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All Saints Wokingham Parish Magazine June 2013

www.allsaintswokingham.org.uk

ÂŁ1.00


Working for, or being an active member of, the Church of England can be an emotional roller-coaster ride on many levels. Being in ministry either as an ordained or lay pastor brings you close to people at some of the highest and lowest points of their lives. That‘s a wonderful privilege of Christian service and it is what we are here for as church; walking together along the road of life, as Jesus walks with us, with love and understanding. Those kinds of highs and lows are part of life and of being open to God’s Spirit. But other highs and lows I’m thinking of too are my feelings about the Church of England as an organisation. One day I’m utterly inspired to see so many people committed to making sure that All Saints parish church is here for everyone, sharing the love of God. It’s only because of their free offering in faith of gifts, energy, time, and money that we have a church community and facilities which offer so many services. These are services both of worship and also of care and provision of all kinds in our local community. There’s every reason when we look at All Saints parish church and see the church and the Cornerstone busy and thriving to feel the Church of England at local level is doing well, is appreciated and is serving its true purpose. But then the next day I will see yet another dispiriting item in the media about the Church of England’s declining attendances nationally; and especially of those under 45 years of age. Or I will be at a diocesan meeting where we are struggling to figure out how we might sustain a parish church presence and ministry in every community when finances are so squeezed. The constant belittling of faith and religion by smart talkers on TV is of course completely uninformed and mostly we tune out; but nonetheless by constant attrition it does influence public opinion about the Church of England. In short the Church of England is living in interesting times. And that can be wonderfully inspiring exhilarating and encouraging some days, and other days… more than challenging! What I believe is important for any of us who are on this up and down adventure with the Church of England is to keep connected - in three dimensions. Firstly, to be in touch with God – to be “looking up” – connected with the Spirit of God. The Church of England at any level isn’t here to serve itself , but to make a difference towards God’s kingdom coming “on earth as in heaven”. We need to make 1


time and space through prayer and reflection to hear what the Spirit is saying to us about what and how we’re doing. Secondly, to be “looking out” – that is, connecting with the people and the world around us. On Sunday 23 June we will welcome Floyd Llawet as a visiting speaker. Floyd is the Provincial Secretary of the Episcopal Church of the Philippines who will share with us what the Church is doing for human rights and social justice in his country. Meanwhile in our own parish over the next two months our youth leader Kat will be working to support the children who will be transferring from junior school to secondary school – a big step in their lives – and in parents’ lives too! A church should not act as if it has all the answers or expect others to answer its call; but instead, needs to come alongside others, rather to be answering their call, as God the Spirit answers our call. Thirdly, to be “looking in” – being aware of the gifts and the needs within the community and people already linked to All Saints Church; making it possible for us all to play the part we can offer to the work that needs to be done. Collaboration is a key word here – working together around a common purpose with honesty and focus. These three dimensions are better described as relationships – with God, with the community and the world, with companions in service. If those three relationships are right then the Church of England as we know it will change, but that will not be a decline because the Church will be serving its true purpose. With similar thoughts in mind the new Parochial Church Council with our church wardens Anne King and John Smith will spend an extended meeting later this month reviewing our parish goals and starting work on a Parish Mission Action Plan Since I wrote last for the magazine I’m delighted we have commissioned our parish lay pastoral assistants to work alongside the clergy as a parish pastoral care team. Please speak to any member of the team with any pastoral concerns you have or requests for prayer. Team members are identified in church by their badges. See the special leaflet about the team or details on the website for more information about how to be in contact. This is part of our commitment as a caring church to ensure that no-one need go without support from the church. When you make contact with the team we will be able to talk about how best we can support you. This could be by praying for you and/ or with you; and if appropriate, through one of our own pastoral ministries offered by our pastoral support groups, such as visiting, home communion, prayer ministry, or by supporting you to seek other help available within the community.

