Page 1

The Parish of All Saints Wokingham

Remembrance They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them.

Lest we forget www.allsaintswokingham.org.uk

ÂŁ1.00


From the Rector — November 2012 Looking at  Luke It  so  happens  that  I’m  writing  this  on  the  eve  of  St  Luke’s Day.  I  mention  this  because  I  am  thinking  at  present  about Luke’s  Gospel.  Luke  will  be  the  gospel  we  ‘ll  hear  most   in  church  on  Sunday  mornings  in  the  coming  year. Each  of  the  gospels  has  its  own  character.  Luke  has  stories  none  of  the  other   gospels  have.  One  of  the  most  obvious  is  Jesus’    parable  of  the  Good   Samaritan.  This  is  an  example  of  what  makes  Luke  different  from  the  other   gospels.   Concern  for  the  disadvantaged  in  society  is  a  special  theme  of  Luke.  This  gospel   highlights  how  important  compassion  and  hospitality  were  in  the  practice  and   teaching  of  Jesus  and  the  early  Church.  It  shows  Jesus  eating  and  drinking  with   “tax-collectors  and  sinners”  –  those  with  a  low  reputation. There  is  also  a  special  focus  on  women  in  Luke’s  Gospel  and  to  women  are   given  vital  roles  in  the  mission  of  Jesus  and  witness  to  the  resurrection.  In   Luke’s  Gospel  the  poor  are  blessed.  It  shows  how  God  is  especially  concerned   for  those  with  little  or  no  power  and  influence  in  the  world,  whose  lives  are   restricted  and  diminished,  often  by  the  over-weening  power  of  others.  In  Luke’s   Gospel,  wealth  is  a  spiritual  danger;;  causing  people  to  be  self-satisfied  and   closed  to  the  far-reaching  grace  of  God  moving  in  their  lives. Luke’s  gospel  offers  a  challenge  about  what  is  involved  in  being  a  true   disciple  of  Christ.  How  in  practical  terms  do  we  model  God’s  creative   compassion  and  wide,  accepting  embrace?  How  can  we  be    “good  news  to   the  poor”? This  special  theme  of  Luke’s  Gospel  is  very  relevant  to  the  challenges  our   communities  and  society  face  today.  Look  at  any  of  the  news  media  and  it  will   be    full  of  stories  about    the  struggles  of  the  poorest  and  most  vulnerable   members  of  society;;    about  how  economic  growth  should  be  generated  and   shared  out,  and  about    the  proper  use  of  wealth.  How  well  are  those  in  need   offered  compassion  and  opportunity  to  live  life  to  the  full?    W here  do  our  own   responsibilities  lie?  These  challenges  must  be    the  concern  of  any  Christian  who   wants  to  be  faithful  disciples  of  Christ.  These  challenges  are  the  concern  of  God   whose  compassion,  though  the  witness  of  Luke,  we  see  embodied  in  Jesus. This  month  we  launch  opportunities  for  us  to  get  to  know  Luke’s  Gospel  better.   The  aim  of  course  is    to  get    to  know  Jesus  better;;  and  to  make  some  time  and   1


space in  our  lives  to  reflect  –  on  our  own  lives  as  disciples  of  Christ;;  and  on  our   communal  witness  and  mission  as  a  church  community.  Are  we  “good  news  for  the   poor”  like  Jesus  is?  What  can  that  mean  to  us  today? November  is  always  a  good  time  to  prepare  ourselves  to  get  to  know,  or  reacquaint  ourselves,  with    the  gospel  for  the  forthcoming  church  year,  which  begins   on  Advent  Sunday. Luke  in  particular  though  has  a  special  resonance  with  the  church’s  year  in   November.  In  church,  during  November,  between  All  Saints  Sunday  and  the    feast   of  Christ  the  King  the  focus  is  on  God’s  kingdom.  What  would  life  be  like  if  lived   more  thoroughly  influenced  by  the  Spirit  of  God’s  compassion  and  peace?    This  is   also  the  time  when  we  remember  those  who  have  lived  the  whole  of  their  lives  on   earth  already  .  On  All  Saints  Sunday  we  celebrate    the  acknowledged  saints  who   lives  shone  as  beacons    of  God’s  light  and  active  influence  in  this  world.  On  other   Sundays  in  November  we  recall    departed  loved  ones  who  also  shared  the  light   and  love  of  Christ  in  their  lives  among  family,  friends  and  neighbours.  We   remember  too  those  whose  lives    were  caught  up  and  cut  short  in  the  conflicts  of   the  nations  ,  who  went    to  defend    our  freedoms  and  peace.  Luke’s  special  theme   of  compassion  and  inclusivity  chimes  well  with  a  focus  on  the  kingdom  of  God  and   the  remembrance  of  forebears  who  looked  for  the    light  and  peace  of  that  kingdom   in  their  lives  and  days. Here    are  the  main  opportunities  for  you  to  engage  with  Luke’s  Gospel  this  month. Listen  to  audio  recordings  of  St  Luke’s  being  read  aloud.  Commit  to  listening    each   day  and  you  will  have  heard  the  whole  of  Luke’s  Gospel  within  the  month,  or   sooner,  depending  on  your  listening  time. Read  through  the  gospel  using  Luke  for  Everyone  –  a  modern  translation  of  the   Gospel    by  Tom  Wright.  Commit  to  read  a  section  each  day.   Study  individually  using  Tom  Wright’s  Luke  for  Everyone  –  Bible  Study  Guide  Take   time  every  day  as  you  read  through.  Both  Wright’s  books  are  available  on  Kindle  as   well  as  in  paperback. Study  in  a  group  by  joining  the  next  course  of  the  Bible  Study  module  in  our   rolling  programme  for  Christian  Growth.  “Look  at  Luke”  will  be  3  evening   sessions  about    Luke’s  Gospel:  Mon  12th,  Tues  20th,  Mon  26th  November. On  combine  one  or  more  of  the  above  options! More  information  on  obtaining  the  audio  files  or  signing  up  for  the  groups  are   available  in  church,  from  the  Parish  Office,  or  online  at  the  church  website.

David Hodgson 2


BREAKFAST Come along  and  enjoy  a  con nental  breakfast  in  the   Cornerstone  following  the  8.00am  service  (you  might   prefer  to  come  before  the  9.30am)  on  Sunday  4th   November.  We  will  be  serving  cereals,  croissants,  fruit   etc.  with  a  choice  of  coffees  and  teas.  You  sit  down  and   enjoy  your  breakfast  with  a  nice  chat  to  others  and  we   will  get  on  with  the  work!    Really  we  do  so  look  forward   to  these  once  a  term  occasions  and  look  forward  to   welcoming  you.  If  you  have  any  dietary  requirements  or   ques ons  please  telephone  Diana  979  2614.  There  is  no   need  to  book  so  see  you  on  4th.

Please leave  items  for  publica on  in  the  Magazine  tray  in  the  Parish   Office  or  email  directly  to  the  editor  on  or  before  the  Copy  Date   please.    Contribu ons  can  be  typed,  handwri en  or  emailed All  Saints  PCC  Wokingham  is  a            Registered  Charity,  No.  1127585 Editor:

Bill Poulsom

Associate Editor

(979 0484)

Harriet Swinyard

(962 9313)

Email: editor@allsaintswokingham.org.uk Distribu on:

Sheila Longley

(978 4193)  

Adver sements:

Bill Poulsom  

(979 0484)

Colla on:

Sheila Longley  &  team

(978 4193)  

Copy Date  for  November:        Nov.  11th,  2012                 Colla on:  

 

 Nov.    20th  2012

This magazine  is  published  by  the  Rector  and  PCC  of  All  Saints   Parish  Wokingham.    Opinions  expressed  by  individual  contributors   do  not  necessarily  reflect  the  views  of  the  publishers. 3


Clergy and Officers Parish Clergy Rector Associate  Priest Honorary  Asst.  Curate Honorary  Asst.  Curate Church  Wardens                                                   Parish  Administrator Children  and  Youth Safeguarding  Co-ordinator and  Children’s  Advocate Crèche  Leader   Junior  Church  Co-ordinator     Youth  Church  Contacts: Friday  Night  Youth  Drop-In (FDI)  Contacts: Worship  and  Music Director  of  Music  (inc.  Choir)     Music  Group  Leader   Head  Server     Deputy  Head  Server Bible  Readers’  rota   J Tower  Foreman     Flower  Guild  Chairman Worship  Rota  and Prayer  Lists  Co-ordinator       Lay  Co-Chair  of Transforming  Worship Parochial  Church  Council   PCC  Secretary   Deputy  PCC  Secretary   PCC  Treasurer     Deputy  PCC  Treasurer  

