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ADELPHEAN

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of Alpha Delta Pi Special Issue May 2020

SISTERS

ON THE FRONT Alpha Delta Pi on the Front Lines of the 2020 Coronavirus Pandemic


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features 7 A SISTERHOOD FROM COAST TO COAST

How Alpha Delta Pi Responded to the COVID-19 Pandemic

8 VIRTUAL ENGAGEMENT

Opportunities for Online Sisterhood

10 SISTERS ON THE FRONT

Stories from Collegians and Alumnae on the Front Lines of the COVID-19 Pandemic

On the Cover: Dara Bessinger (left) and Elizabeth Smith, both Kappa—Samford, graduated in 2018 with nursing degrees and now work on the front lines.

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42 OFF THE ROAD

The 2019-2020 Leadership Consultants Adjust to a Virtual Support Model

49 RECRUITMENT 2020

The National Panhellenic Conference Is Leading Conversations about Recruitment

66 RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE CHARITIES REMAINS COMMITTED RMHC Continues to Serve Families


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46

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in every issue 5 FROM THE DESK OF THE INTERNATIONAL PRESIDENT

44 ALPHA DELTA PI FOUNDATION Planning Forward in Times of Uncertainty

45 ALPHA DELTA PI FOUNDATION Emergency Grants

46 ALPHA DELTA PI FOUNDATION Violets Are Going Virtual

50 ON CAMPUS

Chapters Report on Their COVID-19 Response and Operational Adjustments

68 FROM THE ARCHIVES History Repeats Itself


ADELPHEAN

the

of Alpha Delta Pi

grand council

executive office

international vice president Sarah Davis-Candeto, EY sdavis-candeto@alphadeltapi.com

executive director Amanda Sloan, AB 1386 Ponce de Leon Avenue NE Atlanta, GA 30306 404-378-3164 asloan@alphadeltapi.com

international vice president Melinda Jordan Hall, ZL mhall@alphadeltapi.com

international vice president Dawn Victor-Herring, ZH dvictor-herring@alphadeltapi.com

vice president of scholarships Kathy Karrh Cashin, I kkcashin@gmail.com vice president of grants Amalia Cochran, ZL amalia.cochran@gmail.com secretary Pamela L. Zimmerman, ET pamelazimmerman01@comcast.net vice president of finance Barbara Kinter Kunkel, DK barbkunkel@att.net trustees Stacy DeMartini Bruton, DS stacyadpi@gmail.com

international vice president Jacquelyn Hontalas, ZP jhontalas@alphadeltapi.com international vice president Mandy Holland Savage, BB msavage@alphadeltapi.com

foundation foundation president Tracy L. Garner, ZO tlgarner@bellsouth.net

international president Emily Erkel, ZC eerkel@alphadeltapi.com international vice president Jennifer Brown Arends, BS jarends@alphadeltapi.com

volu me 1 2 4 may 2 02 0 spe c ia l issu e

alpha delta pi foundation executive director Jennifer Polley Webb, EN 1386 Ponce de Leon Avenue NE Atlanta, GA 30306 404-378-3164 foundation@alphadeltapi.com

Written correspondence may be sent to any of the above sisters at 1368 Ponce de Leon Avenue NE, Atlanta, GA 30306

Karen Elliott Galentine, AU wpaadpi@gmail.com Patricia Green Pratt, AK ppratt@ccrsurveys.com Jessica White Tom, HZ jessicatom09@gmail.com Bonnie Yamaoka, AY bkyamaoka@gmail.com

Telephone messages may be left by calling the main Executive Office line at 404-378-3164 and following the prompts

Contacting The Adelphean

adelphean staff

If you have a comment about any of the articles in this issue, or wish to suggest a story, we invite you to write the editor at her address to the right.

adelphean editor Elizabeth Lewis Wright, GF 203 Nestlebranch Drive Safety Harbor, FL 34695 adelpheaneditor@gmail.com

ADELPHEAN

the

of Alpha Delta Pi Fall 2019

GRAND

C O N V E N TI O N Alpha Delta Pi Goes to Las Vegas!

northern district editor Ellen Long Liston, AK 6909 Government Farm Road Knoxville, TN 37920 ellenadair1@gmail.com

southern district editor Erin O’Donnell Howard, AP 6729 Front Royal Road Springfield, VA 22151 eodhoward@gmail.com

central district editor Rebecca DeSensi Sivori, ED 6113 Springhouse Farm Lane Louisville, KY 40222 rebecca.sivori@gmail.com

western district editor Amy Tincher-Durik, DP 3737 Southern Hills Drive Des Moines, IA 50321 amyadpieditor@outlook.com

The Adelphean of Alpha Delta Pi is a quarterly educational journal of college life and alumnae achievement. It is the official publication of Alpha Delta Pi sorority, oldest secret society of college women in the world, founded May 15, 1851, at Wesleyan Female College, Macon, Georgia, the world’s first chartered college for women.

CONNECT WITH ALPHA DELTA PI

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From the Desk of the INTERNATIONAL PRESIDENT Change. Alpha to Delta Member. Delta to Alumna Member. These are changes we expect in our sisterhood. Shelter-in-place and quarantine orders sparked unprecedented changes in our sisterhood that we did not expect. I am proud of your resiliency as we live out our motto, “We Live for Each Other.” March 12, 2020, is when my life in Little Rock, Arkansas, quickly changed. Maybe it was a little sooner or a little later for you, but I know each of us has felt the life-altering changes that COVID-19 has brought—loss of travel and activities, isolation and loneliness, working from home and homeschooling, fears and anxiety. As quickly as we make plans, we are revising them. While there have been many challenging and emotionally difficult changes, there has also been so much good. I hear our motto guiding me throughout the day as I see ways that my decisions impact not only my health and well-being but also directly impact the health and well-being of others. I felt conspicuous the first time I made a mask out of a bandana and hair ties and walked to the grocery store, but for me, it was what our motto guided me to do. We held Alpha Delta Pi’s first full Grand Council meeting via videoconference in April. The meeting was productive, collaborative, and worthwhile. I missed the things we get to do when we are in person—hugs, walks through the neighborhood, shared meals, and singing— but I found that we used the meeting time to thoughtfully share and listen to each other. In the nine years I’ve been on Council, we’ve had Cheetos with every lunch at Memorial Headquarters during our meetings. To keep the tradition going, I bought a bag to have with my lunch those days. They were delicious, even if I had to eat the whole bag by myself this time! Among the good things, I also count developing new routines. I now enjoy dance classes from my living room, attend church online, and play games via FaceTime. One routine I haven’t changed is wearing my pearls every day. I had my 48th birthday early in the wake of the pandemic and was fortunate to receive one of my favorite treats in the mail—pints of ice cream! Having my own “ice cream parlor” in the freezer during this time will always be a good memory. As I look back on the past two months, I still think about what we have missed out on. More than anything, though, I am in awe of the innovation and resilience of ADPi sisters in how you connect with each other and support those around you. Many chapters have creatively held virtual fundraisers for Ronald McDonald House to support families facing not only a pandemic but also an ill child. We can make a difference, even from afar. Thank you for choosing to live our motto for yourself, your family, your chapter, and your community. Loyally,

THE ADELPHEAN | SPECIAL ISSUE MAY 2020

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Having a physical house and social events are not what make us

Our

SISTERHOOD transcends campus limits, and even COVID-19 cannot challenge that.

ALPHA DELTA PI . . .

Caroline Bosler, Alpha Pi— George Washington

Meranda Vinson (left) and Camryn Harris, both Zeta Phi—Francis Marion

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THE ADELPHEAN | SPECIAL ISSUE MAY 2020


A

sisterhood FROM COAST TO COAST ALPHA

DELTA

PI

Our thoughts are with those affected by COVID-19 (commonly referred to as coronavirus) as governments, universities, and private businesses take steps to minimize spread of the disease. Because the health and safety of our members is our primary concern, Alpha Delta Pi’s leadership took quick action in March 2020 to ensure our collegiate members and alumnae volunteers had the tools and support they needed to navigate the situation. All areas of organization operation were affected as staff, volunteers, and collegiate leaders stepped up to the challenge. Chapter Operations

Travel Restrictions

Over the course of mid-to-late March, all 159 campuses with Alpha Delta Pi chapters closed for in-person instruction. Consequently, our collegiate sisters moved to their homes to follow stay-at-home orders and distance learning as they finished the term. The Executive Office Membership Team quickly organized virtual operations tools for our chapters and identified the most vital activities and meetings necessary for continued operations. Chapters were provided with access to Zoom meeting lines and simplified meeting templates. Many chapters were forced to cease operations prior to inititating their spring Alpha classes, and care will be taken to keep the approximately 1,300 Alpha members engaged until they can be initiated into our sisterhood.

Not only did the Leadership Consultants come off the road, all Alpha Delta Pi travel ceased for the spring and summer. International Officers canceled chapter visits, staff halted travel, and the summer International Officer Leadership Seminar moved to a virtual delivery. All Greek leadership conferences and trainings were either canceled or held via webinar, and the NPC International Presidents and Executive Directors met virtually.

Leadership Consultants Alpha Delta Pi’s 11 Leadership Consultants came off the road as collegians were moving off campus. They moved to their homes to complete the term and continued to work with collegiate leaders to assist with the transition to virtual operations and plan for the coming year. These sisters held individual meetings with chapter officers and advisors and completed special projects for the organization.

Housing Operations Alpha Delta Pi’s house corporations and housing volunteers were on the forefront as they worked hard to maintain a safe living environment for our collegiate women during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic. Executive Office housing staff immediately developed guidance and best practices for dealing with contagious illnesses, and the volunteer Housing Resource Directors remained in constant communication with our house corporation officers. These sisters worked diligently over the course of the spring term to manage employees, contracts, and campus obligations in order to best serve our collegiate residents and ensure a safe and fiscally viable home away from home when students return.

Virtual Sisterhood Alpha Delta Pi’s education and programming staff organized online opportunities for sisterhood and engagement for all members. We hosted events such as ADPi Book Club discussions and HIIT workouts as well as our Be the First Webinar Series to help participants learn something new, develop and enhance their skills, connect with sisters, and grow through virtual community. We will continue these online sessions and add additional ones to engage alumnae and outside professionals. Follow the A Sisterhood from Coast to Coast page at alphadeltapi.org or look for these opportunities in monthly Chronicle newsletters.

Looking Ahead We are optimistic that chapters will be able to return to normal or adjusted operations during the fall term in compliance with state, local, and campus guidelines. Some campuses may remain remote for part or all of the term, and some may employ hybrid learning systems. Alpha Delta Pi’s leadership has identified critical and immediate needs for our chapters and will be ready to assist with the unique situations our members find themselves in. The National Panhellenic Conference organized a special task force to study the recruitment process in a virtual system and provided guidance to campus Panhellenics and member groups with options for consideration. Our chapters will continue to be supported by their volunteer advisors, International Officers, and Executive Office staff as they adjust.

THE ADELPHEAN | SPECIAL ISSUE MAY 2020

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BETHE BE THE

Loyally

FIRST WEBINAR

SISTERHOOD FOR A LIFETIME

SERIES

Virtual

E N G AG E M E N T Alpha Delta Pi is committed to providing ways for members to engage and learn together throughout all stages of membership. Be the First Webinar Series provides space to put yourself first and develop you in a variety of ways. During each session, a different speaker leads a conversation to help you learn something new, develop and enhance your skills, connect with sisters, and grow through virtual community. Need to make a business case to participate? Alpha Delta Pi provides a customizable form letter to help your manager understand why this webinar series will be valuable for your professional development. Alpha Delta Pi alumnae and friends of the organization present the sessions on topics such as Living Imperfectly, Redefining Our Relationship with I’m Sorry, Connection and Belonging from a Distance, Learning Styles, Lions on LinkedIn, Overcoming Imposter Syndrome, Maintaining Financial Calm During a Crisis, Getting to Know Generation Z, and much more. Recordings are available in the Library on Pride Online the week following each webinar unless otherwise indicated.

Although the ending to our graduating members’ senior year looked different than they imagined, Alpha Delta Pi is confident they are prepared for the journey ahead. During the last few weeks of the spring 2020 term, senior members were offered opportunities for connection, support, and celebration through the new Loyally: Sisterhood for a Lifetime senior program. ADPi alumnae participated in panel discussions for graduating sisters interested in consulting, education, development, and graduate school. Participants enjoyed the conversations and ability to “pick the brains” of alumnae with experience in these fields. On May 20, 2020, Alpha Delta Pi hosted a virtual graduation ceremony for our senior members with remarks from International President Emily Erkel; author of Live in Love Lauren Akins, Alpha Kappa—Tennessee; and Class of 2020 representative Christianna Gess, Theta Psi—Rollins. As our 2020 seniors leave their college experience behind, we know this will not be the final chapter of their Alpha Delta Pi story. Our sisterhood has so much to offer beyond graduation.

Remember, you are always an Alpha Delta Pi. Now or 40 years from now, people will associate you with the oldest secret society for collegiate women. Wear your letters with pride and shine bright, no matter where your new adventure takes you.

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THE ADELPHEAN | SPECIAL ISSUE MAY 2020


CONGRATS ADPI CLASS OF 2020. WE ARE SO PROUD OF YOU! THE ADELPHEAN | SPECIAL ISSUE MAY 2020

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Sisters

O N T H E F RON T During the early days of the spring 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, the whole world adjusted to a new way of living to include physical distancing, stay-at-home orders, modified education, and more. Alpha Delta Pi sisters stepped up to the challenge in their workplaces and communities to do their part to fight the battle and direct their teams toward new solutions. These stories by and about our sisters in health care, service, tourism, education, and media show how ADPi women are leading the way.


Covering

T HE S TORI E S BY R EBECCA D ESENSI SIVOR I C E N T R A L D ISTR ICT AD ELPH EAN ED ITOR

Taylor Deckert reports stories from the front lines of the pandemic Taylor Deckert, Iota Beta—Campbell, is a news reporter with Fox Illinois in Champaign, Illinois. She moved to this new city at the beginning of the nationwide pandemic following a stint at Siouxland News in North Sioux City, South Dakota. For Taylor, in addition to the challenges of learning a new television market during twelvehour shifts, she moved without a social network in the area. She covered stories such as a local nurse traveling to the COVID-19 front lines in New York City, teacher parades in local neighborhoods, the University of Illinois making batches of hand sanitizer, and sheriffs reporting that domestic violence calls increased during the stay-at-home order. She was thankful to share the stories of what was happening on the front lines and help capture this moment in history. Taylor’s work can be viewed on her YouTube Channel.

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How I Am

M AK I N G A DI F F E RE NCE BY C A SS I M C D I A R M I D , A L P HA CH I—U CLA AND LAS V EG AS ALU MNAE ASSO CIATI ON

I am a second-year medical student and the Osteopathic Medical Student Government President at Touro University Nevada, College of Osteopathic Medicine in Henderson, Nevada. As medical students, my classmates and I are uniquely qualified to provide assistance to the greater Las Vegas community and help health care providers. Since the beginning of stay-at-home orders in Nevada, I’ve spearheaded a team with two other students to develop volunteer opportunities and provide both clinical and nonclinical assistance in our community. We’ve launched #MedReady, a communityfocused website, where we provide news and updates on COVID-19, disseminate accurate information, provide wellness resources, and coordinate volunteering needs. Volunteer work includes offering grocery shopping assistance for high-risk and immunocompromised individuals, dog-walking, and assistance for first responders; the site also includes a submission box to request

medical-student assistance for clinical activities. Nationally, we offer free video tutoring for K-12 and undergraduate students; MCAT tutoring; and pre-health profession advising and mentoring for DO/MD, OT, PT, and PA. Less than one week after the launch of #MedReady, we had more than 70 students registered to volunteer in excess of 300 hours of tutoring services, in addition to another 50 students ready to provide community assistance. I’ve also been responsible for coordinating our students’ clinical volunteering efforts at the Cashman Center in Las Vegas, where they help screen homeless individuals for COVID-19 symptoms to ensure the safety of all individuals. I’m grateful to be able to give back to our community in this time of need and collaborate with other students—including alumnae members of other NPC organizations such as Delta Gamma—to both help during this pandemic and support one another.