David Hodgson 2


River and Sky

Move our hearts with the calm, smooth flow of your grace. Let the river of your love run through our souls. May my soul be carried by the current of your love, towards the wide, infinite ocean of heaven. Stretch out my heart with your strength, as you stretch out the sky above the earth. Smooth out any wrinkles of hatred or resentment. Enlarge my soul that it may know more fully your truth. A prayer of Gilbert of Hoyland, (died c.1170, Abbot of the Cistercian monastery of Swineshead in Lincolnshire)

Please leave items for publication in the Magazine tray in the Parish Office or email directly to the editor on or before the Copy Date please. Contributions can be typed, handwritten or emailed All Saints PCC Wokingham is a Registered Charity, No. 1127585 Editor:

Bill Poulsom

(979 0484)

Associate Editor

Harriet Swinyard

(962 9313)

Email: editor@allsaintswokingham.org.uk Distribution:

Sheila Longley

(978 4193)

Advertisements:

Bill Poulsom

(979 0484)

Production/Distribution

Sheila Longley & team

(978 4193)

Copy Date for July issue:

11 June 2013

Production:

18 June 2013

Publication:

23 June 2013

This magazine is published by the Rector and PCC of All Saints Parish Wokingham. Opinions expressed by individual contributors do not necessarily reflect the views of the publishers. 3


Clergy and Officers Parish Clergy Rector

The Revd. Canon David Hodgson

979 2999

Associate Priest

The Revd. Caroline Kramer

979 9956

Honorary Asst. Curate

The Revd. Helen Charlton

978 9153

Honorary Priest

The Revd. Colin James

978 1515

Church Wardens

John Smith

979 0948

Katherine Huggett

07834 450819

Anne King

07768 923608

Jo Asplin

979 2797

Kat Allwright

07729 398718

and Children’s Advocate

Margaret Raggett

979 2797

Crèche Leader

Rachel Garlish

978 2602

Junior Church Co-ordinator

Harriet Swinyard

962 9313

Youth Church Contacts:

Robert Vacher, Susan Westgate

979 2797

Kat Allwright

07729 398718

Parish Administrator Children and Youth Parish Youth Leader Safeguarding Co-ordinator

Friday Night Youth Drop-In (FDI) Contacts: Worship and Music Director of Music (inc. Choir)

Richard Smith

Music Group Leader

Gail Houghton

979 2797

Head Server

Rachel Knowles

979 4736

Bible Readers’ rota

Joyce Baldry

978 8506

Tower Foreman

John Harrison

978 5520

Flower Guild Chairman Worship Rota and Prayer Lists Co-ordinator

Lucille Taylor

978 6847

The Revd. Colin James

978 1515

Liz Rippon

978 0455

David Atkinson

979 7911

Lay Co-Chair of Transforming Worship Parochial Church Council PCC Secretary

4


Clergy and Officers Stewardship Co-ordinator

Jo Robinson

978 9730

Gift Aid Co-ordinator

Peter Whittaker

978 6225

Electoral Roll Officer

Joyce Baldry

978 8506

Leadership Forum Convenor Pastoral Care

Liz Rippon

978 0455

Pastoral Care Co-ordinator

Jo Robinson

978 9730

Home Communion

Barbara Smith

979 4407

Healing Prayer Group

Jack Hayley

978 3939

Bereavement Care

Claire Jones

979 2797

Baptisms, Weddings, Funerals

Parish Office

979 2797

Transportation

Susan Westgate

977 1041

Clergy available days:

David

All days except Thursday

Caroline

All days except Friday

Colin

Mon to Wed, Sat, Sun.

Helen

Usually Tues. and Sun.

The Parish Office (0118 979 2797), in the Cornerstone, can be contacted about church related issues (Baptisms, Marriages, Funerals). It is open on Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday from 9.30 am to 1.00 pm and for urgent matters or by telephone on Monday and Thursday from 10.00 am to 12.00 noon. e-mail:

parishoffice@allsaintswokingham.org.uk

Postal address:

The Parish Office, Norreys Avenue, Wokingham RG40 1UE

All Saints website:

www.allsaintswokingham.org.uk

The Cornerstone: For room bookings and general enquiries please phone 0118 979 7778. Administrator Monica Martin is in the office: Monday 2-5pm, Tuesday 12.15-4.30pm, Wednesday 2-5.30pm, Thursday 1.45 - 6.00pm. e-mail: info@thecornerstonewokingham.org.uk 5


Worship at All Saints Services at All Saints' Church embrace a wide range of formats. An outline is given below but for details and information about occasional services, see the weekly leaflet.