The Revd.  Canon  David  Hodgson The  Revd.  Caroline  Kramer The  Revd.  Colin  James The  Revd.  Helen  Charlton John  Smith Katherine  Hugge Vacancy Jo  Asplin

979 2999 979  9956 978  1515 978  9153 979  0948  

07834450819                                                                        — 979  2797

Margaret Ragge Rachel  Garlish Harriet  Swinyard Robert  Vacher,  Susan  Westgate

979 2797 978  2602 962  9313 979  2797

Katherine Hugge ,  John  Smith

979 2797

Richard Smith Gail  Houghton Rachel  Knowles Ruth  Smith Joyce  Baldry John  Harrison Lucille  Taylor

979 2797 979  4736 978  7065 978  8506 978  5520 978  6847  

The  Revd.  Colin  James

978 1515

Liz Rippon

978 0455

David Atkinson Jo  Robinson Stephen  Smith John  Alp

979 7911 978  9730 979  4407 979  2797

4


Clergy and Officers PCC Treasurer’s  Team     Stewardship  Co-ordinator     Gi  Aid  Co-ordinator                 Stewardship  Recorder           Electoral  Roll  Officer               Leadership  Forum  Convenor Asst.  Stewardship  Recorder and  Asst.  Gi  Aid  Coordinator  Pastoral  Care  contacts Home  Communion   Healing  Prayer  Group     Pastoral  Care Bereavement  Care Bap sms,  Weddings,  Funerals   Churchyard  Steward     Transporta on   Clergy  available  days:

Margaret Hawkins Dickon  Snell Jo  Robinson Peter  Whi aker Jim  Creech Joyce  Baldry Liz  Rippon  

962 9792 978  1044 978  9730 978  6225 377  4194 978  8506 978  0455  

Chris Westgate

979 2797

Barbara Smith Jack  Hayley Jo  Robinson Sarah  Boylan Parish  Office John  Smith Susan  Westgate

979 4407 978  3939 978  9730 979  2797 979  2797 979  0948 977  1041

David Caroline Colin

All days  except  Thursday All  days  except  Friday Mon  to  Wed,  Sat,  Sun.

The Parish  Office  (0118  979  2797),  in  the  Cornerstone,  can  be  contacted  about  church   related  issues  (Bap sms,  Marriages,  Funerals).  It  is  open  on  Tuesday,  Wednesday  and   Friday  from  9.30  am  to  1.00  pm  and  for  urgent  ma ers  or  by  telephone  on  Monday  and   Thursday  from  10.00  am  to  12.00  noon.   e-mail:  

parishoffice@allsaintswokingham.org.uk

Postal address:  

The Parish  Office,  Norreys  Avenue,  Wokingham  RG40  1UE

All Saints  website:  

www.allsaintswokingham.org.uk

The Cornerstone: For  room  bookings  and  general  enquiries  please  phone 0118  979  7778.    Administrator  Monica  Mar n  is  in  the  office:  Monday  2-5pm,  Tuesday   12.15-4.30pm,  Wednesday  2-5.30pm,  Thursday  1.45  -  6.00pm.   e-mail:  info@thecornerstonewokingham.org.uk 5


Worship at All Saints Services at  All  Saints'  Church  embrace  a  wide  range  of  formats.  An  outline  is  given  below  but   for  details  and  informa on  about  occasional  services,  see  the  weekly  leaflet.

8.00 a.m.

Sunday Services Holy  Communion.  A  said  service  with  a  brief  address  using  the  tradi onal   language  version  of  the    Common  Worship    Order  One  Eucharist.

9.30 a.m.

Parish Communion.  The  service  is  sung,  with  hymns,  and  follows  Common   Worship  Order  One  Eucharist.  Children  are  catered  for  in  the  Crèche  and   Junior  Church.  The  last  Sunday  in  the  month  is  Parish  Communion  for  the   Whole  Church  and  o en  includes  Parade,  children  are  present   throughout,  and  contribute  to  the  worship. Prayer  for  Healing  with  Laying  on  of  Hands  is  offered  regularly  at  certain   Parish  Communion  services  (see  diary). Coffee  is  served  a er  the  service  and  this  is  the  weekly  'social  gathering'   of  the  Congrega on.  Please  come  and  meet  us  there  if  you  are  a  visitor  to   the  church  or  would  like  to  get  to  know  us  be er.

11.00 a.m.

(1st Sunday)  Family  Service The  service  is  simple  with  songs,  prayers  and  a  talk  for  children.    Everyone   is  invited  but  especially  parents  and  children. If  you  ever  worry  that  your  children  are  too  noisy  for  Church,  this  is  the   place  to  try!

11.15 a.m.

(2nd Sunday)  Holy  Communion A    said  service  using  the  Book  of  Common  Prayer.

11.00 a.m.

(3rd Sunday)  Family  Service

11.15 a.m.

(Some 4th  Sundays) Ma ns  using  the  Book  of  Common  Prayer,  usually  sung  and  including  a   sermon.

6.30 p.m.

(1st -  3rd  Sundays) Evensong  using  the  Book  of  Common  Prayer  with  sermon. Choral  Evensong  is  sung  usually  on  the  first  Sunday  of  each  month. (An  alterna ve  form  of  worship  on  4th  &  5th  Sundays;  and  Services  of   Healing)

6


Weekday Services Morning  and  Evening  Prayer  are  said,  using  Common    Worship  Daily  Prayer,  at   9.00  a.m.  and  5.00  p.m.  each  day  from  Monday  to  Saturday. All  may,  and  are  encouraged,  to  a end.    These  services  may  be  led  by  a  Priest  or   members  of  the  Laity. Holy  Communion  is  celebrated  as  follows: Monday Tuesday

(Common Worship  Order  One) (Common  Worship  Order  One  with  short  address,   followed  by  coffee) Wednesday 10.00  a.m. (Simple  form  of  Common  Worship  Order  One  and   short  address  (par cularly  for  parents  and  child  minders   of  babies  and  pre-school  children) Wednesday 10.00  a.m. (Simple  form  of  Common  Worship  Order  One  and   short  address  (par cularly  for  parents  and  child  minders   of  babies  and  pre-school  children) Friday  

9.30 a.m. 9.30  a.m.

in various  Residen al  Homes

Major fes vals  are  also  marked  by  addi onal  celebra ons  of  Holy  Communion. Please  see  the  Parish  Diary  elsewhere  in  the  magazine,  or  see  our  Services  leaflet. ******************************************** Home  Communion:  If    anyone    knows  of  a    housebound    parishioner,  either   temporarily  or  long  term,  who  would  like  to  receive  Holy  Communion,   please  contact  the  Parish  Office  (979  2797). Confirma on,  Welcome  or  Growth  Groups: Anyone  interested  in  confirma on,  a  refresher  course,  or  learning  about   the   Chris an  faith  is  invited  to  join  one  of  the  Eureka!  groups  or  a  confirma on   course  -  contact  Barbara  Smith  on  979  4407. Bap sms:  are  usually  conducted  at  a  special  a ernoon  service  on  the  last  Sunday   of  each  month;  or  occasionally  in  Sunday  morning  services  if  requested.   Bap sms  can  be  booked  via  the  Parish  Office  (979  2797). Wedding  Bookings:  Clergy  are  available  in  the  Cornerstone  on  Monday  from  6.30   pm  -  7.30  pm  and  on  Saturday  from  10.30  am  -  11.30  am  on  an  appointment   basis.  Please  book  via  the  Parish  Office  (979  2797).

