Page 1

  Cover art: ​ Aathira Chennat   


What is spooky femme?

Spooky femme is a term that originated from Aathira Chennat and myself when we were roommates in the spring of our junior year after returning from abroad. Inspired by the film “A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night,” we coined the term “spooky femme” to describe the aesthetic that the main character embodied.

   

Spooky femme is more than an aesthetic: it is a mindset and a way of life. Spooky femme prioritizes women and femmes of color in all of our weirdness and magic. As I set out to compile work for this zine, I wanted to keep the spooky femme aesthetic in mind, even though not all of the contributors identify as such. Still, I believe that we all have the spooky femme spirit inside of us, and that shines through in all of the amazing pieces included in this zine. -Ally Ang


Contents     Margin Notes ­ Anju Madhok

3

Space Cadet ­ Marisa Adame

4

Demi ­ Marisa Adame

5

Texts From My Dad ­ Ally & Wim Ang

7

On Yelling “Fire” In A Burning Building ­ Anonymous

8

3 Paintings ­ Frantz Lexy

9  

Church ­ Ally Ang

12  

Are We Not Still Lynched? ­ Justice Namaste

13  

Selfie Culture

15

Mammoth, I Am ­ Ben Ostrowski

18

Untitled ­ Dom

19

3 Poems ­ Ashleigh Bridges

21

2 Drawings ­ Dan Berle

23

Summer Playlist

25

2


Anju Madhok​  is a Psychology and Women’s & Gender Studies major at Wellesley College who will one  day change the world through music, radical self­love, and anti­colonial education. When she is not  writing and performing music, you can find her making sandwiches or astral projecting.     Scan the QR code to listen to Anju’s third album, ​ Margin Notes​ .   

3


space cadet  marisa adame    they call me space cadet and i find myself floating as if Gravity forgot  to take me under her wing. i walk with my chin tilted toward Sky, praying to find inspiration  in the drizzle of rain that escapes the sun beating down on an April afternoon.  my body  catapults itself into space as the people around me attempt to break my inner walls.  my body  forgets that i need to stay connected to the ground in order to complete my degree    and suddenly anxiety acts as anchor  gripping me back into reality;  a plague of a thousand books all open at once­­ too many ideas, not enough time;  forever getting lost in the forest of my mind with no roadmap       yet  of a consistent way out of depression  save for sunlight and harmonies  which act as Ariadne’s labyrinth string guiding me  out of my Haunted.    see sparkle.  hear laughter.  remember that the world will not end today.    but if it does, i have found sanctuary in between the stars­­  the chaotic cosmos of my mind creating space for me to rest.  when you see me and the light behind my eyes is not here,  know that i am simply visiting home.         


demi marisa adame    my body remembers but my heart doesn’t.    as my legs wrap instinctively around the next,  my mind climbs into the galaxy above, searching         for the meaning          of this moment.  i move the molecules of stars,  transcendently trying  to remember what it means to love as the animal inside me carries out its thrusts­­  almost like responsibility.   my thoughts float on waves of light dripping  from the vodka bottle on my desk as my body fools around,  simply fulfilling its job.    my body remembers but my heart doesn't:    what it means to be filled with a love that forces you outside of yourself  so that even a year later you cannot utter the accusation ​ rapist​ ; at least  my body has forgotten how to cry.                 has become fortress                     walling up my emotions when i must act in line with expectations                     and i give myself to social scripts                     while my mind                           wanders,                                constructing staircases to celestial beings while my body is consumed,      my inner self moving among twilight galaxies in time with the movement  of the guest in my bedroom.    my hands remember how to be grateful­­   run fingers through hair as if it holds water in a drought.  5 


my palms recall the skin of my Hercules lover:  demigod smoothness granting me power to finally finish a thought.    my heart feels a shadow of the day  his pinky  forgot           his promise.    since then, i peruse bookshelves of constellations,  walk through the walls of my bedroom mid­coitus to search for the answers to life,  try to reach the inevitable destruction of the sun through letting others use my body.    my lips remember kissing space on the rim of an empty champagne bottle,  realizing i had been emptied for someone else.  my body remembers how to betray me,  and that's all it's ever done since  i forgot how to love.                                       Marisa Adame​  is an international actress and spoken word poet from Dallas, Texas currently working  out of Cleveland, Ohio. She is a co­founding member of Ra Poetry Collective which hopes to compete in  this year's College Unions Poetry Slam Invitational. Her work has previously been published in St. Sucia  zine. These and other selected poems can be found at her website: ​ http://www.marisaadame.com/​ . Check  out her Facebook if you like; she sends you all the loveliest of vibes.  


