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WE’RE BACK . . . WITH A CRACKER!

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STEVE’S MULTI £MILLION GIVEAWAY! ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

SCHOOL JUST GOT BETTER

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PROUD TO BE SUPPORTING THIS UNIQUE CHARITY PAPER

FAST TRACK TO JOBS

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15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

What’s inside NEWS

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NEWS

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STEVE MORGAN  FOUNDATION UNITED UTILITIES

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NEWS

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INDEPENDENT LIVING

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CONTACT BOARD

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HEALTHZONE

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MOTORZONE

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TWO thirds of people who died of COVID-19 during March to mid-July were disabled people, according to the latest data.

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COVID-19: WORLD AT HIS FEET p16-17 BOOKS/HOROSCOPE GARDENING

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Can YOU help? n All Together NOW! is a registered charity set up to provide a tip top news service for anyone whose life is affected by disability, long-term health condtions or age. n The charity – the only one of its kind in the UK – relies entirely on support from its sponsors, advertisers, subscriptions and donations.

0151 230 0307

Editor: Tom Dowling

email: news@alltogethernow.org.uk

Editorial Support: Gerry Corner

Advertising/sponsorship 0151 230 0307

email: sales@alltogethernow.org.uk IT Support: Ken Almond Website: Pharos Design www.alltogethernow.org.uk

All Together NOW! is published by All Together Now! Ltd, The Bradbury Centre, Youens Way, Liverpool L14 2EP Registered Charity No.1106387 Company No. 5096931

COVID-19 kills more disabled people

Charity’s new start a real plus

PROUD: Lynne Turnbull, right, CEO at Disability Positive and Joanne Grubb, MD at JB Creative

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ISABILITY Positive – that’s the new name for Cheshire Centre for Independent Living.

The charity’s chief executive, Lynne Turnbull, said: “This a very exciting time for us and we are really proud of our exciting new brand. We have been introducing it at our head office over the last few days and getting lots of positive feedback. “As a charity, which is run by people living with a disability or long-term health condition,

Courage of doc who went blind

we believe that people are not disabled by their condition but by a world that doesn’t meet their needs. “This year has been a particularly challenging year for many people so it feels even more important that Disability Positive is here to make the world more accessible and to help society to understand disability in a more positive way that brings people together.”

n Disability Positive: Tel. 01606 331 853

Neglect

then suffered

horror movie hallucinations

Amit’s fight with Charles Bonnet syndrome

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EN years ago Doctor Amit Patel, pictured, lost his sight. That was traumatic enough. But ever since he has suffered from visual hallucinations.

As a trauma doctor, Amit had a limited knowledge of Charles Bonnet syndrome before he experienced it himself. He said: “One day, not long after I lost my sight, I was walking down the stairs in my house and this girl suddenly appeared in front of me. I realised it was the girl from the horror movie The Ring. “The hallucination only lasted a few seconds, but it was enough for me to fall down the stairs. At that point I wasn’t really comfortable talking to people about what I was going through in losing my sight and I was very much in my head and in a bad place.

Figures show that while disabled people make up 16% of the population, they made up 59.5% of all deaths from COVID-19. After adjustments for region, population density, household and sociodemographic characteristics, disabled women were 2.4 times more likely to die of the virus, and disabled men were twice as likely to die of the virus, according to the data from the Office for National Statistics Kamran Mallick, at Disability Rights UK, said: “We are neither shocked nor surprised at these figures. Disabled people and their families have been telling us for months of the disproportionate impacts of the virus upon their lives. “A catalogue of neglect has built up from the start of the outbreak which has led to these shocking figures.

“After a few weeks though this same girl kept appearing and that’s when I knew I was having visual hallucinations and I thought that it may be Charles Bonnet syndrome.” The Covid-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdown has only exacerbated Amit’s experience of CBS. Campaign group Esme’s Umbrella – which was set up to support people living with CBS – say their helpline has received double the number of calls over the past five months.

n A team of researchers at Cardiff University, funded by Fight for Sight charity and Health and Care Research Wales, has developed a novel method to induce controlled hallucinations in the lab, which will allow them to explore the mechanisms underlying CBS.

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“The misapplication of ‘Do Not Resuscitate’ notices, the lack of social care available for those who live independently, the returning of infected residents to care homes where their fellow residents had no escape from infection, the lack of PPE and testing, and the lack of infrastructure to allow food and medicine to be delivered to those forced to shield at the start of lockdown, all show the neglect of disabled people by those with the power and authority to protect us. “The Government instigated the Coronavirus Act back in March. It took away our rights within the Care Act. It showed us just what Government thinks, or rather, doesn’t think, of us. “The Government now has an opportunity to show the fourteen million disabled people in this country that it has learnt from the mistakes of the past six months.”


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15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

Organisations like The Steve Morgan Foundation and All Together NOW! are vital in supporting vulnerable people — STEVE MORGAN CBE

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GREAT TO BE BACK T OUGH times continue . . . but thanks to our fantastic sponsors, we are delighted to be back with this, our 15th anniversary issue. When we last published in February, we had no idea of what lay in store. COVID-19 is wrecking so many people’s lives and devastating so many vital services – including here at All Together NOW! We really didn’t know when we would be in a position to print again. Thankfully, some great support has come from our partners – the Steve Morgan Foundation, United Utilities and Appreciate Group – and others who recognise the importance of the newspaper. First came a grant from the Mayor of Liverpool’s COVID-19 Emergency Fund, then singer-songwriter Jennifer Jones and Zut Media put together a virtual world choir to sing a fundraising song for the charity, and now we’ve heard that the National Lottery and Government are helping with the costs of running our website. This all great news. But new challenges ahead . . . not least, having to find new ways to get the newspaper to our readers. Since lockdown, many of our long-time stockists have been forced to place restrictions on visitors. We’re still confident of getting tens of thousands of papers out and about, but if you have any ideas where we can place our pick-up boxes then please do get in touch with us. I really hope you enjoy this special issue. Stay safe.

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– but this 15th anniversary issue is tinged with deep sorrow

NANCY JAMES

ADELE DOWLING

HE PAST six months have been horrendous, with so many families losing loved ones – Claire, right, Neil and son, Leon mine included. In our last edition we reported the death of my aunt, Eileen Eastwood, one of All Together NOW! ’s original trustees. Now it’s with much sorrow I have to record the passing of

PROUD TO BE SUPPORTING THIS UNIQUE CHARITY PAPER

three more relatives and great supporters of the paper – my mother-inlaw, Nancy James, another founding trustee; my sister-in-law Adele Dowling, a Liverpool city councilor who continually sang our praises in the town hall; and Claire Semadray, my nephew Neil’s partner, who championed our work across the city. They are all deeply missed.

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Disability Day all set for your screens

ORGANISERS of the North West’s annual Disability Awareness Day – postponed in July due to the pandemic – are planning to create their first ever virtual exhibition. Warrington Disability Partnership are creating an online tented village packed with stalls. DAD-Virtual goes ahead on Sunday 25 October, via a dedicated website http://www.dadvirtual.org.uk/ n THE charity has also opened a new Shopmobility service at Birchwood Shopping Centre. The service provides scooters for shoppers with mobility problems. Tel 01925 251079

City helpline

A NEW helpline is available for people in Liverpool who need to self-isolate during the COVID-19 pandemic. The advice team can provide a range of options to help people in a personal financial crisis, including signposting to emergency foodbank support. They can also advise people on where to get help with issues including alcohol, poor mental health and domestic abuse, as well as help to quit smoking. n Liverpool’s Covid Isolation advice line: 0151 233 3066 (Monday to Saturday, 8am-6pm)

Water bills’ help

UNITED Utilities are offering help to people who have been furloughed or made redundant due to COVID-19. The North West water company say its new scheme could reduce water bills up to the end of next March. Jane Haymes, the company’s affordability manager, said: “The financial impact of COVID-19 has affected so many customers. Customers whose incomes have been affected by the virus can apply to have their bill reduced.” People must be receiving benefits or tax credits and will need to complete an affordability test. n Tel 0800 072 6765 n www.unitedutilities.com/difficultyPage 21 paying-bill


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15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

HIV victims not taking life-saving medicines

HALF of people living with HIV do not take their life-saving medication, says a new study. Researchers also found that people from BAME communities, women and heterosexual men are under-represented in HIV studies. Prof Debi Bhattacharya, who led the research at the University of East Anglia’s School of Pharmacy, said: “It’s really important that people with HIV start taking medication as soon as possible and continue taking it as prescribed for life. “While medication can’t cure HIV, taking it correctly helps people live longer, healthier lives. Medication can also reduce the risk of HIV transmission.” The research team from the UAE and Western Sydney University also found that people from ethnic minorities, women and heterosexual men were underrepresented for the country in which the study was taking place. Prof Bhattacharya added: “We found that none of the 80 studies had a trial population that reflected the actual population of people living with HIV.”

Clair takes the helm

THE former boss of the Alder Hey Children’s Charity, Clair White, has taken over as chief executive of Liverpool Council for Voluntary Services (LCVS). During her six years at Alder Hey, Clair restructured the charity to make it more sustainable. She was previously chief executive at The Tim Parry Johnathan Ball Foundation for Peace. LCVS’s previous co-CEOs Graham Wright and Colin Heaney are remaining at LCVS as director of finance and resources and director of policy, partnerships and programmes, respectively.

Home not hospital

A £62m package will help towards discharging people with learning disabilities or autism from hospital into the community. Disability charity Sense welcomed the Government cash but said it was “long overdue”. The charity’s chief executive, Richard Kramer, said: “Disabled people should be living in homes not hospitals so we hope this new funding will quickly and finally put an end to that practice. “Over the years we have seen too many instances of abuse and safeguarding violations happening in those settings and change was overdue. “It’s also vital that there is investment into preventative community social care services so that individuals with complex disabilities, their families and carers can be given the correct support before reaching crisis point. “This is especially needed with many services still closed due to the pandemic and family carers having to manage without support.”

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Here for you

TV’s Loose Women host Kaye Adams is throwing her support behind the Stroke Association’s Here for You telephone support service, which helps combat loneliness and isolation. Kaye, whose mum had two strokes in 2018, said: “Stroke is a cruel condition that turns lives upside down in an instant. When my mum had a stroke our whole family’s lives changed forever. The thought of that happening during lockdown is just unbearable. “I can only imagine how scary it must feel for survivors and their loved ones. Having someone to talk things through, especially as people struggle to come to terms with what’s happened to them, is vital. “The Stroke Association’s new Here for You service across the UK offers real hope to people as they cope with the impact of stroke on their lives.” Support in BSL over video call is also currently available. n Stroke Helpline: 0303 3033 100

DON’T LET US DOWN DURING LOCKDOWN C KAYE ADAMS: “Our family’s lives changed forever . . .”

ARERS must not be left without help if there is a second lockdown due to COVID-19, the head of a leading UK charity has warned.

Helen Walker, chief executive of Carers UK, said: “Carers must not be left unaided should there be a second wave or future lockdowns. “ Their care is vital to supporting older and disabled people in our communities.” Her comments came after research revealed that huge numbers of carers were unable to get formal help with their physical and mental health during the spring lockdown. This was at a time when 70% of carers had to provide more care for older, disabled or seriously ill relatives or friends, and millions more people took on an unpaid caring role. The research, carried out by the Universities of Birmingham and Sheffield, in partnership with Carers UK, shows well over half (58%) of people caring for someone outside of their own home were unable to get through to NHS 111 services in April. Half of carers needing formal care services could not get them in April, and only 40% could get help in May. Helen Walker added: “Some carers have had to cope for months without any outside support - seeing the health, wellbeing and mobility of the person they care for deteriorate, and their own physical and mental health heavily impacted as well. “The NHS must quickly identify carers and prioritise their needs and medical treatment. If their health breaks down, the cost will be catastrophic.” Carers UK is calling for an immediate increase in Carer’s Allowance - the main benefit for carers looking after someone for 35 hours or more a week - currently just £67.25 a week. n Helpline: 0808 808 7777 n Carers UK Forum: www.carersuk.org/forum

Find YOUR local Carers Centre – p19

FAMILIES NEED A BREAK – p18

Left without care

DISABLED children and their families were left in lockdown with vital care and support withdrawn during the coronavirus pandemic, a survey by more than 70 charities found. In three out of four cases support stopped completely, leaving parents and young siblings taking on all care responsibilities around the clock. The study, by the Disabled Children’s Partnership, found that disabled children’s friendships, learning, communication, behaviour and mental and physical health have suffered.  Parents already struggling before the pandemic, due to lack of support, felt locked out during lockdown, abandoned by society and fearful for their own physical and mental health.  Amanda Batten, chair of the DPS, said: “The health and social care system was

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already in crisis, without the resources to support disabled children. It will be even more stretched in future. The Government needs to start planning now for enhancing funding for disabled children’s health and social care so that they are not left even further behind their peers.”  Ian Noon, head of policy at the National Deaf Children’s Society, said: “The Government has shown that it can introduce radical changes in a matter of days. “Moving forward, we will need that same innovation, ingenuity and urgency to make sure every child gets the support they need and the future they deserve.” n NDCS Helpline: 0808 800 8880


XMAS TIME CRACKER!

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15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

HIS

ENTRY FORM

THE draw takes place on Friday 11 December. You can also send your answer on the back of a postcard to: n Armani Watch Competition, All Together NOW! The Bradbury Centre, Youens Way, Liverpool L14 2EP OR enter online www.alltogethernow.org.uk

NAME

MR

MRS

MISS

MS

ADDRESS

Two fabulous ARMANI watches up for grabs HERS

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IMES are tough. But we’ve got something up our sleeves that will get your pulses racing!

To mark the 15th anniversary issue of All Together NOW! one of our main partners, Appreciate Group, are donating TWO sensational Armani watches, each worth more than £200, for a special competition.

What a fabulous Christmas present they would make for the special man or woman in your life – or maybe even for yourself! The Emporio Armani Gents Watch features a durable stainless-steel bracelet strap with an unconventional brushed steel-effect blue dial.

POSTCODE TEL NO:

EMAIL:

Can we send you our newsletters/ bulletins / and competitions? We will not share your details. YES NO

Where did you pick up All Together NOW! ?

AllTogetherNowNews

The Armani Lady Banks Watch has a high quality rose metal bracelet with a gold dial and a triple chronograph with date function. Together, they make for one of our best ever prizes, and it’s all due to the fantastic support we get from Appreciate Group.

@ATNnews

For the past 12 years, the Liverpoolbased company have teamed up with us to run our Christmas competition, which is one of our most popular and most looked forward to features. You can enter the draw by using the form on this page, or by visiting www.alltogethernow.org.uk

Newsman Jon’s coronavirus bulletins

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HANNEL 4 news presenter Jon Snow has recorded audio versions of crucial information around the coronavirus pandemic to ensure it is readily available for blind and partially sighted people.

Mr Snow said: “The pandemic has changed life for all of us. It’s of the utmost importance that everyone has access to this information.” Since the outbreak, the Royal National Institute of Blind People has found that not all Government information has been made available in alternative formats.