7


SONNING DEANERY  PRAYER  CYCLE Our  Area  Dean,  David  Hodgson  has  asked  me,  in  my  role  of  Deanery  Project  Coordinator,  to  re-establish  the  Prayer  Cycle,  which  was  in  opera on  within  the  Deanery   some  years  ago.    It  is  hoped  that  in  praying  regularly  for  the  special  needs  of  our   Parishes  we  shall  be  drawn  into  closer  fellowship  across  the  Deanery. The  Prayer  Cycle  will  have  two  sec ons;  firstly  we  shall  pray  each  month  for  our   Deanery  Synod  or  for  the  Clergy  and  people  in  a  par cular  Parish  or  some mes   Parishes.  That  is,  in  November  we  shall  be  praying  par cularly  for  our  Deanery  Synod,   in  December  for  Arborfield  with  Barkham  and  the  White  House  School  and  so  on   month  by  month  for  the  different  Parishes  in  the  Deanery Secondly  we  shall  include  par cular  prayer  requests  from  ANY  Parish  in  the  Deanery;   these  requests  could  be  for  new  ini a ves  of  mission  or  evangelism,  courses  taking   place,  par cular  groups  etc.   I  shall  be  in  regular  contact  with  Clergy  and  LLMs,  Church  Wardens,  Parish   Administrators  and  any  person  in  each  parish  iden fied  as  having  a  par cular  prayer   ministry  within  the  parish.    I  should  be  pleased  to  hear  of  anyone  in  your  Parish  that  I   might  include  on  this  list? I  shall  circulate  the  Prayer  Cycle  out  to  Parishes  on  the  first  day  of  each  month.    The   Prayer  Cycle  will  also  be  displayed  on  the  Sonning  Deanery  Website. Hazel  Berry  -  Deanery  Project  Co-ordinator sonningdeaneryprojects@googlemail.com ********************************** Helpful  Bible  Verses Lord  I  believe,  Help  Thou  mine  unbelief.  Mark9  v  24. These  words  were  said  by  a  distraught  father,  who  had  already  approached  the   disciples,  asking  Jesus  ,as  a  final  resort,  to  heal  his  son  mentally  tormented  by  evil   demons. Jesus  takes  his  trust  and  ,in  faith,  cures  his  son. That  father  comes  across  so  vividly,  as  any  fran c  parent  would,  then  and  today,   pleading  for  help  for  his  child,  yet  fully  and  humbly  conscious  of  his  own  inadequacies. Barely  a  day  goes  by  without  his  words  entering  my  consciousness,  when  my  faith   runs  thin.  Yet  I  have  constant  examples  of  Jesus'  love  working  its  purpose  out. I  give  thanks  that  our  church  at  All  Saints  provides  a  vibrant  living  example  of  Chris an   faith  to  hold  to  through  good  and  ill.   Chris ne  Snell 8


Flower Guild An increasingly  familiar  feature  of  many  churches  on  the  four  Sundays  before  Christ-­‐ mas  is  the  Advent  wreath. Advent  Sunday  is  the  fourth  Sunday  before  Christmas  and  is  the  start  of  the  Chris an   year.  Advent  historically  was  a  season  of  penitence  and  fas ng  in  prepara on  for  the   coming  of  Christ.  The  four  Sundays  were  originally  associated  with  the  themes  of  Heav-­‐ en,  Hell,  Death  and  Judgement.  In  modern   mes  there  has  been  less  emphasis  on  these   peniten al  themes  and  themes  of  Hope,  Love,  Joy  and  Peace  have  gradually  taken  their   place. Advent  wreaths  have  their  origins  in  the  folklore  of  northern  Europe.  At  the  darkest   me  of  the  year  people  would  light  candles  on  wheel-shaped  bunches  of  evergreen.   This  symbolized  their  hope  of  the  eternal  spring  of  life,  which  would  return  with  the   longer  days. The  wreath  is  tradi onally  made  of  evergreen  plant  material,  laid  in  a  circle  to  symbol-­‐ ise  eternity.  Four  candles,  red  or  purple,  stand  around  the  circle.  One  candle  is  lit  on  the   first  Sunday  in  Advent;  on  the  second  Sunday  it  is  lit  again  and  is  joined  by  a  second   candle,  a  third  on  the  third  Sunday,  and  the  fourth  on  the  fourth  Sunday.  They  are  all  lit   again  on  Christmas  morning,  when  the  central  white  candle  is  put  in  place  and  lit  to   symbolize  the  coming  of  Christ. Lucille  Taylor Date  for  Your  Diary We  invite  you  to  join  us  for  a  workshop Saturday  24th  November in  the  Cornerstone from  9:30am  to  12:30pm We  shall  be  showing  you  how  to  create  a  simple  arrangement  using  Amaryllis  and  display-­‐ ing  various  design  techniques.      The  cost  will  be  £12  to  include  refreshments There  will  also  be  an  opportunity  to  buy  materials  to  create  a  door  hanging  or  table  ar-­‐ rangement  at  home. Booking  is  essen al  as  we  need  to  know  how  many  amaryllis    to  purchase.  Contact  Lucille   Taylor  9786847 Flower  Rota  for  November November  4th      Mrs  K  Thomas,  Mrs  S  James,  Mrs  H  Ma hews        KT November  11th  Mrs  L  Taylor,  Mrs  M  Whitaker,  Mrs  G  Jones,  Mrs  J  Mitchell,                                                Mrs  A    Wade    LT November18th  Mrs  L  Draper,  Mrs  S  Shields,    Mrs  T  Freeston  LT Novembe  25th      Mrs  J  Ta erdill,  Mrs  L  Clark            LB

9


SMC Solar Ltd The  Solar  Power  Specialists  –  Connect  with  the Power  of  Nature

Get FREE  Electricity:  EARN  up  to  £1800  p.a.  from   your  Roof   (South  facing  is  best  but  East  and  West  work  too.)

 25 years  guaranteed  index-linked  income  from  Feed-in-Tariffs  (FITs) - tax  free  for   homeowners

 Earn 43.3pence  for  every  unit  you  produce  whether  you  use  it  or  not.  Free  electricity  -  use  what  you  make  and  save  on  bills  Sell  back  what  you  don't  use  -  and  generate  addi onal  income  Significantly  reduce  your  carbon  footprint  and  do your  bit  for  the  environment  Zero  running  costs  and  completely  silent

Typical return on  investment  11-15%  and  adds  value  to  your  property SMC  Solar  is  a  Chris an-run  company  specialising  in   renewable  energy and  commi ed... "To  strive  to  safeguard  the  integrity  of  crea on  and  sustain   and  renew  the  earth." (from  Anglican  "Five  Marks  of  Mission"  -   No.  5)

10


The Mothers’  Union The  Mothers’  Union  publishes  various  booklets  and  resources.    One  example  is  the   ‘Hand  in  Hand:  Enjoying  Faith  as  a  Family’  booklet,  which  sells  for  £2.00  and  is  available   on  the  MU  stall  on  the  last  Sunday  of  each  month,  on  request  from  a  commi ee   member  or  directly  from  Mothers’  Union.

This booklet  is  intended  for  both  those  parents  who  already  have  a  strong  faith  and   desire  to  nurture  this  in  their  children  and  for  those  who  feel  less  certain.    It  comprises   a  number  of  sec ons  which:

 Connect us  with  a  God  who  is  love  and  loves  us  daily  Offer  prac cal  ways  in  which  to  share  family  spirituality  Help  us  enjoy  finding  faith  in  our  families  Celebrate  the  wonder  of  life  in  good   mes  and  bad  Help  us  to  find  out  more  about  the  Bible  together Enable  us  to  develop  our  personal  and  family  faith.

As well  as  being  a  stand  alone  resource  (it  could  be  a  good  Bap smal  present),  it  could   also  be  used  by  a  parents’  group  exploring  how  they  experience  faith  in  their  family  or   together  with  downloadable  prac cal  ideas  to  help  families  enjoy  faith.    

There will  be  several  winter  mee ngs  across  the  diocese  this  year.    The  nearest  one  will   be  during  the  day  of  Thursday  15th  November  at  St  Peter’s,  Earley.    The  speaker  there   will  be  Primrose  Gallimore,  a  past  diocesan  president.    Soup  and  a  Ploughman’s  lunch   will  be  served.    All  the  winter  mee ngs  are  open  to  all,  so  please  do  go  along  if  you  are   interested,  with  or  without  an  accompanying  current  MU  member. The  winter  mee ng  is  also  a  collec on  point  for  Christmas  cards  donated  for   Bullingdon  prison.    This  prison  lies  in  our  diocese  and  the  chaplain  has   asked  if  

MU members  would  be  willing  to  donate  Christmas  cards,  so  each  inmate  will   11


12


receive at  least  one  card;  also  cards  can  be  donated  for  the  prisoners  to  send  to   those  closest  to  them. Branch  news.  The  speaker  at  our  November  mee ng  will  be  Mr  Bill  Crooks,  who   has  witnessed  the  workings  of  the  Mothers’  Union  Literacy  project  first  hand.     All  welcome:  visitor’s  fee  £1.00. More  informa on  on  The  Mothers  Union’s  work  worldwide  can  be  found  on   the  website  www.themothersunion.org.    For  branch  informa on  or  a  li  to   mee ngs,  please  call  Valerie  (978  7363)  or  Mary  (978  2678).   Tues  13th  November

 9.30am  

Corporate Communion.

