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October/November 2012

NORTH WEST MAGAZINE OF THE YEAR

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TV star Rachel’s invite to readers £50,000

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OLLYOAKS actress Rachel Shenton is climbing London’s BT Tower to raise money and awareness for Action on Hearing Loss – and wants readers to join her! Rachel, who plays femme fatale Mitzeee in the hit Channel 4 soap, encountered deafness aged 12 when her father lost his hearing overnight. Rachel, 24, said: “I was quite young when my dad lost his hearing and I fully appreciate the day-to-day barriers that people with a hearing loss face. “I trained as a British Sign

Language interpreter, and I’ve worked within the deaf community for years. “I’m really looking forward to charging up the tower with lots of other energetic fundraisers.” The BT Tower Climb is on Friday, October 26. To secure a place, contact the charity’s Events Team: telephone/textphone 020 7296 8172. To sponsor Rachel, visit http://www.justgiving.com/RachelShenton. n Action on Hearing Loss Information Line 0808 808 0123 (freephone) or 0808 808 9000 (textphone) or email: informationline@ hearingloss.org.uk

up for grabs . . .

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ALENTED disabled entrepreneurs are being urged to apply for this year’s Stelios Award for Disabled Entrepreneurs in the UK.

RACHEL SHENTON

n All Together NOW! is a registered charity set up to provide a tip top news service for anyone whose life is affected by disability, longterm health condtions or age. n The charity relies entirely on support from its sponsors, advertisers and from general subscriptions and grants. n You can contact us on

THE REEL THING: Pupils including, inset, Sarah and Christopher. Left: the Chaplin classic

0151 230 0307 Who to contact Editor: Tom Dowling email: news@alltogethernow.org.uk

Advertising/sponsorship Chris Groves email: sales@alltogethernow.org.uk IT Support: Ken Almond Website: Pharos Design

NEXT EDITION: Tuesday 27 November, 2012 All Together NOW! is published by All Together Now! Ltd, The Bradbury Centre, Youens Way, Liverpool L14 2EP Registered Charity No.1106387

Chaplin ‘re-make’ is a sensation at the junior Oscars

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SPECIAL needs school took part in a junior version of the Oscars after a film made by pupils was nominated for a top award.

The four-minute film, made by Sandfield Park School in West Derby, Liverpool, was inspired by the Charlie Chaplin classic, Modern Times. And it earned a special mention from the multi-award winning film director Stephen Frears. Pitched against entries from mainstream schools across the UK, Sandfield Park’s film Modern Times in Modern Times earned a prestigious place on the final national nominations list.

by LARRY NEILD It meant a delegation from the school, including ‘stars’ of the film, 16 years-old Sarah Skelland and classmate Christopher Higginson, heading to the British Film Institute at London’s South Bank for the glittering ceremony. Although the film didn’t win the main award, making the final short nomination list was a dream come true for the team of pupils involved in the project. Sarah said: “This was my first ever trip to London. Did it make me want to be a movie star? Yes it did. I love drama, I love singing and I love acting. “I felt a bit nervous with so many

people watching me in the film but I liked it. I would love to make more films.” Modern Times was selected by the pupils because it looked at hardships in the 1930s. The class discussed the similarities and difficulties faced by young people today – giving them their inspiration for their mini-epic. Other pupils involved in the film were Mark Tyrer, Kyle Cockram, Molly Curran, Callum Farrelly and Calum Jones. Sandfield Park is a member of Cineclub which has over 200 schools taking part in film making, with successful clusters of participating schools in areas such as Liverpool, Manchester, Bradford and Birmingham.

The £50,000 award, jointly run by the Stelios Philanthropic Foundation and Leonard Cheshire Disability, recognises the achievements and unique challenges faced by disabled entrepreneurs. EasyJet founder Sir Stelios Haji-Ioannou said: “Removing the barriers disabled people face in business is essential, and I hope that the Stelios Award for Disabled Entrepreneurs goes some way to highlighting their achievements. “We want to hear from talented disabled entrepreneurs who are able to show they have got what it takes to run a successful business and meet a real need in the market.” Helen Carter, who is organising the awards at Leonard Cheshire Disability, said: “Disabled people in business experience disadvantage and discrimination everyday, largely through ignorance. This must change. “Leonard Cheshire Disability is committed to enabling disabled people to succeed in business and in employment, and campaigns to challenge people to change the way they see disability. “Our partnership with Sir Stelios is helping the charity highlight the barriers disabled people face in the workplace and recognise the outstanding achievements of disabled entrepreneurs.” Visit: www.lcdisability.org/ stelios or call 0845 671 7173. Closing date: October 26. The winner will be presented with a cheque at a special ceremony in London on December 3.

All Together NOW! is exceptionally well liked by its readers. 225,000 readers DO NOT see any other local paper — The Murray Consultancy

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October/November 2012

All Together NOW!

McVey appointed Disability Minister

THE PERFECT LEGACY!

Hello!

IT WAS one of those fantastic, spine tingling moments that just went on and on and on – for 12 days, in fact, when disability stopped the world in its tracks. Millions tuned in to follow and be mesmerised by the sensational performances in the London 2012 Paralympic Games. “Prepare to be inspired, prepare to be dazzled, prepare to be moved,” Lord Seb Coe, chairman of the Olympic organising team, told the crowds at the opening ceremony. He was absolutely right. It was the best ever Paralympics, the best ever event to raise awareness about all kinds of disabilities. But people are also now talking about the legacy of the Games – about how we can all start helping to make Britain a better place for the nation’s 10.4 million disabled people and 6.6 million carers. I know one very easy way – by developing All Together NOW! into one of the best read newspapers in the whole of the UK. As regular readers – and supporters – are aware, All Together NOW! is the only paper of its kind in the Britain. With a readership that’s nearing half a million, it is also one of the best-read papers in the North West. But we know that we can do so much more – if we had the resources.

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Blackpool – Highfield Road Lytham – Haven Road

A BIG THANKS to all the Community Colleagues and Charity Champions at these stores for helping us to get more and more copies of All Together NOW! to customers. Other store bosses wanting to stock the paper can call us – 0151 230 0307 – and we will try and do the rest!

More than 100,000 FREE copies are currently being picked up at over 400 outlets, including 40 Booths, Asda, Sainsbury’s and Tesco supermarkets. The figure can so easily be doubled – with a bit more funding or advertising revenue. With more commercial partnerships, and more support from supermarkets, All Together NOW! could even become a top national paper, helping millions of people all over the UK to cope with – and understand – the immense challenges of living with disability. Now what a legacy that would be . . .

Liverpool – East Prescot Road; Woolton. Gtr Manchester – Salford. Southport; Preston – Flintoff Way; Penwortham – Birch Avenue; Warrington – Church Street; Wirral – Cheshire Oaks; Neston; Prenton; Upton

Formby; Liverpool – Park Road; Deysbrook Lane. Gtr Manchester – Gorton. Bidston Moss; Heswall

From where I sit, there can be nothing better. I’d be delighted to hear from any company bosses who would like to know more about our work and our ambitions. Please call me on 0151 230 0307. Email: news@alltogethernow.org.uk Meanwhile, I hope you like this issue. As you will soon see it’s jam-packed with news, information and inspiration! We’re back in time for Christmas – November 27 to be precise. See you then. Thanks for all the support!

— Tom Dowling, editor

WIRRAL West MP Esther McVey has been appointed the new Minister for Disabled People – after just two years as an MP. The former TV presenter, who replaces the promoted Maria Miller, takes over responsibility for key welfare cuts including to disability living allowance (DLA) which has angered many disabled people, including prominent Paralympians. Her role is also likely to take in the future of Remploy factories for disabled workers, many of which will be axed by the end of the year. Ms McVey, 44, said: “I am delighted to get this wonderful opportunity. Supporting disabled people to live fulfilling lives and restoring fairness to the welfare system is vital. I am delighted to be joining the Department at such a crucial time.” Ms McVey is a patron of Wirral Holistic Therapeutic Cancer Care, and of Full of Life, a London-based charity for disabled children and their families. She is also an ambassador for Action Medical Research, a charity that funds medical research.

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October/November 2012

NORTH WEST MAGAZINE OF THE YEAR

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Charity champ Tom’s incredible journey Campaign to turn the tide of negative press CAMPAIGNERS are calling on the Government and media to mind its language in relation to disabled people. The plea follows a survey which shows that over 90% of disabled people believe negative coverage of disability in newspapers is directly linked to a rise in hostility and hate crimes. And the UK’s leading disability organisation, Disability Rights UK, says most people believe it is the language the Government uses when referring to disabled people that results in negative press coverage. The charity says: "We have attempted to tackle examples of unfortunate Government language which exacerbates negative press stereotyping. "When the DWP Press Office referred to ending out of work benefit payments for about 280,000 disabled people who have worked as making 'the benefit system fair to taxpayers' we highlighted that the only people affected had worked and paid Income Tax and made National Insurance contributions. "Disabled people are taxpayers and the system needs to be fair to all. Comments that make an unnecessary and inaccurate division between disabled people and taxpayers can feed misleading newspaper articles and broader prejudice/stereotyping." The charity proposes a successor to the Press Complaints Commission that can take swift action and demand corrections for inaccurate or misleading representations. The survey’s findings showed that: n Over three quarters (77%) of those questioned could cite negative press articles about disabled people, while only a third (35%) a positive story. n 94% suggested press portrayal of disability equality issues was “unfair” and 76% said the volume of negativity was “significantly increasing”. n 91% said there was a link between negative press portrayal of disabled people and rising hostility/hate crime. n Nearly half (42%) suggested the Government was responsible for rising press negativity and hostility towards disabled people.

Shaping the future BLIND and partially sighted people are being invited to help shape the future plans of the charities that support them. Lesley-Anne Alexander, chief executive of RNIB, said: “We have achieved so much from working together and we want our work to remain rooted in the needs and experiences of people who are at risk of sight loss and those who are blind or partially sighted, and to know that we are making a real difference to people’s lives.” n To take part in the consultation, which runs until November 16, call 020 7391 2160 or visit www.rnib.org.uk/thefuture

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into the same ward as injured duty soldiers. He said: “The time I spent there changed my life. “I witnessed the sacrifice, devotion, and selflessness of the staff and patients, all focused on trying to preserve the lifeblood of those men and women who were injured defending our way of life.” Tom was in intensive care for several weeks and suffered complications including MRSA. Having returned to the UK and learnt to walk again, he suffered a second bout of MRSA.

CYCLING fanatic has just clocked up an incredible 4,412 miles across the USA – three years after almost dying in a biking accident. Tom Von Kaenel, 57, is attempting to raise millions of pounds for injured UK and American servicemen. The retired US serviceman, who lives in Oxfordshire with his English wife, cycled from the west to east coast of the US before returning to the UK to lay a wreath at the Cenotaph and finish his epic journey at Brize Norton. His epic cycle ride took him through desert, over mountains and plains, in hail, sleet, snow, rain and sun. Tom’s achievement was all the more remarkable considering the life-threatening

We’re NOT all in it together! accident in the Pyrenees, in September 2009, which came close to ending his life. Tom was sent to US Landstuhl Regional Military Hospital in Germany and admitted

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DEVASTATING new report shows the poorest households – many containing disabled members – are carrying by far the biggest burden of the Coalition’s Austerity Package.

The report contradicts the Government’s claim that “we’re all in it together,” say campaign groups and charities. Calls for a cumulative impact assessment – measuring the effect of benefit, council and NHS cuts, welfare reforms and other changes on disabled people – have been denied by the Government on the grounds that it is too complex. But now an economist from the University of East Anglia has carried out just such an in-depth study. Chris Edwards found that over four years to 2015 the poorest 20% of the 2.7 million households receiving disability benefits will lose 16% of their cash income plus benefits-in-kind. That’s four times greater than the loss in income that will be felt by the richest 20% of households, Mr Edwards claims in the report – The Austerity War and the Impoverishment of Disabled People. Mr Edwards said: “This study has been carried out by me, an economist who was not initially familiar with the statistical sources. Imagine what a team of specialists from the Treasury or Department for Work and Pensions could have done. But the fact that I have done such a study shows that the Government was afraid that it would

n Tom aims to raise £5m to benefit UK service member and veteran charity organisations and similar for US charities. You can sponsor Tom and his team through his website www.sea2sea.org

TUNNEL RACERS: Jade Jones and Mickey Bushell

A good Tyne had by all... NEWCASTLE’S Tyne Tunnels were renamed for ten days in September as a tribute to the world’s best wheelchair athletes and Paralympians. Rachel Turnbull, boss of TT2 who operate the tunnels, said: “We are immensely proud of the annual Tyne Tunnel 2K wheelchair race. It is a world class event that allows the very best international show that those households receiving disability benefits are suffering much greater losses as a result of the Austerity Package than households in general. Far from being all in it together, the Government has not discouraged lies in the tabloid press about disabled people being fit to work but who avoid doing so.” It was commissioned by the Norfolk Coalition of Disabled People (NCODP) whose chief Mark Harrison said: ”This is the comprehensive

wheelchair athletes to show off their talents right here on Tyneside. “To celebrate their incredible achievements, we decided to dedicate each tunnel, on a rolling basis, to our T2K athletic stars. Motorists drove through The Josh Cassidy Tunnel one day, and The Jade Jones Tunnel the next.” impact assessment the Government should have carried out. “No wonder they refused to do it as it shows just how regressive and discriminatory their policies are.” Mr Harrison added: “The Government should listen to Dame Tanni Grey-Thompsonand other Paralympians and abandon the austerity measures and the welfare reforms. The hypocrisy of Government ministers trying to gain reflected glory from the Paralympic athletes’ achievements is sickening.”

Doctors are in the dark MORE than two in every three doctors have a poor understanding of a devastating neurological condition that claims more UK victims than Parkinson’s disease. A poll of GPs has revealed a significant lack of knowledge Post Polio Syndrome among front line professionals. The incurable condition affects 120,000 people in the UK – 190 people per 100,000 compared with a Parkinson’s rate of 180 per 100,000. This lack of awareness – 69% of GPs rated their level of knowledge of PPS as low – is having a significant impact on people’s health and quality of life. Ted Hil, chief executive of the British Polio Fellowship, said: “Despite the perception that polio has been consigned to the history books it continues to be a very real health issue. “PPS is seen as a minority issue and barely even makes the medical school curriculum. This, combined with the lack of a direct diagnostic test and no clear treatment pathway, has resulted in a significant proportion of the population struggling for a diagnosis.”

340,000 people – two-thirds of All Together NOW! readers – DO NOT read any other disability or health publication — The Murray Consultancy

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HE countdown to Christmas has started! And for one very lucky All Together NOW! reader it’s going to be a Christmas they will remember forever! We’ve teamed up again with one of our key sponsors, Park – the UK’s number one for Christmas savings – to give you a fantastic chance to win their top-of-the-range Christmas hamper. The Empire hamper is worth £540 – and it will be all yours if you win our super competition. Our previous Park Hamper competitions have been extremely popular and we expect this one to be even more so!

FEAST YOUR EYES: Park’s delicious and mouth-watering Empire hamper – some contents may vary

This monster hamper contains a huge range of Christmas food and drink goodies to keep even the biggest family fed over the festive period. It’s filled with top brand confectionery, desserts, soft drinks, beers, wines, spirits, pasta, soups, vegetables, freezer foods and the finest quality meat. And, as an extra gift, you will also get a Christmas table runner and napkins set – perfect for your Christmas table. For more than 45 years Park has been providing top quality hampers for hundreds of thousands of customers across the country. More than 400,000 people from all over

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the UK are currently saving with Park for Christmas. Park CEO Chris Houghton said: “We are delighted to offer readers another chance to win our top-of-the-range Christmas hamper. It’s a fantastic hamper – the perfect Christmas prize for families. “Our previous competitions in All Together NOW! have all been extremely popular. We are confident that this one will attract even more interest.” So get your entries in now!

For more information about saving for Christmas with Park, go to: www.getpark.co.uk

ALL you have to do to stand a chance of winning your dream hamper is answer these two questions: 1) How long has Park been operating? 2) How many people are currently saving for Christmas with Park? The first correct entry drawn out of the hat on Friday, November 9, will win the hamper. Send your answers on the back of a postcard – telling us where you picked up your copy of All Together NOW! AND what you think of the publication – to: Park Hamper Competition, All Together NOW!, The Bradbury Centre, Youens Way, Liverpool L14 2EP. You can also enter online at

www.alltogethernow.org.uk RULES: By entering the competition you confirm that you understand and agree that the information you provide will be held on a Park Group database and that it will be shared by all companies within the Park Group. A full list of those companies is available by writing to the Data Controller, Park Group Plc, Valley Road, Birkenhead, CH41 7ED. Park Group plc shall be the data controller for the purposes of the Data Protection Act 1998. The information you provide will be used by Park Group and any necessary third parties to provide you with the goods and services you request. Companies within the Park Group may wish to contact you for customer care purposes or to keep you informed about the latest offers, promotions, prize draws, and competitions, using post, telephone, e-mail, SMS and any other appropriate means, including new technology. If you wish to be contacted via email or SMS, please provide us with your e-mail address and/or your mobile telephone number as appropriate.If you do not wish to be contacted by any member of the Park Group for marketing purposes, please indicate this on your entry. The winning entry must agree to having a photograph taken for promotional purposes.

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All Together NOW!