Findings from RNIB also suggest that one in four of people aged 75 and over who are blind or partially sighted do not have access to the internet, where much of the information about coronavirus is found. As part of the charity’s campaign for accessible information, it has been working with the Cabinet Office Disability Unit to create audio recordings of the latest information, and they are now available on RNIB’s Helpline. Jamie Dormandy, head of customer service at RNIB, said: “At a time when public health information is more important than ever, it’s essential that all of

the two million people living with sight loss have access to these guidelines.” A list of frequently asked questions about the pandemic, as well as information on staying healthy, exercise, accessing food and medicine, financial support and statutory sick pay are among the recordings that are available.

n RNIB’s Helpline 0303 123 9999. As well as the recordings, callers can get advice about anything related to sight loss, including access to information and shopping. NEWS TIME: JON SNOW


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15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

Doctors warned over ‘harmful’ pain pills

DOCTORS are being told to stop prescribing opioids for chronic pain after new evidence shows that they could be harmful and cause addiction. Instead, patients should be told about exercise programmes, CBT, acupuncture or certain antidepressants. The advice comes in the first ever NICE guidelines on the treatment of chronic pain. The news is welcomed by drug addiction treatment experts who reveal admissions for prescription drug addiction have risen by 40% in the last 18 months, with the majority of those seeking treatment being female. The draft guidance reveals that the treatment of chronic pain by commonly prescribed medicines including opioids and gabapentinoids has limited evidence of effectiveness, but that there was evidence that they could be harmful to patients and cause addiction. For those already on prescribed opioids, the NICE guidelines advise GPs to explain the risks of continuing, and also warned of the withdrawal problems that could occur should a shared decision to stop taking the drugs be made.

Now hear this!

ALMOST half of UK adults have never had their hearing tested, a new study reveals. The research, commissioned by cochlear implant company MEDEL, found that people regularly ask others to repeat themselves (35%), another fifth (19%) have their TV/radio volume left on high and almost one in eight (12%) use subtitles and audio-description. Favourite sounds included the classic morning song of birds chirping (40%), music (20%) and the sound of a river running (20%) while construction (48%), car horns (39%) and car alarms (38%) were the least favourite. n www.medel.com

Sign up with Tyrese

MORE than 50,000 people signed up to learn British Sign Language (BSL) thanks to the Sense Sign School, which launched in May. The free online classes were delivered by Tyrese Dibba, a Deaf and partially sighted 15-year-old student from Birmingham. The initial target was 7,000 sign-ups over the course of three months, and this was beaten in its first week. Tyrese and his family have been supported by disability charity Sense since he was six months old. He said: “I want more people to learn to sign, so Deaf people don’t get excluded. You should be able to chat to someone, whatever their disability might be. After all, no one likes feeling left out.” n www.sense.org.uk/sensesignschool

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Breakthrough in help with hearing

NEW studies suggest the brain works better if it has access to all sound – challenging the way traditional hearing aid technology works. Hearing expert Thomas Behrens said: “To date, we haven’t been clear on what occurs inside the auditory cortex, the brain’s main hearing centre. It has been a black box for all audiologists.” Mr Behrens, of hearing aid makers Oticon, added: “A number of independent studies, as well as our own studies in cooperation with universities, have enlightened us on new basic brain function about how the brain processes sound. “This is a significant milestone in hearing research and a breakthrough that gives us considerable insight into what is actually happening.”

Various studies have demonstrate that by suppressing the natural sound environment, the brain receives incomplete information, and reveals that the limiting approach to addressing hearing loss by conventional hearing aids means that the brain has to work even harder to fill in the gaps. Mr Behrens added: “Addressing hearing loss completely is fundamental to avoid hearing loss related health problems. If the brain isn’t fully supported to perform in a natural way, it compensates and changes, not to mention it experiences unnecessary stress. “There is clear evidence that unaddressed hearing loss and the consequences for the brain leads to social isolation and depression, significantly increased risk of dementia, and more incidences of fall-related injuries.”

Stand-up comic Sam Baines on why children are her new audience

JOKING APART I WAS 30 years old when I was told I needed to wear a hearing aid for the rest of my life.

I remember being at primary school and thinking that when I was 30 I’d be so old, although on being diagnosed with hearing loss I felt all too young. At the time, I believed that hearing aids and hearing loss were reserved for those with grey hair and boiled sweets in their pockets – but I couldn’t have been more wrong. Eleven million people in the UK suffer with hearing loss and they span all ages. There are also 34 million children worldwide with hearing loss. I knew no statistics at the beginning of my deaf journey; all I saw were hearing aid leaflets filled with images of people in their 70s, memories of me shouting so my Grandad could hear me over Christmas dinner, and the reoccurring thought that I’d never met anyone my age with a hearing aid. I felt very different and very alone. Talking openly can be hard for a lot of people but as a stand-up comedian talking has always been how I work through my issues, and discovering I had hearing loss was no different. I started writing jokes about my experiences, like being told I was going for a “beep test” – the only beep test I knew of at the time was the one at school where

you run in between the cones, so I turned up in full lycra just in case. I started filming my hearing aid fittings for my Instagram followers and talking to charities like Action on Hearing Loss and the British Tinnitus Association. I should mention that I also have two types of tinnitus, I’m like the package holiday of hearing problems. Talking about my journey helped me take charge of it and meant that other people felt able to share their experiences too. It turns out that I knew several people who lived with hearing aids but as hearing loss and deafness is an invisible disability I’d never known. It was watching The Secret Life of... series about the way children interact and view the world made we want to write a children’s book about hearing loss. I wanted to create a funny adventure book about a little girl who has a hearing aid like me, that doesn’t hold her back. I hope children with hearing loss can relate to Harriet and feel that their deafness won’t hold them back. Equally, I also hope that children without hearing loss or deafness can enjoy the adventure and find out a little more about hearing aids and the awesome people who wear them like Harriet (and me!). n Harriet Versus The Galaxy by Samantha Baines, published by Knights Of, price £12.99

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Lecturer blasts hit TV series

A MERSEYSIDE university lecturer has blasted Ricky Gervais’ Netflix series After Life over its representation of dwarfism. Dr Erin Pritchard, a lecturer in Disability and Education at Liverpool Hope University, says it’s symptomatic of the way her own condition is used for cheap laughs – and it’s particularly offensive when it comes to sexuality. She says: “In one scene, a psychologist (played by Paul Kaye) talks about a friend he calls ‘Paedo Ian’, because this person ‘slept with a dwarf’ whilst ‘off his head’. “This obviously implies that a person would only sleep with a dwarf if they were not in the right frame of mind. However, more importantly it implies that somehow sleeping with a person with dwarfism is peadophilic. “It is not uncommon for people with dwarfism to be infantilised, and whilst it is patronising to be spoken to like a child, being compared to one in terms of sexuality is downright offensive.” Dr Pritchard says the long-running series Family Guy strikes the right tone on disability issues – despite its status as a controversial show. She adds: “If you look at the representations of dwarfism in Family Guy, I don’t think they’re offensive. They laugh at those who poke fun at people with dwarfism, as opposed to dwarfs themselves.”


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15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

Making a difference . . .

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HE Steve Morgan Foundation aims to make a real difference by changing the lives of thousands of people across the region.

Founded by Steve Morgan CBE in 2001, the Foundation supports projects that help children and families, people with physical or learning disabilities, the elderly, and the socially disadvantaged across North Wales, Merseyside and Cheshire. More than £50m has so far been awarded to over 650 charities and organisations, and this number will increase dramatically over the coming years

after Steve committed £250m additional funding to the Foundation in 2017. Enable Funding for individuals was also introduced to provide grants for adults and children with disabilities in financial hardship, who require specialised equipment. There are three types of funding available for organisations which fit the application criteria: n Major grants and one-off capital funding for large projects; n Regional grant funding; n Enable Funding for specialised equipment, which includes the brand new Smiley Buses. If you need help, contact us – details below

Together, we are helping so many more people

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T’S a great pleasure to write in this special 15th anniversary edition of All Together NOW!

We’ve been supporting this pioneering charity newspaper since 2007 in helping people whose lives are affected by disability and ill-health. These are some of the same vulnerable groups of people that the Steve Morgan Foundation was set up to help in 2001. Since then we’ve given out over £50m in grants and committed another £250m, helping millions of people in the process. When Covid-19 struck it was clear that the most disadvantaged members of society would be the hardest hit again – and we couldn’t allow that to happen. We were inundated with calls from struggling charities who found their ability to fundraise had been hit by the pandemic. One food bank we support had 248 additional people register in a single day

and that was being repeated across Merseyside, North Wales and Cheshire. Many charities were on the brink so we launched the Covid19 Emergency Fund, pledging up to £1m a week. We’ve already made over 600 awards and helped 1.5 million people. We’ve supported charities working in food banks, mental health, homelessness, domestic violence, bereavement and social isolation. We’re also supporting cancer patients and their families by building Maggie’s Merseyside at Clatterbridge and a new Maggie’s at the Royal Liverpool Hospital at a cost of more than £5m. Organisations like the Steve Morgan Foundation and All Together NOW! are vital in making sure the vulnerable are supported.”

– STEVE MORGAN CBE

www.stevemorganfoundation.org.uk Tel 01829 782808

Maggie’s a step closer

PICTURED from left: Sean Hanlon, Jim Carroll, managing director, Carroll Ltd; Steve Morgan, chairman, Steve Morgan Foundation; Dame Laura Lee, CEO Maggie’s, and Alexis Redmond DL, Chair of fundraising committee, Maggie’s Clatterbridge

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HE COUNTDOWN has begun for the opening of a new cancer care centre for people across Merseyside and North Wales.

Mr Steve Morgan, chairman of the Steve Morgan Foundation, and his wife, Sally, were among guests for the topping out ceremony of the new Maggie’s Centre in Wirral. The centre, due to open early in 2021, is one of the Steve Morgan Foundation’s largest capital projects to date and forms part of a £5m donation to

Flying high again at The Florrie

build two new Maggie’s Centres. Mr Morgan said: “Our involvement in this project extends far beyond funding. We’ve also been responsible for the planning, design and construction, which is exceptional for a foundation. “That’s why being here for the topping out ceremony gives everyone involved so much pride and joy.” n A second Maggie’s Centre, funded by the Steve Morgan Foundation, will be built at the new Royal Liverpool Hospital once the new Maggie’s Merseyside facilities are operational.

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PIRITS are high again at The Florrie – Liverpool’s famous community hub – and it’s all thanks to the Steve Morgan Foundation.

A three-year grant for a youth worker means many more young people from the Dingle part of Liverpool will benefit from the wide range of activities at the iconic Florence Institute Trust. Laurence Fenlon, events and business manager at The Florrie, said: “The youth worker will make a big difference. We

Laurence Fenlon, left, business manager, and volunteer Lee Swan

want more kids in the building and this new appointment will help us reach a new generation of children. We’re very open to ideas and want to listen to what the kids want to do.”

Steve Morgan Foundation

@stevemorganfdn


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15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

Looming work crisis for young people

DISABILITY organisations are calling on the Government to take urgent action to avoid a looming employment crisis among disabled young people. In a joint letter they warn that because of the impact of the pandemic, disabled young people will be hit by the “double disadvantage” of discrimination and more competition for jobs. And without Government action, this will put them at risk of long-term unemployment when they try to move from education to employment. The coalition – led by National Deaf Children’s Society (NDCS) and Disability Rights UK – want to see: n Careers advisors trained to work with disabled people. n Online job searching made more accessible. n And the £1,000 incentive for businesses taking on apprentices to be extended to all disabled young people. NDCS estimates there are more than 500,000 disabled young people aged 16-25 in the UK.

67,000 more ‘inactive’

THERE were 67,000 more “economically inactive” disabled people during early summer than the same time last year, according to the latest Government data. Between April and June, 3.3m disabled people of working age were economically inactive. The economic inactivity rate measures the number of people not looking for work due to circumstances, including studying or disability and illness.

Free jobs’ website

PARALYMPIAN swimmer Liz Johnson has set up her own jobs’ platform. The website, called Podium, is designed to cater for disabled talent. It’s free to use and open for freelancers to create profiles, showcasing the untapped skill sets of the disabled workforce. Liz, who has cerebral palsy, said: “It’s essential that we use this as an opportunity to tackle our shocking track record of disability employment.” n www.appbytap.com

Changing Places boost

ALL new large public buildings in England – such as shopping centres, sports stadiums and cinema complexes – will have to include a Changing Places accessible toilet. The new laws should mean Changing Places toilets added to more than 150 new buildings every year. The Government also confirmed a new £30m fund will help pay for the special toilets in existing buildings. Another £1.27m is earmarked for 37 more facilities at service stations across England. This should mean that 87 of the country’s 118 service stations will have a Changing Places toilet in the next few years.

The hi-tech assistant keeping Dolly in the picture online

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ALEXA, MAKE MY DAY PRICELESS: Dolly McLoughlin

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AVIGATING the internet can be hard enough for the most technically savvy of us.

But when you are blind or visually impaired, the web can present all kinds of challenges. However, hi-tech personal assistants are now helping to make life easier for those with sight loss. And a collaboration between Royal National Institute of Blind People and Amazon is aiming to make the most of the technology. Like everything that makes use of the internet, hi-tech personal assistants like Alexa, Siri and Google Assistant – which answer questions and perform tasks – need to be approached with a degree of caution. There are concerns about the potential to hack into them and about who’s listening and what they might do with the details we reveal about ourselves. On the other hand, there is no doubt they can help increase the independence of older and disabled people – like Dolly McLoughlin, who began to lose her sight in her 40s due to retinitis pigmentosa, a genetic disorder causing gradual loss of vision. Dolly said: “While I was working, there was always someone who could help, but since retiring it’s been difficult to keep up with how quickly technology changes. “I can use emails and documents, but find navigating the internet with a screen reader very difficult. Websites are all designed differently, which makes it hard to find what I am looking for.

“Alexa is different. I can just ask questions and she will tell me the answer. Listening to music and my audio books through Alexa is wonderful, but getting direct information – like a short biography of an author, or the synopsis of a play I’m interested in – is priceless.” Making it all happen for Dolly is the RNIB who have been working with Amazon to enable Alexa to provide information directly from the charity’s Sight Loss Advice Service. It is hoped the tool will help improve the accessibility of online information for more than two million people across the UK living with sight loss, after RNIB research showed vision impairment remains a major barrier to accessing the internet. David Clarke, Director of Services at RNIB, said: “Voice assistants can enable independence, helping break down accessibility barriers to a more inclusive society. “By using this technology to increase the reach of our own resources, we are ensuring people can immediately get essential information about sight conditions, their rights, and the support available, simply by asking out loud.” Alexa users can hear RNIB-verified information using voice commands such as: “Alexa, how do I register as sight impaired or severely sight impaired?” “Alexa, what assistive technology do blind people use?” n RNIB helpline: 0303 123 9999

‘We need a joined-up strategy to save lives’

A JOINED-UP strategy on alcohol is needed to save lives, the British Liver Trust has told the Government.

The call comes as the UK’s leading liver health charity saw an increase in calls to its nurse-led helpline during lockdown. Vanessa Hebditch, director of policy at the charity, said: “Drinking alcohol to excess is the leading cause of liver disease and liver cancer in the UK, and more than one in five people currently drink alcohol in way that could harm their liver. “Cases of alcohol-related liver disease were already increasing before lockdown. We know that alcohol sales have increased by more than 20% since then and we are really concerned that we are going to be faced with an epidemic of liver disease as a result. “We are particularly worried about people who were already on the brink of alcohol dependence during lockdown.

Easy target

“Alcohol treatment services are traditionally an easy target for cuts when finances are tight. However, we know that investing £1 in these services will save £3 in the long run, as well as directly helping affected individuals, often the most vulnerable in society.” The charity is calling for the Government to urgently adopt joined-up public health measures across the UK that include addressing the affordability of alcohol through taxation, such as by creating a minimum unit price, and putting in place stronger controls on the marketing of alcohol. It is also calling for more support for people who are drinking too much, including more alcohol care teams in hospitals and changing the stigma surrounding alcohol so that people ask for help at an earlier stage. TICKING TIMEBOMB – p20


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15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

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Young people scared to tell bosses they are deaf

TWO out of every three deaf young people would hide their condition on a job application, a new report shows. Meanwhile, careers advice across the country is not up to standard, leaving them unprepared for the world of work, researchers found. Nearly half are not supported by schools and colleges to make decisions about their futures. And 90% are unaware of Access To Work, the Government-funded grant scheme that provides disabled people with accessible equipment, technology or interpreters. The report, Deaf Works Everywhere, written by deaf young activists who visited schools and colleges across the UK, includes interviews with deaf young people. One said: “I went to a careers fair and someone was there from the police. They said, ‘You are deaf, you cannot work for us’. But my dad is deaf and he works for the police.” The National Deaf Children’s Society is now calling on local authorities, schools, colleges and Governments across the UK to work together to ensure that deaf young people receive specialist careers advice. Martin McLean, policy advisor at the National Deaf Children’s Society, said: “Schools, colleges and local authorities need to urgently improve the quality of support they’re offering because many of them just aren’t delivering for deaf young people.”