Thurs 15th  November    11am—2.30pm

Winter Mee ng  at  Earley

Wed 28th  November        7.45  for  8.00pm

Branch mee ng  –  speaker   Bill  Crooks

********************** 1 All  Saints’  Day All  Saints,  or  All  Hallows,  is  the  feast  of  all  the  redeemed,  known  and  unknown,  who  are   now  in  heaven.  When  the  English  Reforma on  took  place,  the  number  of  saints  in  the   calendar  was  dras cally  reduced,  with  the  result  that  All  Saints’  Day  stood  out  with  a   prominence  that  it  had  never  had  before. This  feast  day  first  began  in  the  East,  perhaps  as  early  as  the  5th  century,  as   commemora ng  ‘the  martyrs  of  the  whole  world’.  A  Northern  English  9th  century   calendar  named  All  Hallows  as  a  principal  feast,  and  such  it  has  remained.  Down  the   centuries  devo onal  writers  have  seen  in  it  the  fulfilment  of  Pentecost  and  indeed  of   Christ’s  redemp ve  sacrifice  and  resurrec on. The  saints  do  not  belong  to  any  religious  tradi on,  and  their  lives  and  witness  to  Christ   can  be  appreciated  by  all  Chris ans.   1,255  ancient  English  churches  were  dedicated  to  All  Saints  -  a  number  only  surpassed   by  those  dedicated  to  the  Virgin  Mary.

13


Gardening Exper se            …..at  your  service     

Overgrown areas  tamed Beds  and  borders  en-­‐ hanced  and  maintained One  project  or  seasonal   service Graves   died,  flowers  for   anniversaries  etc. Compe ve  rates

Experienced local  gardener  has   some  availability

Phone 0118  978  6371 14


All Saints’ Church Fellowship Everybody is  most  welcome  to  Fellowship  mee ngs  usually  held  on  the  third   Wednesday  each  month  at  7.45pm  for  7.55pm  in  the  Cornerstone  De  Vitre   Room.  The  cost  to  visitors  is  £1.50  which  includes  coffee  and  if  you  have  any   queries  about  Fellowship  please  contact  Leader  Diana  Clifford  9792614 ENJOY  OUR  AUTUMN  PROGRAM WED.  NOV.  21st       Hold  on  to  your  seats  as  we  are  going  AROUND  THE  WORLD  IN  SIXTY  MINUTES   with  Mr  David  Grainger.  Talk  and  slides. WED.19th  DEC.  CHRISTMAS  GET  TOGETHER  with  prayer  &  Bible  reading  for   Christmas,  plus  fun  quiz  and  light  finger  supper. 2013 WED.  16th  JAN.            A.G.M  .   Following  the  evening  business  we  are  delighted  that  Mrs.  Anne  King  will  be  tell-­‐ ing  us  about  her  visit  to  Buckingham  Palace  when  she  received  her  MBE. CAKE  STALL.      Thank  you  very    much  everybody  who  contributed  to  our  October   cake  stall  which  raised  £80  for  Stage  Fright.

15


LOOKING FOR A HIGH QUALITY CLEANING SERVICE?

iClean-home We offer:  Regular  weekly  domestic  cleans  One-off  spring  cleans

We guarantee:  The  same  cleaner  every  week,  familiar  with  your   requirements  You  can  select  as  many  hours  as  you  need  Pet  friendly  cleaners—we  love  animals! Tel: 01344 350259 16


Service of  Thanksgiving  for  Crea on  and  Blessing  of  Animals,  7  October   2012 Sunday  7  October  was  Animal  Welfare  Sunday  and  on  that  day  was  the  Service  of   Thanksgiving  for  Crea on  and  Blessing  of  Animals  at  All  Saints’  Church.  It  is  always  held   on  the  nearest  Sunday  to  St.  Francis’  Day,  4  October,  as  he  is  the  patron  saint  of   animals. David  held  the  service  and  Julie  Ramsbo om  from  St.  James’  preached,  and  the  animals   were  blessed  individually  by  David,  Julie,  Colin  and  Caroline.  Refreshments  were   organised  by  Jacquie  Headland  in  the  Cornerstone  and  there  were  packets  of  dog  and   cat  food  provided  free  by  Burns  Nutri on  Ltd,  a  firm  in  Carmarthenshire.  This  food  is   totally  natural  and  many  people  give  it  to  their  dogs  and  cats.  Thanks  are  due  to  Jacquie   and  her  helpers  for  organising  the  refreshments  which  were  greatly  appreciated. The  collec on  amounted  to  £55.75.  This  will  go  to  the  Anglican  Society  for  the  Welfare   of  Animals  which  has  several  bishops  on  its  commi ee.  There  were  41  people  with  their   animals,  mainly  dogs,  which  all  behaved  perfectly. Next  year  will  be  the  25th  year  that  I  have  organised  this  service  so  it  will  be  its’  Silver   Jubilee Thanks  to  all  who  supported  the  service. Marcelle  Williams

******************************* Tuesday Morning  9.30  Holy  Communion  Service Recently  Susanne  stumbled  on  one  of  All  Saints’  be er  kept  secrets  –  the   Tuesday  morning  9.30  Holy  Communion  Service  (and  a  cup  of  coffee,  a  biscuit   and  a  chat  a erwards). Now  that  doesn’t  flow  trippingly  off  the  tongue,  I  grant  you,  but  you  have  to   agree  it  does  give  a  fair  idea  of  what  I’m  talking  about.  Like  Susanne,  many  of  us   some mes  find  that  that  precious,  family  day,  Sunday,  is  so  jam-packed  with   things  to  do,  places  to  go,  people  to  see  that  coming  to  Church  just  can’t  be   fi ed  in.  That’s  when  the  TM  9.30  HCS  comes  into  its  own. A  quiet  (no  music,  no  children)  in mate  (the  Lady  Chapel)  celebra on  with  an   always-thought-provoking  talk  plus,  if  you  choose,  a  coffee  a erwards  will   provide  an  oasis  of  calm  in  a  busy  week. Do  give  it  a  try  –  we  don’t  bite! 17


Clergy Team  Le er A  couple  of  weeks  ago  the  Church  Times  had  an  ar cle  which  talked  about   the  feelings  parent's  o en  experience  when  their  children  begin  to  refuse   to  go  to  Church.  Guilt  seemed  to  be  the  overriding  feeling. It  did  not  take  many  years  of  paren ng  to  realize  that  at  some  point  my   children  would  simply  refuse  to  come  with  either  of  us  on  Sunday   morning.  At  first  we  tried  the  same  set  of  persuading  and  discipline  tricks   that  many  parents  try  but  a er  a  conversa on  with  one  of  our  daughters   we  decided  to  let  them  have  more  freedom.  We  realized  that  the  children   were  experiencing  Church  so  nega vely  that  we  were  running  the  risk  of   turning  them  not  just  off  the  ins tu on  for  life,  but  of  seriously  damaging   their  experience  of  God.  We  were  in  a  tough  Church,  there  is  no  hard  and   fast  rule,  but  I  wanted  to  put  together  a  few  thoughts  that  might  help. Firstly  it  is  worth  thinking  about  how  you  experience  Church  as  an  adult.   Your  children,  even  at  a  very  young  age,  will  no ce  your  behaviour  and   reac ons.  If  you  are  engaged  they  will  see  that,  if  you  are  going  through   the  mo ons  for  their  sake  every  week,  they  will  see  that  too.  Yes,  we  all   have  those  days  when  we  would  rather  pull  the  covers  around  our  ears   (even  clergy!)  but  overall  what  do  we  find  we  are  doing  at  Church?  Do  our   children  see  us  joyfully  reading  the  Bible,  do  we  talk  about  prayer  as   something  normal  –  do  we  pray  with  them?  If  you  are  feeling  a  bit   despondent  reading  this  –  don't.  Children  understand  honesty  and  they   will  get  that  this  is  something  worth  s cking  at  if  they  see  you  s cking  at  it   rather  than  papering  over  every  crack.  They  will  also  learn  a  valuable   lesson  if  they  see  parents  who  are  s ll  learning  and  are  willing  to  do  so. Secondly,  expect  rebellion.  Conversa on  does  not  mean  conceding  to  all   demands,  but  you  need  to  listen  as  well  as  talk  (however  angry  the  words   which  come  your  way).  But  remember  that  teenagers  are  looking  for   consistency  and  guidance  (although  they  will  never  say  so)  –  if  you  miss   Church  for  the  game  you  have   ckets  to  it  is,  in  their  mind,  perfectly   reasonable  to  spend  Sunday  morning  on  the  X-box.  There  is  no  hard  and   fast  rule  here,  everyone  had  their  own  expecta ons.  But  even  if  you  are   going  to  make  a  hard  and  fast  rule,  listen  kindly. Thirdly,  try  to  allow  your  children  to  experience  God,  not  just  Church.   Some  teens  love  the  tradi onal,  others  need  noise  and  media.  All  will  look   18