Disabled workers face added danger in crisis DISABLED workers could be left stranded in an emergency at work while their colleagues flee to safety, according to a survey. More than one in three human resources chiefs said that wheelchair users and mobility-impaired employees within their company did not have a Personal Emergency Evacuation Plan (PEEP), which is required by law. Only around half of companies possess the necessary equipment to help mobility-impaired employees in an evacuation, and fewer than 15% of the companies that do have the equipment actually use it during emergency evacuation drills, indicating a stark lack of preparation for a crisis. Mark Wallace, head of evacuation specialists Evac+Chair International, said: “Staff should be fully trained and competent using evacuation equipment to help people evacuate a building safely and efficiently.” Jim Norman, from the Disability Network, said: “This research shows that many disabled workers are still facing discrimination from their employers through their inadequate provision for a safe evacuation. Employers could face prosecution.”

October/November 2012

NORTH WEST MAGAZINE OF THE YEAR

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New record helps future medallists

Single minded RECORD MAKERS: Katy Haymer and Andy Abraham recording their new single, Light the Flame

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RITAIN’S Paralympians have thrown their support behind a new single raising money for a charity that gets disabled kids into sport and music. The record, Light the Flame, written by Judith Kelly and sung by former X Factor singer Andy Abraham, Katy Haymer, and the Elmbridge Choir, will help the charity Get Kids Going! establish a sports academy, spearheaded

Lifeline All Together Now 132x165 ad_Layout 1 21/03/2012 14:58 Page 1

by Paralympian wheelchair racer David Weir. The charity, whose President is Lord Sebastian Coe, has already helped many young people become Paralympic athletes and is now looking to help the next generation realise their dreams. One such athlete is Jack Binstead, 15, who was born with brittle bone disease, and aims to compete in the 2016 Paralympics with the help of a wheelchair

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Hawking hailed T OP scientist Professor Stephen Hawking was the toast of this year’s Technology4Good Awards.

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donated by the charity,. “It’s going to be a lot of hard work, but no pain, no gain,” said Jack. David Weir, the charity’s vicePresident, said: “Get Kids Going! has been a massive support to me over the years. Without the equipment supplied by the charity I wouldn’t be where I am today.” n The single can be down-loaded from ITunes

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Receiving the Special Award for Excellence in Accessibility, he said, in a specially recorded message: “I was lucky to have been born in the computer age. “Without them, my life would have been miserable and my scientific career impossible.” Professor Hawking, 70, contracted motor neurone disease at the age of 21 and was given two years to live. But he went on to Cambridge to become a brilliant researcher. The Technology4Good awards, run by national charity AbilityNet, were set up in recognition of the opportunity technology offers disabled people to achieve their true potential. Overall winner in the Accessibility category was LexAble’s Global AutoCorrect, the invention of 24-year-old, Neil Cottrell. Neil, who developed the software to overcome the difficulties posed by his own severe dyslexia, obtained a

AWARD: Prof Hawking first class honours degree in psychology with the help of his innovation. By allowing people to use the vocabulary they wish to, rather than the words they can actually spell, Global AutoCorrect promotes selfconfidence as well as academic achievement. Leading the field in Innovation was Action Aid, a charity using mobile phone technology to facilitate two-way communication with isolated and often illiterate communities in Kenya. Other winners included Preston city council for their mobile ‘Citizenzone’ internet training facility, which takes technological know-how to hard-to-reach rural areas.

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Autism The long wait to be diagnosed DESPITE increased awareness of autism, getting a diagnosis remains a challenge for many people, says a major new study. Findings from the National Autistic Society’s biggest ever surveys into the condition revealed: n 34% had to wait three years or more for a diagnosis after first raising concerns; n A further 30% said that it had taken between one and two years to get a diagnosis; n 55% said that it took too long to get a diagnosis; n Half said that it was stressful. The survey also found that one in every 10 respondents paid for a private diagnosis, instead of going through the NHS system. And while paying for diagnosis is decreasing among those looking after children, there has been an increase in the number of adults going private. NAS chief executive Mark Lever said: “Getting a diagnosis is a critical milestone that can unlock the door to identifying the right support. Without it, people struggle to access the help they need. “But sadly, our survey has found that accessing a diagnosis is still a significant challenge for many families.. “The UK and devolved Governments must ensure that the NHS follows national guidelines on diagnosis and assessment so that people with autism can access the right support as early as possible.” Almost 3,000 people with autism completed the survey including 1,804 people (61%) who were assisted or had the survey filled in on their behalf. n NAS Autism Helpline: 0808 800 4104 www.autism.org.uk

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August/September 2012

Supporting banking families and retirees with life’s challenges My Home

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My Money

We help with information, advice and financial support. Find out more, visit www.bwcharity.org.uk or call our FREE helpline: 0800 0234 834

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FAMILIES

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Helpline

flooded ALMOST 2,600 people got in touch with Contact a Family’s new National Advice Service in its first six months of operation. The service provides expert help for parents of children with special educational or additional needs. The high demand for help echoes findings of a survey carried out by the charity earlier this year which showed that their child’s education – both now and in the future – was the main concern of parents and carers. Nearly half (46%) of the enquiries were from parents worried about lack of support in school for their child’s additional needs, and wanting to know more about the procedures for getting extra help in school, including the statementing process. n Tel: 0808 808 3555. www.cafamily.org.uk

October/November 2012

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Now we’re motoring! T

OP GEAR star Richard Hammond has given a warm welcome to a new website helping the parents of children with acquired brain injury. The popular BBC presenter, who is a vice-president of The Children’s Trust, Tadworth – the charity behind the site – suffered a serious brain injury himself in a car crash in 2006. Brain injuries in children are often caused by road accidents or falls, but there are also non-traumatic causes such as a brain tumour, choking or meningitis. Richard, whose injury was sustained while filming for Top Gear, said: “There are thousands of children in the UK living with the long-term effects of an acquired brain injury right now. “Their injury will have a major impact on every aspect of their life – their education, relationships with family and friends and their future.

Fear for children

Brain injury service gets backing from TV’s Richard CELEBRATING: Richard and pal “The Children’s Trust’s Brain Injury Hub will at last provide these families with the information they need and a forum to share their experiences. I’m proud to give it my backing.” The site offers comprehensive information as well as a discussion forum for parents and other family members. Katie, the mum of a child with a brain injury, said: “The information contained

on the Brain Injury Hub is written by the experts and has already helped to explain many of the challenges our daughter is facing due to her brain injury. “We now have new tactics and suggested methods of helping her overcome these challenges, so that she can live her life to the full.” n www.braininjuryhub.co.uk Tel, 01737 365 000

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DISABLED children are at risk of slipping through the child protection net, according to an Ofsted report. “Research suggests that disabled children are more likely to be abused than children without disabilities,” said Deputy Chief Inspector John Goldup. “Yet they are less likely than other children to be subject to child protection. “We cannot accept a lower standard of care and protection for disabled children than we expect for all our children.” Although local authorities and Local Safeguarding Children Boards have access to a large amount of data on disabled children, the report found that most had not made good use of this in evaluating the impact of services on protecting disabled children. n Ofsted’s website www.ofsted.gov.uk

. . . After Adoption

Charity urges more people to adopt A

deletion of one of his genes, and this has resulted in some manageable health needs. Tiylor sees both a speech and language therapist, as well as an occupational therapist to help him with his development. He has been making good progress, and he really enjoys these sessions.

LEADING adoption charity is urging adoptive parents in the North West to consider providing permanent, loving homes for children with disabilities.

Families that Last, the family finding part of the After Adoption charity, says disabled children are nearly 10 times more likely to be looked after than the rest of the child population. There are currently over 2,150 children with disabilities in the care system in England. Last year, only ten of these children were adopted. Families that Last has extensive experience of finding permanent carers for children who are unable to remain with their birth parents, and providing the lifelong support to make these placements work. Tiylor is just one of these children in need of a ‘forever family’.

Tiylor is a happy little boy who enjoys interaction, and loves to engage with lots of different activities. He enjoys being read to, and especially enjoys sensory books. Tiylor also loves action songs and being tickled – he can’t stop giggling when he is! Tiylor suffers from a rare condition that involves the

n Families that Last are a thorough and efficient agency and complete the assessment process at a pace that suits you. Crucially, parents are also provided with ongoing support after the adoption is made: we offer SafeBase to all of our adopters - a postadoption programme, with a 98% success rate. n To find out more about Tiylor, or any of the children we are currently family finding for, contact Families that Last on 0300 456 2656, or e-mail us: familiesthatlast@ afteradoption.org.uk


www.alltogethernow.org.uk

October/November 2012

All Together NOW!

Making a difference – that’s our goal!

H

ERE at the Morgan Foundation we want to help organisations who share our philosophy – Making a Difference.

Over the past decade we have helped hundreds of organisations across the region, committing more than £9 million. And this year we will be giving away to good causes a whopping £1.5 MILLION! Created in 2001 by businessman Steve Morgan OBE, founder and chairman of Redrow plc, chairman of the Bridgemere Group of Companies and Wolverhampton Wanderers FC, the Morgan Foundation supports charities across North Wales, Merseyside, West Cheshire and North Shropshire. Our aim is to provide funding for small to medium

sized organisations who are addressing specific needs in these regions. We are particularly keen to support those who have already begun to make an impact, but need a helping hand to expand their work and increase their effectiveness. We focus our help mainly on those who work directly with children and families but we recognise that many wider issues may also affect their welfare, so we are interested in any project that contributes to the quality of life in our region. If you, your group or charity is based within our geographical area (see map, left) and you think we might be able to help with your project then please call our administrator, Jane Harris, BEFORE sending your application. Contact Jane on 01829 782800

THE FINAL COUNTDOWN

Everyone a winner

– sponsors of The Morgan Foundation Entrepreneur Awards 2012

T

HE ENTRIES are in, judges are deliberating, and the winners of The Morgan Foundation Entrepreneur Awards 2012 will soon be announced . . .

Now in their sixth year, the prestigious awards include special categories that give charities and social entrepreneurs the chance to win a slice of the £115,000 prize fund. As well as winning a valuable injection of capital into their ventures, winners also gain access to a range of professional services to help them grow. There is also a new category in this year’s awards – ‘Best Individual Entrepreneur working in a Social Enterprise or Charity’ and other categories have been honed to distinguish between those enterprises

making the best social contribution and those that are having an economic impact in the region. North west businessman Steve Morgan OBE, founder of The Morgan Foundation and chairman of Redrow, said: “In the past it’s sometimes proved difficult to compare organisations that are making either a social or economic

contribution, so this year we have decided to reward both.” Mr Morgan, who is also chairman of Wolverhampton Wanderers FC, added: “These changes are very much in keeping with The Morgan Foundation’s ethos of making a difference to people’s lives. “The benefits of winning one of these awards are far-reaching - including a much needed capital injection, professional help and advice and the boost to staff morale.” Winners and runners-up will be announced at a gala awards dinner at Carden Park Hotel, Cheshire on Thursday, November 15. The short-listed entries can be viewed on The Morgan Foundation Awards website www.mf-awards.co.uk

Best of Friends THERE’S lots to get excited about at Liverpool-based theatre group, The Company of Friends, which has just received a grant from The Morgan Foundation. Set up four years ago by -– and for – adults with learning difficulties, the group have lined up an autumn visit to London to see the Chicken Shed theatre company in action. They are also planning a trip to the Harry Potter Experience – and rehearsals are about to start for their own Christmas performance of the Greece musical. Contact Helena Kane, tel 0151 709 0132

ALL SMILES at DYNAMIC, the unique centre for young people at Wrexham

TAIKO DRUMMERS, from Rock Ferry, at Molineux, home of Wolves FC

VOLUNTEERS at Noah’s Ark Community Centre, Speke Baptist Church

ALL ABOARD . . . a Morgan Foundation Smiley Bus – The Company of Friends

www.morganfoundation.co.uk Tel. 01829 782800

9


GETTING ON . . .

10

All Together NOW!

October/November 2012

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

Life is fragile, handle with care . . .

WISE WINNIE Retirement: we need to learn from the Yanks . . . . . . helps to solve some of the problems faced by older people

IT SEEMS us Brits have unrealistic expectations regarding our retirement age, compared to Americans. “Most US workers now accept that they will have to work past 65 so they can accumulate sufficient savings to be able to enjoy a high standard of living in retirement,” says Nigel Green, boss of the world’s largest independent financial advisory firm, deVere Group

“Brits want the same financially secure retirement although the majority also fully expects to retire by 65. “This is wholly unrealistic because most Brits, like Americans, haven’t saved nearly enough for this to be a reality in today’s world,” said Nigel. “Retirement nest eggs need to be significantly larger than they did a generation ago because people are living longer and

have higher expectations of a fun-filled retirement. Additionally, what we can expect to receive from the State in the future is far less than what we do now. He added: “If today’s British workers don’t actively engage with saving and pensions, and they want to be comfortably off in their mature years, they should, like Americans, expect to retire beyond their planned retirement age.”

Q

I know most people look forward to retiring but I am finding retirement difficult, particularly as my wife died six months ago and I miss her very much. I am painfully reminded of her whenever I turn to an activity that we shared together – bowling, for example. I am thrown constantly into the company of old friends, and I know it’s selfish but seeing married couples still happy with one another seems to rub salt into the wound. It’s worse still when they try to pair me off with another lady. I must be turning into a real old grump, but what can I do?

A

Bereavement and retirement are high on the list of situations that can lead to clinical depression and you are experiencing a double whammy in this respect.

Rather than pursuing all those once shared leisure activities, maybe you should be tackling a tough task, something quite challenging but ultimately enjoyable. I know a man, an achiever by nature, who dreaded retirement. He decided that instead of taking things easy he would master something in an area quite alien to him. So he bought a banjo and started teaching himself to play it, despite the fact that he was tone deaf, couldn’t read music and couldn’t sing. He became quite proficient and now he is writing a book to help people like himself to play the instrument. Take a look at the subjects offered by your local U3A (University of the Third Age). They will be varied enough to offer something out of your normal interest range. If you are experienced and skilled in some particular area – a language, wine appreciation, car maintenance, or local history, for instance – you could offer to lead a U3A group. This approach might help you get your life onto a new level with new responsibilities and friends. A really rewarding voluntary job is to act as a car ambulance driver – you would be helping sick people who need to be taken to hospital appointments. You may already have a pet, but if not think about getting a dog, the sort that will be a loyal friend. If you seem to be existing on tinned and packaged foods turn to the Hairy Bikers and other TV chefs for inspiration – a practical way of bringing more flavour into

Singalongalife!

ALL TOGETHER NOW! A good old sing-song keeps body and soul in tune, say experts

S

INGING is good for your health – and that’s official!

A pioneering research project to measure the value of singing for older people has revealed a consistently higher measure of health for those involved in community singing programmes. The findings have also revealed singing groups for older people are cost-effective as a health promotion strategy. Professor Stephen Clift, who led the study, said: “Our research has not only cemented previous studies that pointed to an increase in health benefits from community

It’s good for your heart and mind

singing programmes, but also demonstrated that singing programmes are a cost-effective method of health promotion against NHS measures for this group of people. “The design of the study has enabled us to put a value on the results which could ultimately result in substantial cost savings for the NHS and local authority adult services.” Working with two sample groups of 240 volunteers over 60 years old, where one group took part in

weekly singing sessions over three months and the other didn’t, the research revealed significantly reduced anxiety and depression scores on a widely used NHS measure among the singing group. The results also pointed towards an improvement in quality of life. The research was conducted by the Sidney De Haan Research Centre for Arts and Healt. The centre is part of Canterbury Christ Church University and is committed to researching the potential value of music, and other participative arts activities, in the promotion of wellbeing and health.

SENIOR MOMENTS . . . with FRANK HARRIS

Pension shock

NEARLY one in every two people do not expect to use a pension to fund their retirement, new research shows. Many people are relying on property, cash and even an inheritance, according to a study by Barings, the international investment management firm One in 10 respondents to a survey – the equivalent of 4.1 million people – said their property is their “pension” and that they have no other pension provision. Marino Valensise, chief investment officer at Barings, said: “While diversification is crucial to best-practice asset management, the suitability of some of these sources can be questioned, such as a reliance on inheritance. “The most challenging finding is that nearly half of the adult UK population admit to not having a formal pension at all.”

Equity release

RETIRED homeowners are putting families first as sales of equity release plans soar. One-in-three pensioners used property wealth to help their families in the first six months of 2012 compared with one-in-four in the same period of 2011 as the total value of housing wealth released soared to £446 million. Over the same period the numbers using property wealth to clear their own debts dropped to 25% from 31%. Dean Mirfin, Group Director at Key Retirement Solutions, said: “Helping out family is a powerful motivation for elderly homeowners and it is striking that they feel financially secure enough to help families before themselves and are under less financial pressure from their own debt.”


www.alltogethernow.org.uk

October/November 2012

%ONmT GBƞƞ VJDTJM to bogus callers! 6NJTFE 6TJĆžJTJFS JS DBƞƞJNH ON Bƞƞ DUSTOMFRS TO PROTFDT TIFMSFĆžVFS GROM EOORSTFP DRJMJNBĆžS Statistics show that around 20 bogus caller crimes are committed every day in the UK, but this might only be 10% of the total that actually take place as victims often feel too embarrassed to report it to the police. Bogus callers often claim that there is an emergency and that they need to check the water supply; they will use this as an opportunity to trick themselves into customers’ homes claiming to be from United Utilities or ‘the water board’. Once inside, they will distract the homeowner while they or an accomplice helps themselves to money and valuables. Genuine United Utilities’ employees always carry an ID card and are happy to show this to you. They will never put pressure on you to get into your home and are happy for you to phone United Utilities to check their identity. And genuine employees won’t refer to ‘the water board’ as this hasn’t existed for more than 30 years! Bogus callers can be very persuasive, but our advice is to never feel under pressure to let someone into your home.