Wanted: more bosses who are disabled-friendly

MOST disabled jobseekers say their biggest barrier to work is finding truly disabled-friendly employers. They also feel their opportunities to demonstrate their qualities and skills are limited. Jane Hatton, director of Evenbreak, which carried out a survey involving more than 700 disabled people across the UK, said, “It seems confidence is a huge issue for disabled job seekers – lack of confidence in employers, in the recruitment process and in themselves. “The good news is that the first two can be addressed by employers. By becoming, and being seen as, inclusive employers of choice, employers will be able to attract and retain many more talented disabled people.” Evenbreak, set up in 2011, is an award-winning social enterprise run by and for disabled people, helping employers attract and retain more talented disabled candidates. n www.even break.co.uk

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FAMILY SUPPORT: Gemma, right, with her family – brother Alex, dad Roy and mum Sally

How others help me through the pain . . .

T

HERE are times – even in my young life – when I realise just how incredibly fortunate I am.

I’d spent my entire childhood and adolescence trying to cope with being in never-ending pain and being denied all kinds of fun opportunities that other children take for granted. It was awful. They were very dark days. Without the support of my wonderful family I really don’t know where I would have been. I thought life couldn’t get much worse. Then at the age of 18 I saw for myself just how truly awful life can be – and is – for others. My local church in Greasby, Wirral, had given me the chance of some voluntary work in Uganda. It was a huge learning curve. I had never been away from my parents for a long period of time. Now here I was in the middle of Africa, disabled, and feeling very alone and vulnerable. I was way out of my comfort zone but there was no time for self-pity. I had to put my own anxieties to one side. I had never seen extreme poverty up close and personal. I found myself right in the core of our mission to rebuild communities and homes, and provide necessary health and

tel 0151 230 0307

MY STORY:

by GEMMA BARBER

education. I literally saw life and death in front of my eyes. I saw things you can never un-see. I realised how short life was, to be grateful for the life I have and to appreciate the smallest things because you just never know what’s around the corner. My time in Uganda taught me so much about life, and I returned with a new perspective and a more positive attitude on my life and the life of others. It was the turning point I needed. I realised that despite how bad life may appear to be, there can be ways to turn things around, especially if you have support – and the knowledge to bring about those improvements. I’m a firm believer in the more aware you are about your own health issues – and those of others – the better life will be for everyone! That’s why I’m on a new mission now: To raise awareness about my own big challenge in life – hip dysplasia (also known as developmental dysplasia of the hip, or DDH).

I was diagnosed at 11 months. My parents had noticed a few things that weren’t quite right such as one leg longer than the other, clicking, and extra creases at the back of my left thigh. The GP wasn’t particularly concerned, but my parents sought another opinion and an orthopaedic surgeon confirmed my diagnosis. I was immediately placed into traction to relocate my hips. However, the treatment failed and it meant years being spent in a cast. I can’t begin to imagine the pressures this put on my parents. It must have been extremely difficult for them to cope. But they had a great network of support from family to friends. They say they never felt alone and I think it made a difference. But this doesn’t take away the sadness, and the countless restrictions on family life that having a child with hip dysplasia brings. I spent most of my teenage years under the care of Liverpool’s Alder Hey Children’s Hospital, where I felt part of a family – every department knew me and my family. I was the first young person in the whole of the county who had a double pelvic osteotomy, this was to realign my pelvis and

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Mum’s guide for parents

Online cash guide for blind students

NATALIE Trice has been through the heartbreak of watching her son Lucas undergo endless operations followed by months of recovery. That experience inspired her to set up a charity – and write a book – aimed at helping parents avoid “the despair and isolation” she went through. Natalie’s charity, DDH UK (Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip), provides round-the-clock support for parents and patients. Natalie’s book, Cast Life – A Parent’s Guide to DDH, is available from Amazon, £9.99. Professor Nicholas Clarke, who wrote the foreword, said: “DDH is one of the most common congenital abnormalities and it is remarkable that there is so little information out there. “This book is essential reading for the parents of children with the condition, as well as health professionals working with them, and I would love to see it in all clinics around the world.” n DDH: Tel. 07825 615303, email: info@ddh-uk.org, www.ddh-uk.org

HIP DYSPLASIA is an abnormality of the hip joint where the socket portion does not fully cover the ball portion, resulting in an increased risk for joint dislocation. It can occur at birth or even late in life. Complications without treatment can include arthritis, limping, and chronic low back pain.

create deeper sockets to stop more dislocations. The surgery was extremely dangerous. I was warned my injuries could be like being hit by a double decker bus. But I was never in doubt. I was determined and positive and knew I’d be stronger for it. My recovery period was going to be extremely tough but I so wanted to be a normal person again. I, too, had things I wanted to experience, places to visit like Uganda. But, aged 18, I soon discovered how different child services were to adult services. I was transferred to my local hospital where staff had no understanding or awareness on my condition. I slowly lost my mobility, my independence, my self-esteem. Fortunately, my GP helped me to get PIP (Personal Independence Payment) and I was given the higher rate which enabled me to receive a mobility car to allow me to be as independent as I could be. Throughout the last few years I have been going around in circles, meeting different surgeons and hoping they could improve my quality of life. One surgeon said I would be in pain for the rest of my life! Some opinions were better than others. Two years ago, I was referred me to University College London Hospital. I arrived at the hospital feeling so nervous and anxious. I just wanted to run away and hide. But,

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to my amazement and joy, a consultant recommended left hip replacement surgery! A few months later I was on my way to London for the op and on the train opposite me was Ashley Luke Lloyd from the West End musical Dreamgirls. He was great and invited me, my mum and my auntie to one of his shows. What a dream come true! A few months into my recovery, I started having pain in my right hip which I put down to muscle weakness, so I threw myself back into strict physiotherapy to build up muscles in both legs. However, despite all my efforts, another hip replacement was the only answer. Naturally, I was very anxious, but with my parents always at my side, I got through it okay and I’m now doing everything I can to make the most of my two new hips.

My life so far has been a rollercoaster of a journey. Now I can’t wait to see what these next few years years bring.

tel 0151 230 0307

B

ISOLATED: Natalie and sons Lucas, right, and Eddie

Growing

HELP is at hand for blind university students worried about their finances. Student Dosh is a new guide covering everything students need to know – from banking accessibility to information on overdrafts and how to budget, including additional support on financing studies. There is also a useful ‘budget calculator’ to help identify what money students have coming in and what they have to spend, so they can plan and manage their finances. Tara Chattaway, at Thomas Pocklington Trust, said: “We know starting university can be challenging under normal circumstances for anyone with vision impairment, but in the current crisis it is going to be even more difficult. “This online guide is just part of a wide range of information that can found on our website.” n Student Support Line 0203 757 8040 n www.pocklingtontrust.org.uk/student-support

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We’re all revved up to get you into gear! Advertising feature

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T Allied Mobility we know the freedom a wheelchair accessible vehicle can bring to your life.

That’s why we don’t want you waiting months to take delivery of your new pride and joy. We’re committed to delivering your car within three weeks* of you confirming your order with us. All of our mobility cars come with reverse parking sensors, electric winch (or lift where applicable) and privacy glass completely free, so there’s no hidden extra costs. Depending on your additional seating preference and the size of your wheelchair, our mobility advisors will chat through your best options before arranging a free home demonstration with your local mobility consultant. With a seven-day helpline (0808 916 3028), we’re here for you if you have any questions or if you need our help. We provide a free, yearly safety inspection of the accessible parts of your vehicle so you can travel in complete confidence. If you’re a Motability customer, your vehicle servicing and MOT is included in your contract and we’ll call you when they’re due. With our specialised mobile support vans, we can even service your vehicle** right outside your front door! *New models, does not apply to factory orders. **Ford and Peugeot


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Marathon bike ride to beat motor neurone disease

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Fund-loving Bandits JOURNEY’S END: From left: Arlene and John Chart, Matt Hellyer and Christopher Chart

T

HE PILGRIM Bandits rode into Land’s End with a very special plea – “help us beat Motor Neurone Disease”.

Leading the team of 10 veteran amputees was 49-year-old John Chart, who was diagnosed with the incurable disease last year. A jubilant John said: “This ride has been about doing everything I can to raise awareness as not enough is known about the disease. “I want people to take a few minutes to read up on this demonic disease. I want people to see the devastation of what it does to you, but I also want to say to people don’t ever give up. You’ve got to keep going.”

Using hand bikes and specially adapted tandems, John and the Bandits battled through a heatwave and atrocious weather to complete their amazing John O’Groats to Land’s End bike ride in just 13 days. The team were also joined by various companions along the way, including John’s wife, Arlene, and their 14-year-old son, Christopher. John said: “Motor neurone disease shuts down your muscular system until you are literally cocooned inside your own body. Your brain is still compos mentis but you can’t move, you can’t breathe, you can’t eat, you can’t speak and your body eventually will just close down.”

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Pilgrim Bandits’ patron, former Lance Bombardier Ben Parkinson was among the team. Ben lost both legs and suffered brain damage while serving in Afghanistan in 2006. He was not expected to survive, let alone speak or walk again. But he defied these odds and has since taken part in many Pilgrim Bandits’ expeditions – becoming the first double amputee to cross the Hardanger Plateau in Norway and one of the few to conquer the mighty Yukon River in Canada. More recently, he took on the charity’s Winter Survival Course in Sweden, trekking across inhospitable terrain and sleeping in snow holes at minus 20 degrees. Ben, who rode a tandem with the charity’s

CEO, Matt Hellyer, described the ride as being “a walk in the park” in comparison to his previous feats. “It’s been a long time in lockdown and I hadn’t seen anybody for months. I couldn’t wait to be part of the team again. There’s always someone struggling and this was my chance to support John to get him on his way.” Support has come from the Duchess of York, Sarah Ferguson, Oscar-winning actor Eddie Redmayn; and SAS Who Dares Wins’ Mark Billingham. n Pilgrim Badits: Tel. 01425 626598 n Donations can be made via the Operation Ride UK Total Giving page: https://bit.ly/3fadwvw

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New term, new hope

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15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

Guidelines will mean so much for Down’s pupils

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HERE are strong hopes that at long last pupils with Down’s syndrome will get a better chance in the classrooms.

The Educational Guidelines document is the first of its kind in the world, and sets out exactly what teachers and institutions should be doing to improve the availability and quality of education for learners who have Down’s syndrome. Gillian Bird, at the Down’s Syndrome Association and one of the guidelines’ three authors, said: “Many families are frustrated by the slow rate of change towards inclusion for their children particularly within secondary and further education settings. “Our helpline calls suggest that equality and inclusion is going backwards, with more barriers rather than less. “Calls about moving from mainstream to special schools doubled last year. We may lose some of the wonderful opportunities that were given to adults (now in work and living in their local communities) through their inclusive education during the 2000s. The document is the culmination of best practice and learning over the last 30 years, and has been put into one document by Down Syndrome International. Gillian added: “We expect the guidelines to be included in all teacher training courses. Inclusive education

should be available for all learners, from all backgrounds and, although many learners who have Down’s syndrome have attended their local mainstream schools since the 1990’s, there are still many today who do not have this option. “We are ready for a leap forward in practice so that inclusive education means everyone. The guidelines are bursting with information about how to educate learners with Down’s syndrome of all ages and abilities, covering leadership, teacher education and curriculum access.” Education Secretary Gavin Williamson is now being asked to consider adopting them as best practice throughout the country. n Helpline: 0333 1212 300 n The guidelines are available at www.bit.ly/2ZW1fXj

Fact file

n Down’s syndrome is a genetic condition caused by the presence of an extra chromosome. Around one in every 1,000 babies is born with Down’s syndrome. n There are over 40,000 people who have the condition in the UK. n Everyone who has Down’s syndrome will have some degree of learning disability. n www.downs-syndrome.org.uk

‘Life changing’ phone for blind

A NEW voice-activated smartphone is set to transform the lives of blind people. The RealSAM In Your Pocket phone, developed with help from the Royal National Institute of Blind People, is the UK’s first fully voice-activated smart phone, media player and personal assistant for people with sight loss. Features include an inbuilt video magnifier when reading labels while shopping, and custom-built navigation software that allows users to bookmark landmarks when travelling alone and be guided back with direction and distance. n Prices start at £25.99 a month as part of a twoyear contract with O2. Tel. 0333 772 7708

Irton House Farm

Sunflower card eases rail travel HAPPY HO LID AWARD 2 AY 012!

ALL OF Britain’s rail companies are now recognising Sunflower lanyards and cards so that passengers with non-visible disabilities can travel with extra confidence. Robert Nisbet, from the Rail Delivery Group, said: “The Sunflower scheme can help people with non-visible disabilities feel more confident asking for assistance, whether that’s to buy a ticket, find their way or get reassurance that the next train is theirs. “Passengers returning to train travel after lockdown will also benefit from wider staff training to improve disability awareness and the 8,000 new, more accessible train carriages we are introducing by 2025.” Disability blogger and freelance writer Chloe Tear, pictured, who regularly uses the lanyard, said: “Despite having a physical disability and being partially sighted, if my cane is folded up and I’m sat down it wouldn’t be hard to mistake me for a non-disabled young woman. “The fear around not receiving support or being judged for using priority seats is eased by the lanyard and card.” n You can collect a lanyard at ticket offices across England, Scotland and Wales.

A warm welcome is waiting for you at our superbly scenic, fully accessible self catering cottages in the Lake District.

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Bionic arm opens up a whole new world for Daz

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PLAYTIME: Daz with daughter Sky

PASS ME A CRAYON, DAD M ILITARY veteran Darren “Daz” Fuller, who lost part of his arm while on active duty in Afghanistan, can finally comb his little girl’s hair again.

And it’s all thanks to a revolutionary 3-D printed bionic arm. “It really is fantastic,” said Daz, 43. “The first thing I did was to shake my little girl’s hand. I can comb her hair, play games, draw, and do all the things I’ve missed out on. We can now walk together, hand in hand. “It’s great to be able to move the thumb to a wide range of angles. It is a more sensitive device than those I have tried before. I just wish I could have had something like it when my daughter was younger – it would have helped a lot with changing nappies!” Daz, who is an outreach officer for the veterans charity Blesma, served with the Parachute Regiment for 20 years and was injured during an incident with mortar ammunition in Afghanistan. It led to the lower of his right arm being amputated. He spotted the Hero Arm in the Blesma Magazine, which highlighted how lightweight the device was. “To be the first veteran to get a Hero Arm is fantastic, but it leads on to me being hopefully the first of many. The first few weeks have been a voyage of discovery. “There are so many things I’m doing two-handed compared to before and so many things I’m still discovering. “Doing things together as a family that may not have been possible or a lot harder before has been great. I can also now remember the last time I ate with a knife and fork as it was yesterday!” The arm is one of several hero arms manufactured by

Bristol-based company Open Bionics. It works by picking up signals from muscles in the residual limb. When Daz puts on the arm and flexes his muscles just below the elbow, special sensors detect the naturally generated electric signals and turn these into hand movement. Brian Chenier, Blesma’s Prosthetics Support Officer, helped Darren to get the arm through the Veterans Prosthetics Panel, set up by the NHS eight years ago to help veterans lead more independent lives. He said: “This is the first time the Hero Arm has been funded by the VPP. Hopefully, this now paves the way for other military veterans and could lead to wider use within the NHS for civilian amputees as we have seen with Microprocessor Controlled Knees which were widely provided to amputee veterans following recent conflicts.” Open Bionics co-founder Samantha Payne said: “The fact that Daz is the first person to receive funding through an NHS funding pathway gives hope to the dozens of people with upper limb differences in the UK who are currently actively crowdfunding for their Hero Arms, and hundreds more who are waiting patiently. “We very much hope the NHS sees how helpful these devices are and begin offering them to more amputees. “The Hero Arm is made in the UK and is currently covered by French and Irish national healthcare systems, but not England’s. We have a wait-list of amputees who cannot afford private healthcare waiting for the device to be available via the NHS.”

n www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/armedforces/veterans-prosthetics/

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HAPPY HO LIDAY AWARD 2 012!