Sunday Services 8.00 a.m.

Holy Communion. A said service with a brief address using the traditional language version of the Common Worship Order One Eucharist.

9.30 a.m.

Parish Communion. The service is sung, with hymns, and follows Common Worship Order One Eucharist. Children are catered for in the Crèche and Junior Church. The last Sunday in the month is Parish Communion for the Whole Church and often includes Parade, children are present throughout, and contribute to the worship. Prayer for Healing with Laying on of Hands is offered regularly at certain Parish Communion services (see diary). Coffee is served after the service and this is the weekly 'social gathering' of the Congregation. Please come and meet us there if you are a visitor to the church or would like to get to know us better.

11.00 a.m.

(1st Sunday) Family Service The service is simple with songs, prayers and a talk for children. Everyone is invited but especially parents and children. If you ever worry that your children are too noisy for Church, this is the place to try!

11.15 a.m.

(2nd Sunday) Holy Communion A said service using the Book of Common Prayer.

11.00 a.m.

(3rd Sunday) Family Service

11.15 a.m.

(Some 4th Sundays) Matins using the Book of Common Prayer, usually sung and including a sermon.

6.30 p.m.

(1st - 3rd Sundays) Evensong using the Book of Common Prayer with sermon. Choral Evensong is sung usually on the first Sunday of each month. (An alternative form of worship on 4th & 5th Sundays; and Services of Healing)

6


Weekday Services Morning and Evening Prayer are said, using Common Worship Daily Prayer, at 9.00 a.m. and 5.00 p.m. each day from Monday to Saturday. All may, and are encouraged, to attend. These services may be led by a Priest or members of the Laity. Holy Communion is celebrated as follows: Monday

9.30 a.m.

(Common Worship Order One)

Tuesday

9.30 a.m.

(Common Worship Order One with short address, followed by coffee)

Wednesday 10.00 a.m.

(Simple form of Common Worship Order One and short address (particularly for parents and child-minders of babies and pre-school children)

Friday

in various Residential Homes

Major festivals are also marked by additional celebrations of Holy Communion. Please see the Parish Diary elsewhere in the magazine, or see our Services leaflet.

******************************************** Home Communion: If anyone knows of a housebound parishioner, either temporarily or long term, who would like to receive Holy Communion, please contact the Parish Office (979 2797). Confirmation, Welcome or Growth Groups: Anyone interested in confirmation, a refresher course, or learning about the Christian faith is invited to join one of the Eureka! groups or a confirmation course - contact Barbara Smith on 979 4407. Baptisms: are usually conducted at a special afternoon service on the last Sunday of each month; or occasionally in Sunday morning services if requested. Baptisms can be booked via the Parish Office (979 2797). Wedding Bookings: Clergy are available in the Cornerstone on Monday from 6.30 pm 7.30 pm and on Saturday from 10.30 am - 11.30 am on an appointment basis. Please book via the Parish Office (979 2797).

7


Help!

8


Flower Guild At our Flower Guild meeting in April, Pam Gilbey demonstrated how to arrange spring flowers using a pinholder. Despite the meeting clashing with Women's Fellowship, sixteen members came and created very different designs using daffodils, tulips, hyacinths, and irises. Thank you Pam for providing us with the inspiration to arrange these beautiful spring flowers.