for honesty  and  integrity.  That  means  that  Church  has  to  behave  like  the   body  of  Christ  and  not  like  a  gaggle  of  people  reluctantly  poured  together   on  a  Sunday  morning.  Love  really  is  quite  infec ous.  It  is  important  for   Churches  to  create  dedicated  space  for  teens  but  also  to  teach  them   about  this  community  of  which  they  are  a  part  –  to  share  tradi on  and  to   learn  new  expressions  of  faith.  The  wider  Chris an  community  is   important  too,  things  like  Greenbelt,  Soul  Survivor  and  Diocesan  and   Deanery  Youth  Events.  Again,  there  is  no  hard  and  fast  rule  but  a  good   ques on  is  are  we  allowing  our  teens  space  to  experience  God  and  to   begin  to  learn  to  own  their  faith  for  themselves? The  reason  so  many  young  people  fall  away  from  Church  is,  I  believe,   because  we  spend  a  lot  of  energy  keeping  them  in  the  building  instead  of   really  thinking  about  helping  them  build  rela onships  with  Jesus  (which   o en  keeps  them  in  the  building!).  With  no  parents  to  insist,  university   students  may  have  no  real  faith  founda on  upon  which  to  base  their  own   religious  prac ce  –  and  this  is  a  tragedy. Teaching  faith  is  not  about  facts  and  figures,  it  is  about  engaging  religious   imagina on,  about  nurturing  the  innate  spirituality  which  children  all   have  and  about  le ng  that  grow  and  blossom  into  a  living  rela onship   with  God.  When  children  say  “  I  don't  believe  in  God,”  just  pause  to   wonder  whether  what  they  are  rejec ng  is  ins tu on,  the  way  you  see   things  rather  than  the  maker  of  heaven  and  earth. Caroline

********************************* THE CHILDREN’S  ACTIVITY  TABLE We  are  hoping  to  have  the  table  in  the  Cornerstone   on  various  Sundays  leading  up  to  Christmas.  The   next  one  is  planned  for  Sunday  4th  November  and   we  look  forward  to  seeing  the  children.  Please  see   weekly  Sunday  leaflet  for  confirma on  of  this  and   other  dates.  The  session  follows  the  9.30am  service. 19


Music List July 2012 Sunday

4 Before  Advent  -  All  Saints'  -  Back  to  Church  -  4th  November

Org

Service

All-Together Communion

RS

Motets

Sing of  the  Lord's  Goodness  -  Ernest  Sands,  arr.  Houghton For  all  the  Saints  -  trad.,  arr.  Houghton/Smith Gaudent  in  Caelis  -  T  L  de  Victoria

Final Voluntary

Nun danket  alle  Gott  -  Sigfrid  Karg-Elert

Service  11.00

Family Service

LA

Service

Choral Evensong  

RS

Introit

Gaudent in  Caelis  -  T  L  de  Victoria

Responses

Neary

Psalm

150 -  Stanford

Canticles

Stanford in  C

Anthem

Give us  the  wings  of  faith  -  Ernest  Bullock

Final Voluntary

Sunday

Remembrance Sunday  -  11th  November

Service

Eucharist:  Archer  -  St.  Mark's  Setting

Motets

Call to  Remembrance  -  Richard  Farrant

RS

For the  Fallen  -  Douglas  Guest Final  Voluntary

Fantasia in  G  minor  (BWV  542)  -  J  S  Bach

Service 15.00

British Legion  Service  of  Remembrance

Anthem

Kontakion of  the  Departed:    Give  Rest  O  Christ  (Kieff  Melody)

Candle Lighting

For the  Fallen  -  Douglas  Guest

Final Voluntary

Fugue in  E  flat  major  (BWV  552)  -  J  S  Bach

20

RS


Music List July 2012 Sunday

2 before  Advent  -  18th  November

Org

Service

Eucharist:  Archer  -  St.  Mark's  Setting

RS

Psalm

16

Motet

O Nata  Lux  -  Thomas  Tallis

Final Voluntary

Toccata in  F  major  (BuxWV  157)  -  Dieterich  Buxterhude

Service 11.00

Family Service

LA

Service 15.00

Bereavement Service

RS

Final Voluntary

Elegy -  George  Thalben-Ball

Service

Healing Service

Sunday

Next Before  Advent  -  Christ  the  King  -  25th  November

Service

Eucharist:  Archer  -  St.  Mark's  Setting

Motets

Gloria -  Antonio  Vivaldi  (Movement  1  -  Gloria)

---

RS

Gloria -  Antonio  Vivaldi  (Movement  6  -  Domine  Deus) Final  Voluntary

Fantasia in  G  (BWV  572)  -  J  S  Bach

Service 15.00

Baptism Service

RS

Service

Evening Prayer

---

21


22


HEALING FEAR  OF  DEATH At   this   me   of   year   our   thoughts   are   very   much   turned   towards   those   who   have   died.   On   Remembrance   Day   we   remember   those   who   have   died   as   a   result   of   ac ve  service  in  the  armed  forces  and  on  All  Souls  Day  all  who  have  died.  This  sets   our  minds  to  the   me  when  we  shall  be  called  to  depart  this  earthly  life.  For  many   this  induces  fearful  thoughts  of  how  we  will  face  up  to  this  inevitable   me,  because   there   is   nothing   more   certain   than   the   fact   that   we,   amongst   all   things   living   on   earth,  will  eventually  die.  So  why  should  we  fear  the  inevitable? There  are,  of  course,  several  reasons  why  dying  is  feared.  Firstly  there  is  the  greatest  fear,  namely,  that  of  the  manner  in  which  we  will  die.   We   all   hope   that   it   will   be   quick   and   peaceful.   But   for   many,   the   process   can   be   long,  drawn  out  and  full  of  pain.  For  those  it  is  difficult  to  understand  why  it  should   happen  to  them  and  for  those  closest  to  them  who  will  suffer  with  them.  We  are   blessed   these   days   with   many   hospices   which   provide   pallia ve   care   to   reduce   suffering   and   give   spiritual   support   and,   in   par cular,   to   console   their   thoughts   about  what  may  happen  a er  death. For  all,  no  amount  of  specula on  will  provide  the  answer  to  this  ques on,  but  for   those  of  a  Chris an  faith,  life  a er  death  should  not,  of  its  self,  be  a  cause  of  fear.   In  the  Apostles’  Creed  we  say,  “We  look  for  the  resurrec on  of  the  dead  and  the   life   of   the   world   to   come”.   In   the   New   Testament   we   read   of   many   mes   when   Jesus’  promised  eternal  life.  In  John‘s  Gospel,  chapter  10,  v.  26,  he  quotes  Jesus  as   saying,  in  his  analogy  of  comparing  himself  to  the  Good  Shepherd,  “I  give  them  (his   sheep,  his  followers)  eternal  life,  and  they  shall  never  perish”.  Again  in  verse  25  of   chapter  11,  “I  am  the  resurrec on  and  the  life.  He  who  believes  in  me  will  live,  even   though  he  dies;  and  whoever  lives  and  believes  in  me  will  never  die”.  For  some  the   thought  of  living  for  ever  can  be  a  source  of  fear,  but  when  Jesus  talks  about  life   23