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The Safety of

TH OS E I AM H E LPI NG BY R E B E C C A D E S E N S I S IVOR I, CENTR AL D ISTR ICT AD ELPH EAN ED ITOR

Jennifer Allen, Delta Phi—Missouri, Kansas City, is a certified aide in the nursing department at Advent Health Shawnee Mission in Overland Park, Kansas.

What are the biggest challenges or changes within your workplace? One of the biggest challenges my hospital is facing is the lack of PPE (personal protective equipment). The nurses and doctors who are working on the front line are the ones who are exposed to the virus the most, and we are running out of supplies to treat these patients without putting [health care workers] at a greater risk of exposure. Another challenge we are facing is the lack of education people have on this virus. While we do encourage people to wear masks and gloves, they are not using them the proper way. Using these items wrong can cause further contamination and increase the risk of contracting the virus. A final challenge we face as health care providers is physical and mental status declining. We work long, hard hours to provide to those who are very ill, and because there is not a vaccine or medication to fully cure the virus, it takes a toll to not know whether or not this patient will get to leave the hospital.

What are your biggest worries and how are you coping with these stresses? My biggest worry is the safety of those I am helping and the stress of being exposed and bringing it back to my house. I continuously wash my hands and make sure I clean my uniform as soon as I get home. I cope with stress by reminding myself how lucky I am to be a part of an amazing organization who is playing a crucial role during this tough time. Before and after each shift, I remind myself of the positive things in my life and how important it is to take care of myself so I can continue to serve others.

What do you want people to know about what is occurring in your work facility? We want people to know that we highly support the stayat-home order and social distancing protocols. We are doing everything we can to care for these patients, and we want the community to do the same. We also know that times are very tough right now, so we do ask that if you are struggling mentally and physically, to utilize the resources available in the community to ease the stress and anxiety of this life-changing situation.

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Americans Must D O T HE I R DU T Y BY S HA N N ON ZING LE, BETA ETA—MICH IG AN

Shannon Zingle, Beta Eta—Michigan, is a medical doctor in Nashville, Tennessee. The column below was originally published in The Tennesseean on April 16, 2020.

This morning I woke up to silence. No alarm alerted me to jump up, change into scrubs and begin my commute to a bustling clinic full of patients in need of my care. Instead, in an uncommonly quiet moment, I looked out my window to a still Nashville cityscape. For the first time since the outbreak of COVID-19, I cautiously began to feel safe. I’m grateful to have remained home the past 14 days with familiar walls serving as a barrier from harm that lurks outside. They provide more protection than the disposable face mask I was reusing while working within inches of my patients as I examined their eyes. I’m thankful to no longer be fearfully assessing them for signs of illness from the doorway before entering each room. Boredom has not crossed my mind. From my perspective, staying home is a privilege, one fellow doctors in other specialties will not be given. Americans, we’re being called to duty—all of us. By continuing to shelter in place, we fight the spread of the coronavirus and help protect others, including my nursing home patients—the elderly and chronically ill individuals who have long since lost the comfort of remaining in their own home. We give armor to others bravely persisting on the front lines with limited defenses. When a food crisis developed during World War I, the United States encouraged all Americans to contribute by “sowing the seeds of victory.” Three million gardens were planted. Not only were shortages prevented, but the burden on farmers providing for troops and civilians abroad was greatly reduced. Today, we must stay at home to save lives. Prevent health care providers from becoming outnumbered. Reduce the strain on our hospitals. Buy more time for our leading scientists.

Small business owners, I’ve walked in your shoes. You’re familiar with sacrifice already. Entrepreneurship is a journey of ups and downs, gains and losses, strides and setbacks. You’re the essence of the American dream, the backbone of this country. But if your doors open, people will enter. All employees, patrons and business owners must stay home. Similarly, doctors must serve as examples. Continue social distancing. Society is watching. I empathize with those grieving being able to travel. I still remain many miles from the one I love. Our ground here was shaken from a tornado and then our air became tainted. It’s difficult to walk steadily and breathe easily and that much harder to be far apart from those you miss terribly. However, America was founded by valiant individuals who agreed to cross an ocean, often separate from loved ones, for an unknown period of time, understanding their future, once reunited, would be better for it. I assure you, we’re in this together. Tennesseans are resilient. To those facing broken milestones, your disappointment is valid. Whether it’s a graduation, birthday, wedding, new baby, or retirement now postponed or complicated, I’m sorry. As a freshman beginning college in New Orleans when ordered to evacuate for Hurricane Katrina, I sympathize with your fallen hopes. But one day you’ll discover peace in the form of wisdom and provide comfort to another who has not yet learned that disasters are unpredictable. They appear sometimes even as an invisible enemy, target the vulnerable, disrupt our plans and impart fear. But they also remind us we are part of something greater than ourselves. We all have the opportunity to answer the call. The time is now to do so.

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LEADING IN THE LAB

BY R E N E E BA I L E Y I AC O N A, P H . D . DELTA UPS I LO N — T E N N E S S E E , MART IN AST R A ZE NE C A V IC E P R E S ID E N T F O R ONCOLOGY B I OM ETR I CS, R &D AND NORTHE R N DI S T R IC T T E AM D IR E C TO R


Renee Bailey Iacona, Delta Upsilon—Tennessee, Martin, is the Vice President for Oncology Biometrics, Research and Development at AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals and Alpha Delta Pi’s Northern District Team Director. She shares how her research and development team is responding to the pandemic and how she crossapplies her skills between professional and volunteer work. I have always found where I work and what I do professionally to be rewarding, never more so than in the last few months as our world deals with the COVID-19 pandemic. I have worked at AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals for 19 years and currently am the Vice President for Oncology Biometrics in the Research & Development side of the business, which means my team develops new medicines for patients—in my case for cancer patients. My team works cross functionally with medics and scientists to design clinical trials to test new drugs, and once those trials read out, that same team determines if the drugs are safe and efficacious (i.e. do they shrink the tumor and does the patient live longer as a result). If the results turn out positive, we submit the data to health authorities across the globe to seek drug approval so that new medicines can be made available for patients.

How does that relate to COVID-19? In early March as the coronavirus began to impact the United States and Europe, my company and many others turned our attention to help fight the virus on multiple fronts, including: developing vaccines to prevent COVID-19, developing testing so individuals know if they have been infected by COVID-19, developing treatments for those who contract COVID-19 and need medical treatment to deal with the symptoms, and ensuring that our business can continue—that we can still get medicines to patients and run our clinical trials while also assessing how the COVID-19 outbreak has impacted our ongoing clinical trials.

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Prevention—Vaccine Development

What has been remarkable in the COVID-19 pandemic is the level of collaboration across the pharma companies and the health authorities because we are all working for a common goal—to find effective and safe treatments that will help patients and find them quickly.

A vaccine to prevent COVID-19 is perhaps the best hope for ending the pandemic. Currently, there is no vaccine to prevent COVID-19, but researchers are racing to create one. Coronaviruses are a family of viruses that cause illnesses such as the common cold, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). COVID-19 is caused by a virus that’s closely related to the one that causes SARS. While vaccine development can take years, researchers aren’t starting from scratch to develop a COVID-19 vaccine. Past research on SARS and MERS vaccines has identified potential approaches. As an example, my company developed FluMist and influenza vaccines in the past and therefore has experienced immunologists who understand virology. We have been researching development of a COVID-19 vaccine using existing technology to test and develop a potential vaccine. We recently announced a partnership with the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom to develop, produce, and manufacture a vaccine and hope to have it ready late this year or early 2021.

Testing—Antibody Test Development We have heard a lot in the news about testing and the lack of available tests—many companies are now trying to develop rapid tests, sometimes referred to as “on contact” tests, as opposed to those that require lab processing with a longer turnaround time. You may wonder what do these tests measure and what do they tell you? A blood test identifies the presence of antibodies that indicate a person had an immune response to COVID-19. A positive result to this antibody (IgG) test indicates you may have had previous exposure to COVID-19 and your body has developed antibodies. While AstraZeneca is not a diagnostic company, we do have diagnostic experts on staff, and those individuals recently have been working in collaboration with other scientists on developing serology testing. We have also been working on developing a test and recently announced a partnership with GlaxoSmithKline and the University of Cambridge in the UK to boost nationwide testing in the United Kingdom. My team analyzes the data to ensure the test is both sensitive (individuals who are positive test that way) and specific (we don’t have false results). These tests will also be used by AstraZeneca to help essential staff (who need to be on the work site to complete their jobs) know if they have been infected with the virus.

Treatment—Development We have also heard a lot about how COVID-19 acts differently from past viruses and sometimes causes severe symptoms that can lead to hospitalization, or sadly, even death. Many companies are also trying to develop treatments that will either reduce the severity of the symptoms or help prevent organ failure. Because drug development and testing in clinical trials can take time, there are many companies testing agents already in their pipeline of medicines to see if they could help with the COVID-19 pandemic. These products include antivirals which target the virus in people who have been infected and try to block the virus, monoclonal antibodies which trigger the patient’s immune system to attack the

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virus, and immune suppressants to reduce the acute respiratory distress seen with COVID-19, just to name a few. Even with potential drugs already available in company pipelines, the key is that these drugs need to be tested in COVID-19 patients to determine if they are safe and improve patient outcomes. My team has been designing clinical trials to test a couple of our products to see if our medicines used in other indications will have an impact on COVID-19 patients. Hearing the anecdotal stories of how some of the experimental treatments are helping these patients is inspirational—patients on ventilators leaving the hospital days later to go home. Now we have to turn these stories into data that can lead to medicines. What has been remarkable in the COVID-19 pandemic is the level of collaboration across the pharma companies and the health authorities because we are all working for a common goal—to find effective and safe treatments that will help patients and find them quickly. Regulatory bodies such as the Food and Drug Administration have even created a special emergency drug approval process to fast-track medications that show promise, as recently seen for the Gilead antiviral drug remdesivir.

Business Continuity As a manager of a large team within AstraZeneca working through the impact of COVID-19, I’ve also had to lead through a sudden disruption in our ways of working, seek new ways to come together as a team, and plan for the future in case COVID-19 affects us more long-term. We have learned to work together virtually and adapted our ways of working using Zoom and Microsoft Teams to have personal interactions with staff, recruit new hires, and inspire our teams to continue to deliver through major personal change. All this work has also had great relevance for me as a leader of a large team (the Northern District team) within Alpha Delta Pi—the similarities are remarkable. In Alpha Delta Pi, we have worked together cross functionally across the Strategic Leadership Team, the District Team Director/Collegiate Services Specialist team, and my Northern District team to lead our chapters to new ways of working, determine how COVID-19 could impact our organization both short- and long-term, and scenario plan ahead for how this fall will work depending on whether campuses stay virtual, continue social distancing practices, etc. I feel very fortunate that my work, both professional and volunteer, is important—impacting the future of patients and young women and teaching what I learn in both organizations into each other. As an example, I’ve taught recruitment skills I learned in ADPi into AstraZeneca and now, business continuity planning from AstraZeneca into Alpha Delta Pi. Sisters, I apply lifelong skills learned from our sisterhood in work regularly. Planning business continuity for both work and ADPi has meant a lot of time in front of my laptop on Zoom calls talking COVID impact—sometimes the day runs into the evening and I haven’t left my computer. However, I feel very fortunate to have the support of my sisters and even more proud when I get texts and messages from sisters cheering me on for the work that I do professionally. Thank you, sisters, and be safe and healthy wherever you are!

I feel very fortunate that my work, both professional and volunteer, is important— impacting the future of patients and young women and teaching what I learn in both organizations into each other.

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Caring for FA M ILI E S

BY A M Y T I N C H E R - D UR IK, W ESTER N D ISTR ICT AD ELPH EAN ED ITOR

Sarah Stadnik, a social work counselor, has adapted to serving patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Sarah Stadnik, Gamma Nu—William Jewell and member of the Houston Alumnae Association, is a social work counselor at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. In her role, Sarah works with a patient’s care team to gain a deeper understanding of patient needs and concerns. She then helps patients and caregivers cope with the impact and changes resulting from a diagnosis of cancer, assists in finding resources for housing or transportation, and provides resources designed for children dealing with a parent’s cancer diagnosis. COVID-19 has had a major impact on patients, including no visitors being allowed at the hospital except for, almost exclusively, end-of-life concerns. As a result, many patients are dealing with even more anxiety and sadness, because they can’t have family or caregivers with them—and that’s where Sarah and her colleagues come in. They check in daily with patients, actively listening,

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showing empathy, validating and normalizing patients’ feelings, and providing a safe space for them to express themselves, while also helping patients identify and implement coping skills. During this difficult time, Sarah and her colleagues are also trying to talk to every patient about advance-care planning and directives like a medical power of attorney or living will. Although these conversations can be challenging, identifying a patient’s legal next of kin, especially given the impact the virus has had nationwide, is important. Sarah and her colleagues address these matters in a thoughtful way to enable patients to better focus on themselves and their care. Sarah is proud to work for an institution that values a patient’s mental health as well as their physical health and provides her and her fellow social work counselors opportunities to showcase expertise and be valued members of the medical team.

THE ADELPHEAN | SPECIAL ISSUE MAY 2020


Dedicating

A D D I T I ON AL T IM E BY R E B E C C A D E S E N S I S IVOR I, CENTR AL D ISTR ICT AD ELPH EAN ED ITOR

Ashley Hanners, Delta Phi—Missouri, Kansas City, works as a pharmacy technician at Jones Drug Store, a locally owned independent pharmacy in Jackson, Missouri.

What are some of the biggest challenges and changes within your workplace? One of the biggest challenges that we are facing is having our lobby closed. We are operating with curbside service and delivery only. In the past, we have done a lot of deliveries, but now deliveries are becoming people’s first choice. In addition, we are only allowing customers to pay over the phone to reduce contact as much as possible. All of our employees are required to wear masks, and we are taking every precaution to make sure customers remain healthy. Another big change for us is that we aren’t typically a compounding pharmacy. However, with COVID-19, we have grown into the hand sanitizer business. At every point throughout the day, there is somebody making it.

What are your biggest worries, and how are you coping with that stress? My biggest worries are that people are not taking it seriously to stay home. Because of that, there is still contact happening all of the time which will not prevent the disease from spreading, but instead increase it. Our pharmacy has been continuously posting on our Facebook page about our free delivery service to encourage people to remain at home.

What do you want people to know about what is occurring in your work facility? I hope that people acknowledge that pharmacy staff, just like nurses, doctors, and everyone else considered front-line, are continuously working to do our part in spreading awareness and safety. We are all dedicating additional time to put forth our best service and supplies in such a crazy, unexpected time.