texts from my dad 

ally &  wim  ang                                                                    7 


on yelling “fire” in a burning  building   anonymous    content warning: abuse 

I am writing a love poem to the fireplace  Which is another way of saying:  When my house burned down I blamed the wood  And the bookshelves, and the handmade potholders.   I apologized on their behalf for this inadvertent arson,  Together we asked forgiveness of the fire  But the flames and the furniture had no words in common.     What I wanted to say was:   I’m sorry  For being so flammable, so small and frightened  For finding monsters in the shadows on the wall  I’m sorry for yelling “fire”, and for all the commotion I caused.  I’m sorry for how ugly I made the fire feel by screaming.          

8


mañana   frantz lexy   

9


red eyes   frantz lexy  10 


queen frantz lexy     11 


church ally ang      I feel most godlike  when my head aches from hunger  when I’ve drunk too much tequila  when a stranger takes me home.    I go to parties  just to watch people dance   all hot & sweaty, making out with boys   whose names they’ve forgotten  under pulsing fluorescent lights.    I am prettiest when I am burning.  I can tell by the way you watch me  glowing crimson; a forest fire  embers floating into the night.    I don’t like how men look at me  but I play along  mouth wet, body soft  ripe and ready to burst  between my thighs.     a body splits  so easily. it takes  hardly any pressure at all.     if nothing else,  I am clean.                 Ally Ang ​ is a self­proclaimed spooky femme who is in love with the moon.    

12


are we not still lynched?   justice namaste    content warning: anti­black racism, police brutality, slavery    When I was a young girl in school, the only brown face in a sea of overwhelming whiteness (the  way I spent most of my childhood), I remember sitting in a classroom while my teacher talked  about slavery. I remember how all of the other students in the room turned to look at me  whenever it came up.  If I had not made the connection between myself and slavery before that  day, it was made for me in that classroom.     These are the same children who grew up into the teenagers who told me they were my friends,  and told me I wasn’t really black, until I came home crying to my moms because there was so  much hurt inside of my chest that I hadn’t figured out how to put into words.     Are we not still lynched?     I remember the day that the ruling for the Michael Brown case came down. I remember sitting  in my dorm room, trying to do some sort of reading, but unable to even see the words because I  was so anxious and my eyes were already filled with tears. I remember when Darren Wilson was  cleared; I remember feeling paralyzed and unsurprised and terrified and deeply sorrowful. That  was the first day I remember feeling like I was holding the pain of generations of ancestors  somewhere inside my chest. My face looked older that day, like centuries of pain had etched  worry creases into my forehead and blackened the dark circles under my eyes.     Are we not still lynched?     I open my computer and cannot escape from graphic images and videos showing the violent  deaths of Black people, re­igniting the horrors of generations of trauma that I do not have the  words to articulate. This pain that suffocates me with its seemingly infinite depth and brings  tears to my eyes, this trauma that that tastes like plantation dirt and metal bars, I ask: are we not  still lynched?    When corporations are profiting off of the piling up of Black bodies in the streets and in prisons,  when the media allows these images to be so seared into our brains that they float on the inside  of my eyelids when I close my eyes at night, when pain is so deeply etched into our history that  you can hear it in the first cry of every Black baby, I ask: are we not still lynched?     If you listen carefully you can hear the sound of Black people all over the country crying, their  tears Black like the water our government forces down our throats as we collectively scream but  13 