A warm welcome is waiting for you at our superbly scenic, fully accessible self catering cottages in the Lake District.

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www.alltogethern

THE GO tour – a

Epilepsy: Young people need help

MORE seizures, more stress and appointments being cancelled are among the challenges faced by young people with epilepsy during the pandemic. A new study from the Young Epilepsy charity underlines the difficulties posed by lockdown to the 112,700 young people with epilepsy in the UK. n 30% of respondents reported an increase in seizures during lockdown. n The majority report deteriorations in sleep and mood). n Three in five are more reluctant to go to hospital. Susanna Fantoni,24, has autism and epilepsy. She said: “I’ve had to postpone several appointments, and missed blood tests that I’m supposed to get every three months to make sure my phenytoin levels (my main anti-epileptic drug) don’t get too high and potentially put me in a coma. “It’s these uncertainties that add up and amount to the kind of stress that can cause a sudden peak in seizures.” n Helpline 01342 831342, text 07860023789 or email helpline@youngepilepsy.org.uk.

Warning to retailers SHOPS are being warned not to discriminate between customers on the basis of disability and to provide required reasonable adjustments. Guidance from the Equality and Human Rights Commission also asks retailers to plan ahead for the needs of disabled shoppers, to communicate effectively with disabled customers and to ensure all staff are properly trained.

No masks, please

TWO out of three parents of deaf children would not send their child to school if teachers wore face masks, according to a new survey by the National Deaf Children’s Society. Ian Noon, chief policy advisor at the NDCS, said: “In the decades I’ve worked in education policy, I’ve never seen a policy roll-out that’s happened so quickly and caused so much fear, worry and anguish for deaf students and their families.” Polly, 15, is severely to profoundly deaf. She said: “I use a radio aid in lessons, but I still rely on lip reading and speech clarity to learn effectively. Face masks remove both of these options and it means I won’t be able to understand what my teacher is saying. “I just want people to understand the impact on deaf young people before any decisions are made.”

THE WORLD

L

AST YEAR, endurance cyclist Josh Quigley suffered horrific injuries after being hit by a car at 70 mph while riding across America.

He was just 3,500 miles short of completing a remarkable round-the-world journey – a journey that Josh was undertaking in his attempt to deal with his mental health issues. Family and friends thought he would never get back on a bike. But Josh proved them all wrong. Not only did he make a miraculous recovery from a fractured skull and broken bones, he soon got himself fit again, and now he has just set a new world record for the North Coast 500 Route. Josh, who only took up cycling four years ago, recorded a time of 31hrs, 19mins and 8secs, beating exprofessional cyclist James McCallum’s previous record by 4mins 27 secs. The North Coast 500 – a 516-mile route around the Scottish Highlands – is now ranked as one of the world’s toughest endurance challenges. Josh said: “I started cycling because I was depressed and looking for something that would help me turn my life around. “I never in a million years thought I would then go and set a new world record. “Thank you to the hundreds of people who were lining the streets all the way around the route. Their support and encouragement helped me dig deeper than I’ve ever dug before.”

Josh was using his record-breaking attempt to raise money for the Baylor Scott & White Medical Centre, in Temple, Texas n www.gofundme.com/f/north-coast-500world-record

WE ASKED Josh to share some of the lessons he has learned – and how he has been able to overcome adversity.

NO-ONE will forget this year. So many people are struggling, so many are isolating, and so many are turning to junk food or even upping their alcohol consumption to cope. Some basic daily healthy habits have gone out of the window. But it doesn’t have to be this way . . . I’d like to share with you a strategy and a mindset that has helped me spot opportunities in troubling times and use adversity as a means to grow, learn and become a greater version of myself. My first real brush with adversity came back in 2015. After a break-up with my long-time girlfriend, I fell into a

dark depression and was str my own. Things finally came months later when I attempte crashing my car on t Luckily, I surviv life back on tr I was insp Chris Hoy my bike the worl I was s and ce I knew and tha Cycling way of d journey t Amazing year cycling covering 10,00 goal but I was ha home. However, I soo habits and unhealthy ways o Getting back on a bike was more round-the-world attemp in the towel as soon as I felt Then my father’s death from of depression. Deep down I knew what I h


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OOD . . . AND THE BAD: Josh on his round the world and recovering from his near-death accident in Texas

Asthma: No increased risk, say researchers

How cycling round the globe has helped Josh deal with depression

AT HIS FEET

had to do. And so, on April

14, 2019, I set off on my seventh round-the-world attempt – and this time I was absolutely determined that I would complete it. On that life-changing journey, I encountered many obstacles and challenges: My bike was stolen, I got stuck in the Alps during heaving snowfall, I had food poisoning in Azerbaijan, and severe dehydration in China. A damaged passport in Australia also meant I had to fly back to the UK for a replacement. Previously, all these obstacles would have stopped me in my tracks. But with my newfound commitment, they were never going to get in the way. However, there was one final big obstacle in America … I was 14,500 miles into the challenge — I only had 3,500 miles and three weeks of cycling left to do. But, while coasting through Texas a car hit me from behind at 70mph. I was in hospital and in rehab for five weeks. My long list of injuries included a fractured skull, traumatic brain injury, seven broken ribs and multiple fractures across my back and down my legs. It was enough to end my dream. But from the moment I was conscious, I knew had to get back on the bike and finish the challenge. This was just another obstacle to overcome. After just three weeks of rehabilitation, I was cycling on an indoor bike while sat in a wheelchair with my foot in a cast. Seven weeks later I was back home and riding an

indoor bike. Another ten weeks and I was back out on the road again. My recovery and my rehabilitation have been made possible by so many hard-working and supportive people. Covid-19 and the global travel situation stopped me in my tracks. But it’s giving me the chance to focus on my health, sorting out my weight and eating habits. I’ve also taken up yoga and started learning French. My messages are … n If you have ever said you were going to lose weight, but never had the time to cook healthy meals – now is the time. n If you have ever said you were going to start exercising, but never had the time to work out – now is the time. n If you have ever said you were going to cut out alcohol but couldn’t beat the temptation of your mates going to the pub at the weekend – now is the time.

uggling to deal with life on to a breaking point six ed suicide by intentionally the motorway near my home. ved — and decided to get my rack. pired to get into cycling by Sir y, and decided I would get on and attempt to cycle around ld. This, despite the fact that eriously overweight, unfit, rtainly not a cyclist! w I needed extreme results, at required drastic action. g around the world was my doing this — and to start my o happiness. gly, I managed to spend a full g across 14 countries, 00 miles. I didn’t achieve my appy again and returned on slipped back into old of life. s the answer. But, despite pts, I found myself throwing good about myself. m cancer led to another bout

It is possible to overcome adversity. Use these troubling times to become a greater version of yourself!

n You can follow Josh at: Facebook: www.facebook.com/JoshQuigley1992 Twitter: twitter.com/JoshQuigley92 Instagram: www.instagram.com/joshquigley92/

PEOPLE with asthma do not present an increased risk of developing a severe form of COVID-19, says a new study. Scientists at Bicêtre Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris / Université Paris-Saclay say their work suggests there is no evidence of increased illness or mortality in people with asthma. In a group of 768 patients hospitalised from 15 March to 15 April 2020, 37 (4.8%) were asthmatic, a proportion broadly similar to the general population of the same age in France. These patients were younger than non-asthmatic patients hospitalised for COVID-19 pneumopathy and more often female. None of the patients experienced a severe asthma attack warranting specific treatment on admission to hospital, confirming that this respiratory infection is less likely to exacerbate asthma than other respiratory viral infections. n The research is published in the European Respiratory Journal

Shameful

SEVEN in ten people with a learning disability had their social care cut when they needed it most, according to a survey by learning disability charity Mencap. Mencap chief executive Edel Harris said: “I am really shaken by the results of this survey. We knew it was bad, but no one could hear these stories without feeling ashamed to be part of a society that allows this to go on.   “Social care has had decades of underinvestment, and we have been warning about the system being at breaking point for years – but here are clear signs that the system has broken and people with a learning disability and their families are paying the price. n Helpline 0808 808 1111 (8am-6pm, Monday-Friday) or email help@mencap.org.uk     

Your stories . . .

BUSINESS Disability Forum is looking for stories of how organisations and individuals have responded to the unprecedented events of 2020 in a disability-smart way. The charity’s chief executive Diane Lightfoot said: “Disability Smart Stories is an opportunity for us to capture and share what has worked well, and to carry those learnings forward into 2021.” Stories will be published on the Forum’s website and social media channels on 3 December to mark International Day of Persons with Disabilities. n BDF, tel 020 7403 3020. www.businessdisabilityforum.org.uk


18

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

SHOPMOBILITY

n ALTRINCHAM . Tel 0161 929 1714 n ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE. Tel 0161 339 9500 n BARROW. Tel 01229 434039 n BIRKENHEAD. Tel 0151 647 6162 n BLACKBURN AND DARWEN. Tel 01254 690566 or 07757 502217 n BLACKPOOL. Tel 01253 349427 n BOLTON. Tel 01204 392946 n CARLISLE. Tel 01228 631564 n CHESTER. Tel 01244 312626 n CHORLEY. Tel 01257 260 888 n COLWYN BAY. Tel 01492 533822 n CREWE. Tel 01270 580 031 n ELLESMERE PORT. Tel 0151 355 1420 n KENDAL. Tel 01539 740 933 n LEIGH, Wigan. Tel 01942 777 985 n LIVERPOOL. Tel 0151 707 0877 n MANCHESTER Trafford Centre. Tel 0161 747 2684 n MANCHESTER Arndale Centre. Tel 0161 839 4060 n NELSON. Tel 01282 692 502 n NORTHWICH, Vale Royal Tel 01606 288820 n OSWESTRY. Tel 01691 656882 n PENRITH. Tel 01768 895 438 n PRESTON. Tel 01772 204 667 n RHYL. Tel 01745 350665 n ROCHDALE. Tel 01706 865 986 n RUNCORN, Halton Lea Tel 01928 710144 n SHREWSBURY. Tel 01743 236900 SKELMERSDALE. Tel 01695 550066 n ST HELENS. Tel 01744 613 388 n STOCKPORT. Tel 0161 666 1100 n WARRINGTON. Tel 01925 240064 n WARRINGTON. Birchwood Tel 01925 822 411 WIDNES: 0151 511 8833 n WIGAN. Tel 01942 776 070 n WINSFORD Tel 01606 557550 n WREXHAM. Tel 01978 312390 MIDLANDS n BIRMINGHAM. Snow Hill Railway Station. Tel 0121 236 8980. Level 2, Centre Car Park, Bullring. Tel 0121 616 2942 n STAFFORD. Tel 01785 619456 n STOKE ON TRENT. Tel 01782 233333 n SUTTON COLDFIELD. Tel 0121 355 1112 n TAMWORTH. Tel, 01827

Days out just got easier

The Tasker family – from left: Reuben, Gary, Jane and Faith

These families need a break T

HREE in four families caring for disabled adults felt forgotten about during the lockdown – and received no warning that support and care were being reduced.

And a third of families are still waiting for the support to be reinstated, a survey by national disability charity Sense found. More than half of families had to take on additional caring responsibilities, and many were denied access to vital community services such as medical treatment, day centres, and support at home. Faith Tasker, 20, from Liverpool, has complex disabilities, which include being autistic, blind and hearing impaired. When the lockdown begun, the day service and respite support she receives stopped and she was left in the care of her family 24/7. Seven months later, and the support is still to be reinstated. “Providing care with no respite is tough”, says Faith’s mother, 60-year-old Jane, “but the hardest thing is the lack of information about when the support will be reinstated, or even what the plan is.

“You feel like you’re chasing people for updates, and then getting fobbed off.” The charity’s chief executive, Richard Kramer, said: “Everyone has had their life affected by this pandemic, but few have had a harder time than the families looking after disabled adults over the last five months. “Many haven’t had a break from caring and feel isolated and forgotten. Disabled people’s needs have largely been forgotten. “Government must take action to reinstate the care and support that families need such as short breaks. “We need to see clear and increased communication with disabled people and their families, and sufficient funding, support and resources to local authorities to flexibly deliver care and support.” Sense is asking supporters to sign their letter, calling on the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, Matt Hancock, to take action to secure and reinstate community services and support, such as short breaks for disabled adults and their families. n www.sense.org.uk

HELP AT THE END OF A PHONE

n ANGLESEY: TARAN Tel 01407 721933 n BLACKPOOL Disability Information and Support. Tel 01253 472 202. Textphone 01253 476 450 n CHESHIRE CIL Tel 01606 331853 n CHESTER Dial House Tel 01244 345655 n DENBIGHSHIRE Tel 01745 354445 n ELLESMERE PORT DICE Tel 0151 355 1420

n HALTON Disability Service Tel 01928 717222 n KNOWSLEY DISABILITY CONCERN. 0151 480 4090 n LANCASTER DISC Tel 01524 34411 n LIVERPOOL Association of Disabled People. 0151 263 8366. Text 0151 260 4076. n ACSIL (Amputees and Carers), Tel, 0151 261 1166 n THE BRAIN CHARITY Tel 0151 298 2999

n MANCHESTER (GTR) Coalition of Disabled People Tel 0161-273 5154 n MOLD Flintshire Disability Tel 01352 755546 n NELSON: Pendle Pakistan Welfare Association. Tel 01282 603 616 n PRESTON DISC: Tel 01772 558 863. Text 01772 204 787 n RHYL Tel 01745 350665 n STOCKPORT: Disability

THE new online edition of The Rough Guide to Accessible Britain (accessibleguide.co.uk) is packed with over 200 comprehensive reviews. Through collaboration with Carers Trust and the National Autistic Society, this edition features more information relevant to carers and those with hidden disabilities. Twenty-five exciting new venue reviews are featured, including outdoor attractions such as Belfast Zoo, Kew Gardens, Legoland, Trebah Gardens, and Powis Castle According to research, half of people with a disability, or their carers, spend between two and five hours planning a day out and one in 10 spend more than a day researching. Emma West, reviewer and foreword author of the Guide, said: “The Guide is such a valuable resource for simplifying that process.”

In the can!

THE three winners of our recent competition to win a Miracle Watering Can are: Suzanne Ford, Norley Drive, Eccleston, St Helens; A Kilshaw, Plover Avenue, Winsford, Cheshire; and Katherine Comer, Dingwall Drive, Wirral. n For the full range of Miracle Can products, go to www.miraclewateringcans.co. uk

Stockport. 0161 480 7248 n WARRINGTON Disability Partnership. 01925 240064 n WIRRAL WIRED Tel 0151 670 1500 n WEST LANCS HELPLINE Freefone 0800 220676 n ST HELENS DASH Tel 01744 453053 MIDLANDS n BIRMINGHAM Disability Resource Centre Tel 0121 789 7365

n Disabled People’s Network Solihull Tel 0121 788 1544 n STOKE: Disability Solutions Tel 01782 683800 n WOLVERHAMPTON Elder and Disabled Group Tel 01902 448552 n WEST MIDS Amputee

Group. 07891 794733; 07585 958322; 07557 228154


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19

15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

CARERS’ CENTRES

YOUR SAY ON HOUSING Time to start drawing plans for a better future

H

ERE’S your chance to have a say on how houses should be built to be more accessible for everyone.