Need a little ExtraCare? We offer a range of free services to help customers who: qBSF PMEFS qIBWF B EJTBCJMJUZ qIBWF B TFSJPVT JMMOFTT qIBWF TJHIU IFBSJOH PS MFBSOJOH EJGÄ DVMUJFT 0VS TFSWJDFT JODMVEF qQFSTPOBM OPUJÄ DBUJPO PG XBUFS TIVUPGGT qMBSHF QSJOU #SBJMMF BOE UBMLJOH CJMMT 8F BMTP PGGFS B GSFF QBTTXPSE TDIFNF GPS BMM PVS DVTUPNFST

To find out more call 0845 746 1100 or textphone 0808 143 1195 03/12/SD/5073

All Together NOW!

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Beat the bogus caller p-0$, Home or away – keep all doors -0$,&%

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To help you, we operate a ‘password protection’ scheme. Joining the United Utilities password scheme is easy. It takes just one call to 0845 746 1100. We simply need your details and your choice of password. Then, whenever someone claiming to be from United Utilities calls at your home, you can ask them for your password. Only a genuine visitor from United Utilities will know what it is. It’s a simple deterrent that really does work and will give you the confidence to turn people away. Most gas, electricity and telephone companies will operate a similar scheme – see a recent bill for further details and contact numbers.


12

INDEPENDENT LIVING All Together NOW!

October/November 2012

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

Respite fears are justified, say Vitalise

Who’s your winner . . ?

FEARS about sending disabled, frail and elderly people into respite care are totally justified, since much of it amounts to “little more than warehousing”, a charity chief has claimed.

BRITAIN’S annual awards for those who “go the extra mile” to remove barriers faced by disabled people are for the second year running being organised online.

The criticism comes as research shows carers feel huge guilt at the prospect of sending their loved ones into residential care – even for a few days. When respite opportunities arise, worries over the quality of care prevents them from taking them up, a report by disability charity Vitalise reveals. The study found that six out of 10 carers felt guilty about needing to use respite care and that worries about the quality of the care were a significant barrier. Chris Simmonds, Vitalise chief, said: “The sad fact is that carers’ fears are quite justified. In many cases respite care amounts to little more than warehousing for disabled or older people, so it’s not surprising that carers would rather struggle on at home, risking their own health in the process.” Vitalise provides short breaks ina holiday environment for disabled people and carers at three UK Centres. Vitalise, tel 0303 303 0145, www.vitalise.org.uk

Locked out – of houses

S

HOCKED housing industry executives have promised immediate action to tackle the reasons disabled people are effectively locked out of the property market.

They were reacting to a report, Locked Out, which found that estate and letting agents had little or no understanding of accessible property and that leading property websites failed to offer a way to search for accessible accommodation. The result was that disabled people were prevented from living independently, relocating for work or even moving in with their partners.

Organisations representing landlords and estate and letting agents vowed to act when asked for their reaction to the report at a meeting of the Allparty Parliamentary Group for Young Disabled People. Mark Hayward, acting chief of the National Federation of Property Professionals, admitted that there was “not any real awareness” among property professionals about the issues. The Locked Out report was researched by members of the Trailblazers network of young disabled campaigners, part of the Muscular Dystrophy Campaign.

The Trailblazers want to see more local authorities setting up registers of accessible housing. And they want councils to pledge that all new housing will be built to the Lifetime Homes Standard – which describes key features that should be included in the design of accessible and adaptable housing – while 10% should be wheelchair-accessible. Paul Maynard, the disabled Conservative MP who chairs the all-party group, said he knew from the many landlords in his constituency of Blackpool North and Cleveleys that “the bottom line matters to them, not the morality”.

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Breakthrough UK’s National Independent Living Awards 2012 celebrate the success of those businesses, voluntary groups and individuals that excel in promoting the independence of disabled people. Awards will be presented to entrants promoting: an ‘overall independent living initiative’; excellence in the employment of disabled people; and public sector engagement with disabled people. Other categories include: peer support or advocacy; disabled entrepreneur of the year; accessible communities; tackling disability hate crime; and Breakthrough UK’s “best practice” award. Winning organisations will feature in a short film which will be shown on Breakthrough UK’s website on December 3 – International Day of Persons with Disabilities – and receive a specially commissioned trophy. Gemma Brown won last year’s Disabled Entrepreneur of the Year Award. She said: “I want to show others who have a learning disability what they can achieve.” Closing date:October 15. www.breakthrough-uk.co.uk

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October/November 2012

All Together NOW!

13

Saddle up – time to achieve your dreams

Top this for an AGM!

Stalls, jugglers, unicyclists, and a model elephant – all part of the fun at the meeting

HAVE YOU been inspired by the performance of our Olympic and Paralympic athletes over the summer? LCH is encouraging people to follow in the tracks of Team GB’s gold medal cyclists by signing up for its Cycle for Health scheme. Gavin McLaughlin, Development Officer for Cycle for Health, explains: “Whilst we appreciate that not everyone will become the past year, our staff have delivered over one There was also an opportunity for people to INTREE Racecourse’s Earl of Derby the next Chris Hoy or Laura million patient contacts, and I am very proud of feed back their questions to a panel of Board Stand was transformed into a Big Top Trott, I do think a lot of members at the end of the presentations. as Liverpool Community Heath hosted the many, amazing feats that they have people have been very undertaken in our communities. Guests were also invited to sign up as its annual general meeting with a inspired by the “Hosting a circus-themed AGM was perhaps a members of the Trust in order to have more circus-themed twist. performances of our Team first for the NHS, but we wanted to take a more influence over the future of their health Stilt walkers, jugglers, and unicyclists mingled GB athletes this summer. innovative approach to delivering what can services. and mixed with more than 200 visitors in the “Although most people often often be a very dry event.” packed grandstand. There was even a moving, cycle when they are young, For more information about the services that often they lose the habit as The event also hosted a huge ‘market place’ life-size, model elephant – all to help showcase LCH delivers or to sign up to become a where members of the public wandered around the ‘amazing feats’ of the Trust’s staff and its they get older. At Cycle for member of the Trust, visit: stalls, chatted to staff members and found out many different community health services . Health we want to help www.liverpoolcommunityhealth.nhs about different services in their area. people to get back into LCH chief executive Bernie Cuthel said: “Over cycling because it’s a really easy sport to take up – and it’s also great fun and great for your health. “Our sessions provide a really good platform for people of all ages and LIVERPOOL Community Health abilities to have a go at NHS Trust (LCH) has been getting back on the saddle experience first-hand the kinds of care after a period of illness or WO MPs popped in to short-listed for three different Liverpool Children’s Centres to they provide to help whole families to awards at the prestigious inactivity.” stay healthy and avoid illness. find out about the valuable Nursing Times Awards 2012. Cycle for Health run a Luciana said: “It’s obvious that the work that’s going on to support Widely recognised as one of the series of flexible weekly families really appreciate the advice local families. nursing sectors most high profile sessions, spanning and support they receive from health Luciana Berger, MP for Wavertree, occasions, the annual awards daytimes, evenings and visitors. The service is making a big met the Health Visitors Team at Picton celebrate national innovation and weekends, all of which are difference by helping babies and Children’s Centre to learn about their excellence in nursing. completely free of charge infants get the very best start in life.” work. A total of 12 different health teams and last for about 1-2 hours Gillian said: “Being a health visitor is each. She then joined health visitor Gillian from the city region have been something I’m incredibly passionate Davies on some of her routine home named as finalists, but LCH has HEALTH VISIT: Luciana Berger Gavin adds: “There are about, so I was absolutely delighted to lots of proven benefits to visits to families in Toxteth in order to topped the short-listings by being MP, right, and Gillian Davies have Luciana join me for one of my nominated for three separate cycling. Over the weeks we visits to understand more about what awards categories, including: see real improvements in we do and how we can increase Continence Promotion and Care; the fitness levels of people partnership working to improve Respiratory Nursing; and Nursing in who come along to Cycle for outcomes for families in the future.” Mental Health. Health sessions regularly. Meanwhile, Stephen Twigg, MP for Bernie Cuthel, chief executive of “Cycling can help you West Derby, also found out about the LCH, says: “Nursing teams from maintain a healthy weight, work being done at Yew Tree Merseyside have really dominated reduce stress and Children’s Centre in West Derby before depression and help you the short-listings, highlighting just joining health visitor Julia Clark on how much innovation, creativity and sleep better. There’s also a some of her routine visits. talent exists within our region’s real social side to group Every family with children under five nursing sector. ” cycling sessions as you get has a named health visitor who offers The winners will be announced on to meet new people and advice and support during pregnancy, October 31 at an awards dinner at explore lots of new places birth and continuing throughout the London’s Hilton Hotel on Park Lane. around the city.” pre-school years. The Trust has also just been Contact Cycle for Health LCH’s Health Visitors Team provides on 0151 285 4975 or email short-listed for the Guardian Public health advice and support for some Services Awards (Community jeanette.smith@ 5,000 new births which take place in Engagement) and Health Service VOTE OF CONFIDENCE: Stephen Twigg MP with LCH chief executive liverpoolch.nhs.uk Liverpool every year. Journal Awards (Staff Engagement). Bernie Cuthel, right, and the team at Yew Tree Children’s Centre

A

How’s this for excellence?

To find out more, visit . . .

MPs join team on home health visits T

www.liverpoolcommunityhealth.nhs.uk


No room on board for the bullies All Together NOW!

14

October/November 2012

MERSEYTRAVEL

Police backing

CRIME BUSTERS: Cllr Liam Robinson, Merseytravel Chair; Cllr Peter Brennan; Cllr Marlene Quinn, Deputy Chair Merseytravel; and Cllr George Davies (Wirral)

M

ERSEYSIDE is already one of the safest regions in the country for people using the transport network.

Now a new campaign is set to give even greater peace of mind to every passenger travelling on the region’s buses and trains. The Stop Hate Campaign, which targets bullying and name calling, is being spearheaded by Merseytravel’s TravelSafe initiative. The campaign’s message will be splashed across 800 buses and 200 poster sites across Merseyside. Working with Merseyside Police, Liverpool, St Helens and Wirral councils, and the national Stop Hate UK charity, which provides 24-hour support and information to people affected by hate crime, the campaign

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

will also feature awareness-raising events across the region. Councillor Liam Robinson, chair of Merseytravel, said: “People travelling across Merseyside should not be alarmed by this campaign; we have one of the safest transport networks in the country. “However, we can always do more to reduce incidents of hate crime. Quite often hate crimes happen due to ignorance or prejudice, but as with all crime, we take a zero tolerance stance and do everything we can to ensure the safety of passengers.”

The vast majority of the 179 million public transport journeys each year in Merseyside pass without incident, with most buses, and bus and rail stations, having CCTV cameras. There are also police-led operations in partnership with the bus and rail operators. Mark Leighton, of Stop Hate UK, said: “We are delighted Merseytravel is part of a wider partnership promoting safety across the Merseyside transport network which includes the reporting of Hate crime to our 24/7 independent helpline.” Liverpool’s mayoral lead for community safety, Cllr Peter Brennan added: “People should expect to feel safe on the buses or trains. Being able to get from A to B without fear of being targeted because of your

background is a fundamental right. “I wholeheartedly support this campaign to encourage people to report hate crime, whether they themselves are a victim or a witness.” George Davies, Wirral Council cabinet member for housing and community safety, said: “Hate crimes destroy lives and the way that we as a community react to them says a lot about our determination to tackle discrimination and promote the rights of everyone equally.” Councillor Richard McCauley, cabinet member for safer communities at St Helens Council, said: “No hate incident should be tolerated in a respectful society; this includes name calling and bullying. We can only take action if decent people are brave enough to report it.”

We care about the accessibility of our buildings, vehicles and information. All of our staff are trained to be courteous and considerate, particularly when our customers have special requirements.

Merseytravel is making sure that Public Transport on Merseyside is easy for everyone to use

Whether it be automatic door openers in our head office, availability of textphones for main points of contact, or producing timetables in large print, we want to make public transport easier for everyone to use. Among our services and facilities are: U Àii Vœ˜ViÃȜ˜>ÀÞ ÌÀ>Ûi vœÀ œÛiÀ {n]äää «iœ«iÊ with disabilities U œ`iÀ˜] œÜ‡yœœÀ] >VViÃÈLi LÕÃià ܅ˆV… >ÀiÊ developed in partnership with our local authorities and bus companies U ˜vœÀ“>̈œ˜ ˆ˜ > Û>ÀˆiÌÞ œv vœÀ“>Ìà ˆ˜VÕ`ˆ˜} ̅iÊ iÀÃiÞÌÀ>Ûi VViÃà Ո`i q Vœ˜Ì>ˆ˜ˆ˜} >VViÃÃÊ ÊÊÊ`iÌ>ˆÃÊvœÀÊ>ÊLÕÃÊ>˜`ÊÀ>ˆÊÃÌ>̈œ˜Ãʜ˜ÊiÀÃiÞÈ`i Textphone users can dial 18001 then 0871 200 22 33 for a text relay assisted call

0871 200 22 33 Calls costs 10p per minute from land lines, mobiles may vary

THE POLICE are solidly behind the campaign. Inspector Ken McVey, of British Transport Police, said: “Hate crime has no place on Merseyside’s railways and we are actively seeking ways to drive this behaviour from our trains and stations. “BTP is committed to tackling hate crime in all its forms and will continue to work with and support partner organisations to reach as many people as possible and to show them that we take the issue extremely seriously.” Superintendent Rowlie Moore, of the community engagement unit, said: “Merseyside Police are delighted to work in partnership with Merseytravel, who are providing a significant opportunity to the Merseyside public to raise the awareness of hate crime. “Merseyside Police deploy dedicated resources to the investigation of hate crime through their Sigma Units and Stop Hate UK provides an innovative 24/7 hate crime reporting mechanism.”

Here’s how to contact Stop Hate UK

By Phone: 0800 138 1625. The Stop Hate Line is a free 24-hour, confidential helpline for anyone who has experienced hate crime. By text: 07717 989 025 If you’re out and about but don’t feel like talking, you can report incidents by SMS text. Operators will aim to respond to texts within 20 minutes. By text relay: 18001 0800 138 1625 for people who are deaf or have a hearing or speech impairment. By post: Stop Hate UK, PO Box 484, Leeds LS7 9BZ Online: www.stophateuk.org/talk Merseytravel TravelSafe is an initiative which supports a public transport system offering the opportunity for all members of the community to travel safely and without fear.


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October/November 2012

All Together NOW!

Open top car alert

D

RIVING convertible cars with the top open at speeds above 55 miles per hour may lead to deafness. American scientists used five different makes and models of convertibles to see the effect on drivers’ hearing. Sound level measurements in 80% of the cars at 88.5 kmph – with the top down – had maximum sound recordings greater than 85 decibels.

Exposure of noise above 85 dB for prolonged periods is not recommended according to the USbased National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health. The higher the noise level, the shorter the recommended exposure time. At 75mph the mean noise exposure inflicted on the driver of a convertible car driven with the top open was 89.9 decibels. n Continued on Page 16

Driving’s a doddle

OUT IN FRONT: Etac’s drive-from-wheelchair system

SHOWSTOPPER: Etac’s new Automatic Tie-down System that delivers drive-fromwheelchair and upfront passenger capabilities was one of the many hits with young disabled drivers at the Get Going Live! event at Donnington. What makes the Etac system different is that it is electrically operated by the powerchair and not the vehicle battery. This eliminates the need for complex installation and additional wiring through the adapted vehicle floor well, which could affect resale value.

Specialist insurance for disabled drivers Mobility scooter insurance Adapted vehicle insurance Disabled driver insurance

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Open top car alert

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(Continued from p15) Not only was the mean noise exposure excessive with the top open, but the driver was also exposed to extreme noise ‘spikes’ while driving on the highway – e.g when driving next to a motorcycle or lorry. No excessive noise levels were recorded from any tested car driven with the top closed. Dr A A Mikulec, who oversaw the study at Saint Louis University School of Medicine, said: “Although driving for short distances under such levels of noise exposure is unlikely to cause a significant degree of noise-induced hearing loss, our study demonstrates that long duration driving at high speeds with the convertible top open will increase the risk of hearing damage. “In light of the results of this study, we are recommending that drivers be advised to drive with the top closed when travelling for extended periods of time at speeds exceeding 55 mph.”

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October/November 2012

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HE focus of the blue badge parking scheme on disabled people with significant physical mobility problems is likely to be maintained in England.

by JOH

Department for Transport proposals are contained in a new consultation on how eligibility for a blue badge will change when Disability Living Allowance is replaced by the new Personal Independence Payment. Liberal Democrat transport minister Norman Baker has suggested that automatic eligibility for a badge should not be extended to all those claiming the enhanced rate mobility component of the new PIP. This would have included many people with mental health conditions or learning difficulties who can walk but have problems planning and following journeys. They will now have to apply instead to their

local council for a mobility needs if PIP is due to be age claimants fro to replace DLA fo October 2013. The new consu of reforms said to blue badge schem In a written stat that he favoured to those who sco assessed on the within PIP, as it w similar to the curr This option wou cannot move mo

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an assessment of their they need a blue badge. e introduced for new workingom April 2013, and will begin or existing claimants from

ultation is the latest in a series o be aimed at improving the me, and cutting misuse. tement, Mr Baker told MPs granting automatic eligibility ore eight points or more when “moving around” activity was the option that was most rent scheme. uld mean that anyone who ore than 50 metres – or

October/November 2012

cannot move up to 50 metres without using a wheelchair or other mobility aid – would be automatically eligible for a blue badge, and so would restrict eligibility to those applicants who are unable to walk or have very considerable difficulty walking. At present, about a third of blue badges are issued – automatically – to 900,000 recipients of the higher rate mobility component of DLA. An alternative option included in the consultation document would mean no-one receiving PIP would be automatically eligible for a blue badge, with everyone between the ages of 16 and 64 needing instead to apply to their local authority. Another option would create automatic blue badge eligibility for all those who receive the enhanced rate mobility component of PIP, including many people with mental health conditions and learning difficulties.