Dates for your Diary 12th13th14th July 'Worship The Lord' A Festival of Flowers and Vestments Please come and support the above event, which will showcase the new vestments to be used throughout the Church year with accompanying floral displays. Flower Guild Rota for June June 2nd Mrs M Whitaker, Mrs J Mitchell MW June 9th Mrs K Thomas, Mrs E Goss KT June 16th Mrs K Maund, Mrs P Gilbey PG June 23rd Mrs J Mellor, Mrs L Taylor LT June 30th Mrs L Barrell, Mrs M Hughes LB

For further information contact Lucille Taylor 9786847 or Hazel Matthews 9786700 9


10


From Revd Helen Charlton: some thoughts on prayer posture……. As part of our Lent theme on Liturgy I spoke, during Holy Week, on the topic of kneeling. This is one of many actions, gestures and rituals that we do as part of worship. Visitors to churches often get confused by the movements we make. We ourselves may not understand the background or reason for some of the actions that everyone does, or that those leading the worship perform. It isn’t always necessary to understand completely why we do certain things; symbolic actions can often become meaningful simply by the way our body responds, especially if actions are repeated. This is an essential part of worship, of the way we talk to God and God talks to us, even for us buttoned-up Anglicans! Some are straightforward, such as bowing in reverence in front of the Altar. Some are obvious in meaning but not part of our particular church culture, such as swaying and dancing while singing gospel songs in a charismatic church.

The different postures for prayer are varied and have their roots in Scripture and tradition (both before and after Christ). The first position – standing eyes open, looking up, with hands and palms uplifted, is the oldest posture. It’s called the ‘orans’ position from the Latin word for praying. The worshipper is acknowledging God as external and transcendent; this is a way of giving thanks, blessings and praise as well as general prayers. It is the norm in the Eastern Church and in Jewish Synagogues. It is used in Western Churches (eg when clergy bless the bread and wine during the Eucharist). I Timothy 2: 8a, Luke 9: 28- 32 The second position is also standing, but with eyes closed or averted, head bowed and hands clasped at waist. It is the traditional posture of a shackled prisoner of 11