Parish Diary - November 2012 Sunday 4 08.00am

Monday to  Saturday All  Saints Holy  Communion  

5

M

09.30am

Parish Communion  

6

T

11.00am

Family Service

7

W

8

Th

9 10

F Sa

3.00pm

Page

Serendipity Julian Group

6.30pm

Choral Evensong

11 08.00am

Remembrance Holy Communion  

12

M

Bible Study  Group

2

09.30am

Parish Communion  

13

T

MU Corporate  Communion

13

11.15am

BCP Eucharist

14

W

3.00pm

Remembrance

15

Th

6.30pm

Sung Evensong

16

F

17

Sa

18 08.00am

2 before  Advent Holy  Communion  

19

M

09.30am

Parish Communion

20

T

Bible Study  Group

2

11.00am 3.00pm

Family Service Bereavement

21 22

W Th

Fellowship

15

6:30pm

Healing

23

F

24

Sa

Flower Guild  Workshop

9

26

M

Bible Study  Group

2

09.30am

Holy Communion Parish  Communion

27

T

11.15am

No Service

28

W

Mothers’ Union

13

3.00pm

Holy Bap sm

29

Th

6.30 pm

Said Evening  Prayer

30 31

F Sa

25 08.00am

Christ the  King

 Forthcoming  Events 19  Dec Fellowship  Christmas  Get  together. 24


eternal, it   will   be   nothing   like   the   life   we   have   lived   on   earth   and   is   beyond   our   comprehension. St   Paul   in   chapter   15   of   his   first   le er   to   the   Corinthians,   verse   51,   offers   his   vision.   “Listen,  I  will  tell  you  a  mystery!  We  will  not  all  die,  but  will  be  changed  in  a  moment,  in   the  twinkling  of  an  eye,  at  the  last  trumpet.  For  the  trumpet  will  sound,  and  the  dead   will  be  raised  imperishable,  and  we  will  be  changed.”  He  follows  with  the  following  well   known   quota on   from   the   Prophet   Hosea,   “Death   has   been   swallowed   up   in   victory.   Where  O   death   is  your   victory?   Where   O   death  is   your   s ng?”   With   such   assurances,   how  can  we  be  afraid  of  what  sort  of  life  we  should  expect  a er  death? Another   fear   is   that   of   the   possibility   of   judgement   a er   death.   We   also   say   in   the   Apostles’   Creed,  “And   he   shall   come   again   with   glory   to   judge   both   the   quick   and   the   dead”.  I  have  read  of  research  carried  out  a  few  years  ago  which  showed  that  the  fear   of   judgement   is   not   as   common   as   it   was   many   years   ago.   Fewer   people   now   a end   church,   and   those   who   do,   generally   speaking,   rarely   hear   a   sermon   on   ‘future   judgement’.   No   man   or   woman,   however,   who   knows   Christ   need   fear   judgement,   because   as   Paul   so   beau fully   puts   it   in   Romans,   chapter   8,   verses   1and   2,   “There   is   therefore   now   no  condemna on   for   those   who   are   in   Christ   Jesus.   For   the   law   of   the   Spirit  of  life  in  Christ  Jesus  has  set  you  free  from  the  law  of  sin  and  death”. Lastly,  there  is  the  fear,  or  rather  the  sadness,  at  the  thought  of  the  coming  to  an  end   of   a   life   that   has   brought   us   both   joy   and   sadness;   the   joy   of   the   beau es   of   God’s   crea on,  the  joy  of  the  loving  rela onships  that  we  have  experienced  and  our  gra tude   for   the   way   God   has   supported   us   in   all   of   our   trials   and   sadness.   There   is   also   our   concern,  rather  than  fear,  for  those  who  we  will  leave  behind;  for  the  loss  they  will  feel   in  losing  the  love  and  companionship  of  years  spent  together. So  we  pray  Lord  that  you  will  bring  us  peace  and  comfort  on  leaving  our  life  on  earth,   and  to  those  we  leave  behind,  and  we  look  forward  to  being  united  with  you  and  your   Son,  Jesus  Christ  and  all  the  Saints, Jack  Hayley.   (Members  of  the  Group  are  Gill  Allen,  Maggie  Davies,  Jack  Hayley,  Mary  Hughes,  Ann   Penn,  Rosemary  Sturmer,  Joan  Thomason  and  Joan  Wa s)  Please  let  us  know  of  any   need  for  healing  prayer  support.  Confiden ality  is  assured.  The  Laying  on  of  Hands  will   be  made  available  at  Parish  Communion  on  Sunday  21st  October.  The  next  Healing   Service  will  be  held  on  Sunday  18th  November  at  6.30pm.                       25


Ca e's Channel  Swim Our  daughter  Ca e  went  through  Junior  Church  and  Young  Saints  at  All  Saints   and  was  briefly  a  bellringer.  Many  in  the  congrega on  remember  her.  This  is  a   report  for  interest  about  her  swim  across  the  English  Channel. It  all  finally  got  under  way  on  Saturday  6th  October.  This  was  a er  three  post-­‐ ponements  and  was  announced  as  definite  when  Ca e  was  at  a  party  in  York-­‐ shire!  Nevertheless  arrangements  were  quickly  made.  At  midnight  Ca e  and  her   two  supporter  colleagues  (Ella  and  Pete)  and  her  Dad  (Steve)  assembled  at   Folkestone  Harbour  to  meet  Kevin,  our  pilot  for  the  night,  his  assistant  and   Andy  (the  observer  officially  provided  by  the  Channel  Swimming  Associa on). Off  Shakespeare  Cliff,  Ca e  was  coated  firstly  with  sun  cream  lo on,  then  with   an -jellyfish  compound,  and  then  finally  with  a  fairly  revol ng  fa y  compound.   And  with  that  she  was  gone,  swimming  towards  the  small  beach  so  that  she   could  officially  start  as  was  necessary  with  dry  land  under  her  feet.  Start   me  =   02:02. The  night  progressed,  with  Ca e  swimming  at  a  very  regular  pace,  illuminated   with  a  small  strobe  light  on  her  swimming  cap.  Meanwhile  we  on  the  launch   started  the  rou ne  of  preparing  liquid  feed  every  thirty  minutes  and  then  sig-­‐ nalling  to  Ca e.  She  would  then  come  alongside  and  using  a  pole  and  cord  we   would  lower  the  bo le  down  to  her.  She  would  gulp  down  the  500  mls  and  then   resume  swimming.  Some mes  as  a  treat  she  would  get  half  a  chocolate  miniroll  or  similar  -  a  quickly-eaten  solid  of  less  than  one  mouthful. Ca e  just  kept  plodding  on,  forward  into  the  darkness.  Ella  had  decorated  the   boat  and  ourselves  with  glow  s cks,  flashing  lights  and  more,  so  we  must  have   looked  a  strange  sight  to  Ca e  as  she  laboured  below.  The  weather  condi ons   were  pre y  benign  -  a  slow  wind  and  only  small  waves  -  with  rela vely  clear   skies  and  a  half-moon  to  illuminate  the  scene.  It  must  be  noted  though  that  the   sea  temperature  was  down  at  13½°C  overnight  and  14½°C  by  day. Around  5  o'clock  we  found  ourselves  approaching  the  busy  westbound  shipping   lanes.  We  could  make  out  the  silhoue es  and  of  course  their  naviga on  lights.   And  then  we  saw  something  absolutely  bathed  in  light.  It  was  in  fact  an  oil  pro-­‐ duc on  pla orm  being  pulled  incredibly  slowly  by  two  tugs.  Kevin  was  in  radio   contact  with  the  coastguard  and  in  the  event  we  think  maybe  the  tugs  altered   course,  because  Ca e  eventually  swam  in  front  of  them  (by  a  safe  margin). It  was  ge ng  light  now  and  the  water  started  ge ng  a  bit  more  choppy.  Ca e   just  ploughed  on.  This  choppiness  lasted  for  a  couple  of  hours  and  then  things   calmed  down  again.  A er  the  swim  was  complete,  Ca e  announced  that  she   had  'really  enjoyed'  the  swim  throughout  this   me,  and  previously  through  the   night.  Something  about  swimming  in  the  dark! In  due  course  it  was  agreed  that  Ella  would  join  in  and  so  Ca e  was  joined  by  a   swimming  companion.  By  this   me  England  behind  us  and  France  ahead  of  us   were  both  of  roughly  equal  magnitude.  Andy  the  observer  was   ming  the   26