All Together NOW!

New rules on epilepsy DRIVERS with epilepsy who have only ever suffered seizures while asleep may now be considered for a licence after one year, instead of the previous requirement of three years. New rules also allow drivers who have only ever suffered seizures that have no impact on consciousness or their ability to drive to apply for a driving licence one year from the date of their first seizure. Previously, drivers could only be licensed if they were free from these seizures for a period of 12 months. Road Safety Minister Mike Penning said: “Road safety is a top priority for the Government and our licensing rules have an important role in ensuring that Britain maintains its position as having some of the safest roads in the world. “We must make sure that only those who are safe to drive do so, while at the same time avoiding placing unnecessary restrictions on people’s independence. “We believe that these changes strike the right balance in allowing as many people as possible to drive, without compromising safety.”

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LETTERS Always check holiday details

CAN I remind all readers to check the finer details when booking a hotel reservation – either for themselves or a friend or relative? We recently booked a stay in a four-star hotel after carefully checking they had a lift because of my husband’s medical condition. On arrival we were directed to our room – down two flights of stairs with no lift. There was a small platform lift for people using their restaurant but this was down a short flight of steps. To access the rest of the hotel a person with a disability needed to exit the front entrance, walk or be ambulated round the rear of the building using a side entrance to reach a room at ground floor level. The problem, we were told, was that the main building is Grade 2 listed so it can’t be altered. I understand the special architectural and historic interest in such buildings but surely alterations could be made whilst maintaining the original beauty. Isn’t it about time people with disabilities were not treated so differently? My husband got soaking wet exiting the building and walking round the rear of the hotel to access our room. All other guests without mobility problems could reach their rooms in comfort. How equal is that? Cilla Shiels, Willis Street, Warrington

Are you tough enough?

FANCY getting down and dirty with Warrington Disability Partnership? We are looking for tough guys and girls, adults only please, to complete a 12-mile challenge of glorious muddy hell at Cholmondeley Castle, Malpas, Cheshire, on Sunday, November 18. Tough Mudder events are hardcore obstacle courses designed by Special Forces to test your all around strength, stamina, determination, and camaraderie. You will wade through mud, walk through fire and experience the odd mild tingle of an electric shock or two ... all for a deserving local charity! Free team entry is available through WDP – with a minimum sponsorship of £200. The entry fee includes a prestigious Tough Mudder t-shirt, one beer and admission to the after party with live music and lots of fun. Awards will be given out on the day for Respect, Best Costume, Worst Costume, Bad Hairstyle etc If you think you’re tough enough call 01925 240064 now – and join Team WDP! Fundraising team, Warrington Disability Partnership

All Together NOW! The Bradbury Centre, Youens Way, Liverpool L14 2EP email: news@alltogethernow.org.uk

KINDEST OF October/November 2012

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Lord Morris

How safe is his legacy? by SIR BERT MASSIE

T

HE DEATH in August of Lord (Alf) Morris of Manchester saw disabled people lose one of our most effective Parliamentarians.

Alf was the world’s first Minister of Disabled people from 1974-79 but his contribution to the cause started earlier. His major contributions were in three areas and in all three his legacy is threatened. It was Alf who championed the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970, which gave new rights to disabled people, made public buildings accessible, and dramatically improved the social care system. It also made local authorities financially responsible for providing extra support. But the cutback started in the early 1980s when charges were imposed by those local authorities that had previously resisted making charges. In addition, eligibility criteria was toughened so people with less severe impairments qualified for no help at all. Today the criteria has been tightened so much that only those with the most severe impairments and limited family support receive help at all and severe means testing is imposed. As part of the Government’s austerity measures, local authorities in the North West have experienced a disproportionately large cut in funding. At the same time the number of disabled people is growing as the population ages. This leads to greater need and less money to fund it. The Government recently hinted that it might set a limit on the amount a disabled person has to find to fund their social care, including the cost of residential care. However, this will not address the issue of those severely disabled who need social care support but fail to qualify. Nor will the Government proposals provide the finance to enable local authorities to meet the responsibilities they readily accepted in the 1970s. Alf also made the case in the early 1970s for Attendance Allowance to meet the general costs of disability. A few years later, when he was Minister for Disabled People, he introduced the Mobility Allowance. Both these allowances are now included in the Disability Living Allowance, soon to be replaced by the Personal Independence Payment. Anxious to ensure that the allowance could be transformed into mobility Morris also

MAN OF THE PEOPLE: Pictured clockwise, from left: Lord Morris with Anne McGuire (Minister of Disabled People (2005-08); with Chester Phab award winners, and All Together NOW! editor Tom Dowling

helped to create the charity Motability. For almost 40 years this provision has been an outstanding success but when PIP is introduced next year the eligibility criteria will be much tighter and many of those who currently qualify for DLA will not qualify for the PIP and will therefore not gain access to a Motability vehicle. Once again it seems the legacy of Morris is under threat.

Groundbreaking legislation The passing of the Disability Discrimination Act in 1995 was a significant year for disabled people. This groundbreaking legislation can be traced back to the report of the Committee on Restrictions Against Disabled People that reported in 1982 but was established by Alf in 1979. It argued that only legislation could create a level playing field for disabled people. It took another 13 years to persuade Parliament to pass appropriate legislation. Even then it was half-hearted and further legislation had to be introduced to create an enforcement body, the Disability Rights Commission, and to extend protection to those areas missed previously. In 2007 the DRC was replaced by the

Commission for Equality and Human Rights. Although this commission has produced some useful reports its wider mandate has prevented it serving disabled people as well as it could have done. The Government has now announced that the CEHR budget and powers will be severely reduced. This represents another major blow in the long battle to ensure disabled people are able to play a full role in society without facing discrimination. Although Alf’s legacy is under attack it is unlikely we will revert to the situation before 1970. Local authorities will still find that the largest call on their budgets is adult social care and there is strong pressure to improve services. When Mobility Allowance was introduced only 20,000 people had an “invalid tricycle” and today 600,00 people have a Motability vehicle. This figure will fall because of PIP but it will still be high. Even in civil rights where progress has stopped, most will not be dismantled because many rights are part of European law. Perhaps most important is that disabled people will fight to defend the victories of the past and to build for the future.

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of Manchester

DEREK KINRADE, one of the cofounders of the now defunct National Information Forum, was a friend of the late Lord Morris of Manchester. “He was one of our patrons and a constant supporter,” says Derek. “He kept in regular touch, and we met at the House of Lords only a few weeks before

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O UNDERSTAND the origins of Alf’s political life it is necessary to go back to November 1935, when his father died.

October/November 2012

(1928-2012)

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his death. He was invariably solicitous, making light of his own obvious health problems. “We shared Lancastrian origins and each of us was born into poverty, little more than a year apart. “His experience of life at the bottom informed his entire outlook . . .”

My friend Alf . . . always ready to help those in need

The First World War left George Henry Morris blind in one eye, with a shattered leg, and lungs lacerated by mustard gas. He had become unemployable in 1930, when Alf was only two, and for the next five years the family subsisted on his meagre war pension and a small input from one of the older children who was in employment. It was not nearly enough and Alf has never forgotten the day when his mother, faced with eviction by their private landlord from a slum in Ancoats, and crying inconsolably, said “there’s no future for us now”. Jessie Morris faced life in a workhouse, and young Alf was told he would have to be put into a home. It was not an uncommon plight in families like his, where disability was synonymous with poverty. For the most part disabled people were second-class citizens who might be ‘put away’ or hidden at home. In the Morris family, to make matters even worse, the cause of George’s death was ascribed to heart failure and deemed not to be warrelated, so that Alf’s mother was refused even a 10 shillings-a-week war widow’s pension. Of course, the tide turned. The family were rehoused thanks to the intervention of Canon Shimwell from Jessie’s local church, and after three years she got her pension through the endeavours of her local MP, Harry Thorneycroft.

Private Members’ Bill Alf did exemplarily well at school and in 1953, after study at Ruskin and St Catherine’s Colleges in Oxford, gained an MA degree, and went on to become Labour & Co-operative MP for Wythenshawe in 1964. Five years later fate intervened again when Alf came first in the annual ballot for Private Members’ Bills, giving him the right to parliamentary time for a bill of his choosing. Remembering his roots he determined on a bill to vouchsafe social equality and improve living standards for disabled people. Alf did not expect his bill to reach

the Statute Book, but it received the Royal Assent on May 29, 1970. The Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act touched on practically every aspect of the lives of disabled people and services they needed to achieve their full potential. Dr Duncan Guthrie, who had helped Alf with the administration involved in drafting his bill, greeted it as the Magna Carta of disabled people worldwide. Alf’s legislation, which has since been extended by its inclusion in two international charters, has been of undoubted historic and global significance. It first began to take effect in 1972 and since then has assisted countless millions of disabled people. In March 2011, the Act was celebrated at Westminster Abbey by a Thanksgiving Service, the only other parliamentary legislation to be accorded such an honour since the Abolition of Slavery Act 1833. Alf went on to become the world’s first Minister for Disabled People from 1974-79, introduced the Mobility Allowance and the Motability Scheme – and set in motion the thrust for disability rights which eventually came to fruition through the Disability Discrimination Act 1995. His determination to champion the rights of disabled people, both in this country and throughout the world, persisted through his

33 years as an MP, and continued following his elevation to the House of Lords in 1997. In particular, from 1989 he pursued an unremitting struggle to win compensation for people with haemophilia infected – often fatally – following treatment with contaminated NHS blood products. And in his longest campaign, he espoused the cause of troops involved in the 1991 Gulf War who, fit and well when they were deployed, subsequently developed a range of medically unexplained illnesses.

Super Sharon... CONGRATULATIONS to Sharon Gregory-Wareing, Asda’s award-winning Community Colleague. Customers at the Southport branch nominated Sharon for a prize in the town’s annual Ambassador Awards which recognise those going the extra mile to help people. Sharon scooped the Unseen Hero Award at a glittering ceremony at the Ramada Plaza. It’s the first time that an Asda Community Colleague has won the award. Sharon said: “I am so honoured to have won this award for my work and I’d like to thank all those who voted for me.”

What a paper!

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WOW! What a fantastic paper! I picked up All Together NOW! in Tesco Gorton for the first time by accident and have found it to be very informative, giving a positive view of disability which will help push down barriers. I’ll be calling again at the store again to take some extra copies to the day centre that my son attends. — Lesley Stevens, Denton, Manchester I HAVE just picked up a copy of All Together NOW! at Tesco Gorton. Well impressed! I’m going back to pick up a load more to pass on to family and friends. Thanks for a great read – I love Wise Winnie on the GETTING ON page. — Mrs Mary Doherty, Burnage, Manchester

Fiercely combative Alf enjoyed particularly close ties with Australia and New Zealand and, among other awards, held both the Order of Australia (AO) and the Queen’s Service Order of New Zealand (QSO). He also held numerous honorary appointments in disability charities. As a politician Alf manifested the precious quality of integrity. To quote from my biography: “His gentle kindness is legendary. Yet when faced, as he often has been, with policies that negate social justice, the determination of his opposition has been extraordinary, even fiercely combative, in keeping always with an immutable political philosophy. He is famous for his extraordinary persistence.” I will continue to remember him fondly as a champion of those needing help.

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IT MAY all now be a distant memory, but, oh boy, what a memory . . . Brian Barnes, from West Kirby, is still on cloud nine after being nominated by his wife to carry the Paralympic Torch, when she picked up a leaflet in Sainsbury’s store in Upton, Wirral. Brian, 78, was a swimmer in the 1952 Olympics and was chosen by Sainsbury’s for the work he has done over the past 50 years with the Paralympics. Brian is now hoping that the torch help him raise money for charity.


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Robotic cats for elderly

EDUCATION . . . TRAINING . . . JOBS . . .RIGHTS . . . EDUCATION . . . TRAINING . . .

R

OBOTS are revolutionising factories. And they’re beginning to improve life in the home, too – especially for older and disabled people.

Antonio Espingardeiro has been bringing his robotic cats, seals and humanoid robots into retirement homes to address the isolation and boredom often felt by residents. And the post graduate student believes his work is ahead of the rest of the world – even the Japanese with their rapidly aging population are only just taking advanced robots down this path. By programming his robots with a range of interactive games and activities, he’s also helping to bridge the generation gap as the robots become a source of fascination and discussion during visits. Antonio’s project is part of his PhD, which is about the ethics of human and robot interaction According to his research these machines can

provide cognitive assistance, supervision and entertainment which can be translated into an immense set of benefits for vulnerable groups. He said: “The population of the UK is growing older and, as a result, a lot of people are being left isolated and lonely, even in the best care settings. “The robots are a novelty at first. But they are also less threatening than other people who come into homes to interact with people. And since you can programme them, I’ve been able to make sure that something different happens every week.” Antonio, whose research at the University of Salford still has a year to run, added: “Robots aren’t the only solution to this growing issue, but they can be a part of it. “It might seem like a strange thing to be doing at first, but my results show how much of a difference this can make.” n www.newrobotics.co.cc

Pilot travel scheme to be rolled out

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A SCHEME that’s helping hundreds of disabled and vulnerable students with public transport is to be rolled out across the UK. Run by the National Star Foundation, which helps students with disabilities make the transition from college to work, the LIFT programme is celebrating five years of turning people into confident and successful users of public transport. Winner of a Guardian Award and accredited with Beacon status for being a leading initiative, the pioneering programme was first launched in Gloucestershire. Contact Sarah Stephenson on 01242527631, ext: 5266. email sstephenson@natstar.ac.uk visit www.natstar.ac.uk/lifttraining

‘End this disgrace’ N

EW figures show a massive drop in the numbers receiving money from the Access to Work (AtW) since the Coalition came to power. And a shadow minister condemned the figures, released by the Department for Work and Pensions, as

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“disgraceful”. They show the number of people claiming funding through the employment support scheme fell by more than 5,000 to 30,690 last year, a drop of nearly 15% on 2010-11. The fall has been even more marked, with only 9,930 disabled people claiming funding for the first time in 2011-12, a fall of a quarter since 2010-11 and more than 6,500 lower than in the last year of the Labour government. Anne McGuire, Labour’s shadow minister for disabled people, said the figures were “a disgraceful indictment of the Government’s commitment to using Access to Work as the primary means of support for disabled workers in employment”.

by JOHN PRING Mrs McGuire said: “These figures highlight yet again that the Government is failing disabled people in employment as well as in welfare reform.” Last year, a review of employment support by Liz Sayce, chief executive of Disability Rights UK, called for the number of disabled people receiving AtW to double, so the scheme could change from being the Government’s best-kept secret into a well-recognised passport to successful employment. But the numbers claiming AtW have plummeted. A DWP spokeswoman insisted that the Government had invested more money than ever before into the scheme but accepted that it needs to do more to raise awareness of the scheme among all disabled people. The spokeswoman said: “That is why we are launching a marketing campaign and have set up an expert panel to look at how we can expand, strengthen and modernise AtW to make work and choice of work possible for many more disable people.”

Promote your inclusion policies . . .


October/November 2012

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. . . EDUCATION . . . TRAINING . . . JOBS

HANDS ON: Antonio at work with his robots

New bursary scheme for city students

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IVERPOOL students in most need of a helping hand are to benefit from a £1m college bursary scheme – so long as they toe the line.

Liverpool Community College, in partnership with the local authority, is behind the new scheme which supports a pledge from city Mayor Joe Anderson that students will not be priced out of post-16 study. The scheme, now up for grabs, will see around 1,500 eligible 16 and 17-year-old students at the college receive £20 per week for up to 35 weeks of study. But, as well as meeting basic requirements relating to family income, students will only keep getting the weekly financial cushion if they embrace college rules, and show a commitment to study. The “college goals” include chalking up 100% attendance each week – apart from for three authorised absences each term; complying with college policy including an

“acceptable level of behaviour”; completing coursework on time and attending all exams. The Mayor’s Office has provided £120,000 for the project and Liverpool council hopes to replicate the scheme at other schools and colleges offering post-16 academic and vocational provision. Mayor Anderson said: “It’s really important for the city that we are developing the right skills in the right sectors and that all young people have access to learning. “I’m proud to be able to launch this scheme with Liverpool Community College at a time when family finances are under strain. “Supporting this scheme will benefit our young people now and for years to come.” Other criteria for receiving the bursary include studying for at least 15 hours a week and coming from a low income family receiving income support, income-

based jobseeker’s allowance, income-related employment and support allowance, pension guarantee credit or child tax credit. Elaine Bowker, principal of Liverpool Community College, said: “We are really pleased to be running this scheme with the council and delighted that we will be able to support learners with financial challenges. “We have and always will support learners from all backgrounds. This scheme confirms our commitment to providing education to those who want it, not just those who can afford it.” Cllr Nick Small, cabinet member for skills, enterprise and employment, said: “Given that supporting young people is a priority for the Mayor and the council, it is only appropriate that this commitment is reflected in a contribution from the Mayor’s office.”