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Continuing

TO B E POSI T I VE

BY R E B E C C A D E S E N S I S IVOR I, CENTR AL D ISTR ICT AD ELPH EAN ED ITOR

Rachel Emery, Delta Phi—Missouri, Kansas City, works as a pharmacy intern at Research Medical Center in Kansas City, Missouri. What are some of the biggest challenges and changes within your workplace?

What are your biggest worries, and how are you coping with that stress?

What do you want people to know about what is occurring in your work facility?

The biggest challenge we have had at the hospital is the shortage of protective wear like masks and gloves for most workers.

My biggest worry is of course contracting COVID-19. Being at work and helping patients during this hard time is how I’m coping because I know I’m doing my job. I love it, and I love helping others. Continuing to be positive has had a huge impact on the well-being of patients and other health care providers.

I want people to know that health care workers are constantly coming to work without proper protective gear and putting their lives on the line—most of them more than I am. I think a lot of people are being forgotten about.

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THE ADELPHEAN | SPECIAL ISSUE MAY 2020


Nurses

A R E C A L LE D TO S E RV E

BY E L L E N LO N G L I STO N NO RT H E R N DI ST R I C T A D E L P H E A N E D I TO R

BY ER IN O’ D O NNELL H OWARD SO U TH ER N D ISTR ICT AD ELPH EAN EDI TOR

Kaleigh Mellett, Alpha Iota—Pitt, is a nurse at Johns Hopkins in the Medical Intensive Care Unit. Her unit was the first ICU in the hospital to transform into a biocontainment unit housing all COVID-19 patients. She wears a ventilated hood during her entire shift to protect her from catching the virus. Her unit has been training nurses from other floors and specialties to protect care for the patients, and more and more units are transforming into ICUs to help. Kaleigh said she has felt extremely supported due to the unit receiving many donations. She said it feels incredible to see everyone come together and work as a team during this time, and she feels very proud to be a nurse. Alpha Iota alumna Mia Logsdon and current chapter members Hannah Day and Allison Winiecki also work in the health care industry.

Haley Mapes, Eta—Alabama, is working as a nurse on the front lines during the COVID-19 pandemic. She is known to have a giving spirit, and her friends and family are not surprised she found nursing as a calling. Haley has known and loved ADPi for her whole life and has a rich family history of sisterhood, including her grandmother, Helen Ward, Eta; mother, Carole Ward Mapes, Eta; and aunt, Fran Ward Stebbins, Epsilon Psi— Tennessee Tech. All who know Haley are so proud of the work she is doing for our country in the midst of this pandemic.

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ON THE FRONT IN NEW YORK CITY


Nicole Howard, Epsilon Lambda— South Florida, is an inpatient Physician Assistant in the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit at NewYork–Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. She shared insight into her experience working in a hospital in one of the hardest hit cities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

When did you first learn that COVID-19 might be headed your way, and how did you and your colleagues prepare? I will remember this day for the rest of my life—I was just arriving to the hospital for my day shift when I was told that the first COVID-19 patient in New York City was being transferred to our Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The next days were a nightmarish whirlwind as the COVID-19 pandemic flooded our hospital with the sickest patients I have ever seen. Despite such chaos, I couldn’t be more proud of how our hospital’s management handled such unprecedented times. My Chief Physician Assistant (PA) quickly held an emergency team meeting, and we were told that in the coming days our entire Oncology Service would be taking over two full COVID-19 units while also setting up a Palliative Care Unit (PCU) solely for COVID-19 patients. The PCU would allow us to transfer end-of-life patients from the hectic units to a safe and peaceful space to spend their final days. This entailed working our regular shifts in addition to picking up many extra shifts to have enough providers to care for the influx of COVID-19 patients my hospital was experiencing. The aforementioned plan was rolled out in less than 24 hours, and we were even cleared to give visitation rights (under strict guidelines, of course) to family members of those end-of-life patients in the COVID-19 PCU. It was truly remarkable and humbling to be a part of such a fearless team.

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Tell us what “a day in the life of Nicole” looked like during the height of the crisis. In the non-COVID-19 world, I rotate between day and night shifts, but during the COVID-19 pandemic, I have been working mostly day shifts on one of our two full COVID-19 units or in the PCU. I wake up at 5:45 a.m., put on my scrubs, mask, and gloves, and head to the train station to take the subway into the hospital. As everyone knows, most people who live in the city do not have cars, so unfortunately, I had to take the subway even during these uncertain times. I arrive for my 12.5-hour shift (but usually more like 15 hours) at around 7:00 a.m. ready to care for the sickest of the sick. I get sign-out from the night team and start scrolling my patients’ charts. Afterward, I discuss each patient’s case with the doctor, and we go see the patients together in full personal protective equipment (PPE). The remainder of my day is spent managing my extremely sick and tenuous COVID-19 patients. There are days that I have multiple patients go from being stable on room air to decompensating and needing maximum oxygen requirements (the step right before needing a ventilator), which can happen in a span of 12.5 hours or as few as only a couple of hours—and this is what is so daunting about COVID-19. On other days, I lose multiple patients and am faced with the heart wrenching task of calling their loved ones to deliver this news, knowing they passed without their loved ones at their bedside. As difficult as it is to lose any patient, losing a patient in the COVID-19 PCU gives me a sense of peace knowing that their loved ones were able to visit them in their final days. The trauma from this pandemic is not something that I can just walk away from, and these very difficult and sad conversations take an emotional toll on me. Many nights I cannot sleep thinking about my patients and their loved ones. This physically, mentally, and emotionally exhausts me, but I find gratitude in knowing that I am able to provide much needed support and excellent care to my patients and their families.

Nicole and four colleagues were the first on the front lines for their service on their first COVID-19 shift.

Page 24: Nicole with one of her best friends and coworker (who is a Zeta Tau Alpha alumna from the University of Miami) in front of the “Letters of Hope” board. Page 25: Nicole in a cloth mask made by a friend of her mother.

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How has this pandemic changed how your department operates on a daily basis? Have you changed any processes or protocols on a permanent basis? The hospital as a whole is requiring a “mask on” policy, which means all employees must wear a surgical mask at all times while in the hospital. Our Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) department is now requiring full PPE (N95 mask, gown, and gloves) to be worn in all patient rooms, given our patients have virtually no immune system and are at much higher risk of contracting COVID-19 than the rest of the population. As to what will remain permanent, I think it is too soon to say, but we are taking all necessary precautions to keep patients and ourselves safe.

Are there any stories about patients or coworkers that have impacted you personally? I have always said that every patient I care for impacts me to some degree, and the same goes for their families. The strength these patients and their families are showing during this crisis is truly inspirational and something that will forever remain with me.

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As for my coworkers, it is hard to highlight any specific positive interaction because there are so many, but I can say that I have never been prouder of my team and how we came together to support our patients and their families without hesitation. We spend countless hours at patients’ bedsides FaceTiming loved ones so they feel less isolated. I also have such pride knowing that our team spearheaded setting up the PCU. I may be biased, but my team is truly one of a kind.

What kind of support have you and your colleagues seen from the community or your own friends? The New York City community and beyond has been so supportive of essential workers. NYC takes part in a citywide celebration for essential workers at 7:00 p.m. every night, and without fail the cheers just keep getting louder and louder. Our team has received an array of donations, from food/electrolyte drinks (shout-out to my Alpha class ’06 sister Tara Pate and Alpha class ’08 sister Ashley Donna), to masks (shout-out to Alpha class ’08 sister Danielle Reyes), to hand lotion for our chaffed hands, to money for coffee (shout-out to Alpha class ’07 sister Marikate Howe and Alpha class ’09 sister Nikki Barrett), to Instagram shout-outs from celebrities. Our hospital has been equally supportive—they are providing breakfast, lunch, and dinner and also set up a “Letters of Hope” board at the entrance to the hospital where people have hand delivered or mailed cards and pictures with words of encouragement and gratitude. I know I sound like a broken record, but my team has also been a godsend, and I genuinely do not know if I could have gotten through this without them. They set up virtual support groups and workouts as well as sent uplifting or funny memes on our group chat to keep the morale up. And most importantly, my family and friends have been there for me every step of the way. I knew I had a great support system, but WOW what a crew of love and positive vibes I have accumulated over the years. For the front-line workers, this pandemic has been isolating, but knowing we have so much support from our friends and families, as well as strangers we have never met, has made it easier to get through this thing we call COVID-19. And a quick shout-out to anyone who donated to their local essential workers during this time, because I promise you—it was a bright light in their day!

Nicole and her colleagues with food donated by family members of one of her colleagues.

What would you like your sisters who live outside of New York to know about life in the city during a pandemic? Life in the city came to a halt—which prior to this was unimaginable. But as with all trying times, it is important to find the silver linings, and this COVID-19 pandemic is no different. The city came together and truly supported each other. Whether it was at the grocery store or during online virtual workouts provided by studios who were forced to shut down, you could feel the support and pride we all have for our city and those fighting to keep it alive. I feel honored to serve during this crisis, and it has taught me a lot about myself and about humanity. From the front lines, I thank everyone for doing their part in their communities to stay safe while also supporting those who need it the most! We are all in this together!

Donation care packages made by Nicole’s BMT floor team and delivered to the floors hit hardest by COVID-19.

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Cheryl Noe (left), Hollie Sherman Graham, Zeta Rho (center), and Cheryl’s daughter Grace Davis, Beta Psi—Kentucky (right), collect PPE at Nissan Stadium in Nashville, Tennessee.

Collecting PPE

FOR T HE F RONT LINE BY C HE RYL BA LT H RO P NO E, ZETA R H O—VAND ER BILT E X E C UT IV E D I R ECTO R , PROJECT C. U . R . E NASH V ILLE

It has been extremely fulfilling for me as Executive Director of Project C.U.R.E. Nashville to work to supply personal protective equipment (PPE) to front-line medical workers and first responders here at home. Project C.U.R.E. (Commission on Urgent Relief and Equipment) exists to bring health and hope to the world, but during the COVID-19 outbreak, the world has been our own backyard. To date, our organization (in seven cities) has moved 369 domestic shipments (8,368 boxes of donated PPE) valued at well over $3,000,000 all across the United States. As the world has sheltered in place, it has certainly been a busy time in the life of Project C.U.R.E.— both in Nashville and across the nation. In Nashville, that has meant over 50 loads to over 40 organizations such as EMS, Nashville Office of Emergency Management, hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, doctor offices, dental offices, and fire departments. As a matter of fact, N95 masks for my husband’s fire department in Ashland City was our first domestic shipment.

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When he shared that they were out, the pandemic became very real, very quickly. We also participated in a great PPE drive with the Tennessee Titans where local businesses—dentists, construction firms, real estate agents, and more—brought new and unused masks, gowns, gloves, and shoe covers to Nissan Stadium to donate to front-line medical workers. Additionally, over 150 local volunteers made masks for front-line health care providers, doctors, surgeons, and nurses at Williamson Medical Center from halyard sterilization wrap provided by our warehouse. According to volunteer Gail Berglund, who is overseeing the effort, the material will protect the wearer from 99.9% of particulates. She calls it “nothing short of amazing and a true gift.” I love Alpha Delta Pi. My time at Vanderbilt University was greatly enhanced because of my affiliation with Zeta Rho. I am who I am today largely because of that time. I am grateful beyond words.

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Fighting

FO OD IN S E C U RI T Y BY A N G E L IN A LIANG , ZETA R H O —VAND ER BILT FO UN D E R , M ETRO-ATLANTA FOO D INITIATIV E

It’s undeniable that the COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted our lives in ways that nobody ever expected. University students have been uprooted and forced to vacate, unemployment is soaring as businesses are shut down, and people are falling victim to a vicious invisible enemy. As I was eating dinner with my family one day, I reflected on the difficulty it took even for our family to obtain the food. We relied on our savings to purchase the groceries, our car to drive to the grocery store, and my mother’s and my youth and health to venture out to the grocery stores with some confidence. Then, I came to the realization that some families have none of those things. Thus, the Metro-Atlanta Food Initiative was born. Our mission at Metro-Atlanta Food Initiative is to join and progress the fight to alleviate food insecurity in the Metro-Atlanta area. Our model is based on the unique conditions presented right now where there is an extreme need for food assistance in our community but also an increased amount of time and goodwill available in youth. We want to leverage the latter to fight the former. Within the first week of operations, the Metro-Atlanta Food Initiative was able to secure over $7,000 worth of donations from three local-business sponsors who came together with the will to give back to their community. From there on, I was able to bring on three additional members to bring the initiative to fruition—each one of whom had their careers impacted by

COVID-19 due to cancellations. Since then, we’ve been working around the clock to build the foundations of an initiative set to launch the first week of June. Our goal is to design, package, and deliver quality care packages consisting of fresh groceries, informational pamphlets on access to further assistance, and letters of support from the community to about 150 families on the first day of action. Afterward, we plan to serve many more families through fundraising and utilizing networks of organizations like schools, religious institutions, and businesses to leverage more funding and volunteer power to continue the fight. The amount of support that I’ve received from the sisters of my chapter, Zeta Rho, is unbelievable and heartwarming. The very first people that I excitedly revealed my goals to were sisters, and the enthusiasm and kindness they’ve shown me is incredible. Sisters have taken the time to give me operational advice and connect me with professionals in my area, and they were the first people to follow and share our social media page when it launched. When my chapter posted a sister highlight of me and my organization on their social media, I truly felt the support of an entire sisterhood. Now, with the opportunity to be seen and supported by ADPi on a national scale, I feel incredibly grateful and blessed to have so many strong women lifting me. If you have the time, please support us by following us at @metroatlfoodinitiative on Instagram and Facebook. Thank you!

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Helping Families FAC I N G F I N AN C IAL I N S TABILI T Y BY AMY TINCH ER -D U R IK W E ST E R N D ISTR ICT AD ELPH EAN ED ITO R

Palo Alto is best known for being one of the principal cities of Silicon Valley and home to Stanford University. Just to its north sits East Palo Alto. Although the two cities share a border, East Palo Alto is less prosperous with a high population of low-income, minority residents. When Sue Johnson, Gamma Nu—William Jewel and Zeta Chi—Baylor, moved to the area more than 30 years ago, she wasn’t fully aware of the cities’ different socioeconomic situations. While taking a break from her career—which included Latin America business development for Apple—to raise a family, Sue began to volunteer for her church and children’s schools. That’s when she learned about East Palo Alto. “It was eye-opening,” she says. As a fluent Spanish speaker, Sue “felt compelled to start volunteering in the city.” After her children were old enough to drive, she began working at an educational foundation to raise money for East Palo Alto’s school district, which primarily served under-resourced students. Sue’s experiences at the foundation led her to Able Works, an organization which is aimed at equipping individuals with financial education and life skills to enable them to live free from oppression and poverty. Sue is the organization’s Vice President of Programs. “Our model consists of weekly cohort meetings and individualized coaching, giving clients the tools and resources to move them forward economically,” says Sue. COVID-19 has introduced new challenges. “The community we serve is being impacted. Most types of jobs they have in the service industry—restaurants, gardeners, nannies, retail—have been eliminated. We work so hard with families [throughout our programs] to help them become financially stable, so the last thing we want is for the COVID-19 crisis to completely ruin their financial stability.” This includes undocumented families, which won’t receive stimulus checks or unemployment benefits.

