see and get to know what is happening around you and the world.” days when consulting with a client regarding time Carol thinks of women as more trustworthy, dedicated and result orientated. management systems, I would tend to impress my A good example is that of mothers of generations past, who managed to raise clients by offering them heaven on earth and our children yet still worked very hard in the fields. These same qualities Carol services would exceed their expectations. Some- believes, can also apply to day to day business and family. times things would not go as promised, and that “I advise women to seek God who gives wisdom and direction has helped me as an individual to be trustworthy, to those who ask and I believe our steps are ordered by God. I transparent and offer the best service I can.” By

am a testimony of Gods’ faithfulness and grace upon my life “Women are more result orientated and more focused when they put and I am nothing without his guidance.” their best abilities to task. We have the power of multi-tasking and delegating. The same principles women can apply at home are the same principles we can also apply in the business environment.” offering the best service a good relationship is maintained with a client and this is the key to unlocking more potential clients. Her major achievement to date has been taking over a company that had folded, starting off with nothing and growing Baztech to what it is today. It is one of the first companies in Zimbabwe to introduce Biometric time and attendance systems in the country. Carol walks the talk and for this she

Caroline Chirima You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE SEPTEMBER 13 TO SEPTEMBER 19, 2013

E3

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts

Gladys Mutyavaviri

Gladys is a mother of four, one girl and three boys She is a devout Christian She is the Regional Coordinator for Southern and Eastern Africa within the Universal Postal Union She was the first woman Managing Director of Zimpost, as well as first woman in Africa to be appointed as the Regional Adviser for English speaking Africancountries within UPU REGIONAL COORDINATOR FOR SOUTHERN AND EASTERN AFRICA WITHIN THE UNIVERSAL POSTAL UNION

“Progressing towards the attainment of one’s vision and goals in life through attainment of concrete and tangible results is success. Success encompasses not only the attainment of one’s personal goals, but also the development of others in the process.” When the story of the women of this generation is told, there are women whose stories will be more celebrated, because their achievements cannot be overlooked. Gladys Mutyavaviri is one of those women. Through her ingenuity and hard work she has risen to one of the most prestigious positions in the global communication industry. The most striking thing about Gladys, is not only the numerous successes in her working career, but the way she is informed about the world around her. From the conspicuous to the obscure, she has a deep understanding of how systems function. Gladys is an economist by profession and holds BSc and MSc Economics degrees as well as an MBA obtained from the University of Zimbabwe. She also holds various professional qualifications obtained locally and internationally. Her academic achievements and the professional experience gained from the various executive positions she held in public, private and international organisations that she has worked for, spurred her to success. Gladys has had an exciting career, spanning over the last thirty years. Mutyavaviri is grateful for the support that she received from her late husband, when she went through her university education. She managed to acquire three degrees when she was already married. Her husband was very supportive and this helped her to effectively manage her multiple roles as a mother, wife, student and a professional woman. Gladys believes that women have to work twice as much, to prove themselves and climb the corporate ladder. Women normally take their qualities at family level to

“Women are the heartbeat of the nation. Without women, things fall apart. Women build families, which in turn build the nation. Educate a woman and you educate the nation. Mothers go out of their way to make sure their children go to school. By nature most women are very enduring, caring and hard working, in bringing up their families.” the workplace, and you find them very commited to their work, hardworking, enduring, honest, courageous, self-sacrificing and caring. Mutyavaviri is the Regional Coordinator for Southern and Eastern Africa within the Universal Postal Union (UPU), which is a specialised agency of the United Nations, which is responsible for coordinating postal development activities world wide. She joined the UPU in 2006 as the Regional Adviser for English-Speaking African countries and she was the first woman in Africa, to be appointed to this challenging and prestigious position within the Universal Postal Union. As the UPU Regional Coordinator, she manages a portfolio of twenty one (21) countries in Southern and Eastern Africa. Prior to joining the Universal Postal Union, she worked for Zimbabwe Posts (Pvt) Ltd (Zimpost), for six years (1999 to 2005). She was appointed as the first Managing Director of Zimpost, following the unbundling of the former Posts and Telecommunication Corporation. Before joining the postal sector, she worked in the banking, energy and agricultural sectors. Gladys’ vision is to progress to the highest possible level in her career and in the process positively impact on the livelihoods of communities in the countries within the Southern and Eastern Africa region, that she covers. She believes she was created as a woman for a purpose, “I was created as a woman, to undertake the multiple roles that I do as a mother, a worker and to be a role model for other women. In view of my multifaceted role in the family, in the work“The new Constitution provides a lot of opportunities for development and empowerment of women politically, economically and socially. The constitution is gender-sensitive and thus enhances the role played by women in political decision making through the introduction of the quota system for women parliamentarians and senators. In economic decision making, the new requirements on board appointments and recruitments into senior positions, give women an equal opportunity on board appointments. Socially, a number of restrictions and discriminatory practices that women previously suffered were removed.” place, in the community that I live in and in the communities that I work for in other countries, I wish to develop myself to my full potential and be in a position to excel in my work and to make a difference in other people’s lives, through the work that I do,” she said. She believes that it was God’s plan that she landed in this regional position, which enables her to serve not only Zimbabwe but the other twenty countries she covers. Gladys enjoys seeing concrete results

coming out of her work, changing people’s livelihoods in different communities and believes that hard work, commitment, professionalism, integrity and confidence in oneself, are pre-requisite qualities for success. Mutyavaviri’s career was not without challenges. “My experience at Zimpost taught me that, as the head of the organisation, whether man or woman, we need to have a clear vision for the organisation first and foremost, before bringing the rest of the organisation on board. Attainment of concrete and tangible results in our respective careers or whatever else we do, also helps ‘’woman at the top’’ to gain the necessary recognition and respect that we deserve . The focus should not be on gender, but on results.” explains Mutyavaviri. One of her major achievements during the period that she worked as the Managing Director of Zimpost, was the successful turnaround of the organisation from a loss making position to a viable commercial entity. As the UPU Regional Coordinator, being in charge of several African countries, with different cultures and different ways of doing business, comes with its only challenges. Of this experience, Gladys commented, “working for the Universal Postal Union brought me into the multicultural environment within the organization itself and within the UN system. When one works in a multicultural environment, it is important to understand the different cultures in different countries, to enable one to be able to carry out their mandate effectively.” Mutyavaviri devotes her personal time to her family and to church activities. She also loves travelling overseas with her children when she takes a vacation. Gladys was chiefly influenced by her late mother who inspired her on many levels. She made her the woman she is today with limited resources. “As a widow, my mother managed to raise her eleven (11) children successfully. I cherish the values and social norms that she incalculated in the family. She was a very hard working, generous and loving woman. She was rewarded for her hard work, through her children who have successfully progressed in different professional fields. Within the family we have several Chartered Accountants, Economists, Engineers and successful businessmen,” Gladys reminisces. Professionally she looks up to Charity Jinya who moulded her to be a great executive. Charity is currently the Managing Director of the MBCA Bank in Zimbabwe. Gladys is also inspired and holds Nyaradzayi Gumbonzvanda the Secretary General of the World YWCA (Young Women Christian Association) in high esteem. Spiritually, Gladys gets a lot of inspiration from her friend Mrs. Virginia Mudimu whom she says is a devoted Christian, who goes out of her way to help and support other people in times of need. Gladys is convinced that her daughter Emily is an upcoming woman to “watch”, as she follows in her mother’s footsteps. At the age of 32 she has since acquired three University degrees, two at Masters Level; a Masters in e-Business degree obtained from the International University of Japan and an MBA from the University of Cape Town. “Watching my children grow and progressing in their various careers gives me great pleasure as a mother. Witnessing the graduation ceremonies for my two sons, Tatenda and Tawanda, was a very uplifting experience to me as a mother, who watched these children grow, from boys to men,” a beaming Gladys said. The cherry on top however, is her ten-month old grandson Isheanesu who makes her heart melt. “It’s such a joy to be a grandmother,” she adds. Gladys has high hopes for Zimbabwe for the coming five years, Apart from the constitutional changes; Zimbabwe is a signatory to the UN Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women. The requirements emanating from this protocol have cascaded downwards to different levels. The Gender Policy which is now in place brings a lot of hope for women in Zimbabwe. The establishment of a Gender Commission in line with requirements in the new constitution provides an institutional framework that should go a long way in promoting the interest of women in Zimbabwe. In parting, Gladys encourages the women of Zimbabwe to stand up and be counted, “Pursue your goals and do not give up on your dreams. Continue to dream more, about bigger and better things that you can do. Do not be limited by your gender, culture, education, financial status or whatever circumstances around you. Be focused and work towards the attainment of your dreams.” Real wise words from a woman who has succeeded in a cut throat masculine environment, without losing her femininity. Thank you Gladys Mutyavaviri You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE SEPTEMBER 20 TO SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

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PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts

“Success is fulfilling or getting as close to fulfilling your destiny and leaving not only a Christine Chimuka legacy but a heritage for future generations. It is being able to help the poor and uplift the weak. Poverty is not just financial; it is also a Christine is married and has mindset that one has. Success begins with a three children paradigm shift within oneself.” An epitomy of grace, Christine Chimuka looks the proverbial million dollars without putting much effort. Christine has an innate She is Christian and cultivated talent for style and fashion and pulls it off with amazing panache. This is the woman who is at the helm of Milestone ComShe is a former ZBC munications, specialists in image and event management as well as public relations conTelevision Presenter sultations. Christine was raised in Bulawayo and was educated at the Dominican Convent School. She a typical all-rounder student, a prefect, Christine grew up in was member of the Interact Club, officer of the Bulawayo Bulawayo Junior City Council and an active member of a youth church group among the many other things she engaged in.Christine has extensive experience spanning over 20 years in the broadcasting, hospitality and financial services sectors and was a columnist for a leading Saturday newspaper. Her column was entitled “Your Style, Your Brand”. Christine’s personal vision is realistic, which is to be a true leader who inspires and motivates people to develop their potential and Entrepreneur live life fully.“I believe that my purpose is to help people maximize and portray who God made them to be. One way of doing this is for anyone to be unkempt. In her workshops, she focuses on teachthrough the way we carry ourselves not just ing basic grooming and etiquette. Christine is big on order and organisation and is of the opinion that success follows an organised mind. Along with superb organisational “In every situation a woman, teaches, leads and inspires in what- skills; humility, determination and a love for what one does are qualever sphere be it the grassroots or in the boardroom. Women have ities she considers that one needs to succeed. As a mother of three children, she found that there is great need to be adeptly organized strength beyond their physical stature.” in order to efficiently run a home where everyone has a different schedule and routine. Organization involves planning so as to avoid the way we look but the attitude we exude. disappointments. I believe my mandate is to help people build Chimuka’s personal experiences are a backdrop against which she positive relationships with each other but has rejuvenated and reinvented herself over the years. Seeing other this starts with how you relate to yourself,” women reach out for the stars has motivated and encouraged Chrisshe says. Chimuka believes in maximizing on tine beyond measure. Her divorced mother managed to comfortably organisational skills for both individual and raise a family and that proved to be a worthy inspiration. Having been organisations. “I want to bring out the best a last born in a family of six and having been raised for the better brand in people.” Christine is convinced that part of her life by her mother had its own share of challenges. Solife should be taken a step at a time from the ciety used to and still stigmatises female run homes. Unfortunatefoundations building up. She likes to quote ly even some people in churches that are supposed to give Christian Isaiah 28 verse 10: For precept must be upon precept, support and guidance also misconstrue the word of God and castigate precept upon precept, Line upon line, line upon line, such families. It is against this background that Christine made up Here a little, there a little. Life is lived only but her mind that success will be her portion so that she could counter once and it is the final performance there are the damaging perceptions about children raised in female run homes. no dress rehearsals. “When we step out of Christine is on a healthy living campaign. She battled with weight isthe womb it is “Lights, camera, Action!” Our sues in the past but through a disciplined regime of eating healthy and gifts and talents must be utilized to the full.” exercising she managed to lose 20kg over a 6 month period. To her, a Christine is passionate about seeing peo- healthy body equals a healthy mind.She loves to travel and spending ple especially young women confident and time with family and friends entertaining and putting into action her poised through their own efforts and not al- culinary skills. Her family and friends have been encouraging her to lowing men to take advantage of them. This go on cooking competition programs. she says can be achieved through positively Christine looks up to her mother Margaret Nyirenda for her selflessaffirming young women and giving them ac- ness, courage and for being the best mother for her family. She also cess to different fields in and resources. She is inspired by Graca Machel who despite the tragedy of losing her first is also passionate about healthy living,organ- husband, was willing to give love another chance. She also has a huge isation and order. She also yearns to see men heart and exudes dignity and wisdom. Maureen Shana is also anothand women living healthy lives, being organ- er woman that Chimuka revers for her elegance and sweet spirit as ised in everything they do starting internally well as Grace Muradzikwa and Florence Ziumbe for their sharpened and projecting it outwardly. What she enjoys business acumen. Christine reminds the women of Zimbabwe of how they are fearfully “I am still a work in progress so I do not think I have made a great and wonderfully made and she believes in goal setting. “Set yourimpact yet, but I am slowly chiseling and carving something with- self goals that are small enough to be achieved but big enough to in my industry. One thing I know for sure is that excellence is my shake your world. Be organized and plan your life. Speak to other women but be discerning. Do not just give away all your thoughts benchmark.” and dreams to everyone. Listen to God; wait on Him so He can guide most about her work is meeting people from you,��� she says. Of Zimbabwe she had a few words to share, “Zimbadifferent backgrounds and seeing the trans- bwe is a blessed nation and I see growth not just on the political front formation after a makeover. “I enjoy taking but also for individuals, families and businesses. But for this to hapthe person who is normally overlooked per- pen we need to put God as the focal point. We must assert ourselves haps because they are quiet and withdrawn and make decisions to live right. We have so much to offer and with and making them feel that they are worth selflessness and love we can prosper.” Christine describes herself as more than rubies or diamonds. The joy is in meticulous, hardworking and pizzazz which is an attractive combibringing out the diamond in the rough. Ev- nation of vitality and glamour. eryone is a gem just waiting to be polished to Thank you Christine Chimuka bring out their worth,” said a visibly bubbly You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you! Christine. She believes that there is no excuse