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October/November 2012

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A royal opening for The Walton Centre

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NEW building at The Walton Centre was given a royal launch by staff and patients.

Beatrice Fraenkel chair, Mersey Care NHS

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IFE can be hectic. We seem to be bombarded with more information than ever from every possible source, whether it’s the increasing number of digital TV and radio channels, websites and social media, direct marketing, emails, text messages and mobile phone calls.

For those of you old enough to remember the days when telephone ‘landlines’ were our most common and sophisticated form of quickly keeping in touch, there was a gem of a long-running TV ad campaign called “It’s Good to Talk,” which you can now find on You Tube. I think it’s about time we turned that on its head and announced: “It’s Good to Listen.” Listening to recipients of Mersey Care’s mental health, addiction and disability services is really important to me and my colleagues. By listening to each other we find out how another person feels and importantly, how that person perceives the care they want and not necessarily the treatment they receive. I believe if you stop listening to people you start to make assumptions about what they would really like to say, or you really don’t want to hear the message because it doesn’t fit in with what you want to do. Mersey Care has a track record of listening. That’s why 11 years ago, after listening to service users, we were the first NHS health trust in the country to embrace wholeheartedly in a strategic way the principle that service users had a right to be involved in the recruitment of all staff. We continue to listen. If you’d like your voice heard please join in our current public consultation over proposals to become a new type of NHS organisation, called a foundation trust, with the real benefits that would bring to everyone. The consultation runs until November 26, details are on our website www.merseycare.nhs.uk or call our consultation hotline on 0151 472 4594. FINALLY, a reminder about forthcoming World Mental Health Day. One in four people have a mental health issue during their lifetime so this international awareness-raising campaign is something that really goes to the heart of all our communities. Mersey Care will join Liverpool Mental Health Consortium, the city council and other health partners with a fun and informative event in Williamson Square on Friday 12 October (11am to 3pm) demonstrating the power of art and culture in overcoming distress and achieving wellbeing.

The Lord Lieutenant of Merseyside, Dame Lorna Muirhead, performed an official ribbon cutting of Jubilee House, named to mark the Queen’s diamond year. The event was an important milestone in a major expansion of the specialist neuroscience Trust. Jubilee House contains five teams of staff, including the internationally acclaimed pain management progamme and neuropsychology, who have moved out of the main hospital to make room for new wards and theatres.

JUBILANT TIMES: Dame Lorna Muirhead, Lord Lieutenant of Merseyside, launches Jubilee House, watched by staff and patients at The Walton Centre.

Eye up, parents Early warning advice to be published on detecting child eye cancer

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VERY new parent in the UK is set to be informed about the subtle warning signs of a deadly – and fast-growing – eye cancer.

Parents will now have a fighting chance of seeking medical help for their child in time to save their sight and eyes, according to the charity that fought for the change. The Government announced the move after a year-long campaign by the Childhood Eye Cancer Trust, backed by MP Damian Hinds, parenting website Mumsnet and high street optician Vision Express. They called for Department of Health approved publications aimed at parents to publish information on the signs of retinoblastoma. Now those signs of eye cancer will be included in every new copy of the Personal Child Health Record (known as the ‘Red Book’), distributed to every parent in the UK after the birth of their child. Currently the majority of children with the rare eye cancer will have to lose an eye, and occasionally both, in order to save their life. This is often because diagnosis comes too late for alternative treatments. The charity said it is particularly vital for parents to be aware of the symptoms, as most show no other signs of illness despite having a life-threatening disease. Retinoblastoma is a childhood cancer generally affecting eyes of children from birth to six years old. A tumour can develop as cells mutate within the eye or eyes during rapid growth periods in the early years. The disease is rare, with 40-50 cases diagnosed in the UK each year, but it can be life-threatening. n Childhood Eye Cancer Trust, tel 020 7377 5578. www.chect.org.uk

CANCER FIGHT: Katy Bishop with son Owen

‘Earlier diagnosis is crucial’

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HEN Katy Bishop’s fourth child Owen was born, she little knew he had almost certainly entered the world with a life-threatening condition.

She took Owen to a health visitor at five months after noticing a squint. He was referred to hospital where a clear difference in each eye was also picked up. Katy said: “I was asked if I had noticed anything else unusual. I said the pupil on his right eye was a funny colour in photos. “We were told it was nothing to worry about. I’d tried to look up the symptoms in the Red Book and Birth to Five book but hadn’t found anything so assumed it was insignificant.” An optician missed the tumours again despite the fact Owen now had nystagmus – where the eyes move from side to side. He returned to hospital at eight months where his condition caused concern. But Owen wasn’t seen until 10 weeks later by a

consultant who finally diagnosed bilateral retinoblastoma, meaning he had cancerous tumours in both eyes. The tumour in his right eye was so large it had detached his retina, leaving him unable to see. Katy recalled: “If there had been one paragraph explaining that a white glow in eyes could be a danger signal, I would have known months earlier what was wrong and queried the eye doctor when she told me not to worry. But I had no clue.” Owen is now nearly three and 12 months post chemo. His tumours have started growing again and he faces another three years of hospital visits. His retina has since reattached although sight in that eye is extremely poor Katy added: “I welcome the action to include the warning signs in the Red Book . An earlier diagnosis is crucial to lessen the trauma some children endure.”

Calling all NHS Trusts . . . these pages are


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October/November 2012

All Together NOW!

Over 20,000 volunteer for hospital’s trials WHEN it comes to recruiting patients for clinical research trials, no-one does it better than University Hospital of South Manchester. A total of 20,612 patients were recruited by the Trust in 2011/12 – the highest total for an NHS Trust, and topping a league table published by the National Institute for Health Research Clinical Research Network. One of the main reasons for its success was the groundbreaking PROCAS trial, at the Nightingale Centre & Genesis Prevention Centre, which aims to predict breast cancer risk for women who attend routine NHS breast screening in Greater Manchester. It has recently reached the 40,000

participant mark, from its ultimate target of 60,000. Clinical trials are crucial to finding treatments for breast cancer and other diseases as well as new ways to detect, diagnose, and reduce the risk of disease. They also help researchers and doctors decide if the side effects of a new treatment are acceptable when weighed against the benefits offered by the new treatment. Dr Jonathan Sheffield, chief executive of the NIHR Clinical Research Network, said: “This is fantastic news and illustrates that our partners at UHSM are placing research at the core of NHS business. “We are keen to see other Trusts follow their example and truly embed research as a standard option within their care culture.”

Moon walkers Space technology is helping sports stars – and stroke victims like Sue

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NTI Gravity treadmills used by some of the world’s top injured sports stars to get back to fitness are now helping people who are recovering from a stroke and other disabling conditions.

The exercise machines were first used by NASA to develop fitness regimes for astronauts on space missions. They have also been used to treat the injuries of professional sportsmen and women, with 19 out of the 20 of Premiership football clubs in England employing the unique technology. But now people like Sue Sanders, who suffered a stroke at 47, are finding that a little “moon walking” on the treadmill can have a life-changing effect. The stroke, two years ago, turned Sue’s life upside down. After nine months of rehabilitation, she began to feel more confident but was still a long way from regaining her previous active life. Sue found Cheltenham-based personal trainer Dan Fivey who uses his anti-gravity treadmill on everybody from injured athletes to overweight people who want to run and lose weight. She said: “The Alter G treadmill has given me my independence and enabled me to live the life I had before the stroke. “I go shopping, I go out for lunch – without having to rely on my husband or anybody else!” The treadmill works by using what’s called differential air pressure to “un-weight” up to 80% of a person’s bodyweight. The reduction in weight lowers the impact on joints and muscles to help provide a smooth recovery. “When I started using the treadmill it was literally five minutes at about 0.5 kilometres per hour – a very, very slow walking pace,”

‘I’m still only 49 and I’m not ready to retire BACK ON TRACK: Sue and, right, the treadmill said Sue. “But I’m up to three and four kilometres an hour now and can spend about an hour on the treadmill. “I have been given my freedom again. I’m still only 49 and I am not ready to retire yet!” Dan said: “The treadmill is great as there is a whole range of people that we can use it with, from post-knee surgeries and hip replacements to stroke rehabilitation, from athletes to people with arthritis knees and sore backs.” The treadmills, tested at Nike’s Oregon Research Project by America’s top distance

read by 450,000 readers . . .

quite yet!’

runners, are manufactured by AlterG Inc, based in California. Professional footballers are regaining fitness after injury up to three weeks quicker than normal using the treadmill, according to John Hammond, a clinical Specialist for Alter G Europe. That could have potentially huge financial benefits for clubs if it means stars like Wayne Rooney can be back in action sooner. “It seems a natural progression that we should try to open this out to the general medical population,” added Mr Hammond.

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MEDICAL NOTES Burning issue too many of us ignore A WORRYING new report shows the tough battle faced in bringing down skin cancer rates. The results of a YouGov survey shows many people in the North West are unaware of the risks and are failing to protect themselves and their children. Almost a fifth (18%) of people say they never use sun cream in the UK. More than half of people believe their risk of skin cancer to be low or non existent, according to the poll. Skin cancer is the second most common cancer in young adults, yet only just over half (56%) of those questioned thought 16 to 24-year-olds were at risk. Experts say confusion surrounds the disease that killed more than 2,700 people last year in the UK. Less than half (46%) said they thought people aged 55-64 were at risk, despite recent figures showing rates of melanoma – the most deadly skin cancer – have trebled in the over-50s in 30 years. Only around four in 10 said those aged 65+ are vulnerable – the highest risk age-group for late stage BEWARE OF THE SUN melanoma. Nuffield Health’s UK, who commissioned the survey, say their hospitals have shown a 16% rise in skin cancer cases among 16 to 34-year-olds since 2007. Experts say repeated sunburn significantly increases the risk of skin cancer later in life. Despite this, more than a third of people in the region say they burn at least once a year, while nearly a fifth said their children burn once a year or more. Paul Banwell, a surgeon at Nuffield Health, said: “Because we live in a climate with relatively little sunshine and lots of rain people believe they are not at risk, but this is a fallacy. “The biggest predictor for skin cancer later in life is sunburn when you are young -– whether it materialises in your early 20s or in your 60s. “Sadly, sun awareness and skin checks are not part of our education, and this needs to be addressed as a priority.”

Seven years at top FOR the seventh year running, St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust has been named as one of the top performers in the Patient Environment Action Team (PEAT) assessments. Both St Helens Hospital and Whiston Hospital scored top marks for their high standards in food, patient environment, TAKE ME HOME! and privacy and dignity.

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October/November 2012

E! E HOM TAKE M

BOX OFFICE SENSATION!

Until Oct 13: The Heretic. The Lowry. Black comedy from Richard Bean. Until Nov 3: Lighthearted Intercourse. Bolton Octagon. Rare gem by Bill Naughton. Oct 6: Ross Noble: Mindblender. Liverpool Empire. Standup comedy. Oct 6-Oct 28: Borderline Vultures. The Lowry. 360-degree adventure, putting the audience at the heart of the action. Oct 7: Ragdolls. Llandudno Venue Cymru. Four harmony vocalists recreate the magic of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons. Oct 8-13: Grease. Manchester Palace Theatre. Classic rock musical. Oct 9: Dance Triple Bill. The Lowry. Dynamic dance. Oct 9-27: Dirty Dancing. Liverpool Empire. Stage adaptation of the hit film. Oct 10: St Petersburg Symphony Orchestra. Llandudno Venue Cymru. An evening of classical music. Oct 10-12: Rambert Dance Company - Labyrinth of Love. The Lowry. Contemporary dance show. SIGNED Oct 10. Oct 10-13: Jekyll & Hyde. Runcorn Brindley. Classic book brought to the stage. Oct 11: Nick Harper. The Lowry. Live singer-songwriter and virtuoso guitarist. Oct 12: Never for Ever. Runcorn Brindley. Kate Bush Tribute Band. Oct 12: The Canterbury Tales. Llandudno Venue Cymru. Geoffrey Chaucer’s classic. Oct 12: Three Men in a Bow Tie. Clwyd Theatr Cymru. Jokes, songs and topical tales. Oct 12-13: The Right Ballerina. The Lowry. Provocative new play from award-winner Billy Cowan. Oct 13: Milkshake! Live. Llandudno Venue Cymru. Channel 5’s children’s show. Oct 13: Stewart Francis. The Lowry. Stand-up comedy. Oct 13: Nick Harper. New Brighton Floral Pavilion. Singersongwriter and virtuoso guitarist. Oct 14: Pappy’s Last Show Ever. The Lowry. Sketch comedy troupe. Oct 14: The Lock In. The Lowry. The UK’s number one folk and hip-hop dance extravaganza. Oct 14: Clockheart Boy. The Lowry. Following a successful run at the Edinburgh Fringe, Dumbshow’s energetic ensemble revives their imaginative tale. Oct 15: First Dates. Bolton Octagon. New work by professional playwrights. Oct 15: Play Time. Bolton Octagon. Showcasing works by young playwrights. Oct 15: Danny Bhoy. Runcorn Brindley. Stand-up comedy. Oct 16: Welsh National Opera Jephtha. Llandudno Venue Cymru. Opera with music by Handel and words by Thomas Morell. Oct 16: Andy Fairweather Low. Runcorn Brindley. Singer-songwriter. Oct 16: Fascinating Aida. The Lowry. Top comedy cabaret trio. Oct 16: Jasmin Vardimon. The Lowry. Dance show from the award-winning choreographer. Oct 16-20: The Sacred Flame. Liverpool Playhouse. Twist on the classic murder

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Tom tunes up for guitar festival

T

OP slide guitarist Tom Doughty is having another hectic year.

Despite a jam-packed diary of gigs, Tom has been putting on workshops at spinal injuries centres across the UK to inspire patients to play lap guitar. Paralysed from the neck after a road accident in 1974, Tom started playing guitar when he was a child. But the accident affected his fingers and prevented him from playing music. With the tenacity and creativity of

a new explorer, Tom soon found ways to work around his limited hand movement. He has developed new and unique techniques for playing slide guitar and is now enjoying a rapidly growing international reputation. Tom is now set for the International Guitar Festival at New Brighton’s Floral Pavilion in November. He takes to the stage at the Floral Pavilion on Saturday, November 17, 7.30pm. Appearing with him are Bobby Valentino and BJ Cole.

Put on your dancin’ mystery. Oct 16-20: Stories from an Invisible Town. Liverpool Playhouse. An evening of storytelling. Oct 17: Idina Menzel. Manchester Palace Theatre. Singer backed by a 25piece orchestra. Oct 17: Steve Hughes. The Lowry. Stand-up comedy. Oct 17, 19: Welsh National Opera – Cosi fan tutte. Llandudno Venue Cymru. Opera by Mozart. Oct 17-20: L.O.V.E. Clwyd Theatr Cymru. Performance of Shakespeare’s sonnets. Oct 18, 20: Welsh National Opera – La Boheme. Llandudno Venue Cymru. Major new production of opera’s greatest love story. Oct 18: Northern Soul. The Lowry. One-woman show. Oct 18- 20: Some Like it Hip Hop. The Lowry. First UK tour of the hilarious tale of love, mistaken identity and cross-dressing. SIGNED – Oct 20. Oct 18- 20: Me and My Girl. New Brighton Floral Pavilion. Musical celebration of love. Oct 18-19: Essence of Ireland. Manchester Palace Theatre. Breathtaking dance routines combined with traditional Irish folk music. Oct 19: Cityscape presents... Bolton

Octagon. Musical talent from the North West. Acts to be confirmed. Oct 19: Bronagh’s Big Weekend. The Lowry. Stand-up comedy. Oct 20: Derek Acorah. Runcorn Brindley. An evening of mediumship. Oct 20: High Tease. The Lowry. Burlesque show, back by popular demand. Oct 20-21: Paul Foot. The Lowry. Stand-up comedy. Oct 21: The Real McCoy’s Mr Frazier. The Lowry. Hugely successful international comedy. Oct 23: Elkie Brooks. The Lowry. One of Britain’s most popular singers. Oct 23-27: Obama the Mamba. The Lowry. The true story of Barack Obama’s half-brother. CAPTIONED Oct 25. Oct 23-27: 42nd Street. Manchester Palace Theatre. Tony award-winning show. Oct 24: The Sinking of the Arandora Star. Clwyd Theatr Cyrmu. The story of the ill-fated internment camp-bound ship. Oct 24: Far. Liverpool Playhouse. Modern dance. Oct 24-25: Hairy Bikers – Larger than Live. The Lowry.

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October/November 2012

GUITAR MAN: Slide guitarist Tom Doughty on his way to New Brighton

shoes shoes .. .. ..

Oct 25: Gillian Clarke – The Absurd. Clwyd Theatr Cymru. The launch of Ice by Gillian Clark, the National Poet of Wales. Oct 25: Russell Kane. Llandudno Venue Cymru. Stand-up comedy. Oct 25: The Seagull Effect. The Lowry. Drama centred on the storm of 1987. Oct 25-26: Encore! A Journey through the Hollywood musical. Runcorn Brindley. Oct 25-27: A Murder is Announced. Llandudno Venue Cymru. Play adapted from the Agatha Christie novel. Oct 26: The Sea Show. Runcorn Brindley. Hilarious mix of cabaret and natural history. Oct 26: Death Row Diva. The Lowry. Black comedy. Oct 26: Kate Rusby. New Brighton Floral Pavilion. English folk vocalist. Oct 27: Amy Macdonald. The Lowry. One of Europe’s biggest selling singer-songwriters. Oct 27- 28: Oh Whistle... Two Ghost Stories. The Lowry. Spine-chillers. Oct 28: Wishbone Ash. The Lowry. Hugely popular rock band. Oct 29: The Festival of the Spoken Nerd. The Lowry. Comedy featuring stand-up mathematician Matt Parker. Oct 29: The Proclaimers. The Lowry. Internationally-acclaimed duo. Oct 29-Nov 3: Charles Dickens’ The Haunting. Llandudno Venue Cymru. Oct 30: An Evening with Ann Widdecombe.