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To address the issue, Able Works created and launched a new program in less than two weeks called Together We Rise. Through Together We Rise, the organization is giving extensive support to more than 200 families that have been through Able Works programs. “We know them very well, and we want to make sure they will overcome this crisis and continue on their upward trajectory.” Services of the new program are helping families navigate community and government resources—including what to do if they are denied—and providing financial assistance for food, rent, and utilities. Able Works was able to launch the program so quickly due to strong ties throughout the community and a loyal donor base. “Because Palo Alto is an affluent community, we’re fortunate,” Sue says. Despite the difficult situation, she adds, “The silver lining is telling clients, ‘people you don’t know love and care about you.’ ” Because the COVID-19 pandemic will likely have a lasting impact on low-income people, Able Works is also shifting its attention to how to help clients get back to work. This could include a career change, whether immediate—hot jobs in logistics, food distribution, or banking—or longer term. Sue is thinking about “how we can help families think about other areas of the economy for which they don’t need too much additional education or training.” Sue is passionate about helping others reach their full potential. “I love to work really hard with people to make a difference.” She says her Alpha Delta Pi experience, including being the first President of Zeta Chi chapter, helped her build the expertise she’s used throughout her career. “Being in a sorority gave me a lot of skills, including leadership and teamwork—coming together around something you care about and working hard to make it happen. I was able to practice this as an ADPi and have been able to use it for good in my life.”

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Bringing CHEER

BY K AT I E A D K IN S , ST UD E N T W R ITER , EKU COMMU NICATIO NS & BR AND MANAG EM ENT E A ST E RN KENTU CKY U NIV ER SITY

The article below was originally published on EKU Stories on May 1, 2020. Eastern Kentucky University’s Emma Reister volunteers at Kenwood Health and Rehabilitation Center in Richmond where residents are considered a vulnerable population. “I have always had a passion for helping others,” Reister said. Social distancing rules and the vulnerable population at the 93bed rehabilitation and skilled nursing facility means no visitors. Reister wanted to do something to bring some cheer to residents. She sent one message. “With one message to the EKU Greek Life Community, I received enough money to buy coloring books and word puzzles that contained Bible verses or encouraging messages along with other supplies for the Kenwood residents,” she said. A rising senior in fall 2020, Reister is a Biomedical Science major with a Pre-Dental focus and is an EKU Honors Program student. She is a member of the Alpha Delta Pi sorority and the Panhellenic President. As president, she oversees all seven Panhellenic chapters on campus and communicates with three other on-campus councils (Interfraternity Council, National Panhellenic Council, and the Multicultural Greek Council). “Most of my family are educators, so I have grown up witnessing them going above and beyond to help those in need and ensuring I knew the importance of giving back to the community,” she said. “While my parents never expected praise

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or anything in return, they have been the major force behind my passion for helping those in need.” Reister said she has been given gifts and talents so she can use them to help others, which is why she felt the need to try and do something extra for the Kenwood residents. “Making a difference does not have to be a major event, it can be making one person smile or feel loved which triggers a ripple effect. We are all human beings, and we are here to pick up others that need help because we would like someone to care for us if we ever needed it.” Each sorority and fraternity on campus has a philanthropy that they devote their time to in order to help others in the best way possible. But Reister said she sees the largest impact when they all come together to support each other and their diverse philanthropies. “We push each other to be better and to do more because we know we are able to achieve more,” she said. Reister said she is sad that her time at EKU is almost over, but that she enjoyed every second of her last three years here. “Nationally, Greek Life is portrayed negatively, but at EKU I have never felt anything but love and selflessness from these people. We strive to be better and uplift those around us. I love how welcoming the campus, staff, and students are. It feels like a family,” said Reister.

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Showing

T HE Y ARE LOVE D

BY A B I G A I L HAR R ISON, ETA X I—PR ESBYTER IAN E TA X I V IC E PR ESID ENT OF F INANCE AND P RE S BYT E R I A N PA N H E L L E N IC V ICE PR ESID ENT O F R ECR U ITMENT AND R ETENTI ON

Eta Xi chapter women write to nursing home residents during COVID-19 social distancing The Eta Xi chapter started writing letters to the Presbyterian home through the Presbyterian College Panhellenic Council. The Vice President of Service asked us to write letters to the Presbyterian Home in Clinton, South Carolina, which is a retirement facility near campus. I was thrilled when I heard about this because I know how lonely and sad they must be not being able to get out and see family due to COVID-19. The project is close to my heart since I have been visiting my grandma at her assisted living home about three times a week since the pandemic began. She fortunately has a porch behind her assistant living home, so we are able to bring her food and sit on the curb and have a picnic and talk from a distance! I know it has been very hard for her since she is such a social butterfly, so my

family makes an effort to go and see her. My favorite part is when we pull up to her place and she is waiting outside with the biggest smile on her face. She is the sweetest lady ever, and I am sad that I can’t give her a big hug. I have written about five letters to the Presbyterian Home, and many other chapter sisters have sent multiple letters as well. The other two sororities on campus are writing letters too. For Mother’s Day, we wrote letters wishing residents a Happy Mother’s Day! It is very hard since they won’t be able to be with their loved ones during this time, and I think it is so important to write even though you don’t know who you are writing to. Despite not receiving a letter back, we’ve not stopping writing more and more, as we want to be able to share that they are loved during this time.

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Sharing

T HE E XC E S S BY J I L L E YM E R G R EER , U PSILON—WASH ING TON STATE

Gail Krupke Daniels is the Mayor of Reardan, Washington, known for her efforts to honor local heroes and represent the town overseas. Mayor Daniels organized the sharing of a potato crop excess with the citizens of her community. Gail Krupke Daniels, Upsilon—Washington State, was raised in the small farming community of Reardan, Washington, just outside of Spokane. I met Gail, a stunning blonde, when she went through rush at Washington State University. Gail was athletic and “perky,” with a ready smile and warm laugh, and I seem to remember that we talked about her being a “princess” on a Reardan float, or maybe our mutual Dutch heritage. Gail pledged Alpha Delta Pi, was voted President of her 1967 pledge class, and I was lucky enough to be her big sister in the house! She also represented ADPi in Angel Flight. I lost track of Gail after my 1970 graduation from WSU, as we both built our lives with degrees in teaching, marriage, and children. In 2017, driving through Reardan past a Krupke Street sign, I turned around and parked at a thrift store. Inside were framed photographs of the Krupke farm, and I called Gail on an old cell number, finally reconnecting! Gail had retired from teaching at a school in the Wellpinit School District, returning to her hometown where her brother had taken over the running of the Krupke wheat and barley farm. Always one who wanted to be involved and give back, Gail volunteered on the Reardan City Council and became the President of the 501C3 Reardan Heroes committee. Gail is in charge of working on setting up a park in honor of Joe E. Mann, a 22-year-old WWII soldier from Reardan who fought in Best, Netherlands. With bullet wounds in each shoulder, he fell on a German grenade to save those around him. There is already a new plaque in the Reardan cemetery, as well as the Joe E. Mann Army Reserve Center on Market Street, but donors want to do more. When the Mayoral position became available about nine months ago, Gail stepped up to fill the volunteer position. Mayor Daniels coordinated the painting of city hall and reorganized the offices. She represented Reardan in Best, Netherlands, when they held a WWII celebration dedicating a statue to the memory of Joe E. Mann. Now, during this COVID-19 pandemic, Leonard, a resident of the Hutterite Brotherhood community that raises potatoes, donated a truck bed full of potatoes to Reardan. Mayor Daniels drove over in her truck, accepted the heaping pile, and parked in front of the post office at 10:00 a.m. when most folks come to get their mail, bagging and passing out potatoes to those who wanted them. The next stop was the Reardan Food Bank, who took as much as they could. With potatoes still in the truck bed, Mayor Daniels drove the residential streets of Reardan, stopping whenever she saw people in their yards and asking if they wanted potatoes, until the potatoes were gone! Mayor Gail Krupke Daniels is a credit to her office of Mayor, her hometown of Reardan, and her ADPi sisters!

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LIFE OFF CAMPUS

BY TI F FANY R . WANG , PH .D . OM EGA ALP HA— ALU M NAE INITIATES ASSOCI ATE P ROFES S OR OF COM M U NI CATI ON ST UD IES AND Z ETA DE LTA FACU LTY ADVIS OR


As a professor, Tiffany Wang, Omega Alpha— Alumnae Initiates, has had to make several changes to the way she connects with students and staff at the University of Montevallo. The Adelphean asked her to elaborate on her experience as a member of faculty during the COVID-19 pandemic.

How has COVID-19 affected the university staff? COVID-19 has presented challenges and opportunities for faculty and staff at my university. The University of Montevallo is a small public liberal arts university with an enrollment of approximately 2,300 students. One of the reasons I was drawn to working here was the opportunity to get to teach and mentor students in a close-knit campus community. The majority of our classes are taught in an in-person, face-to-face format, so many of our faculty have limited experience teaching online. Alabama was one of the last states to report COVID-19 cases, so we had time to see what was happening nationwide. The Friday the first COVID-19 case was reported in Alabama, my university announced that we would be moving to distance education the following Monday. Although we knew this was the right decision to protect the health of everyone in our university community, it was still difficult to make the transition online, because faculty members had designed their classes for the face-to-face format. Many faculty members spent their spring breaks dramatically changing what they had planned, to ensure continuity of instruction for our students. Many staff members identified creative ways to support our students who were missing out on many campus events they had been looking forward to (Greek Week, Undergraduate Research Day, formals, departmental honors days, graduation). Ironically, the physical distance has made me feel more connected to my faculty and staff colleagues as we have worked together to adjust to a new normal.

How has it affected you and your responsibilities as a faculty member directly? As a faculty member, I wear many hats on campus and in my professional community, which has meant COVID-19 has affected me and my job directly in many different ways. As Incoming Executive Director for the Central States Communication Association, the largest regional communication association in the United States and the fourth largest academic communication association in the world, I had spent almost nine months working with our Executive Committee to plan a convention in Chicago O’Hare for roughly 1,000 attendees. This included working with an undergraduate student intern to design a 150-page convention program, designing and printing certificates for over 175 award recipients, and mentoring several students who had undergraduate research projects that were accepted to the convention. After we decided that we needed to cancel the convention, we spent the next month taking the necessary steps to cancel it, which is actually more work in a lot of ways than hosting the convention. I mailed certificates to schools all over the country from home, created a YouTube channel to host videos, and created social media graphics we used to promote our award recipients. Although I am still sad that I will not get to see my friends at this year’s convention and that my students will not be able to have this professional development opportunity, I know we made the right decision to put the health and well-being of our members first. As University of Montevallo Faculty Senate President and Alabama Council of University Faculty Presidents First Vice President, I have worked with the university administration on my campus and with faculty senate leaders from across Alabama to find ways that we can create the best learning experience possible for our students despite the challenges we have faced transitioning all of our campuses to distance education. For

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University of Montevallo Bid Day 2018. Photo by Brittany M. Cockrum, Zeta Delta Executive Chapter Advisor.

me personally, this has meant finding creative ways to do events we usually do in person online. For example, I used to lead meetings with about 25 faculty senators face-to-face once a month, but during COVID-19, we have hosted Zoom virtual meetings and used Google forms for voting to make sure we are still making important decisions on schedule. I have also attended Zoom virtual departmental meetings during this time. As my program’s social media coordinator, I recognize that our students are missing out on many events they were looking forward to, including our departmental honors day and graduation. I have been able to create social media spotlights highlighting our seniors and award recipients that they have been able to share with their families and friends. We’re also looking forward to honoring graduating seniors at an August commencement and honoring our award recipients at a fall event. As a faculty member, I participate in a lot of pandemic pedagogy Facebook groups where faculty members discuss best practices for distance education during COVID-19. After reading about challenges with unequal student access to the resources they would need for distance education, I conducted an access survey with my students to see how they were doing and what kind of access they had. I am typically a person who loves to include as much technology as possible when I am teaching classes face-to-face. After looking at the survey results, I realized that I was going to need to make my class more asynchronous because students were working more hours as essential workers or sharing a computer/internet connection with roommates that would make synchronous instruction more difficult.

How has it affected your relationships with students? Have you seen any interesting trends or changes emerge in the student body? As a faculty member who loves teaching/mentoring, I’ve always believed that building supportive relationships with students is the best part of being a faculty member. Although the format of instruction has changed and I don’t get to see my students two to three times per week in person, I believe that my relationships with students have remained strong during COVID-19. Instead of meeting face-to-face during office hours, I have met virtually with students through Zoom office hours. I have also enjoyed popping into a Zoom hangout with the Zeta Delta chapter. This past month, I served as a campus Super Advisor, meeting virtually one-onone with incoming students to our major to help them register for classes for fall. Virtually advising students via Zoom allowed me to really connect with our incoming students. I even got to meet some family members and pets during these appointments! I can’t wait to see what they will accomplish when they join us on campus this fall. One trend that has emerged in the student body has been how challenging it has been mental healthwise for students to move from taking five classes face-to-face to five classes online. Many of my students are working long hours at essential jobs or serving as caregivers for their family members, so this has been really hard for them. I have worked with university administrators to try to alleviate some of the stressors for students. For example, my campus has moved to Pass Credit/No Credit grading, meaning students do not have to stress about having their GPAs adversely impacted by COVID-19. We also moved the drop deadline back so students have more time if they need to drop a class. We have refunded housing and meal-plan fees for the part of the semester following our transition to distance education to help our students financially. We also

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have an emergency fund designated to help students who are struggling. I am proud to work on a campus where we do all we can to support our students during normal times as well as this new COVID-19 normal.

What, if anything, have you learned because of this new COVID-19 normal? Will anything change permanently? I am still learning how to best support students during this new COVID-19 normal. My friend Dr. Kristina Scharp (Assistant Professor at the University of Washington/Family Communication and Relationships Lab Co-Director) and I are collaborating on a research study where we are surveying first-generation students to learn more about their transition from face-to-face to distance education. We are hoping to learn more about how faculty and staff can best support first-generation students. Although I hope we will return to face-to-face instruction in the fall, I think we will be ready for distance education if we ever need to transition back to this format. My colleagues and I are currently learning about ways we can optimize online speech grading by emailing other communication professors from around the country. We are also preparing different formats of our classes so we are ready for all possible scenarios. I hope that I have been able to pick up some skills along the way as I have adjusted to the new COVID-19 normal. I definitely think my video conferencing, social media content creation, and cooking skills have improved! I’ve also enjoyed spending lots of time with my Cavalier King Charles spaniel, London. Although many things will change permanently, I’m confident that our collegians/alumnae can adjust to any change that comes our way as WLFEO and ADPi!

Tiffany (right) and ADPi and academic advisee Zelma Mae Cable throw diamonds at Founders’ Day 2019 where seniors were robed. Zelma Mae served as Zeta Delta President from 2018-2019.