The Government want to hear from as many people as possible on whether it should introduce higher accessibility standards for new housing in England. The consultation paper, Raising Accessibility Standards for New Homes, comes more than 15 months after Theresa May promised a consultation on introducing compulsory higher standards, in one of her last acts before resigning as prime minister. The existing minimum standard for accessible housing has four main criteria: level access to the main entrance, a flush threshold, sufficiently wide doorways and circulation space, and a toilet at entrance level. This is required of all new-build homes. The consultation is seeking views on how to raise standards further, including the option to raise the minimum standard for all new homes.

VISUAL PROBLEMS n ACCRINGTON Tel 01254 233332 n BARROW Tel 01229 820698 n BIRMINGHAM Action for Blind Tel 0121 665 4200 n BLACKBURN Tel 0125 554143 n BLACKPOOL: N-Vision Tel 01253 362696 n BURY Tel 0161 763 7014 n BURNLEY Tel 01282 438507

Government launch new consultation

A higher minimum standard would require additional features including having a living area at entrance level and stepfree access to all entrance level rooms and facilities, wider doorways and corridors as well as clear access routes to reach windows. It would also include further features to make homes more easily adaptable over time to a wide range of occupants, including older people, those with reduced mobility and some wheelchair users. Examples include bathrooms that can be easily adapted for installing grab rails, and stairs designed to allow easy fit of a stair lift. Housing secretary Robert Jenrick says the consultation addresses the issue of inaccessible housing head on and that it considers bold options to

ensure more homes are built to higher accessibility standards. In August, the Government was accused of showing contempt for disabled people after publishing an 84-page white paper on the future of the planning system, without including a single mention of disabled people, disability or accessible housing. The Planning for the Future document makes repeated references to the need for “beautiful new homes” while ignoring the accessible housing crisis. Cllr Pam Thomas, a wheelchair-user and a prominent Labour member of Liverpool City Council, said: “I think the failure to even mention accessible housing shows contempt for, and marginalisation of, disabled people.”

n The consultation closes on December 1. Have your say at: www.gov.uk/government/consultations/ raising-accessibility-standards-for-newhomes n You can also email your views at: accessiblehomes@communities.gov.uk

HELP AT THE END OF A

n CARLISLE: Action for Blind People Tel 01228 595121 n CHESHIRE & N WALES: Vision Support. Tel 01244 381515 n CUMBRIA (West) Tel 01946 592474 n CUMBRIA (Sth Lakeland) Tel 01539 726613 n GUIDE DOGS Tel 0118 983 5555 n HENSHAW’S 0161 872 234 or 0151 708 7055

n LIVERPOOL: Bradbury Fields.Tel 0151 221 0888: Action for Bind Tel 0151 298 3222 n MANCHESTER: Action for Blind Tel 0161 787 9252 n PRESTON: Action for Blind People Tel 01772 320550 n OLDHAM Tel 0161 682 8019 n ROSSENDALE Tel 01706 873256 n SIGHTLINE (North West)

Tel 0800 587 2252 n WIGAN Tel 01942 242891 n WIRRAL Tel 0151 652 8877 HEARING ISSUES n BIRMINGHAM Institute for Deaf Tel 0121 246 6101 n CHESHIRE Deaf Society Tel 01606 47831 n CUMBRIA Deaf Society Tel 01228 606434 n LANCASHIRE (EAST) Deaf Society Tel 01282 839180

n MANCHESTER Deaf Centre. Tel 0161 273 3415 Genie Networks. Tel 0161 941 4549. Text 18001 0161 941 4549 n MERSEYSIDE Society for Deaf Tel 0151 228 0888 n SOUTHPORT Centre for the Deaf Tel 01704 537001 n ST HELENS: Deafness Resource Centre Tel 01744 23887 n WOLVERHAMPTON Centre for Deaf Tel 01902

n ACCRINGTON Tel 01254 387 444 n BLACKBURN with DARWEN Tel 01254 688 www.bwdcarers.org n BLACKPOOL Blackpool Borough Council, Tel 01253 477 716 nCUMBRIA Carlisle. Tel 01228 542 156 Penrith. Tel 01768 890 280 Barrow-in-Furness. Tel 01229 822 822 Kendal. Tel 01539 732 927 Whitehaven, Tel 01946 592 223 n CHESHIRE & WARRINGTON Helpline:0300 102 0008 n KNOWSLEY Tel 0151 549 1412 n LANCASTER Tel 01524 66475 nLIVERPOOL Tel 0151 705 2307 n MANCHESTER Tel 0161 835 2995 n MORECAMBE Tel 01524 833456 n PRESTON Tel 01772 200173 n RUNCORN Tel 01928 580182 n WIDNES Tel 0151 257 9673 n SALFORD Tel 0161 833 0217 n SEFTON Tel 0151 288 6060 n ST HELENS Tel 01744 675 615 n STOCKPORT Tel 0161 442 0442 n WARRINGTON (WIRED) Tel 01925 633 492 n WEST LANCS Tel 01695 711243 n WIGAN & LEIGH Tel 01942 705959 / 486923 MIDLANDS n BIRMINGHAM Tel 0121 675 8000 n SOLIHULL Tel 0121 788 1143 n WALSALL Tel 01922 610 810 NORTH WALES n ANGLESEY Tel 01248 722828 n BANGOR Tel 01248 370 797 n CONWY Tel 01492 533714 n DENBIGHSHIRE: NEWCIS, Tel: 0845 603 3187 nDOLGELLAU Tel 01341 421167 n FLINTSHIRE: NEWCIS, Tel: 01352 751436 n WREXHAM CARERS SERVICE


20

Books

Get set, go – on truly inspirational journey Dead Man To Iron Man: A Ten Month Journey from Dead Meat to Athlete, by Paul Smith, Pitch Publishing Ltd, £12.99

YOU’RE 43, cruising through life when suddenly you’re diagnosed with cancer. What do you do next? When Paul Smith found himself facing that question he decided to swim 2.4 miles, cycle 112 more and then run a marathon. There are tears and laughter in this brutally honest, goodhumoured and intensely personal account of Paul’s inspiring journey from being at death’s door to conquering a triathlon. Join him on a life-affirming mission encompassing exhilarating highs and painful lows. After his devastatingly rare one-in-amillion bowel cancer diagnosis and his time in hospital confronting an operation ominously dubbed the ‘Mother of all Surgeries’, Paul has just 10 months to train his broken body to peak fitness and fulfil his dream of completing one of the world’s toughest and most intimidating triathlons, Ironman Wales. If you think completing an ironman triathlon is an impossible dream, read this truly inspirational story and think again.

Winning mentality

Football Cancer Life Death, by Michael Heinicke, Pitch Publishing Ltd, £12.99 AN unconventional and surprisingly uplifting real-life account of football fan Michael Heinicke’s experience with cancer. Interspersed with 25 years of exhilarating and heartening memories of life as a Burnley FC supporter, the book takes readers back to his first match, as seen through the eyes of a six-year-old boy. The depth of detail woven into Michael’s accounts of Burnley matches through the decades – from the old, decaying terraces of Division Four to the euphoria of a Wembley promotion to the Premier League – will strike a chord with football fans everywhere. Michael, 39, was the father of three young children when he was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 2014. His story breaks down conventional cancer myths and shows us that sometimes, for a lucky few, life’s curveballs can be more positive than negative, bringing a tale of hope to that unfathomable and unbearable cancer diagnosis.

15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

ARIES (Mar 21-Apr 20)

powerful egotist. Your powers of persuasion will be strong on the 19th. A second Full Moon on the 31st marks an exciting turning point in an intimate relationship. A sudden engagement, marriage or divorce will open a door that was once firmly shut to you. Mid-November prompts you to undergo a dramatic makeover. This is a great time to change your hairstyle, overhaul your wardrobe, develop a whole new style or give your home a top to toe makeover. The transformation will change the way people treat you. A Lunar Eclipse on the 30th puts an end to a financial obligation allowing you to forge a new path and open up a new world.

Challenging a time-honoured institution will backfire; pour your rebellious energy into a creative project instead. Pushy behaviour will get an angry reception. As the month nears its end your love life starts to gather an exciting momentum all of its own while another Full Moon on the 31st brings an unexpected boost to your bank balance and a little extra to splash out on life’s little luxuries. Mid-November sees an intriguing opportunity coming your way. It will become much easier to get projects off the ground starting on the 14th; life is about to move much faster. The New Moon on the 15thfinds you letting down your defences with an attentive lover. If you have a partner, their financial good fortune will spill over to you, allowing you to indulge in some creature comforts.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov 23-Dec 21)

TAURUS (Apr 21-May 21)

The New Moon on the 16th warns against taxing your system with too much junk food and alcohol. By feeding your body pure ingredients, you’ll avoid burnout. Turn a deaf ear to friends who criticise your plans to launch a creative venture. A second Full Moon on the 31st prompts you to listen to a wild impulse and transform your look in some way. Avoid spreading gossip – that’s the message for November. Your love life sizzles with excitement on the 21st; but the Lunar Eclipse on the 30th causes a source of income to dry up, prompting you to look for a more rewarding line of work. Finding a job at a government agency, university or hospital is strongly advised, as this position will include excellent benefits.

GEMINI (May 22-Jun 21) October’s New Moon warns against getting involved in a troubled romance. Returning to a hobby you enjoyed as a child will make you feel years younger. Indulge your playful side. Another Full Moon on the 31st brings an unexpected opportunity to rest, relax and recharge your batteries. Plan to do something, go somewhere or just quietly meditate and reconnect with your inner self. Resist the impulse to buy someone’s affection. A stalled project will start moving forward again, filling you with excitement. After a prolonged silence, you’ll finally hear back from a charitable or creative institution on the 29th; the news will be good.

CANCER (Jun 22-Jul 23)

As October gets up and running the Full Moon brings a stressful situation that might be too much to bear. Instead of battling with a jealous rival, strike out on your own. Signing a business deal on the 21st is strongly advised. This contract will pave the way to long-term financial stability. A second Full Moon on the 31st finds you finishing a group project. Don’t be surprised when you’re named the most valuable player. A pleasure trip in November could be just what the doctor ordered so long as you respect your environment and surroundings. Encourage your business or romantic partner to undergo a radical transformation on the 12th; they’ll appreciate your support and the changes they make will make things better for all concerned.

LEO (Jul 24-Aug 23)

Don’t let your ego get in the way of learning valuable skills. On the 16th, the New Moon will tempt you to throw yourself into a nasty argument. Don’t say anything you will come to

RUSSELL GRANT CALLING . . .

regret. Your moneymaking ability will soar starting on the 22nd. Another Full Moon on the 31st marks a thrilling turning point. It’s likely that COVID-19 will still be restricting our movements, but the early days of November are perfect for finding new ways to connect with your family. Powerful desires prompt you to embark on a fitness regimen on the 19th. Starting on the 21st, you’ll feel a strong urge to take a long-distance trip for pleasure. You may have to wait a while, but plan a trip to a country that has an exotic flavour.

VIRGO (Aug 24-Sep 23)

Your powerful allure will cause someone to fall head over heels in love with you while the New Moon on the 16th brings an intriguing moneymaking opportunity. Indeed, more money for luxuries becomes available on the 19th so give yourself a treat or two. A second Full Moon on the 31st could bring news of an interesting new opening. It will be easier to deal with a financial issue during the first few days of November. On the 15th, the New Moon inspires you to delve more into a subject that has always fascinated you. Avoid getting drawn into a nasty argument. You don’t want angry words to come back to haunt you. The Lunar Eclipse on the 30th results in more time for the people and pursuits you adore.

LIBRA (Sep 24-Oct 23) On the 16th, the New Moon tempts you to radically change your appearance. Resist this impulse, as you probably won’t be happy with the results. Be realistic about your work responsibilities on the 18th; don’t force colleagues to pick up your slack. Money from an inheritance, legal settlement or insurance refund will arrive on the 21st. Another Full Moon on the 31st marks a thrilling romantic encounter. November’s New Moon on the 15th brings an exciting moneymaking opportunity. Flattery will get you nowhere with a stern relative on the 16th. Instead of trying to win over this family member, it would be better to please yourself and do your own thing.

SCORPIO (Oct 24-Nov 22)

The New Moon on the 16th could force you to adopt a low profile. Beware of overshadowing a

Be wary about associating with snobs and power players. Don’t let a childish temper tantrum keep you from pursuing a moneymaking opportunity on the 19th; this will bring you much pleasure. If you feel you’ve outgrown a childhood ambition why not start working on a new set of aims and aspirations as October gives way to November. Another Full Moon on the 31st brings wonderful news about a medical matter. Neither a lender nor a borrower be on the 16th; mixing friendship and finance nearly always leads to heartache. Create a private place where you can hear yourself think. On the 30th, the Lunar Eclipse brings an end to a close relationship. As the festive season draws near think about building upon a romantic or business alliance that encourages exploration.

CAPRICORN (Dec 22-Jan 20)

The New Moon on the 16th brings an intriguing opportunity, but it might involve too much personal responsibility. Your generous spirit attracts an exciting travel opportunity on the 19th; making this a good time to finally make a booking. You’ll get a chance to share your expert knowledge with some appreciative people on the 24th. After a prolonged silence, you’ll finally get the news you have been waiting for in the early days of November. Friends in high places will promote your talent on the 19th; don’t be shy about having your work put before the public. A creative block will dissolve on the 29th.

AQUARIUS (Jan 21-Feb 19)

Money from an inheritance, legal settlement or insurance refund will inspire you to buy a beautiful luxury item. Don’t hesitate to indulge your sensual side. On the 16th, the New Moon makes you yearn to expand your horizons, but official duties will keep you rooted to the spot. Another Full Moon on the 31st marks an exciting turning point in your home life. You might relocate to an unusual area that stimulates your imagination. November’s New Moon finds you mixing with powerful people who appreciate your resourceful behaviour. A family emergency will require you to rethink your plans during the middle of the month; be as flexible as possible.

PISCES (Feb 20-Mar 20)

Think twice before opening a credit account; it’s best to keep debts to a minimum. Take a realistic view of a loved one’s strengths and weaknesses on the 18th; putting anyone on a pedestal is a recipe for disaster. Friendship could turn to romance on the 21st. If you’re single, obey an impulse to push a close relationship to the next level. Do you have a partner? Sweep them off their feet. It will be much easier to clarify your thoughts and come to terms with your ambitions at the start of November. Resist the temptation to indulge in retail therapy on the 9th; you don’t want to go into debt over things you really don’t need. This is a great time to pursue your dream.

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15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

21


22

TIMEBOMB in a bottle

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

MEDICAL NOTES

Are YOU suffering with this stomach disorder? TENS of thousands of people across the region could be suffering from a serious stomach disorder – and don’t know about it. Coeliac disease causes the body’s immune system to react to gluten found in food, making the body attack itself resulting in a lifetime of pain and discomfort. Diagnosing the condition has been extremely difficult with the average time being about 13 years! But a new and simple blood test is now available so that some adults over 55 can be diagnosed almost immediately, without first having to have an endoscopy and biopsy. The move follows new interim guidance from the British Society of Gastroenterology, pending the publication of its new Coeliac Guidelines in 2021. Hilary Croft, chief executive of Coeliac UK, said: “This will enable a greater number of people to gain a faster diagnosis, without the need to wait for an endoscopy at the hospital. “Getting an accurate diagnosis of coeliac disease means keeping gluten in the diet throughout the testing process – a difficult feat when waiting lists are long and people feel unwell. “These guidelines are good news for those who meet the criteria for a no-biopsy diagnosis, who will be able to start to feel better sooner on a gluten-free diet, the only treatment for coeliac disease. “However, those that do not meet the criteria are likely to face long waiting times as endoscopy services begin a phased return. Access to blood tests may still be limited at the moment, so we encourage people to speak with their GP if they are experiencing symptoms.” To make it easier to understand if symptoms are possibly due to coeliac disease and discuss further testing with your GP, Coeliac UK has developed a self-assessment test to make it easier to take that first step to diagnosis. n Go to www.isitcoeliacdisease.org.uk to take the online assessment. n Coeliac UK Helpline: 0333 332 2033

H

EALTH experts are warning that the rate of drinkrelated hospital admissions is now “a ticking timebomb ready to explode”.