Runcorn Brindley. Q&A session with the popular ex-Tory minister. Oct 30: Piff the Magic Dragon. The Lowry. Comedy magic act. Oct 30-Nov 3: English National Ballet’s Sleeping Beauty. Liverpool Empire. Oct 30-Nov 3: The Situation Room. The Lowry. New play from Oscar Mike. Oct 30-Nov 3: The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner. Liverpool Playhouse. Alan Sillitoe’s classic novel brought to the stage. Oct 30-Nov 4: Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. New Brighton Floral Pavilion. Musical from Andrew Lloyd Webber. Oct 31: Paul Zerdin. Runcorn Brindley. Puppet master and ventriloquist. Oct 31-Nov 1: The Pied Piper of Hamelin. Clwyd Theatr Cymru. Nov 1: Andi Osho. Runcorn Brindley. Stand-up comedy. Nov 1-Nov 24: Glengarry Glen Ross. Clwyd Theatr Cymru. Stage adaptation of the Kevin Spacey and Al Pacino film. Nov 1-3: Hairy Maclary. The Lowry. Adaptation of the much-loved book by Lynley Dodd. Nov 2: Katy Setterfield as Dusty Springfield. Runcorn Brindley. Tribute act. Nov 2: The Ancient Mariner. The Lowry. Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s poem retold through songs.

Nov 2-3: Batsheva Ensemble. The Lowry. Israel’s finest young dance troupe. Nov 2-25: The International Guitar Festival of Great Britain. New Brighton Floral Pavilion. Featuring Tom Doughty among others, the guitar festival is now in its 24th year. Nov 3: Cannon and Ball. Runcorn Brindley. Stand-up comedy. Nov 3: The Boy with Tape on his Face. The Lowry. Silent stand-up comedy. Nov 4: Misrana. The Lowry. Dance showcase of the Kathak and Bharatanatyam dance forms. Nov 6: Leo Sayer. Llandudno Venue Cymru. Nov 6: Patrick Wolf. The Lowry. Acoustic musician. Nov 6: The Best of BE Festival. The Lowry. Birmingham’s international theatre festival arrives at the Lowry. Nov 6-9: Faust. The Lowry. Opera by Charles Gounoud. Nov 6-10: Steptoe and Son. Liverpool Playhouse. Adapted from the legendary scripts of Galton and Simpson for a modern audience. Nov 7: Paul Carrrack. Llandudno Venue Cymru. Nov 7-10: The Sound of Music. Liverpool Empire. Rodgers and Hammerstein’s classic. Nov 7-10: Don Giovanni. The Lowry. Mozart’s classic opera. Nov 8: Sir Chris Bonington. Llandudno Venue Cymru. Talk with Britain’s best known mountaineer. Nov 8: The Makropulos Case. The Lowry. New production of Janacek’s penultimate opera. Audio described. Nov 8: SXTO. Clwyd Theatr Cymru. Welsh language play. Nov 8-Dec 1: Held. Liverpool Playhouse. First play by Young Everyman and Playhouse Young Writers Graduate Joe Ward Munro. Nov 9: Raga Jyoti. The Lowry. Unique Indian music experience. Nov 9: Richard Durrant in Concert. Clwyd Theatr Cymru. World class virtuoso. Nov 10: Paper Tom. The Lowry. The story of post-war from the perspective of two veterans. Nov 10: Show of Hands. The Lowry. Top British folk band. Nov 11: Prague Symphony Orchestra. Llandudno Venue Cyrmu. An evening of classical music. Nov 13-17: 42nd Street. Liverpool Empire. Tony award-winning show. Nov 13-17: A Government Inspector. Liverpool Playhouse. Nov 14: Frankie Boyle. Llandudno Venue Cymru. Stand-up comedy. Nov 16-Jan 12: Peter Pan. Bolton Octagon. Traditional pantomime. Nov 20: Welsh National Opera – Jephtha. Liverpool Empire. Opera with music by Handel and words by Thomas Morell. Nov 21-24: Welsh National Opera – La Boheme. Liverpool Empire. Major new production of opera’s greatest love story. Nov 22: Peter Andre. Llandudno Venue Cymru. Nov 22: Welsh National Opera – Cosi fan tutte. Liverpool Empire. Opera by Mozart. Nov 23-Jan 12: A Nightmare on Lime Street. Liverpool Royal Court. New comedy from Fred Lawless. Nov 25: Hairy Bikers – Larger than Live. Liverpool Empire. Nov 26-Dec 1: Christmas with The Rat Pack. Liverpool Empire. Rat Pack tribute act. Nov 27: Felicity Aston. Llandudno Venue Cymru. First woman to ski solo across Antarctica. Nov 30-Jan 19: Jack and the Beanstalk. Liverpool Playhouse. The Rock and Roll panto is back! TAKE ME HOME!

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Books

Tess and her son, Sam (inset)

A backpacker with a difference

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ESS Lancashire is not your typical backpacker. In 1989, aged 24, she suffered a severe stroke. It left her with debilitating epilepsy and damaged the part of her brain that processes language, a condition known as aphasia. Tess, an actress and extrovert, found herself speechless, unable to read and write and subject to seizures. Twenty-four years later, Tess, her sixyear-old son, Sam, and her boyfriend, Bernie, left London on a mission to tour Bernie’s homeland of Australia. With their trusty campervan called Harry, and a dictaphone, they spent almost a year crossing the deserts and bushlands. Their journey is more than a travel blog – it is a story of acceptance, reflection and self-discovery. Tess may be aphasic, but she is never lost for words. “I was so determined to record my journey, so I could pass on my memory and my story,” says Tess. “I knew it would be a challenge because of my difficulties reading, writing and talking. “The process has been a type of therapy. Putting the diaries to paper has helped me make sense of my experiences. This is not just a reflection on my journey around Australia, but a reflection on the many journeys I have made in my life.” Outback Uncovered, £17.82, is available to purchase online from Author House and Amazon.

Mind your back! Change Your Posture, Change Your Life by Richard Brennan, Watkins Publishing, £12.99 BAD posture can lead to any number of health problems, from back pain to fatigue. This new book promises to help you avoid those problems through a method called the Alexander Technique, first developed in the 1890s and now included on an NHS list of complementary therapies.


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All Together NOW!

October/November 2012

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FIVE Yeoman loppers to be won!

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NEW range of lightweight telescopic cutting tools has been launched by British garden equipment firm Yeoman to mark its 21st anniversary – and we have FIVE to give away! Our prize, Yeoman’s telescopic bypass loppers, each worth £29.99, are ideal for various distance cutting tasks, from light pruning to slicing through small branches, both overhead and at the back of the border. Their lightweight aluminium manufacture ensures they are easy to use for gardeners with

limited arm or upper body strength. The rounded triangular handles with soft grips add to the user’s comfort and the length can be adjusted from 54cm to 80cm (22in-32in) by a simple twist of the grip end. Bypass blades are widely recognised as giving the cleanest cut. To enter the competition, answer this question: Which anniversary is Yeoman celebrating? Send your entry with your name and address on a postcard or sealed envelope, stating where you picked up

CHECKLIST

your copy of All Together NOW! – and tell us what you think of the paper – to Yeoman Lopper Competition, All Together NOW!, The Bradbury Centre, Youens Way, Liverpool L14 2EP, to arrive by Friday November 16. You can also enter online at www.alltogethernow.org.uk Check out Yeoman’s full range, which includes telescopic hedge shears and lawn shears, at www.yeomangarden.co.uk

EASY DOES IT: Peter Surridge demonstrates the telescopic loppers.

Vib . . .acious! V IBURNUMS grow so easily that they are not always given the credit they’re

due.

If you want an evergreen hedge that tolerates traffic pollution and flowers through the worst winter weather, choose Viburnum tinus. How about a beautiful bush with coloured leaves and scented flowers? Viburnum farreri is for you. Or maybe a shrub that smothers itself with bloom all winter? Take your pick from several species and varieties. The easiest to grow is one of the evergreens, Viburnum tinus, also known as laurustinus, with dark, glossy foliage and red stems. This ignores frost, snow, traffic fumes and salty coastal gales yet in November it produces clusters of pink buds which open to reveal lightly scented, star-shaped blooms that last until February. Later it bears dark purple berries. With minimal pruning, laurustinus AWARD WINNER: The free-flowering Viburnum Gwenllian makes a hedge eventually growing species have a real knock-out produced such fine varieties as Pink up to 3m (10ft) tall but it is easily Prelude, with white flowers ageing to perfume. controlled by spring pruning to make One of the loveliest of these is pink, Purpureum, which has bronzea smaller hedge or a feature bush Viburnum x bodnantense. The purple tinges to the young foliage, about a metre (3ft-4ft) in height and blooms, appearing before the and Variegatum, with broad, cream spread. leaves, are heavily scented and in margins to the dark green leaves. It is a promiscuous shrub, crossrich hues of red and pink on white, Two even better varieties have pollinating with any other laurustinus lasting from late autumn into spring. won Royal Horticultural Society it fancies. The results, as you’ll find The best varieties include Dawn, awards of garden merit – freein corners of the garden, are selfCharles Lamont and Deben. They flowering Gwenllian (pictured) with sown seedlings, each with its own grow slowly up to 2.5m with a dark pink buds opening into pinkcharacteristics. If you can spare the spread of 2m (8ft 6in x 6ft 6in). flushed white flowers, followed by space, allow some of these to grow One parent of that species is plenty of long-lasting pale blue to flowering size – you might have a Viburnum farreri, named after berries, and Eve Price, which pleasant surprise. Reginald Farrer, the plant hunter produces large flower-clusters on a Plant breeders recognised the who discovered it in China. The particularly neat, compact bush. potential of leaves are bronze when young, Though the flower scent of those this shrub turning red-purple then joined in late evergreen laurustinus shrubs is TAKE ME HOME! years ago pleasant enough, the deciduous autumn by whitish, sweet-scented and have

HELPING HANDS

blooms. In mild weather, the blooms continue to appear after the foliage has fallen in winter and early spring. The berries are red. To extend the flowering display into spring, choose the deciduous Viburnum carlesii, with perfumed flowers in April and May, red fruits and leaves that sometimes take on colourful tints in autumn. It’s not too big, reaching 1.2m (4ft) or so in height. Viburnum burkwoodii is similar but evergreen and taller. For a large, shapely bush 3m tall and 4m wide (9ft x 12ft), check out Viburnum plicatum. It is deciduous with bright green foliage in graceful layers and white flowers in spring and summer.

FLOWERS: Plant daffodils in October and tulips in November. Pinch out the tips of long shoots on wallflowers to help them grow bushy. Check borders for selfseeded foxgloves, aquilegias, campanulas, forget-me-nots and other biennials. Move some to make groups of their own kind so they will have more impact when flowering. SHRUBS AND TREES: Guard against wind damage to wall shrubs and climbers by supporting and tying them. Inspect old ties to ensure they are not too tight. PATIOS: Move pots into the sunniest position and raise them on bricks or pot feet so they do not stand in puddles after autumn rains. LAWNS: Damp or mossy lawns should be spiked 10cm (4in) deep and the same distance apart, ideally with a hollow-tined aerator, otherwise with a garden fork. Make a 50:50 mixture of gritty sand and garden compost or good soil and brush this into the holes. If necessary, apply moss-killer and autumn lawn food – not spring fertiliser. PONDS: Keep ponds clear of debris by cutting back dead foliage of aquatic plants, removing any blanketweed and clearing fallen leaves regularly with a net. VEGETABLES: Plant overwintering varieties of broad bean, onions and shallots. When rhubarb leaves have died down at the end of November, sprinkle a handful of general fertiliser round each plant and apply a generous layer of manure or garden compost. FRUIT: Prune apple trees lightly, shortening the leading shoots by one quarter – ideally within fruit-picking height – and trimming sideshoots back to four or five buds. HERBS: Pot up parsley and chives and grow them on an indoor windowsill. Grow fresh basil from cuttings – stand them in a glass of water on an indoor windowsill until roots appear then plant in pots of compost. HOUSEPLANTS: Those which flowered earlier in the year need only enough water to keep the compost slightly moist. Plants that are still to bloom, like Christmas cactus and cyclamen, need food and water regularly.

Disabled and need advice on gardening? Contact national charity THRIVE. Tel. 0118 988 5688. www.thrive.org.uk or www.carryongardening.org.uk


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October/November 2012

Annie’s place Memories which I’ll treasure forever . . .

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O YOU fancy a weekend in Margate? I asked my friend Annie.

It was two months after she had been diagnosed with liver cancer. Annie had been complaining about a bad back in July and we all just thought she’d been overdoing it, working hard as usual, putting all her energies into the projects she was running in a number of different schools. Finally, the pain was so acute that she took herself to hospital, only to discover after many tests that she had cancer. It started in the liver but had also attacked the vertebrae. The result was a month in hospital and a cage being placed in her back replacing the vertebrae. It was as we were sitting in her flat one sunny October day, that I made the Margate suggestion, knowing how much Annie liked being near the sea and thinking that a weekend away might be good. “Oh yes, that would be lovely,” she replied, but then there was a pause. “But I’d really like to go to Wales!”

DREAM HOLIDAY: TY GWYN GUEST HOUSE

CATHI BAKER reflects on a very special holiday with her close friend, Annie

Slightly taken aback I too paused and then responded: “Of course!” This wasn’t what I was expecting. I had in mind a quick visit to Margate, stay over a night, have a walk along the beach, meal out, and home. Wales seemed a million miles away from all that. But when Annie is determined to do something she could move mountains to make it happen. And, to spare me the long drive, she organised a relay system involving family and friends. I drove up to London from Kent, loaded Annie, wheelchair, Zimmer frame, large bag of clothes, large bag of medicines, laptop and various leads, large bag of make-up, three pillows and a sheet into my estate car and drove from Pimlico to Windsor. Then we unloaded and uploaded Holiday Breaks in the Lakes into a Golf and set off on the near Keswick second leg of the journey with a Self catering apartments for 2-6 people. Specially designed with the wheelchair charming friend of Annie’s, who in mind. No steps. Beautiful views in a didn’t mind that when we stopped superb location. Friendly owners in residence. Open all year. for toilet breaks they also included a slow walk/ push of wheelchair around the service station supermarket. Once in Cardiff we then unloaded again, toileted, and reloaded into Annie’s sister’s car – smaller than a Golf! By this time it was dark and our last leg of the journey was all a bit For a colour brochure of a blur for me, but I could tell that Annie was coming home: Tel: 01768 776380 www.disabled-holiday.net places were pointed out and email: joan@irtonhousefarm.co.uk recognised, stories retold and Book now! memories were flooding back. This

IRTON HOUSE FARM

was Annie’s spiritual, as well as childhood, home and her morale and joy rose the further we travelled. The miracle of this trip is that Annie never complained of any pain during the long journey. It seemed the journey was giving her some brief relief, allowing her to enjoy the experience rather than feel the pain. “We’re here!” she announced at about 7.30pm. She had managed to find a bed and breakfast place in Aberaeron that had an annex designed for disabled visitors. Annie had stumbled across Ty Gwyn Guest House while surfing the net. We really couldn’t have asked for better. Mark, the owner, was so helpful. He showed us into a self-contained annex where there was a wet room, kitchen area, large double bed and a sofa bed. It had everything. Annie could even enjoy wheeling her chair under the sink to wash up the pots, a luxury she hadn’t had in her own flat! Mark had trained as a chef and our meals were brought to us. Ty Gwyn was perfect for her. She loved it and had booked a week’s visit last Christmas. Sadly, though, she spent the time in a hospice, recovering from more surgery. Annie had really been looking forward to returning to Ty Gwyn and spending more time with her family. She knew it was a safe place for her to be, even on her own, where she could look after herself and be independent. I’m now on my way back to Ty Gywn, but this time on the train and on my own. Annie died, aged 58, and I am returning to the place that she loved so much for her funeral. Annie loved Wales. It was where she grew up. And she raved about Ty Gywn and all that it offered her. I know she would have liked this information to be passed on to as many people as possible who could benefit from a place such as this . . . n Ty Gwyn, tel 01545 570254.

All Together NOW!