We’re curious, what led you to ADPi as an alumna initiate? In 2014, in my third year as a tenure-track faculty member, I was approached by a Zeta Delta collegian who was one of my students at the time to see if I had any interest in becoming their new faculty advisor. After consulting with a colleague who is an alumna member of a different Panhellenic organization who had experience being a fraternity faculty advisor, I decided to pursue that opportunity. After I became the Zeta Delta chapter faculty advisor, I was introduced to members of the alumnae advisory board, including Suzie Foster Lowery who was initiated into ADPi Zeta Delta chapter in 1980 and Jenny Palmer Studdard who was initiated into ADPi Zeta Delta chapter in 1990. As a relatively new faculty member and Alabama resident, I was so excited to meet women I can now call my sisters and lifelong friends. Suzie invited me to come to a girls’ night out Zeta Delta chapter alumnae dinner in Birmingham that week. Jenny invited me over to her house, and we stayed up until nearly midnight talking about her experience in ADPi. I knew I had found my people. Shortly after, Suzie approached me to see if I would be interested in alumnae membership and expressed an interest in sponsoring me. In 2014, only one woman had been alumnae initiated by Zeta Delta chapter (also a faculty advisor), so I was surprised and honored to be approached. She and the Zeta Delta chapter ended up sponsoring me, and I’ve been proud to be a member of ADPi ever since. My favorite memory of being a Faculty Advisor was when I had the opportunity to visit our Chapter President/Dorothy Shaw Award winner Emme Long who was an Executive Office intern. I loved staying overnight with Suzie in the violet room at Memorial Headquarters, presenting a workshop to the summer interns, and taking a tour of the archives.

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TRAVEL ADJUSTMENTS


Melanie Napier Beauchamp, Alpha Kappa—Tennessee, Knoxville, is the Assistant Commissioner Rural Tourism & Outreach for the Tennessee Department of Tourist Development. She shares how the tourism and hospitality industries are looking ahead to the postpandemic world. What are some day-to-day activities, projects, and goals that you would be working on if it were business as usual in the US? I oversee all facets of tourism outreach, resources, and initiatives with a new emphasis on tourism development in rural Tennessee. My division supports the destinations with a goal to increase the economic impact through tourism for all 95 counties in Tennessee.

What does day-to-day look like now that tourism is effectively shut down? Today, it looks very different. The hospitality and tourism industry is one of the most affected industries as a result of the shutdown. When thinking about the restaurants, hotels, and tourist attractions being closed or restricted, it is a lot. In Tennessee, tourism is without a doubt a significant economic driver. Today we are working on planning for recovery. What is the proper messaging? How do we keep travelers engaged when they can’t travel? We are doing our best to be in constant contact with tourism businesses and provide resources for their communities.

Have there been any unique or interesting stories come up during the lockdown? Tourism attractions and destinations are getting creative! Many are providing virtual experiences to engage their customer base and stay top of mind.

Were there any big campaigns or projects that had to be shelved or postponed due to the pandemic? For tourist development, we were in the final round of the Tennessee Songwriters Week initiative that we had to postpone. Early spring is when most people are planning summer travel. We have delayed marketing until we know people can travel again. Our partners have seen significant impact to their major events, festivals, and conferences as well, most of which are canceled or postponed.

How will the lockdown affect overall tourism in Tennessee? What will be hardest hit? Tennessee’s budget is a sales tax base, and tourism generates a huge amount of sales tax to the communities and the state. In 2018, our last indicator, tourism generated $1.8 billion in state and local taxes. March and April are spring break months, which makes the shutdown’s impact even more significant. Some small businesses may not recover. However, I believe the “drivers”— Nashville, Memphis, Chattanooga, Knoxville, and the Smokies— have been hit the hardest based on the number of job losses and closures during the shutdown. On the flip side, there will likely be a pent-up demand to get out of town after the shutdown. So, some might see an influx when we are back open.

What kinds of plans and promotions have you and your team come up with for after the lockdown? We are just now in recovery planning. We want to support the tourism businesses as best we can. We have a great marketing team that will have to get creative, because once the country reopens, travel will likely look different for a while. Tennessee is a drive market so that is a plus. Early research indicates travelers may skip flying for road trips, which could bode well for Tennessee. Will there be festivals, events, or concerts? Travelers may decide to skip the crowds and go outdoors.

What are the bright spots in Tennessee tourism that you are worried least about? Tennessee is so rich in natural assets and scenic beauty, and with the potential continuation of social distancing, I worry least about our outdoor destinations.

Do you see any long-term, permanent adjustments to operations that may come from this time of lockdown? It’s hard to say if it will be permanent, but I do believe travel is going to look very different. We’ll have to stay in tune with the trends once the country opens and adjust the messaging.

Anything else interesting to share? There is an experience in every community across the country. We often think of the big attractions as tourism, but it’s truly in every community—big or small. Most people don’t realize that the revenue generated from tourism, especially in Tennessee, pays for special services such as education, roads, and EMS. When the country reopens and it is safe to travel, plan a trip!

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O F F T H E ROAD BY E R I N BEAU R EG AR D , EPSILO N R H O—NEVADA, LAS V EGAS 201 9-2020 LEAD ER SH IP CONSU LTANT

The Alpha Delta Pi Leadership Consultants came off the road in March and quickly adjusted to a virtual chapter support model.

The Leadership Consultant (LC) position is a job like no other. Each day brings something new whether that be new friendships, new problems to solve, or new scenery around us. It is a job that many of us have dreamed about for years. This year, however, has turned out a little different than we had expected. As our job relies on the ability to travel from chapter to chapter, the COVID-19 pandemic has flipped our worlds upside down. Around mid-March, schools began closing left and right. At this point we were still on the road— some at schools that had already closed. No one had seen anything like this, and within a couple of days, uncertainty became a norm. In a time when the LCs were usually the ones with the answers, we had no answers at all. What does this mean for ADPi? Do we have to move out of our house? Can we still have formal? What about our seniors? All questions we didn’t have answers to. Throughout all of this uncertainty, we truly saw how much our chapter leaders care. They wanted nothing more than to make this transition as seamless as possible, and we wanted nothing more than to help them do that. While trying to navigate this with collegians, we were wondering similar things for ourselves. What do we do if the school we are at is closed? Are we going back to Executive Office? Is our job over? Thankfully, this was not the end of the consultant program. Within 48 hours, all 11 consultants were en route to our individual homes. The day we each flew home was full of many emotions. We were sad we couldn’t spend more time with the collegians, thankful the organization was taking measures to keep us and our chapters safe, uncertain of what our job would look like from home, and happy to see our families for the first time in a while. As we each settled home, we began to navigate what virtual Leadership Consultant life looked like. Kathleen Nicholson said it best: “When we got off the road, my first reaction was why me? I think many people whose lives have been interrupted

feel this way. But as we settled into virtual visits, I soon realized the core of my job was still intact— encouraging women. It was never about me getting to jet set or see new cities. It has been and always will be about serving the collegians.” While our new normal was not anything like before, it was also just the same. Executive Office staff worked diligently to put together a virtual schedule for us, and within a couple of days, we were back at it—connecting with collegians and navigating this crazy world with them. We still didn’t have all the answers, but we quickly learned that being a Leadership Consultant has nothing to do with having the answers. Answers can be found on Pride Online or in an email update. Our job during this time was more important than ever—to be a sounding board for creative ideas for virtual sisterhood events, to empower chapter leaders to be the best they can be in their roles, and to cheer sisters on—to tell them it’s ok to not be ok. It hasn’t been normal by any means, but we don’t grow in the comfort zone. Maybe this was the push we all needed to explore the potential of our leadership ability. Our work that relied 100% on being present with chapters turned virtual in just one week. Talk about adaptability! We are so much more capable than we ever imagined. So thank you for rolling with us; thank you for hopping on our virtual calls and working diligently to take our organization to the next level. I speak for all of the Leadership Consultants when I say we have been so immensely proud of our chapter leaders during this time as they do everything they can to make sure their chapters are on the right page and prepared to come back stronger than ever. Thank you for Being The First with us. We have learned so much this year, and although this chapter has come to a close for the 2019-2020 Leadership Consultant class, the book hasn’t ended. ADPi is forever.

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Planning Forward I N T IM E S OF U N C E RTAIN T Y

Ideas for Giving and Moving Forward in 2020 CARES Act The Alpha Delta Pi Foundation continues to move forward with the important work of helping our sisters. In the midst of all that is going on, we know that all of you are looking forward to the future when you can enjoy community with friends and resume your regular activities. In response to the current situation, Congress recently enacted several tax law changes. With the end of our giving year approaching on July 31, we would like to share with you some resources to help with your tax planning and to offer some ideas for you to consider if you are thinking about making a gift to the Foundation. The Annual Fund allows the Foundation the most flexibility to respond where the need is greatest to support our sisterhood. However, these opportunities apply no matter what area of support you choose. Make a gift online today at alphadeltapi.org/ Foundation/Donate.

This recently passed law includes several charitable tax provisions to encourage giving. These include: • A new deduction for charitable donors who do not itemize when filing their tax returns. If you do not itemize but make a gift to a charity, including the Alpha Delta Pi Foundation, you will be allowed to take a special tax deduction, up to $300, to reduce your tax liability. • An increase in the deduction limit up to 100% of a donor’s annual income for cash gifts (previously the deduction was capped at 60% of annual income). If you make a gift, you will be able to deduct more this year.

Donor Advised Funds If you have a Donor Advised Fund (DAF) and want to make a gift in support of our sisterhood, you can make a gift to the Alpha Delta Pi Foundation from your DAF without affecting your personal financial security. Learn more about Donor Advised Funds in the Spring 2020 Adelphean (p. 20).

Charitable Gift Annuities If you are concerned about your financial security given the ups and downs of the stock market, you may want to consider making a gift to fund a charitable gift annuity in support of the Alpha Delta Pi Foundation. You can make a cash gift or exchange your lower-performing stock or CDs, for guaranteed, lifetime fixed payments. If you make a gift of an appreciated asset, you will not have to pay capital gains when you fund the annuity. You may also benefit from a tax deduction this year, and a portion of your payments could be tax free. Learn more about Charitable Gift Annuities in the Fall 2014 Adelphean (p. 25).

SECURE Act In December, Congress passed the SECURE Act, limiting stretch payments to IRA beneficiaries to 10 years. If you planned to benefit your children with your IRA, your heirs will now pay higher taxes on the inheritance they receive from you. When you revisit your estate plan, consider funding a testamentary charitable remainder unitrust with your IRA balance. This plan can provide lifetime payments to your heirs and spread out the taxes on their inheritance.

To learn more about these options for charitable giving, please contact Jennifer Polley Webb, Executive Director of the Alpha Delta Pi Foundation, at jwebb@alphadeltapi.com or (404) 844-0637. These are specialized strategies that may or may not be appropriate for you. We recommend you seek the advice of your financial advisor to discuss the best strategies for your personal financial circumstances.

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CA N YOU IMAGINE… Being out of a job

Looking for work for six months And finally finding a job 1,200 miles away So you pack up your home Say goodbye to your friends and family And move to a different state to start anew Except the culture is toxic Your new boss is a nightmare Verbally abusive You ask HR for help But get laid off instead So you’re out of work Searching for a new job again Not yet eligible for unemployment

Although this sounds like it could be the plot of a movie, it’s the real story of an ADPi sister who was helped by a Clasped Hands Fund Grant this spring. COVID-19 has turned life as we know it on its head. It’s magnified the financial struggle for many of our friends, our neighbors, and our sisters. Since 1997, Clasped Hands Fund Grants from the Alpha Delta Pi Foundation have helped alumnae sisters in financial distress due to illness, divorce, house fires, job loss, and natural disasters. And many of the requests start the same way: I never thought I would be writing this letter. The Clasped Hands Fund is supported by individual donors, alumnae association contributions, and our annual fundraiser, Violets for My Sisters. Learn more about the Clasped Hands Fund and its collegiate partner the Abigail Davis Fund at alphadeltapi.org/foundation/emergencygrants or make a gift online at donate.alphadeltapi.org/chf (Clasped Hands Fund) or donate.alphadeltapi.org/adf (Abigail Davis Fund). And the message the sister who received a grant earlier this spring sends? “I am grateful. . . . This assistance gives me a new meaning of our motto, ‘We Live for Each Other.’ ”

Just as a global pandemic hits Can you imagine? THE ADELPHEAN | SPECIAL ISSUE MAY 2020

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Violets

A R E GOI N G VIRT UA L The Alpha Delta Pi Foundation’s annual Violets for My Sisters fundraiser is back and going virtual this year! Celebrating your ADPi sisters, friends, and family has never been easier. Starting on June 1, you can give a Violet on your phone, tablet, or computer in just a few clicks.

How does it work? 1. From June 1-30, 2020, visit violetsformysisters.org. 2. Use the Sister Search function to search for your sisters. You can search using their first and/or last name, chapter, or college/university name. You can also search some popular ADPi groups, including current Foundation Trustees, Grand Council, Leadership Consultants, International Officer teams, and headquarters staff. 3. During the process, you’ll be able to give more than one Violet to each person, add a new email address if one was not found in our database, or add a new name—maybe a friend or family member who isn’t an ADPi. 4. New this year: the Violet Leaderboard. When you are making your gift, please be sure to select an “Associated Chapter,” even if you aren’t a member. The number of Violets you gift will be added to that chapter’s total in the Chapter Standings, which will be updated and shared weekly.

Where does my gift go? Your gift supports the Clasped Hands Fund, which provides emergency assistance to alumnae in financial distress. Over the last five years, the Alpha Delta Pi Foundation has awarded an average of $49,000 per year to alumnae in need. Since the first grants were made 23 years ago, we’ve helped 174 sisters with more than $500,000 in aid.

What about the Violet stickers? For many years, Violets for My Sisters was an in-person event during Grand Convention. In 2001, the Violet appliques currently in use replaced a silk Violet tied to each attendee’s nametag. Violets were introduced to Leadership Seminar for the first time in 2006, and the fundraiser has continued during ADPi’s summer meeting each year since then. To ensure that 100% of your gift can continue to go directly to the Clasped Hands Fund, Violet notifications will go out only via email during the month-long fundraiser. No Violet stickers will be mailed this year.

What about International Officer Leadership Seminar? We know how much you love to bling out your summer conference nametag with Violets! They will be back for Grand Convention in 2021 at the Hilton Orlando Lake Buena Vista at Disney Springs in Orlando, Florida.

Can I make my Violets gift on Day of Giving? Because we’re going virtual this year, all Violets for My Sisters gifts need to be made directly through the violetsformysisters.org website during the June 1-30 fundraising event. We are grateful for your generous support of the Clasped Hands Fund during our most recent Day of Giving (May 15). We are preparing for an increase in applications for the Clasped Hands Fund in the coming months. Your gifts will help support our sisters and help us rise to meet those needs.

5. Your Violet recipients will receive an email notification that you’ve made a gift in their honor—and maybe be inspired to send some Violets of their own!

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Time to CELEBRATE!

Thank You, Sisters! On May 15, 2020, you supported the Foundation’s mission to educate, lead, and serve with a Day of Giving total of

$545,805!

If you missed it, visit alphadeltapi.org/foundation/donate to make your gift.


RECRUITMENT 2020 Recognizing that sorority recruitment could look very different on college campuses in fall 2020, the National Panhellenic Conference (NPC) organized a special Recruitment Contingencies Task Force (RCTF) to review options and provide guidance to college Panhellenics as they plan ahead. The RCTF included women from multiple NPC groups who serve as campus professionals, organization staff, volunteers, and RFM Specialists. The group concluded that NPC must immediately lay the groundwork to lead and to enable efforts to succeed, trumpeting to an unprecedented degree the shared message that sororities are an essential part of the college experience—regardless of how that experience is delivered—and removing barriers to recruiting and joining. They identified three key priorities for immediate consideration:

Adapt and Change to Survive Create certainty, eliminate barriers, and communicate our value so our collegiate members can continue to recruit women to sorority while physically distant, ensuring that we survive and thrive through this moment. This will involve legislative changes to policies and best practices by NPC, and adjustments to recruitment schedules and rules by College Panhellenics. Inter/national organizations should consider flexibility in internal policies that impede adaptability in this moment, for both members and chapters.