A new NHS report reveals that in 2018 1.3 million people were admitted to hospital due to alcohol – 7.4% of all hospital admissions across the country. The numbers have risen by 60% in the last decade. Almost half of those admitted (47%) were aged between 55 and 74 and just under two thirds were male. Nuno Albuquerque, at alcohol addiction treatment experts UKAT, said: “This country’s problem with alcohol is a ticking timebomb about to explode. The NHS is crippling under pressures directly attributable to the misuse of alcohol. “What will it take to make the Government sit up, listen and take effective action? Why do we still not have an alcohol-specific strategy, as promised back in 2018? It is a huge problem and one that needs immediately addressing as a matter of urgency.” The biggest reason for admission into hospital was for cardiovascular disease, accounting for 645,070 (51%) of all admissions.

A further 17% (220,730) of all admissions were for mental and behavioural disorders due to alcohol, conditions which include acute intoxication, harmful use of alcohol, dependence to alcohol and withdrawal from alcohol. Other conditions for hospital admission due to alcohol include breast cancer, alcohol poisoning, and alcoholic liver disease. Almost 5,700 people died due to drink – 2% lower than in 2017 but a 7% rise in 10 years. The NHS report also shows 170,000 prescribed drugs were issued in 2018, 27% more than in 2008. Mr Albuquerque added: “The NHS is being forced into a corner when it comes to tackling alcohol misuse. GP’s prescribing drugs like Acamprosate Calcium, Disulfiram and Nalmefene will only pause the problem, not solve it. “Taking this sticky-plaster approach is also a false economy, costing the NHS an eye-watering £4.32m last year alone.” n For help and support with alcohol, visit www.ukat.co.uk/alcohol/v7/

Make time to love your liver

H

ALF OF all liver disease patients had no signs or symptoms before their diagnosis, a new study reveals.

Three top tips

THE British Liver Trust’s three simple steps to Love Your Liver back to health: n Drink within recommended limits and have three consecutive days off alcohol every week. n Maintain a healthy weight by eating well and taking more exercise. n Know the risk factors for viral hepatitis and get tested or vaccinated if at risk. To find out if you are at risk visit www.britishlivertrust.org.uk/screener

The largest ever survey of UK liver patients – also showed that a quarter were diagnosed at a very late stage when there were very few options for treatment and intervention. One in five had been dismissed or sent home with medication without further investigation when they first visited their GP. The survey also reveals: n A third of patients were diagnosed after being tested for another condition. n Tiredness, abdominal pain and itching were the most common symptoms experienced by half of the respondents. n More than half felt they were given not enough or no information upon diagnosis. n 22% waited more than six months before being

news@alltogethernow.org.uk

referred to a specialist. n Evidence shows the earlier a patient is diagnosed, the greater their chance of survival: 90% of liver disease is preventable. Professor Stephen Ryder, consultant at Nottingham University NHS Trust, said: “We have equipped GPs with a very poor test for diagnosing liver disease – Liver Function Tests (liver enzymes). Repeat testing of liver enzymes just wastes NHS money and does not

provide early diagnosis. “We now have excellent tests for liver scarring, the process which matters in the liver, and those tests should now be universal in primary care.” Pamela Healy, chief executive, British Liver Trust, said: “The UK is facing a liver disease crisis. Liver problems often develop silently as patients do not tend to experience symptoms until the disease has progressed.”

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

‘Kinder’ ways to treat kids’ cancers

RESEARCHERS have made an important breakthrough that could lead to kinder treatments for children with bone cancer, and save lives. Current treatment is gruelling, with outdated chemotherapy cocktails and limb amputation. The five-year survival rate is poor at just 42% – largely because of how rapidly bone cancer spreads to the lungs. New research identifies a set of key genes that drive bone cancer spread to the lungs in patients. In further experiments in mice with engineered human bone cancer cells that lack these key genes, the cancer cannot spread to the lungs. The research was led by Dr Darrell Green, from the University of East Anglia’s Norwich Medical School and Dr Katie Finegan from the University of Manchester. Dr Green said: “Primary bone cancer is the third most common solid childhood cancer, after brain and kidney, with around 52,000 new cases every year worldwide. “These findings are really important because not only do we now have a gene pathway associated with metastasis, we know that removing this gene pathway actually stops cancer spread in a live animal. “And we also know how and why this is happening through hijacking the immune system. “The next step already gearing up to take place is to silence this pathway in treatment form. “If these findings are effective in clinical trials, it would no doubt save lives and improve quality of life because the treatment should be much kinder compared to the gruelling chemotherapy and life-changing limb amputation that patients receive today.”

Tel 0151 230 0307


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15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

Plant and meat diet

YOU don’t have to give up meat and dairy altogether if you want to lower your blood pressure, according to new research. Moving toward a more plantbased diet will be effective, even if small amounts of meat and dairy are included, a study found. A team of researchers argue that any effort to increase plantbased foods in your diet and limit animal products is likely to benefit your blood pressure and reduce your risk of heart attacks, strokes and cardiovascular disease. They conducted a systematic

MEDICAL NOTES Rare muscle link, but keep taking the statins

review of previous research from controlled clinical trials to compare seven plant-based diets, several of which included animal products in small amounts, to a control diet and the impact that these had on blood pressure.. Joshua Gibbs, who led the work at Warwick Medical School, said: “This is a significant finding as it highlights that complete eradication of animal products is not necessary to produce reductions and improvements in blood pressure. “Essentially, any shift towards a plant-based diet is a good one.”

MS BREAKTHROUGH

S

CIENTISTS have made what they describe as a Holy Grail discovery to protect nerves from damage and prevent disability in multiple sclerosis.

Remarkably, they’ve also discovered that a readily available diabetes drug (pioglitazone) could be a potential treatment. In MS the protective coating that surrounds nerves, known as myelin, is damaged and nerves become less energy efficient as a result. Not having the energy they need makes nerves vulnerable to damage and causes disability over time. But for the first time researchers at the University of Edinburgh – funded in part by the MS Society – have discovered a natural mechanism in the body that tackles this issue, which they are calling ARMD (axonal response of mitochondria to demyelination). Although this natural function alone doesn’t provide enough energy to address demyelination in MS, the discovery raises the possibility of using

a drug to enhance it. Research now suggests pioglitazone – currently used to treat diabetes – could be the answer. Dr Don Mahad, leading the study at the University of Edinburgh, said: “Although our understanding of MS has vastly improved over the last two decades, new therapies still do not protect nerve fibres. “Such protection is the Holy Grail in MS treatment – not only for the relapsing form of MS, which has various options available, but for progressive forms too, where treatment continues to lag behind.

Diabetes drug

“Our discovery shows that nerves respond to myelin damage by increasing the movement of mitochondria (the cell powerhouse, which produces energy) to the area of damage – a response we’re calling ARMD. “Remarkably, we were able to enhance ARMD and protect these vulnerable nerves using the readily available diabetes drug pioglitazone. This is an incredibly important discovery – one we believe could finally bridge the gap in MS treatment.”

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Over the last few decades there have been huge strides made in our understanding of MS, and there are now over a dozen effective treatments for people with relapsing MS – but these only address damage that is caused by the immune system. “In order to truly stop MS and find treatments for everyone, ways need to be found to both protect nerves from further injury and repair damaged myelin. Last year, another MS Society funded study found that a different diabetes drug – the fasting mimetic drug metformin – was able to return cells to a more youthful state, and encourage the re-growth of myelin. Dr Emma Gray, MS Society Assistant Director of Research, said: “Currently, there are no effective neuroprotective therapies available for MS, but Dr Mahad’s research demonstrates we are getting closer – and finding treatments for everyone with MS is now a very real prospect.” n MS Helpline: 0808 800 8000

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A SMALL minority of people taking statins to reduce their risks of heart attack and strokes could be more susceptible to myopathy, a rare and painful muscle condition. But the overall benefits of taking them far outweigh the risks of developing the condition. A study by a team at the University of Oxford found that myopathy was rare, occurring on average in only one per 1,000 people during each year of statin treatment. There was a higher risk of myopathy in people on a higher statin dose, and in those who were older, female, of Chinese vs European ethnicity, had diabetes or lower body mass index, as well as those using other medications. Dr Jemma Hopewell, who led the study, said: “We saw a very clear distinction between risk of statin-related myopathy and reports of other muscle symptoms. “This new evidence, along with that from randomised-controlled trials, suggests that the vast majority of aches and pains that statin-users suffer are not caused by the drug.”

Prostate cancer exercise

EXERCISE has beneficial effects on the immune system during prostate cancer, a new study has found. Researchers found that a moderate bout of exercise kept the cell count of some immune cells at a normal level. Exercise helps the immune system mobilise by causing natural killer (NK) cells to move into the blood and be transported to areas of need, such as sites of infection or tumours. At the tissues, these cells move out of circulation and in cancer patients they can infiltrate the tumour and potentially slow the tumour’s rate of growth, the study at the Victoria University, Australia found

Tablets and the elderly

RESEARCHERS have been handed £156,000 to help frail elderly people manage multiple medicines safely. Dr Beth Fylan, at the University of Bradford, says: “Frail older people’s medicines regimens are often extremely complicated and it requires significant work to manage them safely. “When older people aren’t supported to do this, they may be more likely to be admitted into hospital or suffer a fall from which they can find it hard to recover, leading to a downward spiral. “Our aim is to help them manage things better, so they never enter that cycle.” The project is being funded by the National Institute for Health Research.

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15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

MEDICAL NOTES

Can YOU take part in Parkinson’s research?

PEOPLE affected by Parkinson’s disease are being encouraged to take part in a nationwide, two-year project aimed at getting a better understanding of the role of Parkinson’s Nurses. The charity Parkinson’s UK says a specialised nurse can save an NHS Clinical Commissioning Group up to £43,812 in avoided consultant appointments, £80,000 in unplanned admissions to hospital and £147,021 in days spent in hospital on average each year. Researchers at Northumbria University want to hear from people with Parkinson’s, and their families and carers, about their experiences of their Parkinson’s Nurse. They are also looking to hear from specialist nurses working in what is, or was, traditionally a Parkinson’s Nurse Specialist role. Katherine French, at Parkinson’s UK, said: “This exciting study will allow us to examine on a large scale the real impact these nurses are making to the lives of people with Parkinson’s.” Parkinson’s is the fastest growing neurological condition in the world and currently there is no cure. In the UK, 145,000 people are currently living with the condition. n www.northumbria.ac.uk/ParkinsonsNU

Head and back pain link

PEOPLE with persistent back pain or persistent headaches are twice as likely to suffer from both disorders, a new study has revealed. The results suggest an association between the two types of pain that could point to a shared treatment for both. Professor Martin Underwood, from Warwick Medical School, said: “In most of the studies we found that the odds were about double – either way, you’re about twice as likely to have headaches or chronic low back pain in the presence of the other, which is very interesting because typically these have been treated as separate disorders and then managed by different people. “But this makes you think that there might be, at least for some people, some commonality in what is causing the problem.” Prof Underwood added: “A joint approach would be appropriate because there are specific treatments for headaches and people with migraine. “There is a need for doctors and other healthcare professionals to think that when treating one issue to ask about the other and tailor the treatment accordingly.”

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Picture taken pre-lockdown

NEW THINKING ON DOWN’S . . .

SAVING LIVES: Dr Liz Mear, chief executive of the Innovation Agency, with AF Ambassadors

A

N EXCITING new study has overturned the belief that brain function in people with Down’s syndrome cannot be improved.

People’s cognitive skills CAN be improved

A team of scientists say cognitive skills like planning and organising, short-term memory, attention and concentration can all be boosted with a special course of brain training. Historically, it’s been thought that people with Down’s syndrome could not improve in cognitive function because of the genetic nature of the condition. This new study suggests the contrary, underscoring that the cognitive abilities of people with genetic conditions need not be viewed as unalterable.

‘Exciting results’

Dr. Henry Mahncke, head of Posit Science, whose BrainHQ software helped with the research, said: “Because Down’s syndrome is a genetic disorder, people have thought that the brain function and cognitive abilities could not be changed. “These exciting results suggest that’s not true. We hope these initial results spur further research, including randomised controlled trials, with this important group of people.” Researchers at Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, found a 10-week combined protocol of physical exercises and computerised brain training led to a reorganization of the brain and to improved performance on both cognitive and physical

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measures. The cognitive training used in the study was the Greek version of the commerciallyavailable BrainHQ brain app from Posit Science. The team took physical, cognitive, and resting-state EEG assessments of 12 adults with Down’s syndrome before and after a 10-week course of combined physical and cognitive training. The physical training consisted of aerobic, flexibility, strength, and balance exercises. The cognitive training was via BrainHQ, consisting of 29 visual and auditory exercises targeting memory, attention, processing speed, problem-solving, navigation, and social skills. The researchers had hypothesised that the training would trigger the brain’s neuroplasticity – its ability to change chemically, structurally, and functionally. Their results showed increased connectivity within the left hemisphere and from left to right hemisphere, as well as improved performance on physical and cognitive assessments. Physical improvements were reported in upper body strength and endurance (arm curl), and in mobility, and static and dynamic balance. There were also gains in general cognitive capacity. The researchers’ report said: ‘Our results reveal a strong adaptive neuroplastic reorganisation, as a result of the training that leads to a more complex and less-random network, with a more pronounced hierarchical organisation. “Our findings underline the ability of the Down’s syndrome brain to respond to the cognitive demands of external stimuli.”

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Volunteers stopping scores of strokes

AROUND 80 fewer people a year living on the North West coast will suffer strokes thanks to a programme to detect and treat irregular heart rhythms. Ambitious national targets were set five years ago to find and treat people with atrial fibrillation or AF – the most common form of heart rhythm disturbance, and one which can cause devastating disabilities. More than 24,000 people were believed to be living with AF on the North West coast without realising it and efforts to find those “missing” cases have been proving highly successful. The Innovation Agency, set up to help the NHS spread new ideas in health and social care in the region, achieved a 98% detection rate against a Public Health England target of 85% in 2018/19 – making it the highest performing area and exceeding the national target for 2029. A partnership approach helped the agency to engage the whole healthcare system in helping to detect people with AF and improve care in Cheshire, Merseyside, South Cumbria and Lancashire. That included training more than 70 volunteer AF Ambassadors to test pulses in their communities, and training fire and rescue services to perform pulse checks during community “safe and well visits”. Dr Julia Reynolds, Head of Programmes at the Innovation Agency, said: “We are delighted that all the hard work in our region in testing pulses, has resulted in more people being identified with AF and treated to prevent potential strokes. We have already started to see a reduction in AF-related strokes. n AF is responsible for about 20% of all strokes and if left untreated, can lead to serious complications, such as heart failure or stroke.

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Grow your own blood vessels

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Revolutionary method could be a lifesaver

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HE lives of millions of people with heart failure and circulation conditions could be dramatically improved – by growing new vessels in the heart.

