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that the Museum received rooms in the house of the Kraków Medical Society at Number 4 on the Radziwiłłowska, and could open its collection to the public. Exhibits include old printed works, manuscripts, documents, medals, and portraits. Special features include a large set of historic surgical instruments, a set of plaster-casts that originally came from Professor Ludwik Bierkowski’s pathological anatomy collection, and a set of medical case histories from Professor Maciej Brodowicz’s 19th-century clinic. A curiosity which never fails to intrigue visitors is the world’s biggest surviving museum specimen of plica Polonica (Polish plait).

Part of the JU Zoology Museum’s butterfly collection

of collectors and animal lovers. The Zoology Museum will soon be moving to new premises in the Centre for Environmental Education (CEE) on the University’s new campus, where it is due to open in March 2015. Four of the University’s Museums, Zoology, Geology, Anthropology, and Palaeobotany, will be accommodated in the CEE building. The new arrangement of these resources augmented by today’s audio-visual technology will offer a broad scope for teaching and research, and help to promote the natural and biological sciences to its visitors. The skeleton of a female woolly rhinoceros (Coelodonta antiquitatis) in the JU Zoology Museum. It was discovered around 1900 near Prague and is the earliest complete specimen of its kind, of which there are very few in the world

Tadeusz Duda

The history of the Zoology Museum goes back to 1782, when a natural history exhibition was opened at Number 6 on ulica św. Anny. In 1967 – after 167 years in the same rooms – it moved to the building at Number 6 on ulica Romana Ingardena, its present location. The display consists of about 7,000 items representing animals from most of the systematic groups, from the coelenterata to the mammals. The exhibition’s nature as a cross-section presentation makes it an excellent supplement to school and college biology classes. The Zoology Museum has a second facility in the historic basement of the Collegium Iuridicum building at Number 53 on the Grodzka, comprising collections donated by Bolesław Rączka, Roman and Janusz Wojtusiak, Tomasz Pyrcz, Jerzy Małecki, and Radosław Tarkowski. The display, consisting of spectacular shells, fossils, and tropical butterflies, is a favourite with children, but it also attracts the attention

Tadeusz Duda

THE ZOOLOGY MUSEUM

THE BOTANICAL GARDEN MUSEUM The Jagiellonian University’s Botanical Garden Museum and the Jadwiga Dyakowska Workshop for the History of Botany hold Poland’s oldest botanical museum collection. This resource is inherently bound to the University’s scientific and teaching activities, and it is located in the Collegium Śniadeckiego building at Number 27 on ulica Kopernika. The historic nature of the collection, which includes materials for research on the classics of Polish botany, and the building’s elegant period interior decoration endow this Museum with a special atmosphere. The collection dates back to around 1780, when exhibits started to accumulate for a natural history display which, together with the Botanical Garden, served as a supplementary unit of the Chair of Chemistry and Natural History. In the early 19th century its plant specimens were moved to separate premises in the Botanical Garden, and systematically expanded with new accessions throughout the 19th and 20th century.

alma mater No. 166

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Alma mater 166  

Alma Mater 166

Alma mater 166  

Alma Mater 166

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