Marketing the Sorority Experience

Showcase the value of the sorority experience in a proactive and immediate manner, not just while physically together on campus but while socially distant and attending college virtually. To do so, the National Panhellenic Conference, all member organizations, and all College Panhellenic communities and chapters must work collectively and aggressively toward promoting the sorority experience at this time of physical distancing.

Growth in Membership Allow potential new members to join a sorority as soon as possible following parameters set by NPC and create maximum opportunities for growth in members through use of quota and total. Parity in size and outcomes may not be achievable in this moment, but we must strive to hold one another up and protect the sorority community. NPC must provide a greater level of recruitment support to College Panhellenics as they navigate the recruitment process. The NPC Council of Delegates met on May 7, 2020, and immediately adopted legislation to further these priorities and relax restrictions on the recruitment process. Alpha Delta Pi’s Recruitment and Marketing Directors and Panhellenic Relations Directors will work with collegiate officers to ensure chapters have full understanding of their options and are prepared for recruitment success.

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On Campus CENTRAL DISTRICT

Omicron—Duke

At the time of publication, the Omicron chapter reports that Duke is committed to having an inperson graduation ceremony at some point in the future but, in the meantime, has made plans to have a virtual celebration with physician-turned-actor Ken Jeong—who was set to deliver the commencement address. Despite not being able to be together physically, sisters of the Omicron chapter of ADPi found ways to stay connected virtually. The chapter president updated the chapter weekly with an email summarizing events and news. Seniors were recognized on social media channels, and the chapter hosted a virtual senior send-off ceremony. The Omicron sisterhood chair organized movie nights, Zoom meetups, and TikTok competitions to encourage sisters to stay in touch during the pandemic.

Beta Psi—Kentucky

At the University of Kentucky, classes moved online for both the spring 2020 and summer 2020 semesters. With social distancing measures in place, the Beta Psi chapter met virtually to view the chapter PowerPoint in place of in-person Monday night chapter meetings. The chapter recognized its beloved seniors through a variety of social media platforms. Beta Psi’s Instagram account, @ukadpi, posted stories throughout the quarantine that highlighted accomplished seniors, their plans for the future, and what they will miss the most about Beta Psi, as well as Alpha Delta Pi as a whole. To keep sisters informed and involved, Beta Psi posted several “throwback” posts that featured sisters at football games and philanthropy events, and celebrating with their Beta Psi families at Diamond Sister reveal. These posts kept sisters engaged in Beta Psi as they tagged one another in the comments and reminisced on their favorite Beta Psi memories from 2019. Beta Psi originally planned to host the second annual Donate for a Date philanthropy event in April 2020 but postponed the event until the fall due to the coronavirus. Price Dinner Club, the official caterer of the Beta Psi house, which houses over 50 sisters and feeds the chapter for weekly dinners, created Treat Yourself: the Unofficial Cookbook for ADPis, which featured fan favorite recipes sisters could attempt at home. The cookbook can be found at pricedinnerclub.com/treatyourself.

LINK

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The Beta Beta chapter at Tennessee, Chattanooga kept the chapter engaged with the 30 Days of Beta Beta social media campaign.


Epsilon Delta—Western Kentucky

The Epsilon Delta chapter at Western Kentucky held virtual meetings for executive committee and other teams through Zoom in order to make sure officers stayed connected. E-meeting minutes were then shared with the whole chapter. The chapter recognized its senior members virtually by highlighting them with “Senior Spotlight” or “Shining Sister” posts on social media channels. The posts shared accepted job offers, graduate school placements, service within their communities, and loving notes from other sisters thanking them for their impact. Some fun social media posts to engage both current chapter members as well as alumnae included ADPi bingo, First Photo Friday, Sis of the Week, daily GroupMe challenges, a TikTok competition, and Shining Sister posts.

Gamma Eta—Memphis

The University of Memphis transitioned to online learning and planned a virtual commencement ceremony for graduating seniors. They also explored possibilities for an in-person ceremony in late summer or early fall. The chapter held chapter, executive committee, and other committee meetings via Zoom. The Director of New Member Experience transitioned to online Alpha meetings and planned a virtual Diamond Sister reveal. On chapter social media channels, seniors were regularly highlighted. Members were invited to “send a senior some love” via Instagram stories Other social media efforts to keep sisters engaged included bingo, “tag a sis,” and supportive sister. The chapter also helped sisters transition to online learning by posting helpful tips.

Delta Phi—Missouri, Kansas City

In addition to holding virtual chapter, executive committee, and other committee meetings every other week, the Delta Phi chapter focused on supporting social distancing while providing constant communications between sisters through virtual settings. The chapter’s social media presence on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram was in high gear with a different theme each week for sisters to participate in, such as family, pets, travel, fitness, and throwbacks. The chapter took advantage of other platforms such as GroupMe and Zoom to maintain a sisterly bond. GroupMe was a place for quotes, TikToks, and other forms of love. On a more organized note, the chapter hosted Zoom prides. Whether it was discussing a “happy and crappy” of their week, meeting with different classes, learning how to make baked ziti, working out, or watching Netflix together, Zoom was utilized to support the chapter members. To honor graduating members, senior spotlights on social media were added to the regularly scheduled senior days. Overall, the chapter kept its spirits high and persevered together during challenging times.

Epsilon Phi—Eastern Kentucky

Once COVID-19 moved Eastern Kentucky University to online classes, the Epsilon Phi chapter worked to answer questions from members and potential members by modifying the options on its social media channels. Next, the chapter borrowed an idea from a local real estate group: chapter members held up signs with one word, which when combined together into a collage created a message of support for front-line workers. The graphic was accompanied by the caption “We are alone together. We do what we have to do to protect those women and men who are still working, not only in health care, but the doormen and delivery people, the Uber and taxi drivers, the cops and the MTA workers, grocery and pharmacy staff. We protect ourselves to protect you and those we love. We hope that everyone is staying healthy and cautious, as this will be over soon. #alonetogether.” For the high school seniors whose year was cut short, the Epsilon Phi chapter created a series of pictures welcoming these new first-year students to EKU. They wanted to show all the things these students could look forward to in the year ahead. Included in the social media campaign were the chapter’s favorite spots on campus as well as some really fun memories made by chapter members. For graduating chapter members, the chapter prepared a senior appreciation post recognizing the way these women impacted the chapter during their time on campus. Chapter members plan to attend a virtual graduation ceremony held by the university. They also celebrated seniors by having members say their final goodbyes via Instagram and Facebook stories where sisters had an opportunity to say what they’ll miss, whom they’ll miss, and how she (senior) impacted the chapter. These stories were saved under the “Seniors” icon @ekuadpi. The chapter participated in other social media campaigns, including an Educated Women campaign sponsored by the campus Panhellenic and WLFEO Wednesdays.

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Zeta Rho—Vanderbilt

The Epsilon Psi sisters at Tennessee Tech worked together to create this social media collage.

In these unprecedented times, Zeta Rho rallied around its sisterhood as an anchor for love, care, and support. The chapter’s main goal was to keep its current and alumnae sisters informed, supported, and engaged throughout the pandemic. Each week, the executive committee hosted a virtual meeting to work on achieving their goals. The chapter’s primary forms of engagement included social media and Zoom. In April, the chapter hosted a Zoom meeting to gather chapter members for a Senior Send-off event. The virtual event allowed seniors to reflect on their favorite memories with sisters as well as highlight special members who made an impact on their time at Zeta Rho. The chapter also recognized seniors with a “Senior Spotlight Week” with personalized Instagram stories that highlighted their future plans. To promote sisterhood, the chapter held virtual sisterhood meetups on Zoom and held other Zoom events such as a pet talent show and weekly workouts. “Who are you missing this #WLFEOWednesday!” the chapter asked on social media, and they also called on followers to “Tag a sister you’re grateful for!” Vice President of Operations Micayla took over the chapter Instagram to give a sushi-making demonstration. The sisters at Zeta Rho will continue to “live for each other” no matter where they are, and the chapter is incredibly thankful that everyone is safe and healthy at this time.

Zeta Xi—Virginia

The Zeta Xi chapter held a virtual philanthropy called Diamond Series: Pet Edition in place of its regular spring philanthropy Diamond Series event. Philanthropy participants paid $5 while sharing fun facts to enter their pet into the competition. Once entered, a picture was posted on the chapter’s philanthropy Instagram account, @uva_ adpi_diamondseries. The top two pictures that received the most likes by April 18 won gift cards to two local Charlottesville businesses. The gift cards were bought using the philanthropy budget to help support local businesses while UVA students are away from campus due to social distancing requirements. The virtual philanthropy ended with 71 entries and $4,340 raised for RMHC. Sisters also shared stories about the Charlottesville RMH on their Facebook pages to help get the word out that RMH needs help and to encourage people to donate.

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Theta Omicron—James Madison

Theta Omicron worked hard to stay connected during difficult times. Chapter officers created a Google document where sisters could share their addresses for a pen pal project. On Wednesdays, the chapter implemented WLFEO workouts, where a sister recorded a workout and hosted a Zoom conference. The chapter attempted online sisterhood events as well. Although the transition to online classes proved difficult, chapter members motivated one another to be successful and continued with Smart Cookie & Alphie Awards weekly. Graduating chapter members were featured on the chapter’s Instagram stories with a cute picture of them and positive/loving words written by chapter sisters. Other social media engagement efforts included “tag a sister you miss” and “comment some tips for working from home.”

THE ADELPHEAN | SPECIAL ISSUE MAY 2020


Eta Pi—Virginia Tech

The Eta Pi chapter at Virginia Tech held weekly executive committee meetings via Zoom, posted senior spotlights to recognize the graduating members on social media channels, and wrote senior speeches that were shared online. With all classes held virtually, the chapter used social media to allow members to post fun activities and showcase its strong sisterhood.

Theta Nu—Christopher Newport

Iota Beta—Campbell

Christopher Newport University shifted all in-person class online for much of the spring semester, so the Theta Nu chapter shifted its sisterhood virtually in this trying time, staying true to our motto “We Live for Each Other.” On social media channels, the chapter hosted its “Seven Days of Seniors” campaign, taking a week to highlight the graduating class through ways they have exhibited ADPi values as Delta members via posts, shoutouts, and memories from other sisters. Chapter members hosted Zoom events every day of the week—including fun events, baking classes, TikTok dance tutorials, yoga, and chapter-wide dinners—and moved executive board and chapter meetings onto the platform. The chapter’s internal Facebook page became a way for sisters to connect from afar, and chapter members posted daily, from Buzzfeed quizzes to “find out what movie character you are,” to the best study tip discovered and ideas on workspaces from home. Through these extra events and the tireless work of the Total Membership Experience team, Theta Nu sisters were able to stay engaged with each other and with Alpha Delta Pi.

During the pandemic, Iota Beta sisters from Campbell University made an effort to stay connected. The chapter conducted meetings via Zoom so they could still connect on Sunday nights and see the faces of sweet sisters. Events were unfortunately canceled, and this time was particularly hard on the chapter’s Alphas and seniors, as initiation had to be postponed and the seniors unexpectedly lost precious time together. As such, the chapter made concerted efforts to reach out to these targeted groups. The Sunshine Committee sent Alphas letters offering them words of encouragement. “I want the Alphas to know they are important and we will be here for them in the midst of uncertainty,” said Sunshine Committee leader Serenity Wiles. The chapter ran as normally as could be expected, with the executive committee meetings and regular meetings taking place on Zoom. This time was difficult for everyone, but Iota Beta made an effort to stick together through all of this and truly live by our motto, “We Live for Each Other.”

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On Campus NORTHERN DISTRICT

Xi—Ohio University

While many campus and chapter activities at Ohio University have been postponed, including commencement, Xi chapter continues to stay connected by holding virtual chapter meetings online through Microsoft Teams and allowing sisters the ability to screen share. Alumnae Relations Director Cat Sommer has incorporated creative ways to continue to send seniors the chapter’s appreciation, love, and support—just virtually instead of in person.

Pi—Iowa State

Officers at Pi have been working hard to keep the chapter as functional as possible and maintain a feeling of sisterhood. The Sisterhood Program Specialist created virtual sisterhood activities for the remainder of the semester, and the Recruitment Committee is holding workshops via video calls to stay on schedule to bring home the best Alphas in 2020. These sisters are spotlighting their graduating seniors and will recognize Ronald McDonald House Charities during national volunteer week.

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Rho­—Boston

The executive committee and board of Rho met virtually to discuss the chapter’s plan to handle the pandemic. They held a virtual chapter meeting, a variety of sisterhood events and “hangouts” on Zoom, and chapter Zoom movie nights using Netflix party so sisters can watch movies together. These sisters are keeping their Alphas engaged to show that ADPi is there for them during this time with Alpha education sessions via Zoom and a care package from the chapter to show love. Rho also started a Senior Spotlight once a week and creates Instagram stories and posts to keep them engaged and make them feel appreciated. Several Rho sisters are certified yoga instructors and have been live streaming sessions as sisterhood events.

Chi—Wittenberg

At Wittenberg, the mandate to leave school and stay at home for the remainder of the semester meant the inability to hold initiation for the amazing group of young women that had come home to ADPi during recruitment. “Although we were not able to initiate them, we as a sisterhood have never been stronger,” said Lauren Hurt, the chapter’s Vice President of Marketing. We are planning virtual sisterhood events as well as a pen pal system to keep sisters in touch with one another while we are not on campus. The executive committee has loved trying to find new ways to keep sisters close to each other, and they are excited for next fall to come so we are all together again.

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Alpha Epsilon—Nebraska

From virtual chapter and exec meetings to recruitment workshops via Zoom, the sisters of Alpha Epsilon are trying to stay engaged with each other. They also are hosting virtual sisterhood activities including workout classes, led by sisters, and Netflix watch parties, where they watch the movie together and chat throughout! The Director of New Member Experience and Diamond Sisters have been engaging with the Alphas frequently to help their new members continue to feel connected. Alpha Epsilon also is creating a video of memories with the seniors that can be shared just like a traditional senior send-off.

Alpha Beta—Iowa

The sisters of Alpha Beta are highlighting alumnae and chapter members who are working on the front lines of the pandemic. They are staying connected with a mix of Zoom and electronic chapter meetings, with sisters signing the minutes through a Google form and answering questions about important information from the minutes. Seniors are in the spotlight on Instagram, and plans are in the works to do senior wills over Zoom. Lots of Netflix parties and a pen pal system between sisters keep Alpha Betas connected, and they are virtually continuing their Food for Thought program where women can join in a safe space to discuss topics such as body positivity, toxic masculinity, cancel culture, and more. Alpha Beta alumna Grace Payden is an ER nurse at Vanderbilt Hospital in Nashville.

Alpha Pi—George Washington

Alpha Iota—Pittsburgh

Alpha Iota has been holding virtual chapter and executive board meetings—even virtual elections and their leadership transition workshop, as the university requires its chapters to function on a school-year election cycle. They are engaging the Alphas through various bonding activities, such as DIY face masks over Zoom, Netflix parties, and yoga classes. A virtual senior sendoff will allow chapter members to share favorite memories with a senior, and a certificate of thanks will be given to seniors for their dedication to the chapter. Alpha Iota sisters also held a virtual cooking class and plan more virtual yoga!

