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Interview with Gena Kotlarova, a 20-year-old Ukrainian student, on an Erasmus scholarship at the Jagiellonian University for International Relations, and with Roman Kozhuszko, a 20-year-old Ukrainian student, on an Erasmus scholarship at the Jagiellonian University for International Management □ “What made you come to Poland?”

Małgorzata Sypniewska

■ Gena: “Originally I wanted to go to a Czech university. Fate decided I would go to Kraków. I visited the Jagiellonian University’s stand during a presentation of universities at an educational fair. I became interested in studying at the Jagiellonian University, as I like history, and this is where Nicolaus Copernicus and Pope John Paul II were students. So I signed a contract and came to see Kraków for myself. I’ve left my heart and soul in Kraków.” ■ Roman: “With me there were at least two reasons. Learning Polish was much easier than learning English. I visited Kraków in winter and liked it very much. I’d never seen such a New Year’s Eve party before!” ■ Gena: “In comparison with other countries, studying here is cheaper.” ■ Roman: “And much better compared with Ukraine.” □ “Do you have a lot of Polish friends?” ■ Gena: “Yes, my best friend’s Polish. He treats women in a splendid way. He’s a real gentleman and a very good person, all heart and soul. If ever I needed any help I know I could always rely on him.”

Gena and Romek: bewitched by Kraków

Interview with Nina, a 20-year-old Greek student, on an Erasmus scholarship at the Jagiellonian University for Psychology □ “What are your impressions of Poland? Did you see Kraków before you decided to do your student exchange here?”

□ “What do you think of your students’ hall?”

■ “No, I’d never been to Poland before. On the whole, in Greece we don’t know much about Poland. But my impressions are absolutely fantastic!”

■ “I’ve been living there since my first semester and there have been no major problems. It’s really good.”

□ “Have you noticed any cultural differences between Polish people and Greeks?”

□ “How do you rate your tutors?”

■ “Yes, Greeks are more open and sympathetic in personal relations. But it’s not a question of comparing and saying who’s better and who’s worse. We’re just different. Not that that there aren’t any people in Greece who aren’t so warm-hearted and friendly, there are. No-one in Poland has refused to help me when I needed help. I’ve got a lot of Polish friends and they’re really nice people.”

■ “They conduct classes very well. They have a clear programme. I’ve learned a lot.”

Interviews by Małgorzata Sypniewska

Nina: open to cultural variety

Second-year student of part-time second-cycle Editorial Studies

alma mater No. 166

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Profile for alma mater

Alma mater 166  

Alma Mater 166

Alma mater 166  

Alma Mater 166

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