companion swimmers  and  would  announce  a  warning  a  few  minutes  before   they  had  to  clamber  back  onto  the  boat.  A er  Ella  there  was  the  statutory  sixty   minutes  solo  before  Pete  tasted  the  Channel  water.  Then  Ella  again. France  started  looming  larger  in  front  of  us,  and  it  was  soon   me  for  Pete's  se-­‐ cond  swim.  This  took  us  through  the  eastbound  shipping  lanes,  without  inci-­‐ dent  this   me.  But  once  through,  France  seemed  to  get  stuck;  it  wouldn't  grow   any  larger  and  we  were  wondering  whether  progress  against  currents  and   des   really  was  being  made. We  could  see  the  coast  ahead  of  us  quite  clearly  now,  stretching  from  far  away   at  the  right  to  a  point  slightly  to  our  le .  A er  that  it  disappeared  away  directly   from  us.  This  was  Cap  Gris  Nez  which  really  is  more  or  less  a  right-angle.  We   were  aiming  west  of  the  cape  itself  (slightly  to  our  right)  where  we  could  see   the  beach.  Kevin  the  pilot  appeared  to  ask  if  Ca e  could  swim  faster  for  a  cou-­‐ ple  of  hours  in  order  to  make  the  beach  before  the   de  swept  us  past  the  cape.   In  retrospect  the  request  was  very  op mis c  -  the  increase  in  speed  would   have  had  to  have  been  superhuman  -  and  out  of  place  -  Ca e  was  in  no  condi-­‐ on  to  increase  her  speed  especially  as  her  main  characteris c  is  her  ability  to   keep  going  for  ever  at  a  steady  pace. The  apparent  lack  of  progress  was  now  catching  up  on  Ca e.  She  seemed  to  be   having  doubts  as  to  her  ability  to  make  it,  especially  as  the  constant  diet  of  liq-­‐ uid  feed  was  having  its  effect  in  terms  of  a  feeling  of  general  bloatedness,  a   need  to  burp,  and  so  on.  Lots  of  encouragement  was  needed  from  Ella,  Pete   and  Steve  to  get  past  the  headland. But  the  naviga on  now  was  different.  Ca e  had  to  turn  to  the  right  and  swim   against  the  current  and  make  for  the  shore  behind  the  cape.  This  was  tough,   very  tough.  Ca e  was  swimming  solo  and  not  enjoying  it.  Ella,  Steve  and  Pete   just  poured  con nual  encouragement  from  the  boat  and  Ca e  produced  a  spell   that  transformed  the  event.  Using  all  her  reserves  she  pounded  away  pu ng   real  power  in.  Andy  the  observer  was  very  impressed,  saying  that  this  was  the   most  effec ve  part  of  her  whole  swim. For  ages,  the  beach  had  seemed  just  as  far  away  as  ever,  but  then  suddenly  it   looked  within  reach.  With  the  light  fading  fast,  the  clock  gradually   cked   around  un l  the  moment  when  Ella  was  allowed  back  in  again.  Finally  the  two   of  them  could  actually  be  seen  to  be  closing  the  infernal  gap,  and  we  breathed   a  sigh  of  relief.  The  light  was  so  poor  that  we  could  barely  make  out  Ca e   (followed  but  not  assisted  by  Ella)  clambering  over  the  rocks  to  the  small  beach.   She  had  done  it,  a er  a  gruelling  16  hours  32  minutes  and  22  seconds. All  in  all  was  an  unforge able  experience.  And  that  was  just  for  the  watchers   and  companions  on  the  boat.  For  Ca e  it  was  an  absolute  exhibi on  of  endur-­‐ ance,  physical  performance,  stamina,  determina on,  skill  and  sheer  bloodymindedness.  A  triumph. 27


28


DAILY PRAYER  –  DO  YOU? Prayers  are  said  every  day  Monday  -Saturday  at  9am  and  5pm  in  the  Lady  Chapel  using   the  Church  of  England's  Common  Worship  Morning  and  Evening  Prayer  formats.  This   includes  the  bible  readings  and  psalm  for  the  day  as  well  a   me  of  prayer.  We  pray  for   Wokingham,  for  this  parish,  for  the  world  and  those  who  suffer;  and  we  offer  the  pray-­‐ ers  which  are  wri en  on  the  prayer-cross.  There  is  always  opportunity  to  bring  your   own  prayer  requests  or  pray  aloud  yourself.  It  lasts  25  minutes  at  most. These  prayers  are  led  by  a  mixed  team  of  clergy  and  lay  members  of  the  church.  You   are  welcome  to  join  on  any  day  as  li le  or  as  o en  as  you  would  like.   Alterna vely,  if  you  cannot  physically  a end  the  church  on  any  day,  you  might  like  to   go  online  and  follow  morning  or  evening  prayer  there.  All  readings  are  automa cally   provided  and  there  are  sugges ons  for  prayer  topics.  You  can  access  Daily  Prayer  online   from  our  own  church  website  www.allsaintswokingham.org.uk  –  see  Daily  Prayer  in  the   Quick  Link  menu  on  the  home  page.   If  you  use  a  smartphone  there  are  apps  available  which  will  take  you  straight  to  the   Church  of  England's  Morning  or  Evening  Prayer.  Search  for  “myCofE”  if  you  use    iPhone/ iPad;  or  “pocket  common  worship”  if  you  use  Google/Android;  or  simply  bookmark  the   Morning  Prayer  or  Evening  Prayer  websites  on  the  Church  of  England  website  which   present  well  in  mobile  format.  Don't  forget  our  own  church  website  is  also  available  as   an  app  for  Google/Android  phone  users  –  search  for  All  Saints  Church  Wokingham  in   the  Google  Play/Android  marketplace  stores.  You  can  access  Daily  Prayer  in  the  app  via   the  Sunday  Services  icon. If  you  would  like  to  know  more  about  being  part  of  the  team  which  leads  the  prayers   we  would  love  to  hear  from  you  –  speak  to  any  member  of  the  clergy  team  or  one  of   our  regular  leaders  such  as  Barbara  Smith,  Clive  Chaney  or  Geoff  Davies. Finally  we  would  very  much  like  to  have  a  specific  webpage  and/or  app  which  brings   together  in  one  place  online  the  prayer  bulle ns  from  the  different  organisa ons  that   we  use  in  church  at  Morning  Prayer  so  that  online  users  can  pray  for  the  same  prayer   inten ons  are  we  are  using  in  church  each  day.  Any  programmers  with   me  on  their   hands?

The Rector 29


Do you  need  an  NHS  Den st? All  pa ents  are  welcome  at  our  surgery 56  Easthampstead  Road  

THE CHIMNEY  SWEEP  -  EXPERIENCED  AND  CLEAN Contact  Mr.  M.  Blair            0118  934  2799

“Total Quality  Nursing  Care”

West Oak  Care  Home

Sara Gallagher  -    Home  Manager

Don’‛t forget to let our advertisers know you saw their ad in the All Saints Parish Magazine! 30