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE SEPTEMBER 27 TO OCTOBER 3, 2013

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PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts

“The heart of a woman is a wellspring of life. It is a source of creativity, courage and conTracy Lawson victions and a fountainhead of faith, hope, and love. It is created with the greatest of all dignities - as a reflection of God’s heart. There is something fierce in the heart of a woman Tracy is the owner and and she is meant to be a warrior in a uniquely founder of Spaceworks, an feminine way. Each of us has a unique part to Interior design company play of something large and good, something that requires all of us, something dangerous and worth dying for. And that something adds value to this nation.” Her middle name is Tracy Lawson has an innate creative streak in that has seen her scaling new heights at a Christine her youthful age. She is the brains behind Spacework, an interior architectural design company that offers a design service across all arTracy speaks Italian eas of industry. Tracy believes that everyone has a passion and a story to tell, her job is to translate that story into form and place. Her creative approach is driven by a strong narShe lives in Harare rative that captures an emotional and intellectual connection to her clients to give a well crafted storyline. Lawson attended Gateway High School for her high school education and she proceeded to Greenside Design Centre in Johannesburg South Africa where she graduated with a Bachelor of Arts Honours in Interior Design majoring in Community Development in the tourism locality. Tracy then came back home after her studies and worked as a freelance interior designer before starting Spacework. Interior Designer It is no coincidence that Lawson majored in tourism; she is passionate about the sector. With Tourism poised to one of the major contributing sectors to GDP in the near future, empowers and improves the lives we come in contact with. Lawson has worked on projects that were instrumental in her cadevelopment. She recalls a time she worked on the Machangulo I believe it is important to be honest and true to God, to honour reer Peninsula in Mozambique whilst she was still a student. The South your word, to never compromise and set a high standard of excel- African company she worked for was doing interiors of some of the lence. We must never give up and must persevere in the goals and privately owned homes and Tracy had the opportunity to study the proposed community development and environmental impact for visions that we have set for ourselves. the project. She spent much of the time researching environmental she believes that there is a lot she can con- and community problems present on the Peninsula as well as the tribute to the sector from an interior design problems facing the company in the proposed project. It was during viewpoint. this time that she discovered the extent to which design has the powTracy went to great lengths to correct the er to solve problems. This exposure, Lawson believes, has helped her generalization that design is not décor. “De- impact her industry by introducing a high standard of excellence that sign is my passion, but many people misun- can be followed in the area of design. derstand design and when I tell them that I Interior Design is a small and undeveloped industry within Zimbaam an interior designer their immediate re- bwe and Tracy has had to spend time assisting potential clients unsponse is to ask if I will decorate their house. derstand the benefits and purpose of the industry. Another challenge Whilst decor is a part of the job, it is only has been that the building and construction industry is a predomithe cherry on top. Design at its core is prob- nantly male industry with a few women players and it is not always lem solving and an interior designer engages easy to be a woman in a man’s world. This however, has not intimspace and transforms it to solve human prob- idated Lawson who is determined to respect and treat all whom she lems,” she explained. Tracy enjoys being an works with as equals. interior designer, for her design is a tool used Tracy has a deep love for the outdoors and loves spending her perto impact the way we live. It has the power sonal time with family, co-workers and her church community. She to give hope, restore value, inspire, and im- looks up to her mom whom she says encouraged her to be who she prove the way we live.Spacework is also into is today by helping her develop a strong character. Lawson believes the designing of boat interiors for tourism her co-worker Gloria Sambaza is an upcoming woman to “watch” and recreational purposes. in the design industry. Gloria is passionate about standards of excel“I want to leave a legacy. I ask myself how I lence for design and believes her purpose is to use design as a tool to will be remembered. Did I choose to love? Did help women and orphans.Tracy encourages Zimbawean women to Zimbabwe lies on the brink of a great opportunity to change who be proud of their rich heritage and she dreams of making her creSpacework a tourism development tool to assist communities we are, what we stand for and how we build. This change will be ation, in the tourism locality.

lead by the tourism industry and development will take place across our nation. I believe this development to be an opportunity to create a national identity that Zimbabweans are proud of. An identity that celebrates who we are and the heritage we have. I believe it is an opportunity to offer tourists a uniquely Zimbabwean experience that is unprecedented. Further I believe this tourism development to be an opportunity to empower and improve the lives of Zimbabweans. How we build is just as important as what we build.

I point to God enough? Did I leave a mark? I want to leave an offering. To be a child of mercy and grace who blessed God’s name unapologetically. I want to leave that kind of legacy,” she said. Tracy’s vision is about being able to hang her hat on more besides the temporary trappings of this world and add value to life through design. She is convinced that we each have an individual purpose, and Some of the rooms that Tracy has designed collectively we have a corporate purpose. For Thank you Tracy Lawson her, people are the most valuable thing on earth. Who we are to each other corporately You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE OCTOBER 4 TO OCTOBER 10, 2013

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PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts

Shamiso Catherine Ruzvidzo Shamiso is the eldest of three children

Founder of Catherine Ruze Modeling Agency She holds a Bachelor of Science in Information Technology She is also a Fashion Show Producer Was a finalist in the Australian Belmont Small Business Awards

Business Woman

“Women are soldiers and pioneers. We are the soul and heart of the nation because we adapt to situations quickly and carry heavy loads with ease and compassion.” “It’s Not How Good You Are, Its How Good You Want to Be”, by Paul Arden is the book that changed Shamiso’s life. Through this book, she learnt to look at herself with fresh eyes and from a different perspective, a far cry from the way the society views life. Shamiso’s honesty is beyond words, as she speedily admits that she didn’t like regular school much. “My teenage life had a large influence on where I am today. I wasn’t a top student; instead I found interest in fashion and expressing myself through what I wore. I was bored in classes such as math and geography, because of this I became unpopular with my teachers.” She was even voted the mostly unlikely person to succeed in her class. It is against the backdrop of constant negative feedback, that she was driven and wanted to prove that she could make it. Shamiso was inspired by the words of Paul Arden that, “those who fail at school are not interested in facts; or maybe the facts are not put to them in a way they find interesting” this nonetheless does not mean they are not intelligent. This experience drove her to want to prove her intelligence so she went on to obtain a Bachelor of Science, Information Technology from Edith Cowan University in Australia at a time when few women went for an I.T degree. “This gave me the drive, and today this drive and determination makes me wake up believing anything is possible. No door is closed without a window of opportunity opening.” However, Shamiso’s dalliance with IT was not long lasting; though IT had a creative pull, it was fashion that had always been her first

“I believe my purpose is to help youths achieve their dreams through personal and professional development, mainly those in the local fashion industry. Countless talented youth aspire to work in the fashion industry, but few make it. My purpose is to inspire, mentor and assist in providing opportunities that help talented individuals achieve their dreams. Additionally I believe my purpose is to assist in the growth of the local fashion industry, ensuring it is a relevant and profitable industry contributing to the economy as it once did.” love. She has been in the fashion industry for 16 years, having started with grooming and deportment classes with Medusa Promotions as a teenager. Whilst in Australia she founded the Catherine Ruze Modeling Agency which enjoyed varying success and was a finalist in the Australian Belmont Small Business Awards, for business achievements and excellence.Shamiso came back home and indulged her passion. She engrossed herself in a number of fashion shows and events like the Catherine Ruze Agency launch last year, Hifa among others. Noteworthy was her involvement as an assistant creative director for one of the largest modeling competitions in the world, Elite Model Look Zimbabwe. The local competition is run by Janice Costa (Pure Imagination Director); a person Shamiso admires for bringing such a relevant world recognized competition to Zimbabwe. Shamiso then soared to greater heights when she recently launched Fashion Weekend Zimbabwe, which is the culmination of her love and passion for the fashion industry. Fashion Weekend Zimbabwe a platform that merges fashion, music and food was launched earlier in the year as a way of reigniting interest in

“Success is waking up and doing what you love every day and being able to a make a living out of it.” fashion on the Zimbabwean scene. One of the things Shamiso calls attention to is the fact that the fashion industry is not about beauty pageants; the industry is an array of other things as well. Under Fashion Weekend Zimbabwe, Shamiso has a Designer Development Programme which is a fashion talent scout. The scouted talent is then mentored from the basics like producing a quality garment to the more intricate like writing a competitive business proposal. Shamiso laments the absence of mentorship in the industry, and for this very reason she started the Designer

Development Programme.She hopes that through this initiative, she will be able to help young men and women come up in fashion, and grow profitable businesses. World over, fashion is a billion dollar industry which has the capacity of turning around the fortunes of those who work in it. However, in Zimbabwe, this industry is still in its infancy. Fashion is an Art, and hopes that the relevant government ministry will support the industry. On a positive note, non-governmental organisations like Culture Fund and European Union have started taking an interest in the industry and have donated towards Fashion Weekend’s Design Development Programme. Shamiso hopes that the corporates will start taking part in fashion events giving them the opportunity to enhance their brand through fashion. Shamiso was brought up in a family of hardworking and successful parents, as such she believes hardwork, determination, self-belief and a strong support system are core qualities of achieving success. “I believe if you have a strong support system and surround yourself with like-minded positive people, then the road to success is a joyful learning experience,” she says. While pursuing her goals, Shamiso encountered challenges that tested her faith. She kept going even when knocked down because she believes that, every problem ushers you into a newer and higher level. Her close circle also helps motivate her when discouraged. Shamiso believes that she has impacted the fashion industry positively by bringing innovative ideas and creating unforgettable events. Among the women Shamiso looks up to is Dr. Precious Moloi-Motsepe,chairperson of a South African fashion events company; African Fashion International. “I admire her work ethic, poise, and her dedication in working towards developing the fashion industry in South Africa. She supports development and offers opportunities for women in the fashion industry, something I am working towards with the local Zimbabwean fashion industry,” Shamiso explains. Another woman she looks up is her mother, Thokozile Ruzvidzo. Her work and passion for gender development, has rubbed onto many young women. Shamiso has watched her mother empower others and be the voice of the voiceless. She believes such dedication and professionalism has made her mother’s career a rewarding journey. Like any daughter, Shamiso is captivated by her mother, “My mum’s spirit is amazing, she engages everyone she meets no matter their position in life you never forget her warm smile and charming personality,” she adds. Ruzvidzo regards Tsitsi Mutendi, Zimbabwean Editor of Jewel Magazine, as a woman to watch. Singing praise for Tsitsi, Shamiso pointed out,“Tsitsi is taking Zimbabwean media in a direction it hasn’t been in a while. I love that she has taped into empowering women with a lifestyle magazine that gives us a clear and true version of situations that affect us in our everyday life.” Of the things that melt her heart, food and red wine top the list followed by seeing amazing garments coming down the runway and discovering different cultures through travel. Shamiso’s vision for the future is that of growing Fashion Weekend Zimbabwe, not only to bring Zimbabweans together but other African countries as well. She hopes to see Zimbabwe recognized as a top travel destination. For the women of this country, she had a few words of wisdom, “Know who you are first before you seek affirmation from anyone and work hard to make your own dreams a reality. Opportunity is everywhere, you just have to seize it.” Thank you Shamiso Catherine Ruzvidzo You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE OCTOBER 11 TO OCTOBER 17, 2013

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PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts

Farayi Mangwende Farayi is a mother of one She is a Christian and loves God

She has a Master’s degree in Public Communication and Public Relations She is the Executive in charge of Corporate Affairs at First Mutual Holdings Limited Farayi sits on the Human Resources Committee board for Harare Hospital

Corporate Communications

Farayi Mangwende is a rare fusion of traditional and modern, an avid corporate communications veteran who loves adventure. Not only is she buoyant and full of life but she is the quintessential embodiment of passion. In the few minutes I sat down with her, I left with one lasting impression of her; that she is not afraid of change. Her professional life story speaks of an ever changing terrain that she has had to master to stay relevant. After finishing high school, Farayi had her future figured out; she wanted to go into corporate communications but at the time, the only tertiary institutions that offered the degree were in the United States. In Africa and Europe, it was a fledging career at the time. Her father an economist, was more impressed with solid traditional careers, with an accountant for a sister and a journalist brother and another a social worker, Farayi’s father hoped that she would take up an arts related career. Instead she got into journalism and enrolled at the Harare Polytechnic and then worked briefly for the Herald. She quit journalism and joined Zimsun in their entertainment and promotions department. She worked with Alan Riddell whose mentorship was invaluable. Farayi describes Alan as a perfectionist who was ahead of his time. She left Zimsun to go to England on a two year working holiday in the hotel industry and she discovered that she was not cut out for it. Farayi came back home and joined Network Public Relations before proceeding to Dairibord Zimbabwe Limitedwhere she worked with Busi Chindove. Farayi by nature is fiery and Busi on the other hand is calm, the total opposite of her. “In as much as I found Busi “unusual” I learnt that I didn’t have to be a bull in a china shop to get things done. From Busi I learnt to use my soft side to get

“If I have to stop my life, you have to balance it for me. Life is both give and take.” things done.” says Farayi. Interms of public relations, it was at Dairibord that her career finally came of age. This time, the world was more receptive of P.R as a profession, there were courses and degrees that were now being offered and Farayi saw an opportunity to further her career. Farayi went back to England and did a Master’s in Public Communication and Public Relations. The highlight of her career was her father finally seeing the light and acknowledging her chosen career. Before he died, he told his daughter, “Amoyo I get it now.” When she came back home, Farayi moved to the financial sector where she worked for a local bank. Mangwende believes that in the communication industry you need a lot of experience in different sectors of the economy, once the principles are established, the rest is geography. The dynamics were different as opposed to handling one brand; at the bank she handled diverse portfolios at group level. Farayi decided to go it alone for a season. During this break from formal employment, she worked mornings and was a “soccer mom” in the afternoon. This allowed her time to bond with her daughter. She however missed the corporate world, and after four years she rejoined Zimbabwe Sun Hotels (Zimsun) and worked with Shingi Munyeza. “Shingi has his finger on the pulse and has so