From weekly Zoom ADPilates to virtual chapter meetings and recruitment workshops, the sisters of Alpha Pi have found it easy to stay in touch virtually and support each other in many ways. Officers created a plan for the remaining part of spring semester and into summer that includes interactive quarantine graphics, a virtual Mallard Ball, virtual senior week, virtual diamond dates, virtual sister of the week, and a virtual philanthropy week. The Music Specialist created playlists with suggestions from sisters so they could connect through favorite songs, and the chapter’s ADPi baking club allows sisters to create a delicious new item each week.

Beta Eta—Michigan

Beta Eta is keeping their spring Alpha class engaged and involved in learning more about Alpha Delta Pi through attending virtual team meetings and online education sessions. The chapter’s seniors are being recognized through senior spotlight posts across social media as well as personalized letters from chapter sisters highlighting the impact they have made. As a special sisterhood event, Beta Eta is having a virtual yoga class with one of its sisters instructing the session!

Beta Alpha—Indiana

While Beta Alpha sisters are adjusting to a new learning style and extra time at home, their executive board is working to make sure sisters are staying connected as a chapter and hosting virtual meetings weekly. Alphas finished their remaining Alpha education sessions over Zoom; WLFEO Wednesday posts have continued each week; and the chapter coordinated a 30-minute video of sisters thanking seniors who had impacted them during their time in Alpha Delta Pi. They are inspired by their Director of Primary Recruitment, Emrie Ipsan, who has been juggling a full class schedule while working at a hospital during the pandemic.

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Beta Phi—Maryland

Beta Phi sisters are staying connected across the miles with biweekly chapter meetings through Zoom, Thursday night Zoom hangouts, and movie nights through the Netflix party web extension. The New Member Education team is supporting Alphas with online education sessions and a virtual big/little Diamond Sister. Sisters are staying engaged through social media with bingo boards, a quarantine Spotify playlist, sister shoutouts, and sharing quarantine activities. “We hope our sisters are reflecting on their past (and future) ADPi memories through our social media.”

Beta Theta—Manitoba

In Canada, our sisters at Beta Theta have had in-person classes suspended until at least September 1. They are keeping sisters engaged by holding Netflix parties, showcasing sisters’ crafts/hobbies, and having lots of FaceTime calls. Sisterhood activities include playing iMessage games and circulating Instagram story templates for sisters to fill out and connect with each other. They used creativity to continue to serve. “We kept the spirit of philanthropy alive by donating food to our local RMHC as we couldn’t go to cook as planned,” President Morgan Vandeynze said.

Delta Pi—Ripon

For the sisters of Delta Pi, moving everything online didn’t slow down any aspect of living for each other. They now have weekly chapter meetings on Zoom, weekly movie nights using Netflix party, and activities between Alphas and their big Diamond Sisters. These sisters also plan on celebrating their senior sisters during Senior Week, continuing senior spotlights on their Facebook page, and finding other creative ways to make them feel special.

Gamma Kappa—West Virginia Wesleyan

When Gamma Kappa learned their campus would be closed for the remainder of spring semester, the chapter make it their mission to honor Alphas and seniors. Pi Pals sent messages, gifts, and letters anonymously to remind them how special they have been to Gamma Kappa. Alphas’ Diamond Sisters have stayed in close contact with the new members, reminding them that the best is yet to come, and they look forward to initiation. Sisters are staying connected virtually through social media and Zoom calls. Some sisters are having movie nights or virtual coffee dates together just to catch up while being apart.

Gamma Omicron— Susquehanna

Delta Rho—Gettysburg

When Delta Rho had to cancel its biggest philanthropy event, Executive Chapter Advisor Christina DeGraft-Johnson, Beta Phi—Maryland, gave the chapter sisters another way to help others: participate in the Red Shoe Crew Fundraiser for RMHC Maryland. The chapter raised $2,860 from donors in addition to the $405 contributed from Delta Rho team members. In total, these sisters gave $3,265, a great way to continue to raise awareness and support for RMHC through virtual means. The chapter has been meeting weekly on Zoom to handle business and maintain close bonds through small discussion breakouts.

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Gamma Tau—Vermont

Like sisters nationwide, Gamma Tau has moved everything online for the remainder of the semester due to COVID-19. ”Despite not being on campus, we still have our weekly executive board meeting and our chapter meeting virtually,” said Director of Public Relations Carly Hurvitz. “We have found many ways to stay connected to our sisters: from virtual movie parties to our pen pal system! We cannot wait to be back on campus in the fall.”

THE ADELPHEAN | SPECIAL ISSUE MAY 2020

Alpha members at Gamma Omicron remain engaged with different sisterhood events to allow new members to form connections to sisters and sisterhood. Zoom chapter meetings occur once a week and include senior spotlights, recognizing each individual senior for the impact she has made on the chapter. The Vice President of Event Management implemented ADPen Pals, and the chapter’s social media outlets are involving sisters through fun and engaging posts including a 7-day Instagram Photo challenge.


Gamma Pi—Wagner

Gamma Pi’s leadership said they have “worked to ensure the strong core values of Alpha Delta Pi sisterhood in these unexpected times we are living in.“ All sisters have worked to make sure they stay connected by implementing themed Zoom chapter meetings with chapter members dressing up according to the theme. This has helped to provide an escape from reality each Monday evening and also give each sister something exciting to look forward to. Other activities include hosting virtual sisterhood dinners to stay in touch and keep each other entertained, highlighting seniors’ accomplishments through job offers, and cheering on alumnae sisters who are on the front lines saving lives. The positive energy and diligence of every member has made the greatest difference during this global issue.

Epsilon Mu—Northern Iowa

Epsilon Mu is wrapping up recruitment workshops online and looks forward to holding its final chapter meeting of the semester virtually, where they announce awards and highlight seniors members. The chapter’s Wellness Chair and her committee put together a wellness challenge. This innovative program encourages a number of steps sisters should take per week, Zoom workouts to do together, and other virtual sisterhood events. The winner of each week is decided based on points given and then announced to everyone to keep members connected and motivated to stay fit mentally and physically.

Zeta Theta—Illinois State

Chapter meetings via Zoom for Zeta Theta start off in small groups so sisters can easily talk to each other. These are led by a group leader asking about each sister’s week and discussing ways to improve the chapter during this time. Zeta Theta divided the chapter into phone tree groups at the beginning of fall semester and has found those coming in handy during the pandemic. Director of Philanthropy Gaby Goldman implemented a unique project she called 4K in a Day to raise money for RMHC during April with a goal of raising $4,000. Sisters paired up randomly as pen pals to get to know someone better, and Katie Vickrey put together a weekly Zoom Bible study for interested members.

Zeta Upsilon—Oakland

Since transitioning to online learning and sisterhood, Zeta Upsilon sisters have been keeping in touch more than ever with virtual Sunday chapter meetings and utilizing technology to video chat, participating in online sisterhood activities to continue spending quality time together. They hosted Netflix party movie nights and workout classes to ensure all sisters are staying healthy and active. Advisor Nicole Brown engaged the chapter with mental health checks, which has helped sisters be open about their feelings in this unfamiliar situation. Sisters have shared virtual success stories on topics including good study tips to help encourage sisters to stay motivated and recognizing sisters in the health care field for their hard work.

Eta Epsilon—Miami, Ohio

While graduation for the seniors at Eta Epsilon won’t occur as planned, sisters are looking forward to September 11-13 when the university will honor the Class of 2020. The special weekend will feature a formal graduation ceremony and celebration and the opportunity for the Class of 2020 to make the Miami M on the football field during the homecoming game. On social media they are posting Be the First highlights on the first of each month to highlight sisters who are the first to do something. Eta Epsilon is honoring sisters who treat patients and contribute resources to hospitals and other places in need due to COVID-19. Nursing major Natalee Bish (pictured) has been working on the front lines in hospitals to help treat patients; she has been an inspiration to her Eta Epsilon sisters during the pandemic.

Eta Lambda—Albright

Eta Lambda sisters adjusted to online classes and continued with executive and committee meetings virtually to keep in touch. The chapter is being creative to connect with Alphas, utilizing online lessons and sisterhood activities, sending shoutouts to their new members on social media, and hosting games to keep them educated about Alpha Delta Pi and its sisterhood. Seniors are being celebrated online with a video telling how much these members will be missed and highlighting what the soon-to-be alumna members are doing after graduation.

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Eta Eta—South Dakota School of Mines

For the sisters at Eta Eta, virtual chapter meetings are working to keep everything running as smoothly as possible. Most sisters really look forward to their “sharing circle” portion of the meeting where sisters can catch up on what everyone is doing to stay focused while staying at home! They call the Alphas their “diamonds in the rough” because these new members are keeping the chapter excited and engaged with Alpha Delta Pi. Eta Eta’s Vice President of Membership Experience created an ADPi bingo card of activities, and they moved their annual pancake breakfast, ADPiHop, to be a virtual fundraising event to continue support their RMHC.

Theta Theta—Quinnipiac

Virtual sisterhood events at Theta Theta have included everything from painting with sisters to kickboxing and workout classes. They are holding chapter meetings and recruitment workshops virtually, and the Public Relations assistant hosted a “Social Media For Dummies” workshop. Alpha meetings have transitioned online, and new member engagement continues through special activities via Zoom. Senior superlatives spotlight these special sisters and keep them engaged and appreciated, including Senior Sundays in early May on Instagram. The 4-Point Challenge allows sisters to fill in a blank template of the four points of our diamond, which keeps ritual close to their hearts.

Theta Rho—Sacred Heart

While the sisters of Theta Rho were sad to miss spring semester in‑person activities like Family Brunch, spring formal, and plans to honor seniors, they have stayed connected with virtual chapter meetings. Each executive officer has held virtual office hours to allow members to express comments or concerns or just to talk. Virtual sisterhood activities have been made possible with Club Penguin, TikTok, and more. Special virtual meetings were planned specifically for seniors, and the chapter is sharing seniors’ post-graduate plans on their social media platforms.

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Theta Delta—Delaware

A Pet Show & Tell for the sisters of Theta Delta—Delaware was a fun way to connect while the chapter stayed at home during stay-athome orders.


Alpha Pi chapter at The George Washington University developed fun and creative social media graphics and games to keep sisters engaged after the move to distance learning and virtual sisterhood.

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On Campus SOUTHERN DISTRICT

Kappa—Samford

During this uncertain and unconnected time, Kappa sisters made extra efforts to feel as close as possible. This included wellness checkups from executive committee members, the Wellness Specialist, and the wellness committee. It is important to the chapter to know that their sisters are safe and healthy, and calls to all 220 chapter women meant a lot to the sisterhood. The chapter started virtual recruitment practice which also allowed them to have sisterhood time. Sisters moved into breakout rooms on Zoom and shared their “Why ADPi” stories for others to hear and enjoy. The chapter’s Director of Public Relations started a weekly newsletter called the Kappa Chronicle to keep sisters connected and feature the latest about what is going on in Kappa chapter.

Epsilon—Tulane

Tulane moved all classes to an online platform for the rest of the semester, and the graduation ceremony has been postponed. Epsilon chapter held virtual Zoom chapter meetings as well as Zoom sisterhood events and even Zoom formal. They hosted sisterhood online lunches, where each sister can log into the video chat and bring their own lunch to remain connected. The chapter recognized graduating seniors by continuing with “senior sendoffs” over Zoom—sisters received their sendoffs as if they were on campus.

Omega—Louisiana State

In response to the transition to virtual sisterhood, Omega chapter’s vice president of finance Lindsey Mumey made videos to boost morale and help Omega members understand more about their finances, and it became a hit among the entire Southern District. Longer videos created a series that included detail about the budget and how members’ accounts were affected by COVID-19. Shorter TikTok videos shared ways for sisters to save money and make finance fun.

Beta Nu—Georgia

Beta Nu sisters were disappointed to leave Athens for the remainder of the spring semester; however, they are happy to have time to spend with their loved ones and are excited for returning together for the fall semester. The chapter stayed in touch with online chapter meetings and regular Zoom calls. The Digital Marketing Specialist made a special effort to keep sisters positive and recognize the love they all have for their graduating seniors.

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Iota chapter’s executive committee at Florida State reminded sisters that despite being so far from each other, there are endless opportunities to bond.


Zeta Delta—Montevallo

Montevallo continued online classes through spring and summer semesters and plans to return to in-person learning in the fall. Zeta Delta chapter is holding online Zoom chapter meetings and paper chapter meetings to stay connected. The chapter recognized seniors with senior spotlights on Instagram and social media profiles. Sisters create TikTok videos and recently recorded a World Health Day video to stay involved. The chapter sent videos thanking health heroes on the front lines of COVID-19.

Beta Sigma—Mercer

As students at Mercer transitioned to online classes this spring, sisters from Beta Sigma remained in touch and connected through Zoom executive committee meetings and Facebook chapter slideshows. Beta Sigma recognized their graduating seniors, whose commencement was postponed to August 2020, by holding a virtual senior week, using the chapter’s social media and individual profiles to recognize accomplishments. TikTok dance parties, Netflix watch parties, and a Facebook philanthropy event proved to be great alternatives to traditional in‑person events to help the chapter remain connected and fill its social calendar.

Epsilon Pi—Georgia Southern

Gamma Iota—Florida

Sisters at Gamma Iota transitioned to online classes for the remainder of the spring semester, and commencement was postponed until late summer. Members remained focused on keeping as many chapter functions on the calendar as possible and held chapter, executive committee, and executive board meetings via Zoom. They’ve transitioned much of their activities to social media, adopting multiple social media handles for different purposes: @adpiufwellness, a special channel for chapter sisters and alumnae, was created to promote posts about fitness, food recipes, devotionals, and personal testimonies devoted to mental and physical health during social distancing and in response to COVID-19. The chapter found ways to recognize their graduating seniors by making video testimonials, giving virtual violets, and hosting virtual senior week to recognize their sisters’ accomplishments.

Epsilon Eta—Mississippi State University

Sisters at Epsilon Eta chapter remained in close contact through Zoom calls, interactive Instagram stories, and sharing a “day in the life of quarantine,” where sisters documented their daily lives and shared it to feel part of each other’s activities. The chapter remained focused by virtually preparing for fall primary recruitment, holding virtual candlelight ceremonies, and ensuring their graduating seniors felt loved and recognized for their contributions to Epsilon Eta and accomplishments on campus.

Georgia Southern handled the transition to online classes very well; instructors and other resources have been very accessible to all students. Epsilon Pi chapter held weekly chapter meetings on Zoom in addition to Zoom meetings with the executive committee and all officers. Social media accounts were constantly updated with fun things to keep sisters active and connected through social media. In the upcoming months, the chapter plans to post recruitment graphics, ADPi bingo, and ‘this or that’ surveys to their story. Sisters highlighted seniors on all social media platforms as a way to showcase their accomplishments and stay connected with senior sisters as they embarked on new chapters of their lives.

“IT IS SO BENEFICIAL TO BE ABLE TO SEE OUR SISTERS AND CREATE AN INTIMATE SETTING EVEN IF IT IS THROUGH A COMPUTER SCREEN.” KAMERON KEEL, EPSILON ETA

Epsilon Omega—Jacksonville

With all students attending virtual learning and all employees working remotely at Jacksonville, the sisters of Epsilon Omega adjusted quickly. The chapter held their executive committee meetings via Zoom, used Instagram for Alpha Delta Pi Bingo, and sent all sisters virtual Starbucks gift cards and virtual violets to share special moments and give support to sisters. The chapter celebrated their seniors—graduation was moved to homecoming weekend in the fall—through a virtual slideshow sharing happy times with their senior sisters.

