Issuu on Google+

PUTTING GREEN BACK IN YOUR WALLET BARK PUBLIC RELATIONS


Introduction o

Introduction of financial literacy program in 2002

o

Expanded financial literacy program

o

Community Reinvestment Act credit

o

New innovative educational financial literacy program

o

Hopes for expansion

o

Further Outreach

o

Brand awareness and enhanced corporate reputation


Research and Background o o o o

o

o o

o o

Students’ learning habits How students spend their money Other financial literacy programs Need for financial literacy programs Opportunities for a financial literacy program Ties with the culture and mission How a program could improve literacy among targeted publics How Ally can stand out Primary Research: Survey Monkey distributed to students 19-24

o

o

o

o o

o o

Used surveys and scholarly sources to determine design and need for the program Considered the public’s views of Ally and financial institutions Perceived need for literacy information to be dispersed Channels to use Messages that resonate with this public Determined the literacy IQ Considered financial goals and problems


Core Opportunity o

Targeting college-age individuals

o

Campaign launched to promote new web-based tutorials and events

o

Social Media

o

Capitalizing on the fact that the need for financial education has never been greater

o

Ally has the opportunity to reach out and be the number one provider of this type of information for consumers.

o

Basic financial education is important

o

Ally’s new program offers easy access to resources in need

o

Innovative proposal


Projected Outcome o

AllyU public relations initiative

o

Focus on college students

o

AllyU will catapult an interactive, web-based tutorial on how college students can pay off their debts and be smart with money.

o

Social events

o

Creative marketing

o

Strategic partnerships


Goal Leverage Ally’s existing financial literacy curriculum into a new initiative focusing on lowto-moderate income individuals.


Publics Key Publics College-Age Individuals Ages 17-25 Low-to-moderate income communities Need for financial literacy education


Objectives o

To build consumer awareness of Ally’s new financial literacy initiative with the participation of at least 1,000 students from each of the 12 targeted schools.

o

To initiate a nationwide web-based financial education platform about the importance of being knowledgeable of money management techniques in this day-and-age with the support of at least 2,000 consumers by January 2012.

o

Provide target consumers with the financial literacy tools needed to assist in making smart and educated personal finance decisions by the time they graduate college.

o

Highlight Ally Financial’s social responsibility efforts to improve financial literacy in the U.S. and showcase the brand as a good corporate citizen by 2010 as rated by The Wall Street Journal.


Key Messages

o

The need for financial education has never been greater, as the United States is emerging from the credit crisis and consumers are facing damaged credit, job loss, foreclosures and bankruptcy.

o

Whether buying a home, balancing a checkbook, or purchasing a vehicle, consumers should understand the basics of personal finance.

o

o

Buying a home or car, researching insurance, managing a budget and credit and choosing banking and savings products that are right for you can be complex, but with a little extra effort, many resources exist that can help consumers become well-versed in these areas. Ally Financial Inc. cares about the financial education of U.S consumers and is launching this initiative in support of low-to-moderate income individuals.


Strategies

o

Framing the campaign around social media, deliverables, and online platforms

o

Leveraging partnerships with other providers of financial literacy education information

o

Capitalizing on the previous efforts of Ally and improving and updating the ways of outreach


Tactics

o o o o o o o

o

Media kits and press releases to school publications/magazines Create banner ads to be used for online advertising Online financial literacy series Social Media (Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare, ScanLife) AllyU Tailgates Partnering with orientation programs Host four monthly webinars that engage AllyU “students� and teaches them about financial literacy AllyU Diploma


Implementation

o o o o

AllyU Tailgate AllyU Giveaways Orientation partnership AllyU Website


Creative Elements


Creative Elements


AllyU College Tour

AllyU Tailgate Stops: 1. University of Michigan 2. University of Notre Dame 3. Ohio State University 4. University of Nebraska 5. University of Oregon 6. University of S. California 7. University of Texas - Austin 8. Louisiana State University 9. University of Miami 10. University of S. Carolina 11. University of Maryland 12. West Virginia University


Calendar


Budget

Printings: $30,000 New Corporate Financial Literacy Team: $560,000 (10 staff members; $56,000 each) AllyU.com Web site design with flash: $3,500 Tutorial Recording: $1,600 (four months) Partnerships: $500,000 AllyU Tailgate Events: $263,000 (events at twelve universities) Travel Costs: $71,500 (includes Winnebago and gas) Miscellaneous: $70,400 Total: $1.5 million


Evaluation

o

Follow-up Surveys

o

Evaluate databases and online traffic

o

Media analysis

o

Focus on grassroots channels to reach target audience

o

Environmental scan of current channels being used

o

Post-environmental scan

o

Environmental scan after the campaign to see reputation of CRM values


Conclusion

o AllyU will ensure Ally Financial Inc. a positive reputation with consumers o Community Reinvestment Act o Corporate social responsibility will promote Ally and their financial literacy initiative


AllyU - UMD Capstone Project