Researchers are investigating revolutionary ways of treating people who have suffered heart attacks. A heart attack is caused by a blockage of one or more coronary arteries of the heart, which prevents blood and oxygen reaching the heart muscle. Current treatment includes reopening the blocked coronary artery with stents or bypass surgery, though the damage caused by a heart attack can lead to heart failure. The potential new treatment increases the blood flow to damaged heart tissue by using drugs that encourage the body to grow new blood vessels. Heart Research UK is funding the project, HOPE:  being led by Prof Professor Paolo Madeddu, at Madeddu the University of Bristol. His team discovered that an excess of a protein called BACH1 can prevent blood vessel formation. Prof Madeddu and his team hope to show that the use of BACH1 inhibitors can stimulate the growth of new blood vessels If successful, this would be the first step in developing them into drug treatments for heart disease. It could also benefit people suffering from other diseases where new vessel growth is needed, such as poor blood circulation in the legs, or damage to

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15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

‘We’re paying – you get grafting!’

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CIENTISTS aiming to make grafted blood vessels more resilient have been awarded a grant of over £145,000 by national charity Heart Research UK.

Coronary heart disease (CHD) occurs when one or more of the blood vessels that supplies the heart muscle with oxygen-rich blood becomes blocked. Untreated, this can lead to angina, heart attack and heart failure. CHD is the single biggest killer in the UK. One of the current treatments is coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery where a grafted blood vessel is used to bypass the blockage, restoring blood flow to the heart. Although CABG is very effective, over

other organs, such as the kidney, brain and eyes. Prof Madeddu said: “If we are successful, the door will be opened for a whole new method

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time the grafted blood vessel itself often becomes blocked. There is evidence, however, that it is possible to alter the characteristics of blood vessels to make them more resilient, so that they are less prone to becoming blocked and failing. The project, led by Dr Denise McDonald, senior lecturer from the Wellcome-Wolfson Institute for Experimental Medicine at Queens University Belfast, will use a range of laboratory models to test two key compounds that are important in in promoting resilience in grafted vessels. Dr McDonald and her team will investigate the interaction between these chemicals in order to develop novel ways of protecting blood vessels from graft failure, with the aim of preventing vein graft failure and improving the success of CABG surgery for treating patients with CHD. She said: “This is an incredibly interesting area of study, one that could potentially have real and applicable benefits to patients. “By increasing the resilience of grafted vessels, we will decrease the need for extra surgeries and procedures, easing the strain on our health service and reducing the amount of medical intervention a patient needs.” of treating people who have suffered damage to their hearts. The ability to stimulate the growth of new blood vessels will allow us to drastically improve the quality of life of patients who may be at risk of heart

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MEDICAL NOTES

New tool could prevent many strokes and deaths

WORK is under way to develop the first ever tool for predicting the risk of a cardiovascular event or death in patients who have already had a heart attack. In the UK, cardiovascular disease (CVD) causes one in four deaths. People with CVD are up to five times more likely to have a stroke, are six times more likely to die compared to those without, and up to half suffer a second heart attack. Prof Mamas Mamas, pictured, who is leading the research at the University of Manchester, said: “This is an incredibly exciting project that we hope will be able to make a real difference to survivors of heart attacks. “If we can accurately predict the likelihood of them suffering another cardiovascular event, then we can intervene early and hopefully reduce their risk. This will improve their quality of life, an ensure that patients receive care tailored to their condition.”

Puzzle of high salt diet

THE KEY to treating high blood pressure might lie in people who are “resistant” to developing the condition even when they eat high salt diets, shows new research. With one in four adults suffering from high blood pressure in the UK, and over 1.1 billion people across the globe, it is one of the biggest unsolved global public health issues to date. High blood pressure is also a leading cause of other serious diseases. While some people’s blood pressure spikes when they eat high-salt diets, others, called salt-resistant, are able to get rid of salt more effectively and thus don’t experience changes in blood pressure. One way to combat blood pressure would be to mimic what these people are doing to avoid high blood pressure. Boston University School of Medicine looked at how cells in the hypothalamus region of the brain controlled saltresistance and found a structural change in the cells that allows for them to change their response to salt. First author Jesse Moreira said: “Our findings have implications for the development of personalised antihypertensive therapeutics designed to bring about saltresistance in the body.” The research was published in Experimental Physiology.

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AUTUMN CHECKLIST

FLOWERS: Start to plant spring bulbs such as crocus, daffodils and hyacinths but leave tulips until November to reduce the risk of frost damage to premature young shoots and of the disease tulip fire. Split the roots of older herbaceous perennials such as phlox, delphinium and peony. Dig up overgrown clumps, cut off sections from the edge, each with a few shoots and some roots attached, and plant these.

SHRUBS AND TREES: Plant new roses, hedging, shrubs and trees. Evergreens in particular are best planted in early autumn. Water camellias, rhododendrons and azaleas thoroughly if the ground is dry. Clip hedges and topiary, removing all new growth unless it is needed to fill gaps or add height. LAWNS: Raise the mower blades to give the grass a chance to thicken up in autumn. Spike the lawn to improve drainage, reducing moss and weeds, and encouraging grass growth. Apply an autumn feed high in phosphate, formulated for root growth.

OUR FANTASTIC 15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

These cheerful put a smile on

SHEER PERFECTION: Regal Lily

GLORIOUS DAYS: Rose Peach

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PONDS: Remove blanketweed and excess duckweed; pull off the dying leaves of water plants.

O CELEBRATE All Together NOW!’s 15 fantastic years, here’s a bouquet of 15 fabulous flowers.

VEGETABLES: Save seeds of runner and French beans to sow next year. Leave old pods to dry on the plants then pick them before they split. Store the seeds in a dry, frost-free, mouseproof place.

FRUIT: Check remaining apples for ripeness by cupping them in your palm and twisting your hand gently. If ripe, they will snap off. Store apples in single layers, not touching each other. HERBS: Propagate rosemary from semi-ripe cuttings (woody cuttings which can still be bent without breaking); split wellestablished clumps of chives and mint.

GLASS: Stop feeding but continue to water tomato and other crop plants regularly and evenly. Remove lower leaves as they turn yellow. In mid-autumn pick all remaining tomatoes and take them indoors to ripen or make chutney.

HOUSEPLANTS: Give a weekly liquid feed to plants due to flower in autumn or winter.

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ROCKET-LIKE: The high-flying Yukka

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We start in late summer when the rocket-like YUCCA launches its huge spikes of white, tapering bells from a base of striking – and spiky – leaves. Two spectacular species are Yucca filamentosa and Yucca gloriosa, with floral spikes 2 metres or taller. This is also the best time to appreciate HELENIUM, which has daisy flowers with turned-down petals in shades of bronze, orange, red and yellow. They are perennials with strong, tall stems making them ideal for cutting. The varieties Moerheim Beauty and September Fuchs have rich autumnal colours. As autumn arrives DAHLIA tops the bill with vivid colours and dramatic shapes. Flower sizes range from Pompons with spherical blooms only 5cm (2in) across through Cactus types with pointed petals to Decoratives which produce blooms up to 30cm (1ft) across. Then the CHRYSANTHEMUM takes over, also in many bright colours and an array of shapes and sizes. In late autumn, when few plants blossom, the 10cm (4in) flower stems of the hardy CYCLAMEN species Cyclamen hederifolium materialise from the ground where apparently nothing was growing. The elegant blooms with swept-back petals are pink with maroon markings and

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have a sweet scent. The attractive, marbled leaves emerge later. A few corms will soon spread in if planted in welldrained soil in semi-shade. JASMINE is renowned for fragrant summer flowers but the prolific yellow-star blooms of Jasminum nudiflorum are even more welcome. As its name suggests, this climbing shrub is “nude” – with no foliage – when the long-lasting flowers open. The leaves come later. In winter, as the old country saying reminds us, “As the days grow longer, the cold grows stronger,” so it is delightful to see flowers which defy the weather. IRIS is best known for spectacular late spring displays but Iris reticulata and Iris unguicularis raise perfumed blooms, usually purple or lavender with yellow markings, no more than 15cm (6in) tall. At the same time swathes of SNOWDROP appear, looking pale and delicate but tough enough to bloom through a covering of snow. CROCUS is a vibrant harbinger of spring, producing goblet-shaped flowers mostly in shades of white, gold or purple with prominent orange stamens. The unusual variety Gipsy Girl is yellow with purple feathering, while no flower

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flowers will your face

YEARS AUTUMN DRAMA: The bill-topping Dahlia

TRUMPET TIME: Daffodil Jetfire

evokes spring like the familiar bright yellow DAFFODIL or narcissus. There are many other kinds including pheasant-eye types, white with a red or orange cup instead of the large trumpet; sweet-scented, multi-headed jonquils; and 15cm (6in) species suitable for rock gardens such as Narcissus bulbocodium (the hoop-petticoat daff) and Narcissus cyclamineus with a drooping bell-shaped trumpet and swept-back petals, such as Jetfire. PEONY is an eye-catching border flower in spring and early summer. Among the best are the singleflowered Crimson Globe, a fine bowl-shaped type; the semi-doubles, Nice Gal and Krinkled White; the doubles, creamy-white Kelway’s Glorious and pale pink Ballerina and the anemone-form Avant Garde with rose-pink veined petals. The spires of LUPIN are stars of early summer, whether cottage style or in grand herbaceous borders. They come in many hues, from deep purple and crimson through blue and lavender to pink, yellow, cream and white. Some are bicoloured. Russell lupins were the most famous strain ever produced, though better weather-resistance and longer flowering are claimed for more modern kinds such as Band of Nobles and Sky Rocket. There are numerous types of ROSE, from the 6m (20ft), white-

£10m more given to help disabled workers

NEW figures show there has been a sharp increase in grants from the Government’s Access to Work programme over the last year. The scheme funds workplace adjustments for disabled people, such as providing support workers, travel costs and aids and equipment. The figures show a rise of more than £10m in grants over 12 months, from £132m in 2018-19 to £142m in 2019-20. They also show that grants in each of the last two years was higher in real terms than it was in the first year of the coalition government in 2010-11, when it was £125m, before falling to £105m in 2015-16. There were more than 29,000 people who received workplace support of some kind from Access to Work in 2019-20, compared with about 23,000 in 2010-11. The four most significant areas in which people received support in 201920 were for aids and equipment (4,230 people receiving a payment), support workers (10,720 people), travel to work (10,510 people) and mental health support (5,740 people) n Disabled workers can now claim Access to Work support when working from home because of the Coronavirus pandemic.

flowered Rambling Rector, to the ground-cover series Flower Carpet in pink or white. Hybrid tea bushes are among the most popular and include the famous varieties Peace and Fragrant Cloud, both with a knockout fragrance. For sheer perfection of form, look to the LILY. Species vary from towering giants to colourful little pot lilies and many are deliciously scented. The tallest is Lilium giganteum, which can reach a huge 3.3m (11ft) and produce 20 or more trumpetshaped, fragrant white blooms up each stem. My favourite is the regal lily, Lilium regale, which can grow to 1.5m (5ft) and bears classical trumpet blooms with turned-back tips to the petals and a heavy fragrance. For most of summer, the SWEET PEA adds scent and elegance to the garden. Colours extend from white through shades of cream, red, pink, blue and purple while there are types for many purposes – longstemmed for cutting, tall for climbing fences and trailing for hanging baskets. All have been bred from a species with burgundy and purple flowers, small but exquisitely scented, introduced to cultivation by a Sicilian monk, Franciscus Cupani, in 1699. This is still called Cupani and is available as seed.

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15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

Switch on to TV work

IS TV somewhere you can work if you have a disability? That’s the question being put to a talented panel made up of people who work in the industry during an online Q&A hosted by the Royal Television Society Midlands. The 45-minute session will be on Zoom and is free for anyone to watch. n The Q&A panel takes place on Monday October 12, 1.45pm. Book your place at: www.rts.org.uk/event/rts-midlandscareers-fair-0

Virtual M-way guides

SCENTSATIONAL: Elegant Sweet Peas

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MORE than 100 motorway service areas are being surveyed for a series of new online guides for disabled motorists. The first survey took place at Watford Gap in August, with all 113 Access Guides due to launch in early 2021. Virtual Access Guides are also being created using 360-degree imagery. David Livermore, at AccessAble said: “We are delighted to be working with Highways England on this groundbreaking initiative to deliver a world class standard of access information across the service area network.”

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15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

The Accumulator Quiz

STARSPOT CROSSWORD Can you find the celebrity name hidden in this Starspot Crossword? Complete the crossword in the normal way then make a note of the letters contained in all the squares which are marked with shaded stars. These letters will make an anagram of the name you are looking for. 1

2

3

4

5

5

6

9

9

★ 10

10

11

11

12

14 16

17

23

22

23 26

24

24

A B C D

28

25 29

★ 30

31

A B C D

ACROSS

DOWN

1. Pruning shears (9) 6. Bread roll (3) 8. Living-room (7) 9. Astound (5) 10. Demonstrate (4) 11. Opening (3) 13. Atmosphere (4) 14. Imposing display (5) 16. Steal cattle (6) 18. Recount (6) 19. Gasps (5) 21. Harvest (4) 22. Scottish river (3) 23. Condiment (4) 27. Father Christmas (5) 28. Law (7) 30. Knight’s title (3) 31. Declaration (9)

1. Drink in small quantities (3) 2. Freight (5) 3. Horse’s gait (4) 4. Tumult (6) 5. Exchange (4) 6. Brilliant display (7) 7. Widespread, rife (9) 10. Unexpected events (9) 11. Large (5) 12. Social gathering (5) 14. Swiss mountain (3) 15. Affirmative (3) 17. Wrench (7) 20. Feeling of sickness (6) 24. Maltreat (5) 25. Male voice (4) 26. Decline (4) 29. Newt (3)

Horace Hercules Hector Harold

A B C D

A B C D

The Darling Buds of May Hi-De-Hi! You Rang, M’Lord? Are You Being Served?

A B C D

Knockout Repechage Free-for-all Round robin

QUESTION 5 – for 5 points: Which group had a 2011 UK No 1 hit song with What Makes You Beautiful? A B C D

A B C D

Cornish Cuisine Green Windsor Royal Feasts Duchy Originals

One Direction Take That Westlife JLS

A B C D

Rush Hour Die Hard Lethal Weapon Sherlock Holmes

Border collie Old English sheepdog St Bernard Newfoundland

A B C D

Deadly nightshade Aconite Castor oil plant Foxglove

Cork Limerick Clare Tipperary

QUESTION 13 – for 13 points: What is the first name of former prime minister Gordon Brown?

QUESTION 7 – for 7 points: What is Prince Charles’s organic food company called?

A B C D

QUESTION 8 – for 8 points: Jude Law starred opposite Robert Downey Jr in which detective film series?

QUESTION 6 – for 6 points: The Dulux paint commercials feature which breed of dog? A B C D

A B C D

Actor Jude Law – see Question 8

QUESTION 4 – for 4 points: What name is given to a competition in which all players compete against each other?

Coins and banknotes Beetles and flies Stamps and postcards Butterflies and moths

QUESTION 12 – for 12 points: Blarney Castle is in which Irish county?

QUESTION 3 – for 3 points: The character Mariette Larkin appeared in which TV comedy series? A B C D

Peeping Tom Carrie Psycho The Haunting

QUESTION 11 – for 11 points: A lepidopterist is a collector of what?

Highball Flying Dutchman Snowball Yellow Peril

SUDOKU

QUESTION 9 – for 9 points: Which poisonous plant is related to potatoes and tomatoes?

Dougal James John Kenneth

QUESTION 14 – for 14 points: Which country’s flag is red with a gold star in the centre? A B C D

North Korea Vietnam Laos Cambodia

QUESTION 15 – for 15 points: Which Danish astronomer first quantified the speed of light in 1676? A B C D

Tycho Brahe Ole Romer Holger Pedersen Poul Jensen

KAKURO

There is just one simple rule in Sudoku. Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1 to 9, and so must each 3 x 3 box. This is a logic puzzle, and you should not have to guess.