Lest we  Forget Nurses  at  War Many  of  us  who  lived  through  the  Second  World  War  will  have  enjoyed  watching  the   present  series  of  unsung  heroes  and  heroines  in  ‘War me  Farm’  and  ‘How  we  won  the   War’.  We  will  never  forget  the  sacrifices  made  by  the  Army,  Navy  and  Air  Force  men  and   women  in  conflict,  but  there  were  other  very  brave  people  who  gave  us  the  freedoms   we  have  today.  So,  nursing  being  my  own  privileged  service,  it  seemed  right  to   remember  the  part  played  by  nurses. First  of  all,  there  has  to  be  Florence  Nigh ngale,  ‘The  Lady  with  the  Lamp’,  who  nursed   the  wounded  soldiers  at  Scutari.  She  not  only  laid  the  founda ons  of  present  nurse   training  but  transformed  the  living  condi ons  of  military  servicemen. Then,  in  the  First  World  War,  there  was  Edith  Cavell  who  nursed  the  wounded  in   Belgium  and  developed  an  escape  route  for  soldiers  out  of  the  war  zone.  She  was   arrested  and  shot  at  dawn  by  the  Germans  as  a  spy.  She  is  buried  in  the  churchyard  of   Norwich  Cathedral. In  the  Second  World  War,  many  nurses  joined  the  Queen  Alexandra  Royal  Army  Nursing   Service,  the  Women’s  Royal  Naval  Nursing  Service  and  the  Princess  Mary’s  Royal  Air   Force  Nursing  Service.  Many  were  on  ac ve  service  in  war  zones  such  as  Europe,  Italy,   Africa  and  the  Far  East.  When  the  Japanese  overran  Singapore,  seven  Nursing  Sisters   were  hounded  to  the  flat  roof  of  the  hospital  and  pushed  over  the  edge  to  their  death.   Many  also  worked  in  hospitals  under  canvas. At  home,  when  one  reached  18  years  of  age,  we  had  to  contribute  to  the  war  effort  by   joining  one  of  the  armed  forces,  or  become  nurses,  work  in  muni ons  factories  or  on   farms  amongst  other  professions.  I  trained  as  a  nurse  in  1943  at  Guy’s  Hospital,  London,   much  of  my  training  being  at  the  Guy’s  unit  at  Orpington  Hospital,  and  nursed  wounded   servicemen  and  air-raid  casual es  amongst  other  pa ents  with  rou ne  condi ons. Our  Matron,  Emily  P.  McManus,  renowned  for  her  work  during  the  First  World  War,  was   Sector  Matron  for  the  whole  of  the  South  East  of  England.  I  experienced  air  raids  on   London,  the  pilotless  missiles  V1  (buzz  bombs)  and  the  V2  rockets  as  did  many  nurses. The  best  way  to  conclude  this  tribute  is  to  say: “At  the  going  down  of  the  sun  and  in  the  morning,  we  will  remember  them.” Esmé  P.E.  Few

31


32


33


34


All Saints’  Kni ng  Group Most  of  you  are  probably  aware  that  ‘Feed  the  Children’  charity  in  Twyford  has   unfortunately  gone  into  liquida on.  Our  blanket  kni ng  started  at  Easter  1999.   This  followed  the  comple on  of  our  kneeler  project  which  was  launched  in   1996,  with  the  s tching  of  Nave  kneelers.  Thanks  to  the  overwhelming   generosity  and  enthusiasm  of  the  congrega on,  the  sweet  tempered  crosss tchers  were  able  to  complete  further  kneelers  in  the  Lady  Chapel  and  High   Altar.  Now  that  everyone  was  kneeling  comfortably,  the  people  with  busy   fingers  realised  that  they  were  suffering  from  withdrawal  symptoms.  Kni ng   squares  for  blankets  was  suggested  and  greeted  with  great  enthusiasm.  The   blankets  were  sent  to  Kosovo  via  Children’s  Aid  Direct  in  Reading,  un l  they   directed  their  efforts  to  fund-raising  only.  They  referred  us  to  Medicaid  in  Great   Shefford  near  Newbury,  and  we  made  blankets,  hats,  jumpers,  scarves,  gloves   and  Teddy  Bears.  These  were  sent  to  orphanages  in  Ukraine.  Unfortunately   Medicaid  was  only  open  one  morning  and  one  evening  each  week  and  was  a  75   mile  return  trip.  Not  very  convenient.  Shortly  in  2001  ‘Feed  the  Children’   opened  a  depot  in  Twyford  which  was  far  more  convenient.  Ini ally  our  goods   were  sent  to  Afghanistan  and  Iraq,  later  they  were  sent  to  areas  in  need  in   Africa.  Our  total  exports  to  these  three  chari es  amounted  to  18  shawls,  118   jumpers,  21  scarves,  170  hats,  23  pairs  of  gloves,  24  so  toys  and  985  blankets. ‘Feed  the  Children’  closed  their  doors  whilst  Jack  and  I  were  having  a  summer   holiday  in  Iceland!  I  came  home  to  a  pile  of  22  blankets  on  the  spare  room  bed   and  enough  squares  for  another  seven!  Having  completed  these,  where  should   I  send  them?  I  visited  the  Helen  and  Douglas  House  shop  in  town  and  enquired   whether  the  Children’s  Hospice  in  Oxford  could  use  them.  A  quick  phone  call  to   headquarters  and  the  answer  was  ‘Yes  please’.  Having  completed  the  kni ed   garments  and  final  total  of  1014  blankets,  I  would  like  to  thank  everyone  who   helped  us  with  this  project,  the  kni ers,  the  s tchers  and  all  the  many  gi s  of   kni ng  yarn.  Without  them  we  could  not  have  helped  so  many  people  in  great   need. Barbara  Hayley 35


Pippa Liddell

ROWENA WELSH

FSSCh DipPodMed MBChA

The Lady  Painter  and  Decorator

Qualified Surgical Chiropodist HPC Registered Surgery at: Sherwood School Road Barkham Wokingham RG41 4TN

Tel: 01344  776109 Mobile: 07749 898656

sykespippa@hotmail.com 0118 976 0099

Email: rowenaywelsh@hotmail.com

CHIROPODIST Helena S Gold M.S.S.Ch., M.B.Ch.A Registered Member of the British Chiropody & Podiatry Association And Health Professions Council * Modern surgery in Binfield Village * 10 minutes from Wokingham * Very easy parking * Evening appointments * Cryosurgical treatment for Verrucae and Warts

Tel: 01344 459 371 67, Knox Green Binfield Bracknell RG42 4NZ 36


37


38


PCC mee ng  03.10.12 A er  apologies  for  absence  we  started  as  always  with  prayers  for  those  who   could  not  be  with  us. Having  gone  through  the  minutes  to  check  that  they  were  a  true  and  accurate   record  of  the  last  mee ng  we  got  down  to  business.  The  first  item  for  discussion   was  the  solar  panels,  we  have  been  fortunate  enough  to  have  been  awarded   the  EDF  grant!  The  discussion  was  about  how  to  use  the  income  from  the  solar   panels  to  best  help  support  the  out  reach  of  the  church  through  the   Cornerstone.  Remembering  that  this  is  one  major  way  that  we  show  out  reach   in  to  the  community. Next  on  the  list  was  Christmas!  A  quick  overview  of  the  service  pa erns,  note  to   everyone,  Nine  Lessons  and  Carols  is  on  Sunday  23rd  December  at  6pm. It  was  then  on  to  the  new  director  of  music  and  the  work  that  he  has  already   done  in  working  with  other  music  groups  around  the  church  including  the   younger  members  of  our  congrega on!

***************************** Oli’s first  quarter  peal Learning  to  become  a  competent  ringer  is  a  con nuous  process  through  many   stages:  learning  to  be  safe  on  the  end  of  a  rope,  learning  to  control  the  bell   accurately,  learning  to  fit  in  with  a  rhythm,  learning  the  complexi es  of  change   ringing,  and  so  on.    Most  of  these  things  are  gradual  –  like  learning  to  ride  a  bike. But  there  are  some  definite  landmarks,  like  the  first   me  you  ring  with  other   ringers  and  when  you  first  ring  for  a  service.    Another  major  landmark  is  ringing   one’s  first  quarter  peal,  which  Oli  James  did  on  30th September. A  quarter  peal  is  a  con nuous  performance  that  lasts  about  45  minutes,  and  if   successful  it  is  published  for  ringers  worldwide  to  see,  in  the  ringers  weekly   newspaper  The  Ringing  World,  and  also  on-line. This  quarter  peal  was  rung  for  the  evening  service  at  Harvest  Fes val,  and  it  was   also  a  farewell  tribute  to  David  Rance  on  his  re rement  as  Musical  Director.    

John Harrison 39


Bap sms 30 Sept.

Mia Gwen  Varley Ferreira  Lilyrose  Stringer

Marriages 22 Sept. 29  Sept.

Mark Alfred  Stevens  with  Jacqueline  Patricia  Dance Ma hew  Robin  Clementson  with  Charlo e  Rachel  Su erby

Burial 15 Oct. Eric  William  Priest Age  80 Communion  Service  in  Church  followed  by  Burial  at  St  Paul’s 22  Sept. Rachel  King-Salter Age  85

Funeral in  Church  followed  by  Crema on 26  Oct. Edward  Court  Fisher At  Easthampstead  Park  Crematorium 18  Sept. Edna  Rose  Dear 8  Oct. Olive  Lilian  Ben nck

Age 92 Age  77 Age  84

Number of  Sundays

4

Sundays Week days

630

40

167                                                                            


ASPM Nov 2012  

The Magazine of the Parish of All Saints in Wokingham