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with RUSSELL GRANT ARIES March 21st - April 20th The start of October is a good time to have a serious conversation with your best friend, business partner or lover. An embarrassing secret will be revealed at the end of November. TAURUS April 21st - May 21st A plum work assignment will be awarded to you in the opening days of October. You’ll see gratifying results from a self-improvement programme in the final days of the month. A reliable source of income comes to an end in the final days of November. GEMINI May 22nd - June 21st You’ll be free to spend more time with your nearest and dearest. A New Moon in mid-October causes a budding romance to burst into flower. But a romantic rendezvous has to be called off in the early days of November. The results of a health regime will be pleasing. CANCER June 22nd - July 23rd Trust your instincts regarding a relative at mid-month. The last days of October will be irresistibly romantic. A steamy encounter brings November to an exciting conclusion. LEO July 24th - August 23rd Your sex appeal is about to hit an all time high – but don’t hurry love. The last days of October find you spending quality time with your nearest and dearest. November opens with you railing against authority. You’ll enjoy some sweet moments with family as November draws to a clos VIRGO August 24th - September 23rd It’s time to make a long-term financial plan. A new source of income arrives at the middle of the month. Good news from your best friend, lover or business partner is cause to celebrate on the 23rd. MidNovember isn’t favoured for entertaining relatives. Make more time for creative pursuits. LIBRA September 24th - October 23rd Devote more time to social pursuits. The final days of October sees extra money in your bank account. Don’t bother trying to cover up a friend’s embarrassing behaviour in the early days of November; he or she has to face the consequences. SCORPIO October 24th - November 22nd Beware of putting a loved one on a pedestal. Money from a scholarship, Government grant or prize win is about to arrive. You’ll have to drop out of a party to cope with a work emergency in early November. Visit a nearby friend at the end of November. SAGITTARIUS November 23rd - December 21st October opens with a lovely opportunity to travel with a good friend. A compassionate relative is set to relieve you of a dreaded chore. Don’t neglect friends for the sake of a romance. A close relationship is showing signs of strain. CAPRICORN December 22nd - January 20th A bonus or award is on its way. The Full Moon on the 29th brings news of an engagement, marriage, or pregnancy and a friend will do you a fabulous favour as Halloween approaches. The opening days of November force you to make a decision between your personal and professional lives. AQUARIUS January 21st - February 19th Your best friend or lover gives you a chance to expand your horizons. Don’t loan money to a friend – the relationship will suffer. October closes with you attending a family reunion. Give yourself enough time to party in mid-November. PISCES February 20th - March 20th Give your best friend, lover, or business partner a token of your affection. Be very careful with your money in the beginning of November; you need to keep as much cash in savings as possible. The last days of TAKE ME HOME! the month find a friendship turning to romance.

225,000 of our readers DON’T read ANY other newspaper!


All Together NOW!

28

October/November 2012

The Accumulator Quiz

STARSPOT CROSSWORD Can you find the celebrity name hidden in this Starspot Crossword? Complete the crossword in the normal way then make a note of the letters contained in all the squares which are marked with shaded stars. These letters will make an anagram of the name you are looking for. 1

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2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 13. 14. 15. 18. 19. 22. 23. 24. 27. 28.

University teacher (9) Jump the queue (4,2) Account, invoice (4) Bearing (4) Tamper with (slang) (6) Struck out (7) Barren (4) Talk deliriously (4) Female pig (3) Cacophony (3) Thin outer surface (4) Chrysalis (4) Widow (7) Transparent (6) South African monetary unit (4) 30. Pontiff (4) 31. Deceive by ingenuity (6) 32. Unavoidable (9)

A Clutch B Alternator C Distributor D Choke QUESTION 5 – for 5 points: Who wrote the children’s story of The Little Match Girl?

Invader (6) Doubled over (6) Season (6) Accessible (4) Knock down (3,4) Freshwater fish (4) Lingerie (9) Wild flower (9) King of beasts (4) Psalmist (5) Garden pest (4) Headache drug (7) Ribbon-like pasta (6) South American plain (6) Condiment (6) Pal (4) Palm fruit (4)

A Charles Dickens B Beatrix Potter C Hans Christian Andersen D A.A. Milne QUESTION 6 – for 6 points: Which organisation has its UK headquarters at Panda House in Godalming, Surrey? A B C D

The RSPCA World Wide Fund For Nature Surrey Police Driving School Chessington Zoo

The depths of winter The wettest part of the year The season of mists The hottest days of the year

QUESTION 11 – for 11 points: What name is given to the mark used as the dot on the letter i? A B C D

Breve Cedilla Caron Tittle

QUESTION 12 – for 12 points: The fashion designer Jimmy Choo is famous for creating which items? A B C D

Actress Tippi Hedren. See Question 9

QUESTION 7 – for 7 points: Which National Park has its highest point at Kinder Scout?

Hats Scarves Shoes Dresses

QUESTION 13 – for 13 points: What is a Welsh pibacwd?

A Peak District B Brecon Beacons C North York Moors D Dartmoor QUESTION 8 – for 8 points: Which test cricket ground has the Grace Gates at its entrance, designed by Sir Herbert Baker? A Headingley B Lord’s C The Oval D Old Trafford QUESTION 9 – for 9 points: Tippi Hedren is the mother of which American actress?

A B C D

QUESTION 14 – for 14 points: Which perfume house created the fragrance Youth Dew in 1953? A B C D

Estée Lauder Chanel Dior Lancôme

QUESTION 15 – for 15 points: In the Auvergne region of France, what are the extinct volcanoes known as? A B C D

Kirstie Alley Jamie Lee Curtis Bo Derek Melanie Griffith

Seagull A set of bagpipes A tall, black, woman’s hat A mountain spring

Cols Puys Coteau Pics

KAKURO

THERE is just one simple rule in Sudoku. Each row and each column must contain the numbers 1 to 9, and so must each 3 x 3 box. This is a logic puzzle, and you should not have to guess.

EASY

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QUESTION 10 – for 10 points: In weather terms, what are known as the Dog Days?

A White B Green C Yellow D Blue QUESTION 3 – for 3 points: Which British bird lives in nests in the side of river banks? A Pied wagtail B Swallow C Kingfisher D Heron QUESTION 4 – for 4 points: Which part on a car allows for more fuel to be used when starting?

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chosen answers and keep a record of your points total. Maximum total points 120. A A windmill with canvas sails B A church organ C A sailing ship D A net for catching birds QUESTION 2 – for 2 points: What colour flags are flown over beaches that are free from pollution?

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Each question has four possible answers and is worth from one to 15 points. Circle your QUESTION 1 – for 1 point: What was a windjammer in the 19th century?

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www.alltogethernow.org.uk

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FILL in the blank squares in the grid with numbers so that each horizontal or vertical line adds up to the total given in the box either to the left or above it. Horizontal totals are given in the top right corners of the shaded boxes; vertical totals in the bottom left corners. You can use the numbers 1 to 9, but may not use the same number more than once in any run. The number may be used again, however, in the same row or column but as part of another run.

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SAY THAT AGAIN . . .

HOWEVER difficult life may seem, there is always something you can succeed at. — Professor Stephen Hawking

If you’re an underdog, mentally disabled, physically disabled, if you don’t fit in, you can still be a hero. — Steve Guttenberg

Disability is a matter of perception. If you can do just one thing well, you’re needed by someone. — Martina Navratilova

“The greatest healing therapy is friendship and love.” — Hubert H. Humphrey


www.alltogethernow.org.uk

October/November 2012

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ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ EACH number in our Cross Code grid represents a different letter of the alphabet. You have three letters in the control grid to start you off. Enter them in the appropriate squares in the main grid, then use your knowledge of words to work out which letters should go in the missing squares. As you get the letters, fill in other squares with the same number in the main grid and control grid. Check off the alphabetical list of letters as you identify them.

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MISSING LINK Each pair of words has a missing word between them that acts as a link to both (e.g. FRONT – DOOR – MAT). The initial letters of the six answers (reading downwards) will spell out a fruitbearing tree.

1. Herbs 767 362 791 673 496 316 468 172 567 261 727 753 246 612 274 517 122 666 453 173 68

Telephone dialling pads combine several letters on one key. Here we have encoded several sets of words or items by using numbers rather than letters. Then we have divided them into groups of three characters and run all the names one after another to make your task a little more difficult. Can you crack the codes?

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CROSS CODE 13

All Together NOW!

1 []’–

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4. FTSE100 companies 546 434 743 717 247 771 864 538 371 223 783 671 342 436 176 176 923 162 846 625 431 227 252 971 278 363 22

Spaces and any punctuation marks are represented by 1.

618 627 277 766 764

3. Cities of the ancient world 222 956 617 663 189 731 632 221 299 268 486 122 784 243 177 278 215 378 725 361 843 237 132 627 287 187 691 266 782 684 667 53

633 179 557 147 729

5. Types of medication 268 473 784 213 487 212 625 437 421 783 312 382 125 625 371 664 378 268 126 843 152 928 483 139 732 268

6. Snakes and other reptiles 242 635 366 174 339 463 371 837 727 461 262 126 678 742 867 125 544 286 715 464 126 272 144 268 186 786 473 175 699 676 126 226 632

PATHWORDS

SPOT CHECK

Starting from the central shaded letter, move one letter at a time (up, down, right or left, but not diagonally) to find 19 Greek gods.

Can you place the six dominoes (right) into the grid below in such a way that the number of spots in all four rows across and all four rows down totals 12?

384 764 332 683 867

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Add the given letter to the first word to make a new word.

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426 431 918 233 773

2. Playwrights’ surnames 232 538 817 437 432 617 468 371 463 843 142 736 174 253 773 273 174 726 335 561 786 772 731 292 526 876 194 533 124 354 68

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WORD WIZARD

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SOUKOUS 1) A West Indian tree bearing large, sour, pulpy fruit; 2) A form of Central African dance music, originating in Zaire, influenced by Latin American rhythms; 3) An underground tunnel constructed as a link between Egyptian pyramids.

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In which year did all three of these significant historical events take place?

1. Tibet is opened to the world when a British expedition led by Sir Francis Younghusband arrives in Lhasa. 2. Anton Chekhov’s play The Cherry Orchard opens in Moscow. 3. France and Spain sign a treaty granting independence to Morocco.

Clue: Secret agent can be made fair.

WAS IT? a) 1901; b) 1904; c) 1907; d) 1910; e) 1913.

____ +L=_L___

ALL THE ANSWERS Pathwords: Poseidon; Zeus; Artemis; Nemesis; Hecate; Demeter; Hyperion; Pan; Eros; Hermes; Persephone; Dionysus; Apollo; Pollux; Aphrodite; Uranus; Hera; Kronos; Helios.

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ADVERTISE HERE 0151 230 0307

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Accumulator Quiz 1 – C; 2 – D; 3 – C; 4 – D; 5 – C; 6 – B; 7 – A; 8 – B; 9 – D; 10 – D; 11 – D; 12 – C; 13 – B; 14 – A; 15 – B. Starspot Crossword Across – 1 Professor; 9 Push in; 10 Bill; 11 Mien; 12 Nobble; 13 Deleted; 16 Arid; 17 Rave; 18 Sow; 20 Din; 21 Skin; 23 Pupa; 25 Dowager; 26 Limpid; 29 Rand; 30 Pope; 31 Outwit; 32 Necessary. Down – 2 Raider; 3 Folded; 4 Summer; 5 Open; 6 Run over; 7 Chub; 8 Underwear; 13 Dandelion; 14 Lion; 15 David; 18 Slug; 19 Aspirin; 22 Noodle; 23 Pampas; 24 Pepper; 27 Mate; 28 Date. Star Name: LEWIS HAMILTON

Word Wizard No 2 is correct. Soukous is a form of dance music. Dialling Codes 1. rosemary; oregano; thyme; mint; sage; marjoram; parsley; tarragon; basil; saffron; camomile; peppermint. 2. Beckett; Sheridan; Pinter; Goethe; Ibsen; Shakespeare; Pirandello; Stoppard; Ayckbourn; Wilde; Chekhov. 3. Babylon; Rome; Tyre; Mecca; Byzantium; Carthage; Sparta; Jerusalem; Thebes; Damascus; Troy; Constantinople. 4. Kingfisher; Schroders; Unilever; BAE Systems; Diageo; Rolls-Royce; National Grid; Barclays;

AstraZeneca. 5. antiseptic; diuretic; analgesic; steroid; beta-blocker; decongestant; antidote; laxative; expectorant. 6. chameleon; sidewinder; terrapin; boa constrictor; alligator; king cobra; giant tortoise; slowworm; anaconda. Spot Check A = 6; B = 1; C = 2; D = 5; E = 3; F = 4. Missing Link queue; under; index; note; class; edge. Tree: quince. Make a Date The year was 1904. Transformer Bond + L = Blond.

REACH 450,000 READERS . . .

TAKE ME HOME!


30

All Together NOW!

October/November 2012

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

Ann to speak at blind charity meeting

SHOPMOBILIT n ALTRINCHAM. Tel 0161 929 1714 n ASHTON-UNDER-LYNE. Tel 0161 339 9500 n BARROW. Tel 01229 434039 n BIRKENHEAD. Tel 0151 647 6162 n BLACKBURN AND DARWEN. Tel 01254 690566 or 07757 502217 n BLACKPOOL. Tel 01253 349 427 n BOLTON. Tel 01204 392946 n BURY. Tel 0161 764 9966 n CARLISLE. Tel 01228 625950 n CHESTER. Tel 01244 312626 n CHORLEY. Tel 01257 260 888 n COLWYN BAY. Tel 01492 533822 n CREWE. Tel 01270 580 031 n ELLESMERE PORT. Tel 0151 355 1420 n KENDAL. Tel 01539 740 933 n LEIGH, Wigan. Tel 01942 777 985 n LIVERPOOL. Tel 0151 707 0877 n MANCHESTER Trafford Centre. Tel 0161 747 2684 n MANCHESTER Arndale Centre. Tel 0161 839 4060 n NELSON. Tel 01282 692 502 n NORTHWICH, Vale Royal Tel 01606 288820 n ORMSKIRK, West Lancashire Tel 01695 570055 n OSWESTRY. Tel 01691 656882 n PENRITH. Tel 01768 895 438 n PRESTON. Tel 01772 204 667 n RHYL. Tel 01745 350665 n ROCHDALE. Tel 01706 865 986 n RUNCORN, Halton Lea Tel 01928 716971 n SHREWSBURY. Tel 01743 236900 n SOUTHPORT. Tel 0151 288 6885 n ST HELENS. Tel 01744 613 388 n STOCKPORT. Tel 0161 666 1100 n WARRINGTON. Tel 01925 240064 n WARRINGTON. Birchwood Tel 01925 822 411 n WIGAN. Tel 01942 776 070 n WINSFORD. Tel 01606 557550 n WREXHAM. Tel 01978 312390 MIDLANDS n BIRMINGHAM. Snow Hill Railway Station. Tel 0121 236 8980. Level 2, Centre Car Park, Bullring. Tel 0121 616 2942 n STAFFORD. Tel 01785 619456 n STOKE ON TRENT. Tel 01782 233333 n SUTTON COLDFIELD. Tel 0121 355 1112 n TAMWORTH. Tel, 01827 709392 n WALSALL. Tel 01922 650781 n WEST BROMWICH: Sandwell. Tel 0121 553 1943 n WOLVERHAMPTON. Tel 01902 556021

FORMER Conservative MP Ann Widdecombe is guest speaker at The Catholic Blind Institute’s annual meeting at Liverpool’s Christopher Grange centre on Wednesday October 10. The registered charity, based in Youens Way, incorporates St Vincent’s School and Christopher

Grange Visual Rehabilitation and Residential & Nursing Care. Make a note, too, of the annual Visual Impairment Information Day, also taking pace at Christopher Grange on Wednesday November 7 (11am-3pm) Christopher Grange, tel 0151 220 2525

CARERS’ CENTRES

0

ANN WIDDECOMBE

Were you one of our lucky ten winners?

C

ONGRATULATIONS to the TEN lucky winners of our summer gardening competition. They each win an amazing collection of six exotic and unusual houseplants, courtesy of the family firm of Dibleys Nurseries of Llandelldan, near Ruthin, North Wales.