“In life everything can be likened to a Koi fish. It will only grow as much as the water body around it. How you develop is up to you.” much energy. He will not address people if he does not have his facts and figures. He pays great attention to detail,”she said about Shingi Munyeza. Farayi had been out of formal employment as she was self-employed prior to joining Zimbabwe Sun Hotels and thus had a gap to cover when she rejoined the corporate world. She had to polish up on a few skills and Shingi was very patient with her. Under Shingi’s tutelage many priceless lessons were imparted, and for Farayi one of the greatest is being able to get buy- in from your team. Farayi was once again on the move af-

ter Zimsun restructured but she had left a lasting legacy, the rebranding of Zimsun to AfricanSun Limited. She is currently the executive in charge of corporate affairs at First Mutual Life where she has been responsible for rebranding of Afre Corporation to First Mutual Holdings Limited. On a personal level Farayi is passionate about building people. She has informally mentored a few people and she emphasizes balance between work, personal ambition and making oneself financially stable. She is a firm believer in knowing what a person values so that you don’t push them past their endurance levels. For Farayi, relationships hinge on honesty. “You can put a million dollars in front of me but if you lie to me, we are done.” Faith and financial independence are the other attributes that Farayi values. To those who know Farayi fleetingly, she may come off as austere but she has a big heart for the disadvantaged. Farayi has helped fundraise for the St Joseph’s Home for Boys and Shungu Dzevana children’s home. She also sources donations for Harare hospital. Recently she found a donor who paid a significant amount of money for the renovations of Harare Central Hospital Nursing School that was derelict. She also managed to get books for the nurses’ training school which was also in need of new relevant books.The newest edition they had was a 1982 book with some obsolete information. Farayi coordinated a book drive through Facebook which saw Harare hospital receive 350 kg of modern and relevant books. She also roped in her mother who lives in the UK in the book drive project and the books her mother sourced have now arrived in Zimbabwe. For all her hard work,Farayi was recognized by Harare hospital by extending her an invitation to serve on the Human Resources Committee Board. Farayi is currently working on getting donations for starter packs to give to every woman who gives birth at Harare hospital’s maternity wing. “Some women give birth with nothing for the baby and the starter pack will give them dignity and somewhere to start,” she said. As a mother to a teenager, Farayi has had to be firm with her daughter. She acknowledges that parenting has changed over the years and she has had to adapt.Luckily, she is blessed with an easy going focused child. Apart from spending time with family, Farayi loves travelling, and the best place in the world for her is the Cape Coast in Ghana. Farayi dreams of owning a hybrid consultancy firm which will have all services under one roof. When asked who she looks up to, Farayi beams and says Mai Mujuru, “when we look at people from the afar we are judgemental, however, when I met Mai Mujuru I was impressed and blown away. She struck me as a very buy- in type of person. I would definitely vote for her if she runs for president.” Farayi also thinks the world of her mother whom she says is quiet, easy going and does not hold grudges. For a long time Farayi thought her mother’s forgiving nature was her Achilles heel but with age comes wisdom and she has since realized her mother’s ability to forgive and let go is her greatest strength and an invaluable trait. On doing things differently if she were to go back into time, Farayi says she would. “I would push harder and be more focused. I wasn’t as focused as my daughter Chiedza who got 11A’s at ‘O’ Level. With her kind of focus I would have gone very far.I would also live by the Christian values and not go with the crowd like I did then.” Concerning everything else, Farayi has no regrets, except that she would have been more focused, more driven and would definitely have put in a thousand times more effort. Thank you Farayi Mangwende You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


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ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE OCTOBER 18 TO OCTOBER 24, 2013

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts

Tsitsi Mutendi

Tsitsi is the Founding Editor and Managing Director of Jewel Magazine She is married to Daniel Mutendi and has a daughter, Jasmine Tsitsi is also a fashion designer under the name Mucha(her middle name) She was selected as a mentee for the Fortune magazine Global Women’s Mentorship Programme.

Entrepreneur

“I would like to see more women embark on a legacy building journey and make impactful differences in their lives and those of the people around them. I want to leave behind a legacy of the power of possibility and the ethic of hard work. I am what I am and where I am because I have worked hard. Nothing is impossible if you work hard and are consistent.” Tsitsi Mutendi is the avatar of the Proverbs 31 woman, a wife of noble character, purposeful and industrious. Her story is that of serendipity, a happenstance that changed her career trajectory. Mutendi had always wanted to be a fashion designer, and her mother wanted her to go into business. As a compromise, Tsitsi went on to study marketing, at least to satisfy a small part of her creative urge. Jewel was born out of an unfortunate set of circumstances. After suffering a still birth she went into depression and was not interested in anything, life had become meaningless. In those dark moments, she started going through old magazines and designed a cover for fun, next she put together the content and before she knew it, what she meant to pass her time had become a career. In the words of Seneca, “A gem cannot be polished without friction, nor a man without trials,” through the friction and trials of life was Jewel Magazine born and Tsitsi Mutendi’s life has never been the same. She used her past experience at top brands, in her chosen path of media and publishing and in 2011 she pioneered to establish Zimbabwe’s first glossy women’s magazine of international standards. Having started out as a marketer, Tsitsi leant to observe market needs and cater for them. The whole marketing chain’s practice and analysis has been relevant in everyday busi-

“ As editor it has been an inspirational journey of being able to collate together stories, articles, pictures etc and make the magazine appealing and relevant to our readers every month. As our readers have learnt, so have I during the compilation process. I am now more insync with the readers and with myself and with the editorial direction that the magazine has taken. ” ness. Tsitsi was able to identify a niche and built a brand because of her marketing experience. Marketing is one of the most important aspects of any business and proved critical to Jewel’s success. For Tsitsi, the magazine is a tool to empower women by giving them information in every area of life. When she started out, she got advice to concentrate on one thing but Tsitsi believes that, “A woman is not just one thing, we have so many different dimensions, so many things going on in our lives and too many areas that are untouched,” she says. One of her motivations is to bring the world to Zimbabwean women, “Our objective at Jewel magazine is to provide useful information to the Zimbabwean woman so that she does not feel left out; so that wherever she is she does not feel that there is a big wide world that she knows little about. Jewel brings the world to her in a small part every month,” she adds. Tsitsi has kept her love and passion for fashion, design and creativity alive through her fashion label Mucha(Original African Couture). For which she is the Head Designer and Creative Director. She loves Java, the African print which she describes as fresh and different.When asked how she manages her time

“The media sometimes just focuses on the negative for sensationalism. I feel gutted when I see some of the lies that are perpetrated. Zimbabwe is a growing economy. We are dusting ourselves off from years of economic downward spin. Business is gradually becoming vibrant again and its becoming a thriving place.” enabling her to do so much, her reply was, “I multi task because I can, I am a woman and I was born to multi task and make sure my family is well taken care of.” In the same vein of multi-tasking, she is also the co-founder of DanTs Media the Media house which owns and manages JEWEL and other contract published publications. She has been key in the strategic growth and planning of DanTs Media and the setup of the contract publishing department. For Jewel and Mucha, Tsitsi has

big dreams of reaching the international market, not because it is better, but because she wants a strong brand to come out of Zimbabwe that can compete at that level. Mutendi feels that women in media on the African continent are not as respected and celebrated. In South Africa there are few big names but they are not accorded the respect they deserve. Tsitsi hopes that in the future more women will be honoured and recognized. Besides lack of recognition, Tsitsi acknowledges that walking the same path consistently is a challenge. However, if one overcomes self-doubt, everything else falls into place. When asked about the importance of wealth, Tsitsi’s response was that of a sage. “Wealth is essential to the longevity of lasting legacies. In short, riches are short term and short lived and can buy you nice things. Wealth is long term and long lived. Wealth can buy your great great grandchildren an education, change your community and create a viable income basis for millions. As a business and family we are orientated toward building a lasting business that will continue to empower and create more money for our family and the community we reside in. That is true wealth to us.” Tsitsi’s career highlight was this year when she was chosen as Zimbabwe’s candidate for the prestigious Fortune magazine Global Women’s Mentorship Programme. This saw her spend time at Time Inc under the Executive Vice President and Group President, Lifestyle Group, in New York. While in New York she visited the iconic Essence magazine. This opportunity allowed her to be surrounded by people who could ably feed into the work that she does. 2013 has also seen Tsitsi expanding her Media portfolio offering by her delving into film and production by being the co- Excutive Producer for local production Salondotcom. Through this project Tsitsi and her partner have launched JEWEL TV which will give millions of Zimbabweans fresh local content and a new viewership option. In 2008 Tsitsi was drawn into the world of Philanthropy when she founded Women Of Legacy Foundation, an organisation that strongly promotes the importance of legacy growth among women in Africa. The organisation has held two major conferences which were attended by top leading women in government and business from across Africa. Vimbayi Kajese, Thembi Khumalo and Nancy Guzha are the women Tsitsi looks up to locally. These women epitomize what she values. Not only are these women genuine, but each of them has a unique signature. In a country where people copy each other’s styles, these women have an unwavering strong sense of self. Tsitsi loves spending time with her mother, sister, husband and daughter; her favourite people in the world. With so many achievements and accolades under her belt, one would expect Tsitsi to be anything but humble, nonetheless Tsitsi is modest,in fact she likes to think of herself as a mum with a magazine and a fashion label who juggles it pretty hectic but somehow gets it done. Thank you Tsitsi Mutendi You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE OCTOBER 25 TO OCTOBER 31, 2013

E3

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts

Divine Ndhlukula Divine is the founder and Managing Director of SECURICO She holds an Executive MBA from Midlands State University She has won numerous Awards which include most successful woman by Forbes Africa Ndhlukula is a sought after international speaker on Entrepreneurship She is a devout Christian who fellowships at the Methodist Church

Business Woman

“The presiding passion for me is the empowerment of women – I believe that weakened women breed weak children, which in turn weakens the very fabric of civilization. My aim is to teach women that no matter what situation they are in or coming out of, they have the power and ability to rise above their perceived destiny to become the best.” From a mundane kitchen table to an expensive ornate office with all the latest gadgets one can fathom, the story of Divine Ndhlukula success speaks of an unbreakable spirit and fierce determination. Divine has earned every accolade bestowed on her and she can deservedly rest on her lapels.She has become an inspiration to women across the globe and has become a much sought after speaker internationally where she has presented many papers on entrepreneurship. Ndhlukula has been featured as an entrepreneurship expert by various media across the world among them Forbes, The London Times, The Economist, SABC and BBC World. Ndhlukula is the architect behind SECURICO one of the largest security companies in the country. The security company boasts of a staff compliment of 4000, over 900 of which are women. This makes Divine one of the largest female employers in Zimbabwe. In the words of Clement Stone, “definiteness of purpose is the starting point of all achievement.” From an early age Divine knew that she wanted to own a business. She came from a family which owned a business in rural Gutu. Her father was a stalwart character who was fairly strict, assiduous and industrious. From him came the strong work ethic which motivates Divine’s independent drive, focus and tenacity. Divine was a star student and her father would often tell people that she would be the beacon of the family. Sadly,

“I grew up with a very independent spirit, often going against the grain in terms of what girls should do or not do at that time of our generation. I have always known that anything was possible if I put my mind on it.” her father passed on before he could see his foretelling come to pass. Divine started out in salaried employment and worked for the Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation, the government of Zimbabwe and Old Mutual among others. She was however, handling small businesses on the side while employed. She went into farming for a season but it didn’t work out as planned. In 1999 she started a small venture on her kitchen table primarily for the sustenance of her family. This venture is what has grown to be SECURICO. SECURICO was the first company in the security industry to attain the internationally acclaimed ISO9001 QMS. Starting a business in a sector largely dominated by big companies was no easy task. It took perseverance and sharp business acuity to grow a kitchen table venture into a multi-million dollar business. Being a woman came with its set of challenges. Although society is a bit more open minded, there are still individuals who discriminate against women. She nevertheless acknowledges that the challenges of a fluid economy are the ones she had to contend with the most. Despite all this Divine has managed to grow a business through a difficult time of this country’s economy. At the time when most of business was closing shop, she was broadening her base and setting her sights for larger ex-

the workplace. Divine has also made it deliberate company policy to promote education: that of her staff and everyone else in need. It is not unheard of at SECURICO to have someone in management who would have started out as a security guard. As an advocate of protecting and empowering the weak and the voiceless, Divine sits on several non profit organisations that help women and children. She has recently set up a foundation that will cater for the education of the bright and disadvantaged girls from the remote areas. Ndhlukula, like Mandela believes that education is the most important weapon which we can use to change the world. “I have ensured all my children got the best education and they have not disappointed and as SECURICO our community engagements are focused on education through bursaries,” she adds. Divine’s is an avid reader and her office is lined with books. It is not surprising when she says she loves to read and is working towards getting a PhD. She already holds an Executive MBA from Midlands State University and a honourary MBA from the Women’s University in Africa. As a testament of her hard work, Divine has received a plethora of local and continental Awards from various institutions. She was recently named one of the most successful women in Africa by Forbes. When asked of the women she looks up to she answers, “I admire and look up to women who have dared to dream, who started and built institutions from ground zero like Hope Sadza and Kubi Indi. It is never an easy start,” she says. Divine’s idea of a pastime includes fishing and gardening and also loves to spend her time with family. She is affectionately known as “Mawunganidze” by those close to her since she has a way of bringing people together.In describing herself she says, “I am optimistic, determined, hard headed and soft hearted person who believes in being firm and fair.” “My advice to women is: If you want a certain future, go out and create it. Conquer your fears, fear hampers creativity. Opportunities are now galore. We just need to roll up our sleeves, lift our feet, and walk through the door as no one will carry us.” Divine lives by the motto “Never tire in well doing because in due season, you shall reap if you faint not”.