somehow go unheard... The state tries to pollute us like they pollute the water, to kill us by  rotting us from the inside out. They know that how you destroy a community is by suffocating its  light, by killing its babies, by breaking its spirit.     But I do not only carry the trauma of my ancestors, I carry their strength. For while the first cry  of every Black baby oozes pain, its first brilliant smile contains in it centuries of years of joy and  compassion. You can see our love in the way we treat our fallen, in our gratitude, in our  perseverance, in our art. There is a resilience in the spirit of our community that cannot be  stifled, cannot be derailed. There is a beauty in the simple act of survival.     For, like it has gone for centuries before, they will continue to try to lynch us, and we will  continue to resist.                                                           Justice Namaste​  is a rising senior studying American Studies at Williams College. Her middle name is  Audre, after Audre Lorde, and she gets her righteous womanist/intersectional feminist soul from her  mothers. Favorite topics of conversation include: popular culture, podcasts, food, and Nicki Minaj. 

14


selfie culture   

 

  why are people so afraid of narcissism, of a generation that celebrates its own confidence, self-love, and beauty? why is vanity so vilified?

15


16


17


mammoth, i am  ben ostrowski    “etch­a­sketch iris,  trampoline heart.”      something quirky out there in the great blue  is whispering, “mammoth, you are.”      mammoth, I am.    *    this is the fourth summer so far  and my bags are packed  (the wingtip loafers are new;  I need those to keep my height high above the grey).    my affairs resist order, as they should.    my fresh air blue through trumpets into my scarlet balloon,  up behind me like capes and archangels.  and my stretched hand spent an inky second in the mortar.    look at me tattoo this planet. 

            Ben, ​ who studies psychology at Brown University, is weird and deeply in love with words and their  poetry. 

18


untitled dom    

      my mother’s cheekbones  hair on my upper lip  sides shaved down  i think i’ll cut the hair on top  but  i don’t want to  broad shoulders  permanent lacrosse tan  i really like how my arms  look  soft short  19 


fingers i can see my ribs  they keep saying i don’t have an ass  but  whatever  my thighs are   my favorite  i tried to get the dirt off my feet  most of it’s gone                                                                    Dom ​ (they/them) is a short Southern queer nonbinary babe who loves sweet tea.  

20


heritage ashleigh bridges    content warning: racism, violence    Off the deck of the Mayflower my ancestors stepped,  and ever after, like Eve  from the rib of Adam have sprung,  out of unforgiving New England soil  devout, fearful, and hardy,  slaughtering natives in God’s name.  My great grandmother bought people, dispersed them  like furniture needing to be fed.  My grandmother never dressed herself,  suckled at the breast of a black woman  whose name she cannot remember.  Every heirloom is haunted,  ghosts swing noosed from our family tree.  There is a set of china,  passed down through the women,  as white as bone,  glazed with dark blood.       

        21 


dissociate ashleigh bridges      The apathy is a place I can hide,  its gauzy veil a quiet camouflage.  A vast river of sheer, angry noise,  the scream paralyzed always in my throat, they are  subdued by this great equalizer, this  absolute lack of stirring,  this still and open ocean.  I take two hours to get out of bed  the mirror meets my eyes,  a flat gaze surveys this body:  it has been gutted, there is  no blood, no viscera,  just insides hollowed out  vacant and smooth.       

untitled ashleigh bridges      The crisp skins of onions perfume the air,  a single tear rests near her jawline:  a false rivulet.  I want to reach and wipe it away,  to feel her on the pad of my thumb,  I stop myself.            Ashleigh Bridges ​ likes animals, dense forests, and dead things. She is currently practicing mindfulness,  holding her breath, and witchcraft. A Connecticut native. Find her at little­liebchen.tumblr.com.  

22


metamorphosis dan berle  23 


big head  dan berle  24 


summer 2k16: a playlist                                                  25 


Thank you for reading!

If you have questions, comments, or thoughts about anything in this zine, feel free to email ​ aang@wellesley.edu xx, Ally

26

Profile for Ally Ang

Spooky Femme Space Jam  

A collaborative zine of writing, art, music, selfies, and more. Compiled by Ally Ang.

Spooky Femme Space Jam  

A collaborative zine of writing, art, music, selfies, and more. Compiled by Ally Ang.

Profile for allyang
Advertisement