Mrs D.Banks, Lime Close, Liverpool 13. (picked up my copy at Asda in Smithdown Road): “ I find it a very interesting paper.” Mrs Susan Cannon, The Copse, Liverpool, L18 (Sainsbury’s Woolton)

N Davies, Greenfields, Upton, Chester (Countess of Cheshire Hospital_ Mr M Good, Gylemuir Road, Corstorphine, Edinburgh (Broadgreen Hospital, Liverpool) Mrs L Lee, Beatty Road, Southport (Dobbies Garden

Centre, Southport): “A very interesting and varied read.” J McLay, Dig Lane, Nantwich, Cheshire Mrs Hilary Shemilt, Grasmere, Macclesfield (ASDA Wythenshawe) Kamila Soroka, Drake Road, Neston Lesley Stevens, Stapleford Walk, Denton, Manchester (Tesco Gorton): “All Together NOW! paints a positive picture of disability . The paper helps to cross barriers that still exist.” Mrs Chris Wilford, Hollin Drive, Chapel en le Frith, Derbyshire (Dobbies Garden Centre, Preston)

HELP AT THE END OF A PHONE n ANGLESEY:

TARAN Tel 01407 721933 n BLACKPOOL Disability Information and Support. Tel 01253 472 202. Textphone 01253 476 450 n CHESHIRE CIL Tel 01606 782760 n CHESTER Dial House Tel 01244 345655 n DENBIGHSHIRE Tel 01745 354445 n ELLESMERE PORT DICE Tel 0151 355 1420 n HALTON Disability Service Tel 01928 717222 n KNOWSLEY DISABILITY CONCERN. 0151 480 4090 n LANCASTER DISC Tel 01524 34411 n LIVERPOOL Association of Disabled People. Tel 0151 263 8366. Text 0151 260 4076 n MERSEYSIDE Coalition of Inclusive Living. Tel 0151 260 4001 n NEUROSUPPORT Centre Tel 0151 298 2999 n MANCHESTER (GTR) Coalition of Disabled People Tel 0161-273 5154 n MOLD Flintshire Disability Tel 01352 755546 n NELSON: Pendle Pakistan Welfare Association. Tel 01282 603 616 n PRESTON DISC: Tel 01772 558 863. Textphone 01772 204 787 n RHYL Tel 01745 350665 n STOCKPORT: Disability Stockport. 0161 480 7248

n WARRINGTON

Disability Partnership. 01925 240064 n WIRRAL WIRED Tel 0151 670 1500 n WEST LANCS HELPLINE Freefone 0800 220676 n ST HELENS DASH Tel 01744 453053 n WREXHAM Tel 01978 262955 MIDLANDS BIRMINGHAM Disability Resource Centre Tel 0121 789 7365 Disabled People’s Network Solihull Tel 0121 788 1544 STOKE: Disability Solutions Tel 01782 683800 WOLVERHAMPTON Elder and Disabled Group Tel 01902 448552 ORGANISATIONS FOR PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND n ACCRINGTON Tel 01254 233332 n BARROW Tel 01229 820698 n BIRMINGHAM Action for Blind Tel 0121 665 4200 n BLACKBURN Tel 0125 554143 n BLACKPOOL Tel 01253 792600 n BURY Tel 0161 763 7014 n BURNLEY Tel 01282 438507 n CARLISLE: Action for Blind People Tel 01228 595121 CHESHIRE & N WALES: Vision Support. Tel 01244 381515 n CUMBRIA (West) Tel 01946 592474 n CUMBRIA (Sth Lakeland)

Tel 01539 726613 DOGS Tel 0118 983 5555 n HENSHAW’S 0161 872 1234 Tel 0151 227 1226 n LIVERPOOL: Bradbury Fields.Tel 0151 221 0888: Action for Bind Tel 0151 298 3222 n MANCHESTER: Action for Blind Tel 0161 787 9252 n PRESTON: Action for Blind People Tel 01772 320550 n OLDHAM Tel 0161 682 8019 n ROSSENDALE Tel 01706 873256 n SIGHTLINE (North West) Tel 0800 587 2252 n WIGAN Tel 01942 242891 n WIRRAL Tel 0151 652 8877 n GUIDE

ORGANISATIONS FOR PEOPLE WHO ARE DEAF n BIRMINGHAM Institute for Deaf Tel 0121 246 6101 n CHESHIRE Deaf Society Tel 01606 47831 n CUMBRIA Deaf Society Tel 01228 606434 n LANCASHIRE (EAST) Deaf Society Tel 01282 839180 n MANCHESTER Deaf Centre Tel 0161 273 3415 n MERSEYSIDE Society for Deaf Tel 0151 228 0888 n ST HELENS: Deafness Resource Centre Tel 01744 23887 n WOLVERHAMPTON Centre for Deaf Tel 01902 420904 n N WALES Deaf Association, Tel 01492 542235

n ACCRINGTON Tel 01254 387 444 n BLACKBURN with DARWEN Tel 01254 688 www.bwdcarers.org n BLACKPOOL Blackpool Borough Council, Tel 01253 477 716 n CUMBRIA Carlisle. Tel 01228 542 156 Penrith. Tel 01768 890 280 Barrow-in-Furness. Tel 01229 822 822 Kendal. Tel 01539 732 927 Whitehaven, Tel 01946 592 223 n CHESHIRE Helpline: 0800 085 0307 n KNOWSLEY Tel 0151 549 1412 n LANCASTER Tel 01524 66475 n LIVERPOOL Tel 0151 705 2307 n MANCHESTER Tel 0161 835 2995 n MORECAMBE Tel 01524 833456 n PRESTON Tel 01772 200173 n RUNCORN Tel 01928 580182 n WIDNES Tel 0151 257 9673 n SALFORD Tel 0161 833 0217 n SEFTON Tel 0151 288 6060 n ST HELENS Tel 01744 675 615 n STOCKPORT Tel 0161 456 2808 n WARRINGTON Tel 01925 644 212 n WEST LANCS Tel 01695 711243 n WIGAN & LEIGH Tel 01942 683711 MIDLANDS n BIRMINGHAM Tel 0121 675 8000 n SOLIHULL Tel 0121 788 1143 n WALSALL Tel 01922 610 810 NORTH WALES n ANGLESEY Tel 01248 722828 n BANGOR Tel 01248 370 797 n CONWY Tel 01492 533714 n DENBIGHSHIRE: NEWCIS, Tel: 0845 603 3187 n DOLGELLAU Tel 01341 421167 n FLINTSHIRE: NEWCIS, Tel: 01352 751436 n WREXHAM: NEWCIS, Tel: 01978 310414.

Email your news to us at news@allltogethernow.org .uk


PURE

www.alltogethernow.org.uk

French blow ENGLAND’S Wheelchair Rugby League team lost 43-22 to their French counterparts at Medway Park. The defending Wheelchair World Cup champions went into the game having recorded an impressive 34-32 victory over the French last year, but a rampant France opened up a 29-0 lead before Chris Greenhaigh scored England’s first points in the dying moments of the first half. England began the second half strongly and it took just one minute for Tom Doherty to add his name to the score sheet, but the gap between the sides proved to be too great to overcome. A penalty from Giles Clauseills, followed by a second try from Denuwelaere, saw the French extend their advantage once again. A try from Lionel Alazard extended their lead to 43-12 before England finished with a flurry, with two quick-fire tries from Martin Norris.

October/November 2012

London 2012 Paralympics

Your complete results service for our North West Paralympians ARCHERY Danielle Brown (Telford): Gold, Women’s Ind. Compound Richard Hennahane (Ellesmere Port): Round of 32 - Lost 6-4 to Klich Jiri of the Czech Republic. John Stubbs (Warrington): Round of 16, lost 6-4 to Guillermo Rodriguez Gonzalez of Spain. Leigh Walmsley (Warrington): Quarter Finals Women’s Team Recurve: Open. Lost 188-153 to Korea; Round of 16 - Women’s Individual Recurve: Standing. Lost 1-7 to Milena Olszewska of Poland.

ATHLETICS

PROUD: Alasdair and Dad

Scots joy AT THE fourth time of asking, Scotland’s Alasdair Berry finally took the yourgolftravel.com Disabled British Open golf title he’d come so close to winning in the past. The 21-year-old, from Irvine Ravenspark GC, overcame a two-shot deficit after the first round to overhaul overnight leader Joakim Bjorkman, from Sweden, to take the title at East Sussex National with an impressive two-round score of 153, just nine over par. Berry also took the senior category one title, for those with a handicap of 12 and under; blind golfer Andrew Sellars (Normanton GC) took the 13-20 handicap category two title; and Scott Richardson (Stockwood Park) won the category three event (21-28). The yourgolftravel.com Junior Disabled Open, for youngsters aged under 18, was retained by 14-year-old Frankie Jones, from Welshpool, Powys. www.disabledbritishopen.org

Graeme Ballard (Chorley): Silver, Men’s 100m T36. 4th, Men’s 200m - T36 final Mickey Bushell (Telford): Gold, Men’s 100m T53; 4th, men’s 200m T53 Libby Clegg (Stockport): Silver, Women’s 100m T12; 2nd, Heat 3 - Women’s 200m T12. David Devine (Liverpool): Bronze, Men’s 800m T12. Bronze, Men’s 1500m T13. Dean Miller (Barrow-in-Furness): 7th, Men’s 1500m T37 Gemma Prescott (Liverpool): Bronze, Women’s Club Throw F31/32/51; 13th, Women’s Shot Putt F32/33/34. Shelly Woods (Blackpool): Silver, Women’s Marathon T54. 8th - Women’s 5000m T54; 6th Women’s 1500m T54

CYCLING Jon-Allan Butterworth (Sale): Road - 13th, Men’s Individual C5 Time Trial. DNF - Men’s Individual C 4-5. Track - Silver, Men’s Individual C4-C5 1km Time Trial; Silver, Men’s Individual C5 Pursuit; Silver, Mixed C1-C5 Team Sprint. Jody Cundy (Manchester): Track - Bronze, Men’s Ind. C4 Pursuit. 22nd, Men’s Ind.C4-5 1km Time Trial Anthony Kappes (Stockport) - guided by Craig MacLean: Gold, Men’s Individual B Pursuit; Gold, Men’s Individual B Sprint. Crystal Lane (Manchester): Road - 6th, Women’s Individual C 4-5 Road Race. 9th, Women’s Individual C 5 Time Trial. Track - 4th, Women’s Ind. C5 Pursuit Aileen McGlynn (Manchester) - guided by Helen Scott. Track - Silver, Women’s Individual B Time Trial. Bronze, Women’s Individual B Pursuit Rik Waddon (Chester): Track - Silver, Mixed C1 to 5 Team Sprint; 9th, Men’s Individual C1/2/3 1km Time Trial Barney Storey (Disley) - guided by Neil Fachie: Gold, Men’s Individual B Time Trial; Silver, Men’s Individual B Pursuit.

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GOLD All Together NOW!

LONDON PARAYLYMPICS MEDAL TABLE Gold

Silver

1. China

95

71 65

2. Russia

36

38 28

3. Team GB 34

Four golds – Sarah Storey is now Britain’s most decorated female Parlaympian Sarah Storey (Disley): Road - Gold, Women’s Individual C4-5 Road Race’ Gold, Women’s Individual C5 Time Trial. Track: Gold, Women’s Individual C5 Pursuit’ Gold, Women’s Individual C4-5 500m Time Trial Lora Turnham (Liverpool): Road - 7th - Women’s Individual B Time Trial; 8th, Women’s Individual B Road Race. Track - 4th, Women’s Individual B Pursuit. 4th, Women’s Individual B 1km Time Trial.

EQUESTRIAN Lee Pearson (Staffordshire): Gold, Dressage Team Championship; Silver, Individual Championship; Silver, Test 1b; Bronze, Ind Freestyle Test 1b;

FOOTBALL (7-A-SIDE) Matt Dimbylow (Northwich); George Fletcher (Liverpool); Michael Barker (Liverpool) Lost 3-4 to Argentina in semi-final (AET).

FOOTBALL (5-A-SIDE) Darren Harris (Wolverhampton); Roy Turnham (Liverpool). Semi-finals - Lost to China on penalties.

JUDO Dan Powell (Liverpool): Quarter Finals - Lost to Isao Cruz Alonso of Cuba. Marc Powell (Liverpool): Quarter Finals - Men’s 73kg - Lost to Dmytro Solovey of Ukraine.

POWERLIFTING Jason Irving (Manchester): 8th, Men’s -60kg. Result - 163kg.

SAILING Niki Birrell (Knutsford): Bronze, Two-person Keelboat (SKUD18)

SWIMMING Gemma Almond (Shrewsbury): 8th, Women’s 200m Butterfly S10 Jack Bridge (Preston): 4th, Men’s 100m Breaststroke SB9; 5th, Men’s 4 x 100m Medley

Bronze

43

43

Relay - 34pts James Clegg (Stockport): Bronze, Men’s 100m Butterfly S12; 8th, Men’s 100m Freestyle S12. 6th, Men’s 50m Freestyle Jon Fox (Manchester): Gold, Men’s 100m Backstroke - S7; 4th, Men’s 400m Freestyle - S7; 5th, Men’s 100m Freestyle - S7; 6th, Men’s 50m Freestyle - S7 Sean Fraser (Manchester): 7th, Men’s 100m Freestyle - SB; 6th, Men’s 100m Butterfly S8; 5th, Men’s 100m Backstroke S8; 5th, Men’s 4 x 100m Freestyle Relay - 34pts; 5th, Men’s 4 x 100m Medley relay - 34pts; Heather Frederiksen (Lowton): Gold, Women’s 100m Backstroke S8; Silver, Women’s 400m Freestyle S8; 5th, Women’s 50m Freestyle S8; 5th, Women’s 100m Freestyle S8. Rhiannon Henry (Manchester): 7th, Women’s 50m Freestyle S13; 4th, Women’s 100m Freestyle S13; 4th, Women’s 200m Ind. Medley SM13 Natalie Massey (Stockport): 6th, Women’s 200m Freestyle S14; 7th, Women’s 100m Backstroke S14; 2nd, Heat 1 - Women’s 100m Breaststroke SB14. Daniel Pepper (Stockport): 7th, Men’s 200m Freestyle S14; 7th Men’s 100m Breaststroke SB14 Ben Procter (Manchester): 8th, Men’s 200m Freestyle S14; 2nd, Heat 1 - Men’s 100m Backstroke S14. Matt Walker (Stockport): Bronze, Men’s 50m Freestyle S7; 8th, Men’s 50m Butterfly S7. Thomas Young (Manchester): 5th, Men’s 100m Breaststrok SB7; 4th, Men’s 100m Backstroke S8; 5th, Men’s 4 x 100m Freestyle Relay - 34pts; 5th, Men’s 4 x 100m Medley Relay - 34pts; 7th, Men’s 50m Freestyle S8; 6th, Men’s 100m Freestyle S8; 4th, Men’s 400m Freestyle S8; 5th, Men’s 100m Breaststroke SB7; 4th, Men’s 100m Backstroke S8

TABLE TENNIS Victoria Bromley (Wolverhampton): Scott Robertson (Saltney): Lost in Preliminaries

WHEELCHAIR BASKETBALL (Men) Abdi Jama (Liverpool); Ade Orogbemi (Liverpool); Dan Highcock (Liverpool); Jon Pollock (Liverpool): Ian Sagar (Manchester). 4th, beaten by USA 61-46

WHEELCHAIR BASKETBALL (Women) Laurie Williams (Wythenshawe): Quarter-Finals Lost 55-44 to Germany.

WHEELCHAIR TENNIS Jamie Burdekin (Liverpool): Round of 16 Men’s Quad Singles. Lost 1-2 to eventual winner, Noam Gershony (Israel)

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October/November 2012

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Wheelchair cha-cha-cha New deal TRAVELLERS checking in for British Airways flights at Manchester airport found themselves in the middle of a dancefloor, as Strictly Wheels performed sambas, rumbas and cha-cha chas through the departure hall. Putting on the show were Paula Morton and Gary Lyness, who are hoping that Wheelchair Dancesport will soon become a Paralympic sport – and are dreaming of samba-ing all the way to Rio in 2016! Paula and Gary performed on ITV’s Britain’s Got Talent programme – in fact they missed the auditions for the Paralympic Games opening ceremony because of their commitment to the show in which they reached the semifinals. Paula said: “We love performing and are so excited to share our passion for sport. We dream that we might also one day be in the ParalympicGB squad.” n email: strictlywheels@gmail.com

WHAT A TRY!

LIFT OFF: Paula and Gary with BA staff Jemma Hodgkinson and Ross Brall

Rugby League to improve access to all stadiums

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Tel 0151 230 0307 STORM FORCE: Back row: Rebecca Smith, sports director (Bankfield High School), Andy Abernethy, marketing manager at Medicash, Paul Myler, club chairman at Mersey Storm, and John McMullen, regional director for the RFL. Front, George Hill, Paul Craig, and Chris Dennis

D

ISABLED rugby league fans can look forward to enjoying improved facilities at every stadium in the professional game. The sport’s ruling body is carrying out a review of access at all grounds with a view to upgrading the quality of their facilities. The move marks the start of a long-term commitment by the Rugby Football League and is being carried out in partnership with Level Playing Field, the national charity representing disabled sports fans. David Gent, RFL director of participation, said: “We are working hard to ensure that disabled supporters have the best possible match day experience.” Joyce Cook, chair of Level Playing Field, said: “We hope that this ground-breaking lead taken by RFL will inspire other sports bodies to look at their own good governance practices in this area and to follow suit. “RFL is setting the standard with a plan for lasting and meaningful change that puts disabled fans and an accessible match day experience at the heart of everything they do.” An auditing process will take place across all stadiums associated within the professional game in both the Stobart Super League and Co-operative Championships, with the Facilities Trust funding the move within the Championships. n Level Playing Field, tel. 0845 230 6237.

CAN YOU HELP US TO GET EVEN MORE COPIES TO CUSTOMERS . . ?

Healthy boost from Medicash MERSEY Storm, the wheelchair tag rugby league club based in Widnes, has just been given a £3,600 to buy new chairs from health cash plan provider Medicash. The club operates two teams in the Premiership and Championship national divisions of Wheelchair Tag Rugby. Paul Myler, ex-Warrington and Widnes player and club

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chairman of Mersey Storm, said: “The value of the support that comes from companies like Medicash is just fantastic. “The team are really focused on developing the game and bringing their love of the sport to others. This generous donation means they can do this whilst maximising their full potential.” Andy Abernethy, marketing manager at Medicash, said:

“Day-to-day wellbeing is at the forefront of the Medicash message. “We are delighted to provide funding for Mersey Storm, which helps so many people to improve their physical and mental health, while offering people of all ages the chance to participate in this unique, fullyinclusive sport.” n Medicash is an official sponsor of Widnes Vikings

boosts TeamGB’s Rio dreams

SAINSBURY’S have signed a new four-year commercial partnership with the British Paralympic Association. The deal includes rights to the BPA and ParalympicsGB, the team that will compete at the Sochi 2014 Winter Paralympics and the Rio 2016 Games. Jat Sahota, head of Sainsbury’s sponsorship, said: “The impact on our business of our London 2012 Paralympic sponsorship has been profound – from colleague engagement through to customers at the till point. “Now we want to build on that through to Rio, starting with the Sainsbury’s Active Kids For All programme as well as our Sainsbury’s School Games both of which will drive inclusion at grass roots levell.”

New heights for blind climbers BLIND teenage climbers Reanne Racktoo and Samantha Bate from Liverpool’s OnThisROC club put up some superb performances at the World Para Climbing Championships in Paris. Reanne and Sam ended the championships ranked 8th and 10th in the world. Fran Brown, from London, became the first GB para climber to win the title.

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