“The most important empowerment you can give a person is education hence my focus has been to share my knowledge with my employees all the time.” ploits. With a smile on her face she explains how she managed to conquer the odds, “I am a firm believer of the philosophy that there is no easy road to anywhere worth going to. The Zimbabwean business environment has been very difficult in the past ten years, however, at the same time, this presented opportunities for those with a good entrepreneurial flair. I cannot be ignored, I put my best foot forward and be the best in whatever I do.” Not only does Ndhlukula employ women, she also guarantees their safety in the workplace. SECURICO has a gender desk which looks into all matters of sexual harassment in

Thank you Divine Ndhlukula You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE NOVEMBER 1 TO NOVEMBER 7, 2013

E3

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts

Nothando Ndebele

Nothando is a Harvard and Oxford Graduate She is a Managing Director and Head Research, Renaissance Capital. She has a daughter She is a fan of Zimbabwean literature

Managing Director & Head of Research

“I am driven by challenges, taking on the impossible and chartering into new territories. I’m at my best when I am dealing with more than I think I can handle.” An impressive education, a distinguished career and a charming personality, Nothando Ndebele is nothing short of a genius. This woman has proven beyond all doubt that given a chance, women can be just as good as men. She describes herself as passionate, fearless and competitive. In the world of Investment banking, those qualities are priceless. Nothando is a Managing Director and Head of African Research at Renaissance Capital, based in Johannesburg. Renaissance Capital is an investment bank focused on emerging and frontier markets. She has 15 years of experience in financial services, combining work in asset management, private equity and equity research. Ndebele graduated from Harvard with a B.A in Economics (magna cum laude). She also attended the University of Oxford as a Rhodes’ scholar where she obtained an MBA (distinction) from Said Business School and an MSc Social Anthropology. She began her career in Deutsche Bank’s equity research team in 1997 before joining Goldman Sachs in London in 2000. She later joined Investec Asset Managers in Cape Town in 2004. She was a founding member and partner of Afena Capital, a firm that offers specialist equity and balanced portfolios serving the South African institutional market. Nothando is a CFA charter holder and has co-authored Renaissance Capital’s seminal book on Africa’s economy, The Fastest Billion: The Story Behind Africa’s Economic Revolution. Her success can clearly be accredited to a mix of wit and diligence.

“I hope I have helped people understand the investment opportunities in our continent a bit better and appreciate that black women can do any job that men can do. I like to think of myself as an ambassador for the continent.” With such invaluable experience,Nothando’s personal vision is to be the best that she can be, to apply herself a hundred percent and make a difference on the African continent. She wants to sit at the helm of a pan-African business and be a part of transforming Africa’s hopes into reality. Nothando opened up to some of the challenges she has faced on the road to realizing her dream. “As a woman you sometimes come across people who tell you, in subtle and not-so-subtle ways, to aim lower or settle for less. Luckily for me I have been privileged to have great mentors who have pushed me even at times when I doubted myself. I also surround myself with positive, supportive friends and family – people who believe and reinforce my strengths. I have learnt that there is value in reaching the valley, rock bottom. The only way from there is up and if you take the down times as learning experiences, you become stronger on the way up.” To overcome these challenges Nothando stayed focused and surrounded herself with people who cared. “Without a solid support network you’ll struggle in the financial markets, it can be cut throat and impersonal. One of my mentors also taught me a valuable lesson. He said Nothando, don’t take things personally. The world is

“Success is knowing that you have had a positive and visible impact on a life other than your own. ” bigger than you so choose your battles wisely. Lesson learnt,” she explained. From these experiences Nothando believes that Ubuntu, humility, drive, competitiveness, passion, vision and self-awareness are the pre- requisite qualities for success. One of the things she enjoys most about what she does is that there are plenty of opportunities for continuous learning in an ever changing Africa. The continent is evolving at a rapid pace and Nothando’s work allows her to be at the epicentre of financial markets development. She is pleased that she has been

instrumental in building a pan-African franchise as well as having been able to train and mentor younger people in her industry. Academically she attended two of the world’s leading universities, an achievement for which she is proud. In her personal life she has built quality relationships across continents over many years. Besides her mother, who raised Nothando to be a fighter and is described by her as being “as tough as nails”, she also looks up toMamphele Ramphele, Hilary Clinton, Graca Machel, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, Oprah Winfrey, Christine Lagarde, Meryl Streep and Toni Morrison. “These women have not stopped for a breather, with each milestone they have achieved, they have set themselves bigger challenges and refused to be deterred by gender, race or age. Whether you like them or not, it is hard to ignore them in their respective fields.” Nothando loves spending her personal time with her daughter, family and close friends. She describes as fanatical her passion for literature, exercise and travel. She went on to say, “I am a shameless fan of our writers – Petina Gappah and NoViolet Bulawayo. Literature, in my view, is another channel for educating the world about different African countries and the widely varied experiences of our people.” She believes that Petina and NoViolet are some of the upcoming female writers to “watch”.Of the things that melt her heart, “My daughter, who without a doubt is my greatest living joy. On nature she says she loves the Jacaranda season, “nothing beats driving down an avenue of Jacaranda trees in full bloom, Kariba at sunset and Sunday 9am mass at Our Lady of Lourdes in Bulawayo,” she said. Nothando believes that this is the time for Zimbabwe to make the hard decisions, “I believe we are at the crossroads once again. We need to embrace change or risk becoming irrelevant within the continent. Let’s remove the bureaucratic red tape that is strangling our entrepreneurs and even big businesses. Let us open our doors to financial and human capital investment to boost our economy.” She also lamented the little representation of young people in cabinet to which she comments, “Too bad we do not have many women and younger men in the new cabinet; diversity is a key ingredient for change.” To the women of Zimbabwe she leaves wise words, “Live your own life but try and positively impact the lives of others. If possible, try and prioritise education, as boring as it sounds, a good education truly does open doors. Aim for financial independence, it is harder to make the right choices for yourself when you rely on someone else for your day-to-day survival.” Thank you Nothando Ndebele You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


DESTINY - ElizabethMagaya

ut that our Zimbabwean society is so superstitious about things. through in business people tend to ignore the fact that one would rd to attain that kind of success. They tend to speculate too much. s they will allege that you have acquired this success from a wambo (goblin). As an African female entrepreneur one has to develop thick skin.

DESTINY ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE NOVEMBER 8 TO NOVEMBER 14, 2013

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Your Mind & Hands! But Not Your Background

few African businesswomen. African traditional society has never n our potential as businesswomen. I thank God I managed to be Quick Facts “Success is a journey, it is not a destination. strong and remain focused... For as long as I am living I have to keep on Elizabeth Magaya achieving. For me success is measured by to pass through the dessert experience and this builds and solidithe goals that I have achieved.” Magaya is an amazing story of r like Job in the Bible. I believe one has to be patient in life because Graduated with a Bsc in Elizabeth bravery, self-belief and undeniable deterck’ attitude to life does notManagement pay. I am happy thatEntrepremy story shallmination. be and This made her dare to dream in far and that it will inspire many toneurial learn to hold on and never to the face of insurmountable adversity. This Development give up in the face (majoring of adversity...in Marketing) in remarkable woman’s life story speaks of the indelible nature of human will and spirit. 2012 The bible scripture speaks of not despising me to hear about such a novel, prestigious and intellectually prothe day of small beginnings. This rings true mme. I wasn’t so sure whether I would qualify so I went to see for the Elizabeth who has proved that through hard ge of the programme and She narrated to him myenrolled background. was work, anything is possible. Her motiis currently for Hevation is to completely utilise her accumud that I had gone back to school after almost four decades... an MBI programme at ” lated experience and knowledge to the fullEXTRACT FROM THE BOOK extent possible in advancing women’s Chinhoyi University of est economic empowerment issues. Technology others may have been born with a ievement! The book is relevant to every African woman in my While gen- spoon silver in their mouths, Elizabeth did nderscores the sacrifices made for us by the women before us;not have such a privilege. Owing to parental marital disharmony, Elizabeth became we have no excuse not to be achievers” Elizabeth is a mother of six a breadwinner at a tender age. Her mother KWARAMBA (CHINHOYI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY) grown-ups was forced to leave from their Highfields home and her father would disappear for he writes from the heart and her story is enthralling” long periods on end. Elizabeth who was in Standard 6 at the time which is equivalent DEVINE NDHUKHULA (FOUNDER OF SECURICO) She is an experienced of Grade 7 was compelled by circumstancpublic speaker, facilitator es to drop out of school as she inherited the “Refreshing, enriching and therapeutic” onerous task of providing for and motherand negotiator ing her other six siblings. This was no easy PROF. MUFARO GUNDUZA (PUBLISHER) task for the young girl. Forever enterprising, Elizabeth started off selling vegetables and at a delicate age, she learnt the politics and Entrepreneur strategies of survival. She soon developed other practical skills like knitting, crocheting and sewing. What started out as a vegetable stall in Highfields, grew to a few shops which speacialised in African attire particu-

Emanimation Design Studios ™ w.emanimation.co.zw

Autobiography

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‘Only an empowered individual can narrate such a powerful story”’ tion and the competencies it equips one with; that is why I went

Photography: Emmanuel Mahuni

Professormy Hope Sadza (Women’s University In Africa) “I want to be an ambassador for sustainable entrepreneurship. I am back to school at age 52. In addition, personal circumstances not about getting rich quick schemes but taking incremental steps drove me to be an achiever. I was the provider for my family from a very young age, if I did not we would have gone hungry. I think towards wealth creation.”

9780797454569

larly tie and dye. This has grown to a present day business that boasts of diverse portfolios in property development, landscaping, and interior designing among other interests. Elizabeth often identifies opportunities with her entrepreneurial mind. The one thing that sets Elizabeth apart is her never ending zeal for learning. Having left formal education in primary school, Elizabeth then 52 years of age went back to school after 38 years. She enrolled at Speciss College for a year and wrote her ‘O’ Levels. She went on to obtain a BSc in Management and Entrepreneurial Development in 2012 at the Women’s University in Africa. She is currently enrolled for a Masters in Business Intelligence at the Chinhoyi University of Technology. Elizabeth is an experienced public speaker, facilitator and negotiator. She has a vision of not only growing her competencies but also her business. She has sets her sights on the property development industry. With her kind of focus, ingenuity and 46 years’ experience in entrepreneurship,she is destined to excel in whatever she sets her mind on. She envisions a Zimbabwe where many women are entrepreneurs and able to alle-

lack motivated me to professional success. In my mind I can never go back to that place. I had no formal training so I had to use my talents. My hands created my professionalism,” she explained. Elizabeth believes that entrepreneurship and education go hand in hand. Making money or having great ideas is not enough. The corporate world wants to see things on paper and being unable to translate ideas into a sound business proposal can cost one an opportunity. “Education also equips a person with professionalism, management skills and knowledge of business ethics.” In her spare time Elizabeth loves reading, gardening, socializing and motivating other women. Her children are the hub of her universe. She looks up to women who have made it in all spheres of life. For her, “these women have demonstrated that women are capable of economic empowerment in all spheres including government, academia and the private sector.” Elizabeth believes that women are the heartbeat of the nation because they are hardworking and they give all they can in raising families. The impact of women cannot be over emphasised. Everyone has been touched by a woman in their life through motherhood. Elizabeth’s current goals include expanding her property development firm. As well as that she says, “I am also setting up my Entrepreneurship Advisory Services practice and life coaching centre.” she says. She encourages the women of Zimbabwe to work hard and not to give up in times of adversity but to remain focused. “Do not separate your life from the word of God, meditate on it day and night. She recommends the following verses for meditation read Jeremiah 29 Vs 11, Isaiah 29 Vs 15 - 16 and James 1 Vs 12, she says” Elizabeth does not believe there is life worth living outside God. Elizabeth has written a book entitled “Destiny: your mind and hands but not your background”. The book chronicles her life story. Professor Hope Sadza comments on this pieace of literature as follows, “Only an empowered individual can narrate such a powerful story.”

ElizabethMagaya

“I foresee a time when women will be the heartbeat of the nation in all sectors, leadership, governance, education and industry.” viate poverty. Elizabeth is meticulous about her work and strives for excellence and perfection. She believes that integrity, honesty, good business ethics, financial discipline and spirituality are at the core of her success. To date Elizabeth has received numerous awards. Her lack of access to formal education at a young age shaped her in a lot of ways. “I do not regret this for I have come to accept that this was part of my path. At that age I went through an extensive education through life’s experiences. I must say that there is no substitute to formal educa-

• • • • •

Business Woman of the Year Award (1998) Business Woman of the Year Award (Empretec) (1999) Business Woman of the Year Award (CBZ) (1999) Most empowered woman Woman’s university in Africa(2013) The most mature student in management Women University in Africa(2013) • Superwoman in education (Victors Award, 2013) • ZNCC Women’s Conference first runner up in Property Development 2013 Thank you Elizabeth Magaya You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


E4

ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE NOVEMBER 22 TO NOVEMBER 28, 2013

PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts “Success is standing up for what you

Maria Wilson

Maria is married and has two children She plays the piano She attended the Dominican Convent in Harare

Executive Director, HIFA

believe to be true and right; fighting for this belief to survive and grow. It is seeing past pure material gain and trying to establish an initiative that makes a difference in the daily lives of people. ” Maria Wilson has been described as a rare gifting, a phenomenal creative mind, trailblazer and visionary of our times. She is the Executive Director of the Harare International Festival of Arts. This is a prestigious, famed and acclaimed arts and culture event which the country hosts annually and has changed the landscape of Zimbabwean arts and culture. The idea for the Harare International Festival of the Arts came about as the brainchild its founder and now member of the HIFA Board of Trustees, Manuel Bagorro, in 1997. He worked on the idea in conjunction with Maria Wilson and the first Festival was piloted in 1999. From 1999, HIFA has grown into one of the most prominent International Arts Festivals on the African continent. It exhibits unprecedented corporate investment and that is the direct result of Maria Wilson assuming the role of Executive Director in 2002. Her intention was to ensure a predominantly Zimbabwean initiative that would be sustained through partnerships with the Zimbabwean business community set apart from a dependence on foreign or donor aid. Her establishment of attractive marketing and PR packages that answered to the corporate bottom line has gained the festival a loyal support base from the Zimbabwean business community even when times have been extremely difficult.