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Zeta Nu—Clemson

During this time of change and uncertainty, Zeta Nu worked hard to keep chapter operations moving as normally as possible. After Spring Break, Clemson decided to move classes online for the rest of the spring semester and the summer term. Zeta Nu’s goal as a chapter is to return to Clemson in the fall in a better place than they would’ve been if they’d finished the semester together on campus. Each week, the executive committee met via Zoom to problem-solve, provide team updates, and brainstorm new ways to engage the chapter virtually. The chapter stayed connected in many fun ways. Two sisters who are F45 instructors on campus filmed and shared virtual workouts for members to do on their own. The Sisterhood Engagement Specialists hand-wrote cards with words of encouragement to every member of the chapter—all 263!

Zeta Sigma’s Instagram features sisters’ real-life quarantine away from the College of Charleston, which means lots of photoshoots and puppies, of course.

“IT’S LITTLE THINGS THAT MEAN THE MOST IN A TIME LIKE THIS, AND WE ARE SO PROUD OF ALL THE WAYS THAT OUR OFFICERS AND MEMBERS ARE STEPPING UP TO CHECK IN ON EACH OTHER AND STAY IN TOUCH EVEN WHEN WE ARE NOT TOGETHER. DISTANCE HAS NOTHING ON ZETA NU!”

KENDALL GOEDEKE ZETA NU CHAPTER PRESIDENT

Zeta Omega—Central Florida

During a time of so much uncertainty, Zeta Omega chapter was dedicated to focusing on the light. The chapter held virtual executive, chapter, and committee meetings through Zoom and connected with each other on social media in a big way. Throughout their time away from campus, they posted “Senior Spotlights” to the @ucf_adpi Instagram story. Submitted by sisters, these posts highlighted the seniors in a few sentences, describing how proud sisters are of what they’ve accomplished during their time in ADPi and how much they’ll be missed. Sisters utilized Instagram stories for fun engagement activities like Foodie Fridays, Workout Wednesdays, and Sister Instagram Takeovers to share how sisters spent their days in lockdown.

Eta Phi chapter at Furman kept positive morale through posts that reminded us of the strength of sisterhood.

Eta Xi—Presbyterian

At the end of March, the Presbyterian administration moved all classes to an online format for the remainder of the spring semester. Eta Xi worked hard to maintain a normal schedule and routine for the sisters as much as possible. They continued to have virtual chapter meetings on a weekly basis, and the executive team and their committees continued to hold weekly or biweekly team meetings. The recruitment team worked with chapter members to host small Zoom meetings to practice conversation skills and other recruitment mechanics in a virtual setting. Sisters recognized seniors through social media to congratulate them on their many accomplishments at Presbyterian and in ADPi. A traditional in-person sisterhood activity is a weekly Lunch with the Lions, when all sisters join together in the campus dining hall for lunch. Sisters continued to do this virtually every week via Zoom to stay connected in an informal setting.

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Zeta Tau chapter at Winthrop held virtual chapter meetings and virtual violets.

“WE ARE ABLE TO KEEP ONE THING CONSISTENT AMONGST ALL OF THE INCONSISTENCY: SISTERHOOD AND LIVING FOR EACH OTHER, NO MATTER WHAT.” GRACEN PRICE, ETA XI CHAPTER


Theta Chi—Charleston Southern

During this time where classes and graduation have all been moved to virtual spaces, Theta Chi learned that sisterhood is more important than ever. Sisters learned creative new ways to keep their sisterhood healthy and alive during the COVID-19 crisis. The executive committee and officers held virtual committee and chapter meetings to keep sisters involved and focused on moving forward. The Vice President of Membership Experience and her team planned amazing virtual sisterhood events such as lunch/coffee dates during the week and Netflix watch parties in the evenings. Theta Chi also made great efforts to celebrate their sisters who graduated this term by holding a virtual senior send‑off, highlighting seniors through social media, and sending them personalized gifts.

Theta Beta—Coastal Carolina

Coastal Carolina finished the semester through distance learning methods. Luckily, the university had remote instruction plans in place due to years of hurricane preparation, making transition quite seamless. Theta Beta chapter made it possible for sisters to stay connected with the chapter with Zoom chapter meetings, Alpha class check-ins, and executive board meetings. The chapter engaged seniors and recognized them with senior send-offs through Zoom and social media highlights. Theta Beta is very excited to prepare for fall recruitment, and the 2019 Alpha class plans to hold a Zoom workshop to learn recruitment from the chapter side.

Theta Kappa—Florida Atlantic

Florida Atlantic University moved all classes online for the remainder of the spring semester and did not hold spring commencement ceremonies. Theta Kappa held all chapter and committee meetings virtually. In order to keep sisters involved, they kept social media active, especially via Instagram stories. An FAU ADPi bingo card was uploaded to Instagram as a fun activity for sisters to share. Members participated in the FAU Panhellenic #panhealthy workout initiative and joined a Panhellenic Netflix watch party.

Theta Psi—Rollins

After Rollins closed campus due to COVID-19, Theta Psi sisters were unable to attend four RMH Share-AMeals and were not able to hold the taco-themed philanthropy event they had planned. The chapter decided instead to hold a virtual philanthropy event via CrowdChange with a goal of raising $2,500 in ten days. The donations from the event benefitted RMHC Central Florida and the RMHC Endowment. The chapter advertised on social media by posting on Instagram, Snapchat, Facebook, and Twitter.

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On Campus WESTERN DISTRICT

Delta—Texas

As the University of Texas transitioned to be fully online during the spring semester, members of Delta chapter remained in touch by hosting Zoom chapter meetings and smaller virtual group meetings and having fun with contests and social media challenges. Sisters studied, chatted at virtual Pride coffee events throughout the week, and gathered for weekly Zoom Bible study groups. Despite the challenges, members were grateful to have their sisters for support as they adjusted to new circumstances.

Alpha Eta—Kansas State

Members of Alpha Eta chapter adjusted to having classes via Zoom, Mediasite, YouTube, and other media-sharing platforms as Kansas State University moved to an A/Pass/Fail grading system. University students had the option to decide which grading system would be best for each class. Chapter members used a variety of virtual media to keep in touch. The executive committee made an informational video to keep sisters in the loop about chapter operations.

Theta Gamma—Sonoma State

Sonoma State University made all classes online in the spring semester, although it provided on‑campus housing and meals to some students. Theta Gamma chapter maintained online chapter meetings to give sisters updates and encouragement, while the executive board met via Zoom to plan the fall semester. The Vice President of Event Management recognized seniors by making a video montage, highlighting each senior and her post-graduation plans. Additionally, the Vice President of Membership Experience made and sent care packages to sisters in place of the chapter’s spring retreat.

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Tau—Kansas

After the University of Kansas pursued online learning in the spring semester, Tau chapter adapted its approach to member engagement. The executive committee met virtually on a weekly basis to catch up, provide project statuses, and collaborate to determine the best ways serve chapter women. The 11 uninitiated Alpha members worked with the Director of New Member Experience to complete virtual Alpha education sessions. Many sisters participated in a chapter-sponsored pen pal exchange, where members sent letters and small gifts to an assigned pen pal, while all members received cards of encouragement to boost morale. Sisters also encouraged academic achievement through an accountability partner program, where women with similar majors were paired up and checked in with one another periodically to make sure every woman was on track. Seniors were honored with a special surprise in the mail and senior superlatives during Senior Week in April. Virtual Pride groups, like a Workout Pride, and sisterhood events, including Netflix movie nights on Friday, kept Tau chapter sisters connected.

Iota Alpha—Texas, San Antonio

Iota Alpha chapter held business and team meetings through Zoom and virtually hosted a variety of weekly activities. To retain a sense of normalcy, chapter meetings continued on their regular schedule; following each meeting, the Vice President of Event Management held a Netflix watch party. Movies were selected by a poll. Sisters participated in a pen pal exchange. The Vice President of Marketing kept members engaged on social media through trendy Instagram story challenges. Content was then organized by the chapter’s Digital Media Specialist for use on the chapter’s feed. The Vice President of Membership Experience organized Instagram accounts dedicated to seniors, whereby chapter sisters shared memories on a weekly basis. Seniors also received a care package, including an Alpha Delta Pi stole and gifts from the chapter.

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Theta Phi—Louisiana, Lafayette

The University of Louisiana, Lafayette moved to distance learning during the spring semester. The university helped students by offering multiple academic resources through online meetings and emails. Students were able to opt into a Pass/Fail system. During this time, Theta Phi chapter kept Alpha members involved in virtual meetings, weekly Zoom challenges, and events with Diamond Sisters to strengthen their bonds. Women made a video for seniors—filled with memories from their time in the chapter—as well as interactive Instagram stories where they tagged seniors who supported and inspired them. To keep all sisters engaged, the chapter’s Digital Media Specialist created a “Tag a Sister Who . . .” program to foster a sense of long-distance sisterhood. Virtual sisterhood events ranged from Netflix parties to Zoom meetings where sisters played games and stayed connected, while virtual study sessions provided a support system for sisters.

Dallas Alumnae Association

The Dallas Alumnae Association, which has several sisters who work in the fields of education and health care, assisted area nonprofits and agencies during the COVID-19 pandemic. The association donated $500 to the Ronald McDonald House of Dallas to pay for a meal catered into the house and $500 to The Family Place, an agency that assists victims of domestic violence. Paige Flink, Alpha Kappa—Tennessee, is the CEO of The Family Place. A $500 donation was made to Community Partners of Dallas, a nonprofit that provides safe housing and counseling to empower victims of family violence; Paige McDaniel, Zeta—Southwestern, is its CEO. Left: Anjie Coplin, Alpha Zeta—Southern Methodist, a member of the Dallas Alumnae Association, delivered 500 N95 respirator masks to the local hospital system, Baylor Scott & White Health. Anjie is the Director of Corporate Communications & Events at Michaels Stores.

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Ronald McDonald House Charities R EMA I N S C OM M IT T ED As an organization on the front lines of health care, Ronald McDonald House Charities has responded to the COVID-19 pandemic with the care and commitment they are known for worldwide.

Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC) remains committed to providing clean and healthy family-centered spaces for families to rest, recharge, and connect with one another around the world. The health and well-being of their guest families, staff, and the communities in which they serve continues to be their first priority. RMHC remains focused on their core mission of providing overnight accommodations, meals, and support for the families currently staying at Ronald McDonald

House programs. In addition, they’re working with hospital partners to temporarily repurpose RMHC in-hospital program spaces to provide places of respite for health care professionals who are tirelessly working the front lines of this pandemic. RMHC continues to monitor the evolving COVID-19 situation and follow the guidance and recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the World Health Organization (WHO), local State Departments, local hospital partners and Health Ministries.

What you can do to help As an organization that relies on over 580,000 volunteers and millions of donors just like you to help deliver their mission, many RMHC Chapters are experiencing implications to volunteer programs and have had to cancel fundraising events. RMHC has established the Chapter Emergency Response Fund to help RMHC Chapters experiencing severe financial hardship. Donations also help provide necessary personal protective equipment (PPE) to RMHC Chapters and community partners in the 65 countries and regions they serve.

THE ADELPHEAN | SPECIAL ISSUE MAY 2020

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ARCHIVES

History Repeats Itself The 2020 coronavirus pandemic is not the first of its kind. Widespread influenza caused similar reactions and shutdowns of college campuses and Alpha Delta Pi chapters in 1918 and 1919. These excerpts from Adelpheans of that time offer a glimpse into how our members reacted and show remarkable similarities to spring 2020.

College Women and Today’s Public Health Problem: A Message from the United States Public Health Service to Sorority Women of America. Published in the April 1920 issue of The Adelphean. The fall of 1918 found the world’s stage set for a drama of real life, swift in action, spectacular in effect, gripping the imagination. The world was witnessing the close of the most frightful war in history. The nations were soul-weary, every ounce of energy had been spent in supporting the armies in the field, and in keeping up their morale and that of the people at home. Human life had been ruthlessly sacrificed, millions had fallen during those four years of war. Then, on the eve of victory, as if to complete the destruction which men had begun, disease came, spreading with appalling rapidity through Europe and America, carrying sickness and death to the farthest corners of two continents. To combat the influenza epidemic in America, all the medical and nursing forces of the nation were mobilized under the direction of the various public health agencies. Congress appropriated $1,000,000 to enable the United States Public Health Service to help the states conduct their campaign against this plague. Emergency hospitals were opened, corps of visiting nurses were organized. Laboratory studies of the disease were made and methods of treatment perfected. The attention of the entire nation was devoted to combating this deadly enemy—disease. “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” is an old adage and a true one. The economic waste caused by an epidemic such as that of influenza, from the point of view of time, money, human lives, and human happiness more than justifes the expense and time spent in discovering and applying methods of prevention and cure. Public health activities are chiefly concerned with keeping people well. To do this effectively, investigations are made of the sources of diseases and their method of spreading. Methods of prevention and cure are studied and applied. Laws and ordinances are passed, making contagious diseases reportable, and insisting upon their quarantine. The public is told what diseases are infections, how they are transmitted and how they may be avoided.

The following chapter reports were published in the January 1919 issue of The Adelphean. Pi—Iowa State We spent a very unusual weekend as our dean decided on Friday afternoon to quarantine the girls as well as the boys as there are about 200 cases of Spanish influenza here. Sunday was a wonderful day, just the kind that suggests a picnic, so we found it rather hard to stay within the boundaries of our small lawn.

Sigma—Illinois All university activities were suspended during the influenza epidemic. The shows, concerts, and dances were all called off until after the middle of November. During the quarantine most of the university girls “got jobs” and went to work to make money for Liberty Bonds and the United WarWork Fund.

Upsilon—Washington State Within a week things began to happen rather thick and fast, all our schedules had to be changed, the first few cases of influenza arrived on the campus, and compulsory vaccination for smallpox was enforced. It was the flu, however, that spoiled everything. Two of the girls were sick, the rest of us had the dumps at times, our house went into quarantine for a few days, and then the college was quarantined. For nearly five weeks the campus was guarded day and night to keep the students off and the SATC men on. Conditions were so disheartening that our housemother and half the girls returned to their homes for the remainder of the quarter. But we who are left are doing quite well under the circumstances.

Alpha Alpha—Colorado For five long weeks the university has been closed because of the serious influenza epidemic. Today we are attending college for the first time since October 6. Many of our girls went home for the vacation; only a few remained in Boulder. Our first questions today are, “What did you do to keep busy during these five long weeks?” and “Have you all been studying, girls?” Nearly all reply that they have been having a glorious time knitting sweaters, socks, and wristlets. Oh how happy we are to be united again, and to be able to bind more closely to us the ties of friendship with our new pledges!

Alpha Beta—Iowa Life, however, is not becoming a bed of roses immediately, for the “flu” quarantine is to go into effect again tomorrow. During the first wave of the influenza, our university was very fortunate, as compared to many other schools, in having so many hospitals, doctors, and nurses that the epidemic was soon checked. Four of our girls were unfortunate enough to have to spend several weeks in Currier Hall, the girls’ dormitory, one wing of which was turned into a hospital for university girls; the rest of us tried to do our bit by waiting on the girls and relieving the nurses in every way possible. We only hope that the medical authorities will be even more efficient during this second “wave.”

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The Adelphean of Alpha Delta Pi - Special COVID-19 Issue, May 2020  

The Adelphean of Alpha Delta Pi - Special COVID-19 Issue, May 2020  

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