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Transportation Association. The Handbook lists benefits of art in transit that provide an example of the natural limitations placed on artists who win commissions: Art in transit should *encourage ridership, * improve perception of transit, *convey customer care, *enhance community livability, *improve customer experience, *improve organizational identity, *deter vandalism and *increase safety and security. These goals make perfect sense for Metro to consider, but they really only speak to the

promotion of the transit system. As an art administrator, Allen knows that commissioned art installations can do more than decorate public spaces. Well-conceived public art can educate and inspire. The murals that Burton and Ketchens created for the 2015 Metro Art Bus celebrate the beauty of the environment and stress the importance of protecting it. The project was sponsored by the EarthWays Center of the Missouri Botanical Gardens and

ultimately paid for by the Green Homes Festival underwriter, Ameren Missouri. Ameren touts a legacy of environmental stewardship. The Metro Art Bus themes were chosen to showcase energy efficiency, not to call attention to the high-level nuclear waste storage of Ameren Missouri’s Callaway 1 nuclear reactor (located about 15 miles southeast of Fulton). Pointing the public toward less rosy truths is typically left to a different form of artistic production.

METRO’s Art In Transit Art Bus, mural design by William Burton Jr. and Robert Ketchens (photo credit: Richard Reilly) COMMUNITY VOICES

FALL 2015 ALLTHEARTSTL.COM 16

All the Art, Fall 2015  

The Visual Art Quarterly of St. Louis

All the Art, Fall 2015  

The Visual Art Quarterly of St. Louis