“My passion is undoubtedly the youth. I feel they are the future and the adult world continually lets them down by not providing them with the good examples they need to contribute actively to the world around them. I am also passionate about education and the absolute need for it, especially in the field of arts and culture. ” Maria Wilson was not only instrumental in the establishment of HIFA but has continuously pushed for the festival’s development. The various projects that HIFA has undertaken over the years such as the festival’s work with street youth, its endeavours in youth training and empowerment through schools partnerships among others, are a true testimony of Maria’s devotion to community development through the arts. She hopes to see arts and culture valued within the education system especially at secondary level. “My parents were unique characters and the moral and religious strength of my mother particularly impressed me. I attended St. Dominic’s Convent in Harare for the whole of my education and what I learnt from the examples set by the Dominican sisters who taught me has stood me in good stead for the whole of my life. My time working in London taught me about competition and discipline and the need to continually strive to achieve more and reach ever higher standards,” says Maria narrating how her life experiences have undoubtedly shaped her persona, dreams and beliefs. Upon her return to Zimbabwe, she had the pleasure of working with Morrison Sifelani at ZimTrade. She describes him as a wonderful mentor with a warm and generous nature who taught her how to tru-

“I want to make a difference to the lives of the people I meet and interact with. I want to fight for what I believe to be true and right. I want to contribute to the building of Zimbabwe so that my children will have a future here.” ly stand up for what she believed to be right. In challenging times Maria has relied on her family and her faith in God for support. Maria believes that her purpose is to provide a positive interface especially for youth. “I also feel I am supposed to teach youth about my vision of nation-building and motivate them to contribute affirmatively to the future of their country Zimbabwe.” She believes that her purpose is to actively show that arts and culture are positive contributors to nation-building.

She reveals that the her career at HIFA came about more out of need rather than her own decision but the position gives her the chance to promote the value of arts and culture in community development. The greatest impact Maria believes she has made is fighting for the survival of the most positive, affirmative and excellent community initiative in the country. The result has been active illustration of what the Zimbabwean people can achieve if they put their mind to it and if they work positively together. HIFA is seen as one of the most affirmative events not only in Zimbabwe but on the African continent. “Women stand for warmth, generosity, strength and ‘heart’. They keep businesses, families, initiatives going, often against impossible odds. I think it is the deep strength of women that comes of having to fight harder for what they achieve that makes a huge contribution to a country and its people,” says Maria giving her rendition of why women are the heartbeat of the nation. Maria describes herself as courageous, humorous and determined. “I like to believe I have a good sense of humour and have the ability to make people laugh. I can certainly laugh at myself. I believe humour can get people on one’s side and persuade them to one’s way of thinking. I have fought for HIFA and what it stands for, for around 14 years. It is a tiring and often thankless task that takes enormous amounts of energy and courage. Determined because I am stubborn! I like to think that determination is the positive facet of stubbornness!” she adds. During her personal time Maria engages in a number of activities which include working with a school boy choir who sing for Mass each Sunday at a local school and has also volunteered her time in teaching drama, speech and music at various other schools. Her family is the hub of her universe, “This is one of my great loves. I spend time conversing with my family who have such a wonderful perspective on the world,” she says. She also reads extensively and plays the piano as she originally studied music. Maria believes that women should stand up for what they believe. “Do not fit in with the crowd – celebrate your individuality, your uniqueness, your extraordinary way of problem solving. Do not become discouraged or downhearted. Keep caring about what is going on around you.” In parting Maria believes we can build a better Zimbabwe,” If Zimbabweans can become less apathetic, less materialistic, less corrupt, less depressed, more caring, more civilly and socially minded, less self-centred or always questioning “what’s in it for me?”, I know that this country will become the jewel in the crown of Africa. As a nation and a people, we will actively show the Continent and the rest of the world, what it is to work as a people, together, beyond race, age, gender, politics, in order to build a country and fight for it to be a good and Godly one.” Thank you Maria Wilson You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE NOVEMBER 29 TO DECEMBER 5, 2013

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PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts

Jacqueline Nozipo Maraire

J. Nozipho Maraire was educated at Harvard and Columbia (Ivy League Universities) Her first novel is Zenzele: A Letter for My Daughter published in 1996 She is among the first African female Neurosurgeons Maraire is married and has four children

NEUROSURGEON & AUTHOR

“We remember apartheid, when we weren’t allowed to shop in certain stores. ... We’re lost between the traditional African culture and the modern culture. We don’t know how to incorporate them, and there are no role models. The world is so Western, and we want to retain our core identity.” Jacqueline Nozipo Maraire is a Zimbabwean doctor, entrepreneur and writer born in 1964. She is the author of Zenzele: A Letter for My Daughter. The novel was published in 1996, was a New York Times “Notable Book of the Year” and a Boston Globe bestseller. It has been published and translated into over 14 languages. She also is a known public speaker and has addressed as guest speaker at various literary forums including The Gutenberg Literary Festival. She is a director of the Rotary Foundation and has also worked for the World Health Organization. Dr. Maraire has spoken to numerous book clubs and civic organizations and served on many literary panels including being an invited guest of The Gotenberg Literary Festival. She has served on the Board of Directors of several organizations including The Rotary Foundation, The Ross Ragland Theater and The South North Development Institute. She has worked with and for many development agencies including The World Health Organization, NORAD, the Norwegian aid agency and The Synergos Institute. She worked with the Synergos Institute as a consultant and program coordinator and was instrumental in forming community investment funds southern Africa. In 2010 she was one of the winners of the British Airways Entrepreneur Face to Face Award for her entry of Ecosurgica, her vision for cutting edge, affordable

“I have a sense that at any time this moment could be cut short. I think, as a result, I live more fully. Time is so precious.” health care in Southern Africa. She is the founder of Cutting Edge Neurosurgeon Inc., a web based start up. Maraire was five years old when she told her father she wanted to be a neurosurgeon. She had only the vaguest notion of what one did, but liked the idea because, “it sounded like the most difficult thing I could find to do.” Her mother was a pediatrician; her father was a college professor, banker and tobacco farmer. Nozipo grew up in Harare, attended elite private schools, then earned her undergraduate degree at Harvard before studying medicine

“There is not a man in the world who is worth your dignity. Do not confuse self-sacrifice with love. at Columbia. Though her choice of career originated as a dare to herself, it has proven satisfying to Maraire. She feels drawn to the intellectual challenge of working out the puzzle of what afflicts a patient: asking good questions, listening carefully, visualizing the neuroanatomy, doing research. She

recognizes that the problems treated by neurosurgeons lie at the core of the patient’s identity. For Nozipo Maraire the operating room is a world apart, a place where little else intrudes as surgeons, nurses and technicians focus on the delicate work of opening the skull and fixing what’s wrong inside. “There’s a closeness you share with people here. It’s almost a kind of clandestine fraternity,” she says, wearing a blue surgical cap, her smooth black hair pulled back above a high forehead. “Part of the culture is the balance between the seriousness of the situation — how macabre it really is — and yet you’re able to talk about the baby you just had, your lives, and your friends. Time is suspended.” Her first novel takes the form of a letter from a wise Zimbabwean mother to her daughter at Harvard. The mother uses her life story and stories of family and friends to illustrate the struggle of Shona people to preserve the strong aspects of their culture: respect for elders and a feeling of obligation to the community. She warns her daughter Zenzele of the perils of severing roots to her culture. In poetic language, the mother tells how the older generation suffered under and resisted colonial rule in Rhodesia (the name for Zimbabwe until independence from Britain in 1980). “Since I’ve written the book,” Maraire says, “I’ve met a lot of young Africans who’ve told me it’s the first time they’ve read a book in which they recognize themselves, the generation of children who made the transition from pre-independence to the struggle for independence and the post-independence era, and the ensuing cynicism that inevitably followed. The struggle of Maraire’s fictional characters to reconcile African and Western values reflects Maraire’s own enduring interest in the analogous challenge facing Third World societies: how to adopt Western ideals and technologies selectively. While an undergraduate at Harvard, Maraire organized a campus group to place students with international agencies like Oxfam. She took a year off from college to work on AIDS education for the World Health Organization in Geneva. There she worked closely with the late Jonathan Mann, M.D., a visionary advocate for global AIDS policy. She served on the board of directors of the Manhattan-based nonprofit group South North Development Initiative, which finds innovative ways to provide capital to African and Latin American businesses considered too risky by conventional investors. During her surgical residency, Nozipo found grant money for fellowships that allowed American neurosurgeons to visit Zimbabwe. Jacqueline is married to Allen Chiura who was a childhood friend whom she met again by chance at Heathrow Airport in London. (He was traveling from Zimbabwe to Philadelphia; she from Ethiopia to New York.) Chiura is a urologist and they have four children. Maraire had thought she wouldn’t be caught dead making the conventional choice by marrying someone from her upper-class social circle in Zimbabwe. But she and Chiura found that their common frame of reference gave them a deep understanding of each other. She says they “shared a time not too many people have shared, living in a country going through the transition from colonialism to a time of independence. We made sense to each other.” She saw that broadening her horizons by dating men from different cultures had, paradoxically, imposed limitations. She compared it to living in a single room of a mansion. “Meeting Allen, it was like the whole house was open. Light came in.” Marriage to a Zimbabwean made it easier for Maraire to transmit to her children what she most values in the Shona worldview: feeling linked to one’s ancestors. “There’s a sense that you have the benefit of other spirits. You’re not so alone. There’s a sense of some continuum. That continuum is with you and maybe — who knows — gives you wisdom and insights.” Maraire says her drive and her ability to get things done derive from her assumption that she can accomplish whatever she chooses to undertake, even when she can claim no special expertise in a field. “I don’t feel, ‘I can’t do that. Somebody else should do that,’” she says. Maraire believes her lack of inhibition about tackling projects grows, in part, out of coming from the Third World, where fewer people have the education and the connections to get things done. “If you have the opportunity to do something, you have to seize it.” Although Maraire has achieved so much — she feels frustrated that she hasn’t accomplished more. “The more you do, the more you feel needs to be done,” she says. “I feel a responsibility because I’ve had so much opportunity. I’ve had a privileged life.” She divides her time between the US and Zimbabwe.

Jacqueline Nozipo Maraire You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE DECEMBER 6 TO DECEMBER 12, 2013

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PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts

A woman described by many as a rare gem and phenomenal voice on the continent on Professor Hope Sadza education Professor Hope Sadza is a truly remarkable woman. What is probably most outstanding about her is not only her ability to turn a vision into reality but that she keeps Professor Sadza is married dreaming and fighting for the emancipation with two children of women. When I met with Prof Sadza, I was not only impressed by her achievements but by the woman herself; she struck me as warm, motherly, inviting and engaging. Founder and Vice Hope Sadza was born and bred in Mbare Harare. Her mother was a teacher and her faChancellor of Women’s ther a businessman who owned a fleet of taxUniversity in Africa is. She was schooled at Chiroodzo in Mbare, Goromonzi and Waddilove teacher’s college. Prof Sadza holds a BSc and a Master’s degree in Public Administration with the University Her middle name is Cynthia of Missouri, as well as a PhD from the University of Zimbabwe. She distinguished herself in public service having worked for a number of government ministries until her early One of the founding retirement to pursue her dream of starting a directors of the Zimbabwe university for women. Starting a University for women was the ulInstitute of Public timate crowning of Hope Sadza’s noteworAdministration and thy career. In her positions as a Public SerManagement vice and Parastals’ Commissioner, she found it difficult to fill top positions with women candidates, not many women were qualified. This led her to question why only a few women furthered their studies. Her findings revealed that mature women did not have time to go to school because of family responsisome are poor, with scarce resourcProfessor bilities, es that hardly allow them the “luxury” of an education. On the other hand women for a types of women who study with the institution and allows them to long time had no role models to look up to for learn at times that are convenient for them. guidance. Her findings proved instrumental Prof Sadza hopes to see a Zimbabwe in which the policies of the government look kindly towards women in a more holistic way. Undoubtedly the government has come a long way in trying to level the “Do not be satisfied with what you have now. Strive to learn some- playing field for women but there is still more than can be done, esfor the mature woman who missed out on education. Prof thing else; there is something you do not know yet. We can never pecially Sadza has worked tirelessly to get scholarships for outstanding stulearn enough.” dents and those that cannot afford to pay for education. Among some of the university’s alumni is the Vice President Joyce Mujuru and to shaping and paving the way for a Women’s Elizabeth Magaya a rising entrepreneur in the property business. Malaysia is Hope Sadza’s destination of choice. She enjoys the openUniversity in Africa. Armed with this knowledge Hope Sadza left ness of the society and the prevailing high levels of professionalism. her esteemed position in the civil service, Her role models include Amai Mujuru and Graca Machel. These two sold off her car and took a plunge with her women according to Professor Hope Sadza have devoted their lives life’s savings and the Women’s Universi- to fight for the greater good and their projects for women uplift truly ty in Africa (WUA)was born. The University from poverty. Hope Sadza enjoys socializing and spending time with started with only two offices and a small staff family. compliment. In 2002, WUA opened its doors Prof Sadza hopes to expand WUA into other countries and hopes to to a little under 150 students. This seeming- grow the student body to about 5000. However, she cautions that ly small response spurred Professor Sadza growth has got to be accompanied with quality lest standards are on. What was once a vision was slowly be- lowered. She also hopes to see the government implementing poliing transformed into something tangible. The cies that favour the growth of the economy as well as attracting forsaying “do not despise the day of small be- eign direct investment. ginnings”, is true to Professor Hope Sadza. Today the university boasts of over 3000 stu- Some of the Awards she has won include; dents, 85 percent of whom are women and • Achiever’s Award, Educators, presented at the International 15 percent are men. This is a far cry from the Precious Stones Women’s Convention on 23 June 2003, by Faith for less than 150 students WUA started with. The the Nation, Zimbabwe university is also in partnership with other • Citation in recognition of outstanding service to women’s issues and countries such as Zambia. Zambian women Women in Management, Business and Development Trust (WIMBD) come for a period of 3 months at a time for on 2nd November 2006 lectures. Undoubtedly WUA’s vision “to be • Best Educationist in Tertiary Education in 2006 from Anointed Busithe best university in Africa in the promotion nessWomen’s Network (ABN), Zimbabwe of gender equity in tertiary education” is on • 2nd Runner-up in the category of “Public Service” Manager of the its way to beingrealised. Women’s University Year and 1st runner-up in the category of “National Contribution” in Africa has become a platform where wom- Manager of the Year at the Zimbabwe Institute of Management 2007 Awards en came out to prove their abilities. • Award winner in the Category of “Empowering Gender through Tertiary Education”, at the International Business Women’s Confer“My purpose is to help the underdog, those who cannot stand up ence, Washington, D.C., USA. 4th November 2007 for themselves. I have always fought for those who could not fight • Director of the Year (Parastatals) 2007 - the Zimbabwe Institute of Directors. for themselves.” • Won the most prestigious award in the Western World, the Fulbright The success behind WUA is largely because Scholarship for the academic year 2009-2010, tenable at a university of its target market and flexibility. The wom- in the United States of her choice. The topic for the award was “The en targeted by this institution are between University as Innovative Driver and Knowledge Centre” the ages of 25 to 60. This age group to a large • Awarded a Distinguished Honoree by the International Africana extent represents a portion of women who Womanism Council in October 2010. An award presented by the could have missed out on education.” WUA Honourable Vice President of the Republic of Zimbabwe Hon. Joyce represents a departure from the conventional Mujuru. 8 to 5 lecture time routine. “Our university is • Iconic Woman Award – Professional Women Executive Business user friendly and we have devised timetables Association (PROWEB) May 2012 that accommodate every student’s needs. We • Super Woman Award in University Education – Victor’s Awards have lectures from 8am to 5pm, 5pm to 7pm, November 2012 weekend classes and above all we have block Thank you Professor Hope Sadza release programmes,” said Professor Sadza. You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you! This flexibility accommodates the various