EASY

5 2 3 6 8 1 9 6 7 3 8 7 9 9 4 8 6 1 2 2 5 4 5 1 2 6

QUESTION 10 – for 10 points: Which 1960 horror film action scenes took place in a shower at the Bates Motel?

QUESTION 2 – for 2 points: Which cocktail is made with advocaat and lemonade?

20

25

27

18

19 19

13

15

21

13

chosen answers and keep a record of your points total. Maximum total points 120.

QUESTION 1 – for 1 point: In TV’s Steptoe and Son, what was the carthorse called?

7

★ 8

Each question has four possible answers and is worth from one to 15 points. Circle your

DIFFICULT

1

4 3 8 9 6 7 9

5 6 3 2

7

3 1

2

5 9 3 3 2 4 2 5 1

6

8

4

2 6 9 5 1 7

Fill in the blank squares in the grid with numbers so that each horizontal or vertical line adds up to the total given in the box either to the left or above it. Horizontal totals are given in the top right corners of the shaded boxes; vertical totals in the bottom left corners. You can use the numbers 1 to 9, but may not use the same number more than once in any run. The number may be used again, however, in the same row or column but as part of another run.

MEDIUM 24

11

9

14

12

16 30

21 17 19

3 19 4

22 5 28

14 24 8

7

11


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DIALLING CODES

CROSS CODE 





 























































 

 





























 

 











 



 



 





 











































Telephone dialling pads combine several letters on one key. Here we have encoded several sets of words or items by using numbers rather than letters. Then we have divided them into groups of three characters and run all the names one after another to make your task a little more difficult. Can you crack the codes?





 









 









 





 















 





Each number in our Cross Code grid represents a different letter of the alphabet. You have three letters in the control grid to start you off. Enter them in the appropriate squares in the main grid, then use your knowledge of words to work out which letters should go in the missing squares. As you get the letters, fill in other squares with the same number in the main grid and control grid. Check off the alphabetical list of letters as you identify them.





















































=

1 []’–

2 ABC

3 DEF

4 GHI

5 JKL

6 MNO

7 PQRS

8 TUV

9 WXYZ



Spaces and any punctuation marks are represented by 1.

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

(

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All Together NOW!

15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

7

MISSING LINK Each pair of words has a missing word between them that acts as a link to both (e.g. FRONT – DOOR – MAT). The initial letters of the six answers (reading downwards) will spell out a flowering plant.

SPEAR

––––

JELLY

ARMY

–––

HILL

LIE

–––

KEY

LONG

––––

PICKLED

–––––

SAUCE

NATION

––––

ANGLE

BOAT

1. flavours of sweets 646 812 775 317 277 237 791 262 668 815 478 674 231 536 661 227 263 517 322 412 652 178 729 237 791 252 252 377 912 647 333 167 264 315 463

2. music groups of the 1990s 383 762 516 796 216 478 262 126 996 631 348 317 742 314 475 716 613 682 818 364 226 971 278 218 253 184 281 219 482 433 178 377 193 785 433

4. styles of popular music 768 514 272 431 762 517 865 163 825 172 713 655 138 278 371 252 774 225 134 726 173 442 314 687 312 686 879 176 715 284 614 471 467 167 372

5. Catherine Cookson 843 166 841 245 512 245 391 843 134 383 361 787 338 714 264 586 618 431 768 631 869 371 745 368 152 391 265 687 125 463 184 559 187 688 37

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PATHWORDS

SPOT CHECK

Starting from the central shaded letter, move one letter at a time (up, down, right or left, but not diagonally) to find 13 TV crime dramas.

Can you place the six dominoes (right) into the grid below in such a way that the number of spots in all four rows across and all four rows down total the same?

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WORD WIZARD Here is an unusual word with three definitions, only one of which is correct. Can you identify the right definition?

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In which year did all three of these significant historical events take place?

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1. Huge crowds greet South African President Nelson Mandela when he pays his first state visit to England.

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6. films starring John Wayne 746 127 286 142 827 411 733 174 837 187 831 474 818 431 732 724 377 124 415 253 178 243 262 241 843 125 266 184 317 466 847 817 461 472 633

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mobility and

3. disability aids 464 781 228 415 438 172 671 782 475 438 143 274 641 243 194 663 713 726 314 722 172 451 662 454 891 726 683 719 433 524 247 174 693 717 328

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COONTIE

1) A shallow vessel made of bark used by Australian aborigines to hold water;

MAKE A DATE

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2) A plant from whose roots a starch similar to arrowroot is obtained;

2. Racing driver Damon Hill wins the Japanese Grand Prix clinching the Drivers’ World Championship.

N

3) A breed of wild rabbit distinguished by its particularly long ears.

3. Taliban forces capture Kabul and former president Sayid Najibullah is executed.

Add the given letter to the first word to make a new word.

Clue: Hurried to increase supply.

WAS IT? a) 1995; b) 1996; c) 1997; d) 1998; e) 1999.

____ +S=S____

ALL THE ANSWERS Pathwords: CSI; The Bill; Dexter; New Tricks; Midsomer Murders; Breaking Bad; Sherlock; True Detective; Criminal Minds; The Wire; Luther; The Mentalist; Prison Break.

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Accumulator Quiz 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; B; 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; C; 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A; 4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; D; 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A; 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; B; 7 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; D; 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; D; 9 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A; 10 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; C; 11 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; D; 12 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; A; 13 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; B; 14 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; B; 15 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; B. Starspot Crossword Across â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1 Secateurs; 6 Bap; 8 Parlour; 9 Amaze; 10 Show; 11 Gap; 13 Aura; 14 Array; 16 Rustle; 18 Relate; 19 Pants; 21 Reap; 22 Tay; 23 Salt; 27 Santa; 28 Statute; 30 Sir; 31 Statement. Down â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1 Sip; 2 Cargo; 3 Trot; 4 Uproar; 5 Swap; 6 Bravura; 7 Prevalent; 10 Surprises; 11 Great; 12 Party; 14 Alp; 15 Yes; 17 Spanner; 20 Nausea; 24 Abuse; 25 Bass; 26 Wane; 29 Eft. Star Name: MICHAEL BUBLE

Word Wizard No 2 is correct. A coontie is a plant. Dialling Codes 1. mint; apple; raspberry; coconut; liquorice; lemon; caramel; peach; cola; strawberry; blackberry; aniseed; orange; lime. 2. Eternal; NSYNC; Nirvana; Boyzone; Five; Spice Girls; No Doubt; Vengaboys; Aqua; Take That; B*Witched; Steps; Westlife. 3. hoist; bath lift; ramp; stairlift; hearing aid; Zimmer frame; grab rail; mobility scooter; wheelchair; shower seat. 4. soul; garage; rock; punk; metal; rap; folk; dubstep; classical; disco; reggae; house; country; pop; Latin; hip hop; opera.

5. The Moth; Bill Bailey; The Fifteen Streets; Hamilton; The Round Tower; Silent Lady; Colour Blind; Tilly Trotter. 6. Rio Bravo; Hatari!; Red River; True Grit; The Searchers; Big Jake; Stagecoach; The Alamo; The Shootist; Rio Grande. Spot Check A = 3; B = 2; C = 5; D = 1; E = 4; F = 6. Missing Link mint; ant; low; life; onion; wide. Plant: mallow. Make a Date The year was 1996. Transformer Tore + S = Store.

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30

15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

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RACE ACE: McGloin, president of the FIA Disability and Accessibility Commission, has joined the Eighty-One Racing Heroes programme

THE FAST TRACK FOR CAREERS T

HE world’s only female tetraplegic racing driver has her sights set on giving injured ex-servicemen and women a long-term career in motorsport.

In 2015 Nathalie McGloin became the first woman with a spinal injury to be granted a racing licence in the UK. Last year she became the first ever female disabled rally driver, and is president of the FIA Disability and Accessibility Commission. Now she has joined the Eighty-One Racing Heroes programme: a groundbreaking initiative set up by Peter Knoflach, a Swiss racer and businessmen who was inspired by several injured veterans while skiing in his home village of Klosters. Peter is the director of Eighty-One Power Drink, a new energy drink coming to the United Kingdom later this year, which will use motorsport as a platform to promote the unique programme. Nathalie said: “I don’t think I’ve ever felt as excited about a racing programme as I have about this one. “When I met Peter, I knew straight away that his heart was in the right place, and he’s going to create some amazing opportunities for so many people who might otherwise not have had them, both in motorsport and in business.”

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Peter said: “Nathalie’s own motto is that anything is possible, and that fits our message perfectly at Eighty-One Racing Heroes. As well as being an ideal ambassador for our programme, she is a very talented and determined racer, which is what we are about first and foremost. “Porsche has confirmed a car for Nathalie in its new GT4 championship in the UK, and we’re working now to adapt it to her needs, thanks to our equally talented crew of ex-servicemen. Our goal is to create as many opportunities for as many people as we can, so we’re delighted to be off to a flying start already with Nathalie’s help.” The veterans turned mechanics, engineers and logisticians are getting up

to speed with a programme in the Porsche Carrera Cup GB, where they will be visiting some of Britain’s most famous circuits in a high-pressure race environment. Nathalie’s Porsche Cayman GT4, developed by the factory in Germany and run by Redline Racing in the UK, will be equipped with specially-created hand controls. Her long-time mechanic, James Webley, is an injured ex-serviceman who also forms part of the Eighty-One Racing Heroes programme. Nathalie said: “I can’t wait to drive the Cayman GT4. it’s exactly the right step up for me as I’ve been racing a Cayman already, but this is obviously at another level.”

Anything is possible . . .

THE Eighty-One Racing Heroes programme has some ambitious goals that will ultimately lead the team towards the pinnacle of endurance racing. Next year, the racers plan to compete on an international programme using two cars – one female disabled racer paired with an able-bodied female driver, and another male disabled driver paired

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with an able-bodied male driver. The cars will be run and serviced by the injured veterans. A number of celebrities are shortly to be announced as brand ambassadors. As the team rises through the ranks, the ultimate goal is to take on the world’s most challenging race – the Le Mans 24 Hours – to prove that anything is possible.

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WE’VE GOT IT ALL WRONG L www.alltogethernow.org.uk

P

HYSICAL activity and sport need to be redesigned to be more enjoyable for disabled people, according to new research.

The study, led by Manchester Metropolitan University, provides insight into the experiences of, and attitudes to, sport and physical activity for disabled people. It found that a perceived lack of enjoyment was a key factor in preventing participation. The results, published in the Journal of Sports in Society, identified several barriers that stopped disabled people taking part in sport and physical activity including: n Cost of transport and activities n Ineffective communication and advertising n Preconceived images of sport as being competitive and judgmental, n Anxieties about their own sporting abilities The researchers said that many of these barriers – although important – often masked a lack of enjoyment for participants. The study also makes suggestions for future practice. Lead researcher Dr Ben Ives, senior lecturer in sport coaching at MMU, said: “While none of these barriers should be underplayed, especially those caused by anxieties, perhaps the most significant barrier that we found and the main challenge for future provision, is that many disabled people have not enjoyed, or perceive that they will not enjoy, partaking in sport and physical activity. “From our perspective, this lack of enjoyment can cause disabled people to fixate on the difficulties of engaging, such as the cost and hassle of getting there. “Indeed, while disabled people often raise these as barriers to sport participation, they do not seem to prevent them from engaging in other leisure activities that they enjoy. “Attempting to remove these reported external barriers is fruitless unless sport and physical activity is first made more enjoyable.” All of the disabled participants interviewed in the study were aware of the benefits of sport and physical activity for general health and wellbeing. However, 22 out of 24 participants did not meet the UK Government guidelines for physical activity – at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity activity per week. A lower proportion of disabled people meet

‘Sport should be all about having fun and being involved’

15TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

Study says it’s time to focus less on barriers to physical activity and more on what’s actually enjoyable

Teen star: ‘You can do it, too’

Y

OU can do whatever you set your mind to – that’s the message from Thomas Stamp, one of the UK’s rising stars.

ROLE MODEL: Thomas Stamp the recommended 150 minutes of physical activity a week compared to people with no impairment, according to Sport England. Some participants put this down to being unable to access the internet to find out about activities. Others said that they do not like visiting places they have never been before and worried about being embarrassed. In the future, the researchers suggest moving away from “sport” in favour of “activity” when promoting exercise to place emphasis on fun and enjoyment and creating a welcoming non-judgmental environment. They also recommend using a multi-activity

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Thomas, 17, has been appointed a Young Sporting Ambassador for the Cerebral Palsy Sport charity and is keen to encourage more disabled people to get involved in sport. “I hope that I can inspire other young people who have been through a similar experience to me and show them just what you can achieve,”he said. Thomas has cerebral palsy, autism and ADHD. Throughout his life bullying has been a persistent issue. He was slow to develop as a toddler and over the years has needed a number of operations and regular physiotherapy. But that hasn’t dented his enthusiasm for sport. Apart from a stash of medals he’s collected over the years with scintillating performances on the track, Thomas was also selected to be part of the BBC TV Team Rickshaw Challenge 2019 which pedalled from Holyhead to London in a week, raising £8.5m for the annual Children in Need Appeal. Thomas was nicknamed The Night Rider for enjoying taking on the late shift, and also rode up the steepest street in the world in Harlech. n CP Sport: Tel. 0115 925 7027 n www.cpsport.org

approach to allow disabled people to find out what they enjoy and to blend physical activities with non-physical activities, such as coffee drinking and lunches within the facilities to promote social interaction and wellbeing. They also suggest that coaches should receive basic training in how to deliver sport and physical activity for disabled people. Dr Ives added: “In future work we would encourage scholars to leave behind ‘what doesn’t work’, or studies that reiterate the barriers to participation, and to instead prioritise those things that create enjoyment for disabled people and how these might be enhanced.”

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31

City forced to pull out of Special Olympics

IVERPOOL will be unable to host a rescheduled Special Olympics GB National Summer Games in 2022.

Earlier this year, city Mayor Joe Anderson announced big plans to stage next year’s sports spectacular for thousands of athletes with learning disabilities and volunteers. When organisers were forced to postpone the event until 2022 they were hopeful that Liverpool would be still be able to host the event. However, Mayor Anderson said the council could not commit to running the event. He said: “I am both personally and professionally devastated that Liverpool will not be able to host the rearranged 2021 Special Olympics National Summer Games..” Paul Richardson, chair of Special Olympics GB Board of Trustees, said: “The work now begins on what realistically can be achieved under these unprecedented and challenging times.”

Equipment for hire

A NEW sports equipment rental service has been set up for people with cerebral palsy and other disabilities. The equipment includes a range of GameFrames, which are used for playing Frame Football, and RaceRunning Frames, which help keep people upright. Adi Fawcett, chief operating officer at Cerebral Palsy Sport, said: “Our aspiration during this challenging time is to enable as many people as possible to get moving, be active and have some fun being physical.” Tom Henshaw, commercial manager at equipment provider Quest, said: “The rental service is a safe way for children and adults alike to explore their potential for movement, at their own pace, in their own home, but fully supported by both Quest and CP Sport.” Hire is for a minimum of three months. The cost: RaceRunners - £30 non-member, £15 member per month. Frame Football Frame - £20 nonmember,£10 member per month n CP Sport, tel 0115 925 7027

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All Together NOW! 15th Anniversary edition  

All Together NOW! 15th Anniversary edition - packed with news about health and disability issues PLUS the chance to win one of TWO stylish A...

All Together NOW! 15th Anniversary edition  

All Together NOW! 15th Anniversary edition - packed with news about health and disability issues PLUS the chance to win one of TWO stylish A...

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