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE DECEMBER 13 TO DECEMBER 19, 2013

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PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts

Susan Makore Susan is married She is a Seventh Day Adventist

She attended the Universities of Zimbabwe and Natal Published writer and recognized editor

GCEO AB Communications

“I am a mother, wife and a daughter,” says Susan Makore when asked to describe herself. I expected a high flying description of herself to match the many accolades she has collected over time. Nevertheless it was not so. Humble and charming, one would not guess that this woman is the brain at the helm of AB Communications. Though her demeanor is unobtrusive, her accomplishments speak a different story. To date Susan has held important positions in the Zimbabwean media industry and she sits on a number of boards. Susan graduated with a Bachelor of Arts and a post graduate Diploma in Media Studies from the University of Zimbabwe before attending the University of Natal in South Africa where she obtained a Masters in Media and Cultural Studies. Her career in media has spanned a period of 15 years. Makore started out in print where she wrote for a weekly Durban newspaper. In subsequent years she worked in television and radio. She has also lectured at the University of Zimbabwe and the Zimbabwe Open University. “I want to be a force to be reckoned within the industry, to be a driver of something that I will initiate and leave a lasting legacy for posterity. As I advance in the industry I have a dream of setting up a college that will teach the practical things of the media industry, with little emphasis on theory since that is adequately covered,” she says. As an academic, Susan was instrumental in crafting the curriculum for the Media programme for the Zimbabwe Open University. With the benefit of hindsight, she however thinks the curriculum should have been more interrogative of the trade for there is a clear need for the theory to be augmented by practices in

“Women are the heartbeat of the nation because they bring life into a nation. It is rare to find women who are destructive, divisive and disruptive; women strive for unity. That women cannot work together or stand each other is wrong perception created by men. This they do to control us, they would rather have us divided than united. When women are done ranting and raving, they want peace.” the field.“We should revisit curricula with the objective of enhancing the existing material. Needs in a digital world are ever changing especially in media, any small change in technology impacts the industry,” she adds. Susan has written and also edited academic books. She is currently working on a book on the media history of Zimbabwe focusing on the impact of Information and Communication Technology. Growing up Susan wanted to be a good hands on mother. When she joined the Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation in 2001, her dream of being hands on dissipated. Her youngest daughter was 7 months old and the job was demanding. Whilst it was exciting as a young mother to head children’s programming, the job took a toll on her.She rose from being head of children’s programming, to head of television and was then promoted to Chief Executive Officer of ZTV. At the same time her

“Globally I look up to a driven and passionate woman. I am always in awe of the women in PROWEB; they are powerful, have made history and push for the recognition of other women doing outstanding things. I look up to women like Hope Sadza, who have a vision not only for themselves but a vision to empower a whole nation.” children were growing and she was spending a lot of time away from home. “The world had progressed from analogue and gone digital, I had to travel and learn new things. I had to keep up with new technologies and at the same time I had children who needed me. I didn’t have as much time as I wanted but I wanted them to be proud of me. I want them to understand the sacrifices I made.” As a mother of daughters, Susan wants her daughters to have a role model and she hopes that they will understand the sacrifices she made and continues to make. The missed prize giving days, concerts, sports days she had to

forego were all for a greater goal that should have greater returns for society and ultimately her children as well. Susan is grateful for the support base she has especially from her husband Milton. There were times she had to ask her family members to take her children to the doctor because of a hectic work schedule. “It has been a journey of making sacrifices and hard choices;I have missed weddings, kitchen parties, funerals and other important family gatherings. Inevitably people were disappointed but ultimately I count on them to understand.” Media is no different from other industries. There is a perception that women are soft, emotional and irrational in the way they lead organisations. “As a woman you are always on guard and want to prove that you are tough and smart but as women we are not wired that way.”In the workplace women are seen as more draconian than men because they try to prove that they are tough. Women in leadership positions try to manage these perceptions. They want to be seen as balanced, reasonable, focused and hardworking. In the end, women feel that they have so many things to prove. Susan feels she is highly favoured of God as she explains her meteoric rise in media. At the time she went to ZBC she was among the youngest managers and when she left she had reached the zenith of the organization. She currently is the Group Chief Executive Officer of AB Communications, owners of ZiFM Stereo, Zimbabwe’s first (and currently) the only private commercial radio station and Mighty Movies Private Limited, arguably the largest Independent media production house in Southern Africa outside of South Africa. When asked what she does with her free time, Susan reveals that she does not have any free time. “I wish I could buy a few more hours. I battle with managing my time. All my time is allocated to something. As a Seventh Day Adventist, she goes to church on Saturday and she does not consider it free time, “I take time to rest, re energise and revitalize. I consider it important for spiritual growth.” Susan is thankful that both her parents are still alive. She wants to be relevant and supportive of her family who have supported her over the years. To the women of Zimbabwe she had wise words to share, “Our situations are different, we make the mistake of believing that there is a template for success and balance but each one of us is unique. The world would be far from interesting if we were the same. Let each person embrace who they are; some are good with hands, others with brains. Harness that which you are good at and make it work for you. At times we push angles we are not good at and miss out on the opportunity to make an impact,” she advises. Susan commended the government for coming up with new ways of defining unemployment. She holds the opinion that most Zimbabweans are doing something to earn a living and only a few can be classified as unemployed. She believes that if the Zim Asset blueprint is sincerely implemented Zimbabwe will again be vibrant, thriving, and economically viable. Thank you Susan Makore You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE DECEMBER 20 TO DECEMBER 26, 2013

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PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts

Cheryl-Jane Kujenga

Cheryl-Jane was the first black female partner in Audit at EY in South Africa She serves on the Accounting Standards Board in South Africa CJ started her career at EY Harare She is affectionately known as CJ by those close to her

Chartered Accountant

“I am passionate about the upliftment of women entrepreneurs in particular, being the daughter of one. I watched my mother grow her business from nothing; I have a tremendous amount of respect for female entrepreneurs, especially given that they often have less access to the resources and networks required to help them achieve their goals”. Compassionate and driven, the story of Cheryl-Jane’s spectacular rise in a masculine world is that of sheer hard work, mettle and purposefulness. Cheryl Jane is a partner at Ernst & Young South Africa and was the first black female partner in Audit at EY. She qualified as a Chartered Accountant (Zimbabwe) in 2001 and then registered with the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants in 2004. CJ is currently the Africa Leader for Strategic Growth Markets (SGM). As the SGM leader for Africa, CJ’s role is to identify high potential, fast growth companies across the continent and ensure that EY provides them with the solutions that will facilitate that growth. In that role, she has had the opportunity to work closely with a number of businesses as they formulate their strategies for growth and for expansion across Africa. Cheryl-Jane is the partner sponsor on the EY World Entrepreneur Awards programme and oversees the 4 regional programs in Africa (Southern, East, West and Francophone Africa). As a professional, Cheryl has aligned herself to the goal of women empowerment. “Wom-

““Do you and be yourself. People can spot a fraudster a mile away. Understand yourself and get comfortable in your own skin. You bring something very important to the table, and you can only do that effectively if you are authentic. I am the only woman in the immediate team of partners that I work with, and being true to myself can sometimes be as frivolous as wearing pink to a very serious client meeting.” en make up more than half of the human resources available on the African continent, and their vast potential especially in the area of building solid, sustainable and scalable business cannot be ignored,” she explained. Her passion for the development of women led Cheryl-Jane to pioneer the launch of a program called the EY Entrepreneurial Winning Women in 2013. “This program provides us with an opportunity to channel our resources and convening power to help women entrepreneurs achieve the full potential they envision for their companies. The program identifies and celebrates high-potential female entrepreneurs and provides them with personalized one-on-one business insights and advice as well as insider access to strategic networks of established entrepreneurs,

“Leadership does not start on the day of a promotion to a particular position. Each and every one of us is a leader in our own right, and with that comes a universal responsibility to nurture family, friends, and colleagues to be the best that they can be. I am a great believer that we each have a role to play that will impact positively on someone else’s life.” executives, advisors and investors.” In line with that CJ is passionate about developing women in the corporate sector and was instrumental in the establishment of a Leadership Development Programme specifically targeted at increasing the pipeline of female partners in EY through the enhancement of the leadership and business skills of the female Senior Managers and Associate Directors in Audit. The Leadership Development programme is now in its 5th cycle, and has been a direct contributor to an increased

number of female senior managers being promoted to more senior roles within the organization. For Cheryl success has meant different things at different times in her life. “Thirteen years ago it was passing my C.A exams, 6 years ago it was making partner at EY. Right now success is making a positive impact on the people I lead and work with; I am also about to become a mother and success in that role will be the ability to provide financial and emotional security for my child and be able to raise a confident well balanced adult.” She is also a firm believer in teamwork. “You can’t do it alone, one of my mentors once told me that in order to succeed, I need to be the weakest link in my team, and it is something I have held onto ever since. I do not have to be the most intelligent or have the best execution style; I believe in having a vision of what success will look like and inspiring people with that vision,” she says.She strongly believes that identifying and nurturing talent as well as ensuring that you have the right people in the right roles is critical to achieving success. There is no leader who will succeed in a sustainable manner with a dysfunctional team. “Find out what makes people tick, what they are passionate about and if you can help them tap into that and use it in their day to day jobs you have struck gold,” she adds. In her personal time Cheryl volunteers at a charity called Doors of Hope. It is an orphanage that looks after abandoned and or orphaned children between birth and 3years old. The orphanage works tirelessly to ensure all its children are placed in permanent homes and has a 99% success rate to date. CJ doesn’t take herself too seriously. She believes in doing interesting and different things outside of work. Not only does it make you more interesting and provide a source of small talk, but it also makes you more human and approachable.“I believe a great leader leads at the front and shepherds from behind, and that is something you can’t do if people cannot relate to you.” Cheryl-Jane has a lot of women to look up to, each for different reasons especially female directors and CEO’s. In her opinion, the corporate world needs more female leaders. However, the highest praises are reserved for her mother, whom she has a lot of respect for. “She started her business from nothing and is the true embodiment of hard work and determination,” she says. To the women of Zimbabwe Cheryl-Jane had this to say, “Never, ever stop learning. Be honest with yourself about your strengths and if there are areas that you need to develop that will make you effective as a leader then get the right coaching and mentoring that you need. Read a lot, even if it’s just magazines and twitter. The key thing is to be aware. These days things are evolving so rapidly that if you’re not aware then how else will you keep up?” Thank you Cheryl-Jane Kujenga You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE JANUARY 10 TO JANUARY 16, 2014

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PROFILE OF THE WEEK

2014 Quick Facts “I find fulfillment in bringing out po-

Cynthia Hakutangwi Cynthia is married to Kudzanai, they have four children

She has published a book called: The Whole You – Vital Keys for Balanced Living” Cynthia holds a BBA in Marketing Communications among other qualifications She was awarded the best Marketing student by IMM South Africa in 1999

Skills Development Consultant

tential through capacity building and by creating platforms for voices to be expressed. The nature of my work allows me to be my authentic self at all times and I enjoy working without a mask.”

My first impression of Cynthia Hakutangwi was that she was, tasteful and in vogue. I found her pleasantly delightful, not only because of the way she carries herself, but because of the way she speaks from her heart; with such passion and fervour. Behind all her chic is a formidable mind. With an array and wealth of skill from different fields ranging from strategy formulation and implementation, human resources management to company structuring, Cynthia runs a consultancy under the banner Wholesome Incorporated. Cynthia believes that her purpose is to be a transformational change agent that provokes people and institutions to challenge their status quo thereby developing and maintaining a momentum that can create solutions beyond their generation. In tandem with her purpose, her vision is to be a strategic broker who interprets and connects community needs with resources for empowerment on all levels. The difficulties that Cynthia has overcome have spurred her on to success. “The struggles to overcome an environment of exploitation and to become relevant, achieving some significance and having measurable impact in my immediate sphere of influence spurred me to a higher level beyond mere existence. The experiences on the various levels of my life and development in general came in different forms of suppression and abuse. Some

“Our creator has greatly endowed women with a spirit of entrepreneurship, creativity and innovation. I encourage all women to harness this creative innovative strength to restore the dignity of our nation and continent.” environments have a tendency of defining, undermining and stifling you if your gender background and profile do not fit certain “approved” criteria. One has to become radically assertive to prevail above all of this. Now when I look back at my experiences I see them as explosive agents that were placed in my path to catapult me out of my comfort zone and facilitate a deeper introspection into what God had deposited within me.” Nonetheless Cynthia is quick to point out that success should be defined according to one’s appropriate pursuits. Wholesome success is embedded upon values and priorities which embrace honesty and integrity. “Success can be defined by beginning strong and ending strong in one’s appropriate pursuits whilst maintaining respect for the journey to one’s wholesome accomplishments and how that journey has shaped them,” she says. She then poses a question that calls for self-introspection, “At the end of the race can your words, motives and actions be trusted?”

“Women are the backbone of most African economies and it is requisite that policy makers start to consider the unique role they play in nation building and society in general. Country development strategies ought to increasingly including gender themes that outline programmes for gender empowerment in all sectors.” The journey has not been without obstructions but the ability to see beyond one’s prevailing adversity comes wrapped in a twin package which Cynthia calls “faith and action”. “When we take time to be still in the midst of raging storms and embrace the peace that God releases to us we become a formidable force that does not operate based on what can only be physically seen and observed. I deliberately commit the goals I set before God and I know that He watches over them unto completion. So in times that I have given my very best shot yet no breakthrough was imminent I would continue to persevere

whilst listening out to God’s strategic direction so that I know when to change course or stop and allow God to take over.” Cynthia has made an impact by challenging the mindsets of individuals and organisations so that they can apply themselves on higher and deeper dimensions whether it is through business or marketing strategies. She believes that she has added value in the areas she has worked. “Good ideas, products and services are only as good as their ability to reach their intended beneficiaries and add true value without causing diminishing returns to the creators, managers and consumers,” she says. Cynthia jealously guards her personal time so that she can be rejuvenated daily to apply herself meaningfully to the world and grow in her personhood. She spends a lot of time in deep meditation. “I regularly engage in reading literature and watching documentaries that stimulate my creative flow of thinking and out of such moments I write down and develop change, direction, strategy as well as planning and reviewing goals going forward. Some of this time is also shared with my family as we interrogate and review goals together. Of the many women she looks up to her sister Lynette Matsinde stands out the most. She describes as having left an indelible mark, “I look up to her because of the sacrificial role she played in our lives as her younger siblings when at very tender age she was thrust with overwhelming responsibilities to lead a family when she herself needed someone to look up to. In very harsh and difficult circumstances that surrounded us at a tender age she was able to sacrifice herself and shield us where possible from the tough winds that raged our way.” The next five years for Zimbabwe will bring unprecedented changes for Zimbabwe. Cynthia sees the seasons shifting in a positive tide as Zimbabweans begin to regain their consciousness and need to serve this nation with their gifts, talents and resources. As individuals, families and communities begin to embrace transformed thinking, the same excellent work ethic and strategies they have used to enrich other nations is going to start reviving our beloved Zimbabwe. “For so long we have waited for Zimbabwe to serve us even in her beaten down and weary state. Now as the realisation continues to dawn on us as a collective people that God has deposited within us the capacity to replenish this nation, we are going to experience an incredible turnaround of home grown solutions which have never been seen on the face of the earth. I have listened to the language of my fellow Zimbabweans and it is changing as their hearts are being turned again to love and serve a nation most had given up hope on,” says Cynthia giving a hopeful analysis of the future of this country. She is motivated and inspired by individuals who do so much and are faithful with the least of resources availed to them. Her motivation comes from watching her children grow older everyday which propels her to think about what she is going to do today to ensure that the legacy she I leave for them is secure for their prosperous future. She describes herself as highly dependable, multi- functional and task-oriented. Thank you Cynthia Hakutangwi You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE

JANUARY 17 TO JANUARY 23, 2014

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PROFILE OF THE WEEK

2014

Quick Facts “My purpose is to assist and empow-

Emma Fundira er other women through the skills Emma holds a BSc in Economics from the University of Zimbabwe She is the Managing Director at Finesse Advisory, a financial advisory company Treasurer of AWEP Zimbabwe She sits on a number of boards on a voluntary basis as well as boards of listed companies

Finance

I have acquired and the blessings I have been given.”

One of my all-time favourite people Walt Disney said, “All our dreams can come true if we have the courage to pursue them.” The dream to build an empire has been at the root of some of the most courageous acts of Emma Fundira. Emma left a big corporation at a time the economy was in the doldrums to follow a dream. Whilst the empire is not yet in sight, She believed in the old Latin saying that fortune favours the brave. She comes with a wealth of experience in the banking and financial services sector where she has worked for a quarter of a century. Emma was born in Lusaka Zambia and did most of her primary education at Kabwe Convent in Zambia, then continued her primary and secondary education in England where she completed her ‘A’ Levels. She then attended the University of Zimbabwe where she graduated with a BSc in Economics. She worked in various positions in large international banks before leaving to start Finesse advisory services and Finesse MicroFinance. Emma sits on the Board Credit Committee of Barclays Bank of Zimbabwe among others so she has an in-depth understanding of risk management. “My vision has been to set up a financial institution run by women to finance both sexes. I have been hampered by the economic environment. I have not had as much success as I would like to but I am still

“ “MushaMukadzi”, this saying is not only relevant in the context of the home but also of a nation. Regardless of whether a man is working or not, a woman makes a plan and brings stability to the home. Whilst the contribution of the women to the economy is seemingly informal, they contribute a sizeable amount. Women work for the sustenance of the family as opposed to ego enhancement and self-gratification.” in business, and I believe that one day I will get there.” When Emma started out, the banking industry was a white male enclave. “I was a black female in a male dominated environment. Most times people were not interested in what I had to say, they did not believe that I could bring something meaningful to the table so my challenge was to convince them that I could be of assistance.” Whilst her tenacity got her through those times, Emma also recognises the role played by her boss who constantly sung her praises. Emma purposed in her heart never to take a back roll seat, “I wasn’t the type to keep quiet in a meeting, regardless of what people thought about me, I spoke, if you heard what I said and it made sense then you would listen.” For Emma success is an individual thing, achieving that which you set out to do. The one achievement that Emma is proud of

“Women need to believe in themselves and to understand their environment. This will help them turn disappointments into opportunities and not always blame external factors.” is having succeeded in leaving a large corporate environment and setting up Finesse advisory services. More importantly, she is delighted that they have survived the harsh economic environment where a lot of financial institutions have folded. Her efforts were recognized when the Women in Enterprise and Business awarded her the Winner’s Award in the Banking and Finance sector. For Emma perseverance, hard work, drive and integrity are a requisite for success. Through her advisory services, Emma believes that she has helped companies stay afloat when

they could have gone under. Emma hopes to see Finesse growing and evolving into some form of banking institution to empower women. Fundira’s projects include the de-mutualisation of Old Mutual, acquisition of Cape Grace Hotel by Meikles, acquisition of National Foods by Innscor and the Unbundling of Valtobac S.A Limited Societe Anonyme by BAT Zimbabwe among many success stories. Emma is also co-founder and treasurer of African Women’s Entrepreneurship Program Zimbabwe which was launched in 2012. AWEP assists women who are currently in some sort of business to grow and find external markets for their products. AWEP aims to build capacity and promote sustainable business for the women they work with; they have also been working with financial institutions to get funding for the women’s projects. Emma went on the Women in Leadership Forum where 40 women from all over the world participated. She was attached to Meryl Lynch of New York for 5 weeks. During this time she had the opportunity to meet Barack Obama, Mitt Romney and Madeline Albright among other notable people. She had a chance to meet CEO’s of the Fortune 500 Companies. This exposure inspired Emma but more importantly made her grateful for the support system she had back home because many of the women she interacted with did not have people whom they could trust with their children. “As women we don’t only focus on business, we do focus on family as well. We want to be well rounded individuals.” Hilary Clinton and Oprah Winfrey are some of the women that have inspired Emma. “Hilary is tenacious and held on during tough and trying times and Oprah is a business woman not short of being a philanthropist. She stretches her hand to give and I find that admirable. Not only that, Oprah has also reached into her African roots,” she said. Locally, Emma looks up to Divine Ndhlukula. “If you look at where she started, how she pushed herself and where she is today, I take my hat off to her. When you get to know her, she is a woman who reaches out to others and wants to help,” she continued. During her lunch breaks Emma goes to the gym, she is passionate about training and keeping fit. She also spends a lot of time at church where she puts her gift and talents to good use. Emma enjoys reading and spending time with her family. Emma has been able to balance marriage, motherhood and business and still find time to induge her love of reading. Where Zimbabwe will be in the next few years is dependent on the direction the people of Zimbabwe choose for their country. Politics is part of the economy and therefore political and economic strategies have to be in sync. Ideally, Emma would want to see Zimbabwe start paying off its debt. She also longs to see the return of our currency so that liquidity is restored but this should be on the back of positive balance of payments and foreign direct investment. Thank you Emma Fundira You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE JANUARY 24 TO JANUARY 30, 2014

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PROFILE OF THE WEEK

2014

Quick Facts “Our success comes not so much Ruth Ncube from what we do, but how well we do Managing Director of First Mutual Life Assurance Company Ruth holds an MBA from Nottingham Trent University, UK A graduate of the Institute of Marketing (RSA), a member of the Chartered Institute of Marketing (UK) Current President of the Marketers Association of Zimbabwe (MAZ) Chairperson of the Life Offices Association

Managing Director

it as well as our attitude. It also illustrates that regardless of our job or our position on the company ladder, we can be successful if we have passion for our work,” The making of a successful woman executive in business is not a unique thing. What makes women executives, like Ruth Ncube, noticeable is that they have learned to master a career game that has been dominated by men for decades. “As a leader, as a woman and as a mother, I believe I have a strong obligation to serve those that have bestowed their trust in me, be it in business, family or nation building. I have carved a model of life that I believe talks to the purpose that God sends us on earth for and this revolves around improving the lives of those I encounter and leaving the world a better place than I found it.” As aptly said by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. “If a man is called to be a street sweeper, he should sweep streets even as Michelangelo painted, or Beethoven composed music, or Shakespeare wrote poetry. He should sweep streets so well that all the hosts of heaven and earth will pause to say, here lived a great street sweeper who did his job well.” For Ruth this typifies both passion and success. “Nothing satisfies me more than seeing my team managing to put together a multi-million dollar business supported by more than 500 000 policyholders, members and subscribers. Anyone in the financial services sector and insurance in particular, will tell

“My view of success is that it is measured by the level of positive impact that one has on the lives of others. Success to me is when I feel the deep exhilaration of knowing that I made a difference for others and helping others develop into better people.” you that this is no mean feat,” Ruth remarks. She is passionate about seeing women succeed, particularly in the workplace. Ruth’s personal vision has been shaped by Mahatma Gandhi’s assertion that, “if one man gains, the whole world gains with him and, if one man falls, the whole world falls to that extent.”Her personal vision is to live a successful, passionate life and use herself as an example to impact positive attitudes and willingness to work together in a way that brings a better life to the generations to come. “As a leader I want to excel in my entirety and bring enlightenment to others, and to share compassion and joy. I wish to be a master of myself and develop my core being.”Ruth’s purpose is very clear and precise and has very strong roots from the biblical teachings on the very reason for existence. Ecclesiastes 12:13 says: “the end of the matter; all has been heard, fear God and keep his commandments, for this is the whole duty of man.”

“In order to positively impact on people’s lives, diligence, reliability and integrity are key attributes. One needs to be able to multitask and delegate as well. Esprit de corps is so vital while remaining positive and adaptable in this fast changing business environment. Last but not least, one needs to be a good communicator and listener, as well as being a strategic thinker.” The challenges women face are harder than those faced by their male counterparts but they ultimately make women stronger. Like many other women, her greatest challenge has been dealing with misconceptions about gender which she had to overcome. “Whether it be assumptions that a woman is more emotional, less strategic, less aggressive, or even less committed, I have faced such criticisms. While attaining accurate feedback is necessary for anyone working in an organization, it can be difficult for a woman to have

the full support needed due to the stereotypes and role expectations we often face in organizations,” she says sharing her experiences in the workplace. “I have, however, made choices to deal with it and used it to my advantage to be the leader that I am today.” Ruth has over 18 years of leadership experience and sits on several boards and committees. Ruth greatly believes that it is more rewarding to work with people that care about their company and about doing a good job. However, this kind of employee has become a rarity in today’s world where so many people care less about honesty, hard work & integrity – their focus is mostly on instant gratification, which unfortunately does not speak to posterity. Ruth is a woman of diverse interests,“On the home front, I am passionate about farming. I take great pleasure out of seeing seeds germinate and give rise to life as well as the downstream effects of what is planted. I am passionate about doing this in a sustainable way so that we leave a legacy for future generations and am not afraid to get my hands dirty.” Ruth finds farming therapeutic, “farming allows me to focus on other important elements of my life away from the hustle and bustle of the corporate world. I also enjoy spending quality time with my daughter who lives in the region,” she said. At work, Ruth is passionate about delivering exceptional customer service and giving the customer relevant products that bring about economic dignity, “for to give a man or a woman dignity is to empower them to better their lives.” She further explained that, “On a personal note, my daughter is testimony of the passion I have in instilling values that will drive her to be the best that she can be, and this extends to my new son-in-law as well.” Ruth also shared her admiration for Professor Primrose Kurasha, Mrs Charity Jinya, Divine Ndhukula, Grace Muradzikwa, Eve Gadzikwa, Chipo Mutasa, Lyn Mukonoweshuro, and Lydia Jokonya. She describes these women as dynamic, humane, and humble and have a wealth of life experience which she has often tapped into. Ruth is actively involved in the community, particularly in health and education. Ruth believes that in a world still largely dominated by men, to make it as a woman requires stamina, courage, and decisiveness. It is critical to have a career strategy and work towards achieving it.Another challenge women executives face and must regularly overcome is their rarity,“given that women executives even in this age are not so common, co-workers, news media, and the public look for flaws with extra scrutiny, and thus it is vital to be known as a woman of integrity.” Ruth describes herself as compassionate, loyal and true to herself. “Compassion is at the centre of all my relationships both, personal and professional. Staying true to myself keeps me grounded and focused and this has been the driving source of my success,” she adds. Thank you Ruth Ncube You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE JANUARY 31 TO FEBRUARY 6, 2014

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PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts Barbara Rwodzi Co-founder of BarRue Knitwear She attained an MBA from the Nottingham Trent University in 2013 She represented Zimbabwe Women Entrepreneurs in the US Current Chairperson of AWEP Zimbabwe Chapter Listed on the 2013 Most Influential people under 40

Entrepreneur

2014

“I believe everyone has a calling; a calling lights you up and sparks the light in you so that you can illuminate the world and this is what I feel when I am engaging with marginalized women be it in the rural areas, at a social gathering or economic forum. As such, I believe my purpose is to help other people elevate or improve their lives economically and socially.”

Aha moments have a way of creeping up on you when you least expect them. A few minutes into my meeting with the buoyant Barbara Rwodzi, I began,through her experiences and vision to get an enlightenment of my own greater goal and a bigger picture. There are people who have done so much for humanity that it obligates us to take stock of our own contribution to bettering the lives of other human beings. Barbara Rwodzi was born to middle class parents; her father was a soldier and her mother a preschool teacher. Her parents believed in sending their children to the rural areas every December holiday. It was during these times that Barbara was exposed to the plight of the marginalized, rural poor who included her cousins, aunts and uncles. Her family would give their old clothes to their relatives who heartily appreciated these gestures. Such childhood experiences cultivated a caring spirit in Barbara and are at the root of her passion for the disadvantaged. After 15 years of working with her husband, Barbara decided to follow her dream. She started a business that would integrate her two passions; Philanthropy and Fashion, giving the birth to BarRue Knitwear in 2009 which she co-founded with Ruth Chigubu.”BarRue is a company that markets and sells handmade knitwear across the world on behalf of rural women in Zimbabwe who have a

“Success to me is being the best at what I do and becoming significant and effec- women [and American Alumnus] in Zimbabwe and they founded an AWEP tive in the society while striking a balance between mywork,my value system Chapter in Zimbabwe in November 2012. AWEP is set to help other women entrepreneurs in Zimbabwe grow their businesses in different aspects by creand a good life which to me encompasses family and spiritual growth.” vast talent in hand knitting,” she explained. Barbara sources markets and obtains designs or patterns from international customers. The women knitters are then trained on the designs and are given raw materials to enable them to knit. After they finish knitting a product BarRue buys back the product from the women at agreed prices and then ships the product to the respective customer overseas. The main markets for BarRue knitwear are in Europe, America, Canada and Australia. The project has changed livelihoods in the area of Chirumhanzu where Barbara comes from. At the peak of the project, BarRue had about 700 knitters. However, because of the poor economic performance of the Eurozone which is her biggest market, Barbara has had to reduce the number of knitters to about 410. Other problems include orders being returned due to quality issues and missing of lead times but through her resilience Barbara has managed to keep the company afloat and going. She is anticipating growth in 2014/2015 following a market growth in the winter season of 2013/2014.The positive impact of BarRue in changing rural livelihoods cannot be underestimated. Children who had dropped out of school have managed to go back to school. These wom-

ating markets locally, regionally and internationally particularly in the USA. AWEP also advocates and lobbies the government to create a good business environment for women and make sure their business benefit in government tenders through the right channels. Assisting in accessing finances for business growth and effectively building the capacity of women entrepreneurs to enhance their businesses is another objective of AWEP. Barbara hopes to see the government take a more active role in helping women entrepreneurs. For Barbara women make up the heartbeat of the nation because they play big roles especially in hard times as men tend hide and operate under the water when the going gets tough be it in a family, organization or at national level, but women soldier on. She looks up to the other AWEP board members, “they gave me the opportunity to lead them yet I am the youngest, these women run successful businesses and organisations,”she explained. Barbara identified. Barbara identified Tatenda Boka, Tsungi Banga and Tendai Madondo as young upcoming women to watch.In her spare time Barbara loves exercising, playing golf with her daughter and reading spiritual books and biographies. She is married to Mutonhori. and have 2 children, George(18) and Mazvita (10). Barbara is convinced that each one of us has a personal calling that is as unique as a finger print, “the best way to succeed is to discover what you love and then find a way to offer it to others in form of service, working hard and also allowing the Universe to lead you. We are all shining stars lets lift each other and light our nation. A woman’s direction of life -her happiness- her financial well-being are based on her choices which are governed by her vision,” she says.

“While we Zimbabweans take pride in being one of the most independent and free countries in Africa, we need to find ways of embracing the world economy and its trends hence the need to strike a balance in all economic matters. A number of things are evolving economically and let’s move in the right direction so that all our policies make sense for the future generations.” en are now able to feed their families and slowly growing their rural wealth.Women who knit for Barbara have been able to buy material possessions which include cattle and solar panels. Barbara was selected by the American Embassy in Zimbabwe to represent Zimbabwean Women Entrepreneurs in June 2012 in the USA on an exchange program called African Women Entrepreneurs Program (AWEP) that trains African women on business and trade in the USA. This programme exposes African women to US markets, investors and civil society. This was a career defining moment and a dream come true. Upon her return Barbara mobilized other successful business

Thank you Barbara Rwodzi You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE FEBRUARY 7 TO FEBRUARY 13, 2014

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PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts Carol Henchie Carol trained to be a Ballet Teacher with the Royal Academy of Dance, London She rose to become a soloist with the National Ballet of Zimbabwe Carol Henchie runs a dance school in Mount Pleasant

Ballet Dancing

2014

“My passion is ballet itself! I am driven by the feeling you get when you receive a standing ovation after a breathtaking performance. The feeling of being able to teach others till they are capable of attaining that moment of pure ecstasy when they are now confident enough to stand up in front of an audience and dance with expression and joy.”

Very few individuals are gifted with knowing what they want in life and nurture it from a tender age. One such person is Carol Henchie, a retired seasoned ballerina who now runs a ballet school. Quiet, direct and passionate; these words describe Carol’s personality, the way she likes to go about her work and the love she has for everyone in her life. From the blossoming age of five, Carol loved every minute of dancing; the shows, the exams and the social acquaintances. As a little ballerina, she performed on stage at the Reps theatre and in senior school she joined the National Ballet of Zimbabwe which is the main ballet company in the country. During her time with National Ballet, she performed many types of dance and rose to become a soloist before retiring in 2009 to take up teaching ballet. “I always knew I wanted to teach so I started teaching senior dancers in 1996. In 1999 I was offered to teach at a school where one of the ballet teachers was leaving,” she said. This happenstance ushered her into teaching ballet in schools. In 2001 Carol obtained a Teaching Certificate from the Royal Academy of Dance in London and she opened her own studio. She has been teaching privately at her studio and in many schools around Harare. “I chose to become a ballet teacher as I loved working with children and ballet was a perfect fit for me and I knew this early on. I want to achieve

“I was put on this earth to impart my love and knowledge of dancing to children. as lacking in ambition. She hopes to get this year’s intake of ballet dancers And to better others’ lives by allowing them to feel free to dance and move with through their examination in June while helping them stoke the love of dance and keep it burning in their hearts. She is optimistic about producing great both grace and coordination.” a balance of a well-respected dance school and a productive one that will grow and spread the sport,” said a passionate Carol. Ballet gives children and young adults more than they realize as they learn the basics which only become clear to them later in life. Nonetheless, Carol was not a big success overnight; she had to put in a lot of hard work and remained resilient. She talks of times she failed to get desired results and how this transformed her and ignited an inner fire which stimulated her to do better. “When I was overlooked or passed over for promotion it hurt at first but this gave me the power to pursue and excel. It’s the same spirit I want to pass onto all of my students to ensure that they are truly the best that they can be. That undying passion is the reason I became a teacher.” Constant dedication, patience, love, trust, resilience, self-sacrifice and most importantly self-belief are indispensible qualities if a person wants to succeed. Carol hopes to promote ballet to be a main stream art form nationwide and help girls and boys express themselves positively through dance. Every year Carol’s school enters students for internationally recognised ballet exams and her studio takes part in the annual shows that are organised by the Dance Trust of Zimbabwe.

shows with her students and in the long term Carol wants to develop her dance school to be the best dance facility in the country. On the future of ballet, Carol said, “I see a great future for ballet in Zimbabwe. There are many young up and coming ballerinas whom in five years’ time will have both gained knowledge and maturity and will be performing in their own right internationally and locally.” “Women are indeed the heartbeat of the nation; they drive all forms of life forward. As mothers we nurture the next generation, as we nourish and groom the future leaders of our great land and as professionals, we are a breath of fresh air in any environment. Carol is inspired by the legendary English ballerina Margot Fonteyn for her endless ability and technique; she broke through boundaries of standard stereotypes throughout her roles. In her personal time, Carol spends time with her family at home; she is also a passionate reader. Before she became a mother, she used to devote her personal time to perfecting her technique and performances. “I encourage other Zimbabwean women not to feel down trodden or confined by their roles in society, instead reach for their dreams and shine.” She challenges fellow women to allow themselves to venture into the world of the arts while maintaining their composure and ladylike qualities. Carol believes that there is so much still to be done and to be learnt, and that the young minds and hearts that love to dance can be molded into truly great individuals.

“Success in my profession is not measured in dollars and cents; instead it is measured in life lessons and milestones. It’s that moment when a challenged child learns to skip freely or when one of the seniors is able to not just perform but blossom into a true performer.” Of the many memories she treasures of her dance career, becoming a soloist with a national dancing company and being recognised as talented by her teachers and seniors stands out as the most notable achievement. Professionally, owning a dance studio and having dancers who started under her tutelage finish their senior exams with tremendous grades has also been a high for Carol. These students of hers have gone on to make dance their livelihood both locally and internationally.Though she has many years to go, at this stage, Carol has positively impacted the industry by changing negative views about ballet. Carol is one woman who cannot be described

Thank you Carol Henchie You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!


ZIMBABWE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT EXECUTIVE FEBRUARY 14 TO FEBRUARY 20, 2014

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PROFILE OF THE WEEK

Quick Facts Pearl Thompson Pearl runs a studio, Pearlites for Art and Craft

She was Miss Zimbabwe body building in 2002

Pearl was born in Zambia and attended school in Zimbabwe and England

Artist

“Once you have tried, you have attained a measure of success. You can then succeed by doing more and striving to do better.” I have often heard people say that being creative does not only refer to abilities but it is a way of thinking and a way of viewing the world. Pearl Thompson offered interesting insights on creativity as an artist and as a way of viewing the world around us. Her infectious spirit and drive is difficult to ignore, such confidence and panache comes from having lived a purpose driven life. Pearl was born in Zambia where her parents were tobacco farmers. As a young girl growing up on a farm, the open space was home to her artistic and creative abilities. She often made figurines from materials found outdoors as the artist in her was indulged by her natural surroundings. Artistry is in Pearl Thompson bloodline, the English artist and explorer Thomas Baines is in her ancestry. Pearl was educated at Ryding School in Karoi before going to Lomagundi High School for her secondary education. She completed her A Levels in England at Harrogate College for girls in North Yorkshire. As an abstract artist, Pearl loves the freedom that comes with not having to adhere to the norm. Her creativity comes alive in serene environments. Surrounded by calm and quiet, Pearl is able to put brush to canvas and produce masterpieces. From the time that she finished school, Pearl has always worked for herself. She did everything from making candles and selling trinkets for art fairs and exhibitions. Success has been defined variedly by other people but for Pearl, success is synonymous with trying. The effort put into making an idea a reality should be counted as success. Pearl is motivated to come up with new ideas by her clients who come back for more. This shows her that she is doing something right. This year, Pearl started teaching painting at a pri-

“Women are the heartbeat of the nation because of their maternal instincts, they can easily detect when something is not going right. In addition, they multi-task, are a lot calmer and have the ability to look at situations in varying ways. Women know how each part of the puzzle fits in and overall, they bring balance to the lives they touch.” mary school in Harare and she finds this experience very rewarding. “The beautiful thing about working with children is that they are loving and giving without boundaries. I find my work with children satisfying because I have all the patience in the world.”She hardly thinks of teaching as a job, she sees it as a calling as working with children has permanently put a smile on her face. “Children want to be encouraged and told that they are capable instead of being told that they are not good enough,” she says. Pearl has a studio at home where children can come and practice art. She believes that everyone has a measure of creativity and she hopes to develop the artistic skills of the children who frequent her studio. She however, is biased towards painting, “I do not teach drawing because that is stressful, through painting and other art forms, children learn to express themselves artistically,” she adds. Besides being an artist herself, Pearl believes that part of her calling is to inspire children through art and craft and make them feel that they can achieve whatever they set their hearts on. Working with children has seen her impact a positive spirit to children under her care but more importantly she

2014

in a day; work hard, one day it will pay off,” she says. When she is not teaching, she is painting. She paints at every free moment she has. “I love painting, which for me is not only a passion but a form of therapy.” Apart from painting Pearl also enjoys working out at the gym, cooking and spending time with her daughter. She believes that motherhood is a full time job and one does not get a break, it is therefore imperative to be able to balance work and motherhood. She however acknowledges that there are moments she just wants to do nothing, to just have a time of introspection and quiet. Pearl encourages women to reach out for their dreams and to keep working at getting better. “Whatever you are doing, be the best you can possibly be at it. Seek comfort in God in troubled times and be grateful; when you are thankful for what you have, you do not give room to negative thoughts. Regardless of what you do, be the best at it,” she advises. Pearl is one of the few people who see the brighter side of life at all times. She recognizes that Zimbabwe is going through difficult and trying times but she is grateful for the other good things that we have as a nation. “Zimbabwe has a low crime rate unlike many other countries. We don’t go around with guns and pepper spray in our handbags. If we thrive to be better individuals, we can be a better people and a better nation.”

“I am motivated and inspired by life, the good and the bad. My outstanding works were painted when I was in mourning for my brother and when my daughter was born.” has proved that one can make a living through art. Most professions have an art background, if one wants to be a chef, architect, cook, fashion designer etc.they require some form of creativity. It doesn’t have to be painting; it is a whole world of varying art forms. Pearl confesses that little gestures from children make her heart melt, “A simple thank you makes my day. It shows a lot of gratitude and appreciation.” Whilst Pearl has been into painting, she has also been a body builder. Being a body builder was one of the highlights of her life before she retired. She won many tournaments including the coveted title of Miss Zimbabwe body building at the age of 24. To get over challenges she has remained focused, positive and spiritual. “Rome was not built

Thank you Pearl Thompson You are the “Heartbeat of our nation” - we salute you!



Zimbabwe Independent - Book of Zimbabwean woman