Parish Diary - June 2013 Sunday

Trinity 1

Monday to Saturday

2

3

Mo

08.00am

Holy Communion

4

09.30am

Parish Communion

5

Tu Serendipity We

11.00am

Family Service

6

Th Julian Group

3.00pm

**No Service

7

Fr

06.30pm

Choral Evensong

8

Sa

Trinity 2

10

Mo

08.00am

Holy Communion

11

Tu MU Corporate Communion

09.30am

Parish Communion

12

We

11.15am

BCP Eucharist

13

Th

3.00pm

**No Service

14

Fr

6.30pm

Sung Evensong

15

Sa

9

16

page

19

Trinity 3

17

Mo

08.00am

Holy Communion

18

09.30am

Parish Communion

19

Tu Serendipity We All Saints Fellowship

15

11.00am

Family Service

20

Th Healing Prayer Group

25

3.00pm

**No Service

21

Fr

6.30pm

Said Evensong

22

Sa

Trinity 4

24

Mo

08.00am

Holy Communion

25

Tu

09.30am

Parish Communion

26

We

11.15am

Choral Matins

27

Th

3.00pm

**No Service

28

Fr

6.30pm

Said Evensong

29

Sa

Trinity 5

30

Mo

08.00am

Holy Communion

31

Tu

09.30am

Parish Com. All Together

1

We

11.15am

**No Service

2

Th

3.00pm

Holy Baptism

3

Fr

4.3

Holy Baptism

4

Sa

23

30

6.30pm

Choral Evensong Forthcoming Events

12


war being brought before the conquering king. In history, looking directly at one’s captor was regarded as insolent – hence eyes are averted. This posture is for submissive petitions or prayer for forgiveness. Luke 18: 10- 13 The third position is kneeling – either with eyes open and hands lifted, or with eyes closed and hands folded. This was the traditional posture for requesting favours from the king and is linked with prayers for repentance and supplication, especially in the Eastern Church. In 325AD the Council of Nicaea forbade kneeling on Sundays as this day is a celebration of the Resurrection and a looking forward to Jesus’ return, so the emphasis should be on joy not penitence. In Western Christianity kneeling came to mean humility and submission, and became the normal posture for prayers. Matt 18:26, Luke 22: 41- 44 The fourth position is prostrate, lying on one’s belly, looking down/ eyes closed. This is the traditional posture for begging favours from the king when the request is large, and/or the petitioner is desperate or has no standing (literally) before the king. It is used for desperate, penitential or intercessory prayers. It is used in the Eastern Church, where they have plenty of room (no pews) and soft carpet! Occasionally seen in Anglican churches where the Priest may do this on Good Friday. Matt 26: 38-9 The final position is sitting, looking down/ eyes closed or averted, hands folded together. Pews were ‘invented’ in the Middle Ages, just before the Reformation. As the Protestant Reformation brought with it an emphasis on teaching the Scriptures and very long sermons, the Protestants kept the pews! As a result this has become the normal posture for many in the Western Church. It is mentioned in the Bible (II Sam 7: 18), but it was not prevalent in public worship before the invention of pews. Some questions: Do you try different postures for prayer either in church or at home? Do you think it’s OK to reflect your emotional state in the way you pray? Do you feel comfortable with the idea that you or God can use your body actively in worship? Do you think your body and its movements can contribute to worship and change you in a spiritual way?

13


THE CHIMNEY SWEEP - EXPERIENCED AND CLEAN Contact Mr. M. Blair

0118 934 2799

Member of the National Association of Chimney Sweeps

Don’t forget to let our advertisers know you saw their ad in the All Saints Parish Magazine! 14


All Saints’ Church Fellowship

A warm welcome to Fellowship which is held in the Cornerstone De Vitre Room at 7.45pm for 7.55pm. Contact is Diana Clifford 9792614. Wed. 19th June: ‘Stage Fright’ Revd. Michael Johnson who will be telling us about Stage Fright and his other work. We know this will be a very interesting evening having had Michael as our speaker on other occasions. Wed. 17th July:

‘Summer Time Get Together’

Wed. 18th Sept: Mrs. Ann Armstrong had to cancel her visit to us in May so we now look forward to her talk entitled ‘My Life & Childhood’ Thank you to date for donations of foreign coins in aid of The Royal Berks Hospital Charity. Please continue to support and give donations to Su McArthur at 8.00am service, any member of Fellowship at 9.30am or telephone Diana Clifford 9792614. Our very special thanks to everybody who supported the April Cake Stall which raised £120 for our 2013 charity which is WADE. THE CHILDREN’S ACTIVITY TABLE We are hoping to have the table in the Cornerstone following the 9.30am service during June. Please see weekly Sunday leaflet for dates. EARLY BREAKFAST A continental breakfast will be served in the Cornerstone following the 8.00am service on Sunday 30th June. No need to book – just come along and enjoy breakfast (lots of strawberries!) cereals, fruit, croissants etc. We are always very happy to serve anybody who would like to come along before the 9.30am service or just to pop in for breakfast and a chat. If you have any dietary requirements please contact Diana 9792614.

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Your branch committee is often told by people sympathetic to the Mothers’ Union and its work, that they are just too busy with current commitments and their families to join anything else. If they joined the Mothers’ Union, they say, they would feel obliged to be more active in their support than their current commitments reasonably allow. Our branch does not share this view in that we welcome and indeed have members who are able to contribute only occasionally but are equally valued; do they contribute more through their private prayers? However, if being seen to be active would concern you, there is an option to become a Central Member. Central membership is open to anyone (male or female) who is a Baptised Christian and who agrees with the organisation’s aims and objectives, which are: Aim & Purpose: To demonstrate the Christian faith in action by the transformation of communities worldwide through the nurture of the family in its many forms. Objectives:

To promote and support married life

To encourage parents in their role to develop the faith of their children

To maintain a worldwide fellowship of Christians united in prayer, worship and service

To promote conditions in society favourable to stable family life and the protection of children To help those whose family life has met with adversity. You can join as a central member by filling in a simple online application form and paying the membership fee of £28.00 (for UK membership). For this you will become part of the worldwide organisation to which members are proud to belong. You will receive our magazines and prayer diaries, be informed of all the latest campaigns and be part of the worldwide wave of prayer. 17


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If you feel this may be for you, please visit the Mothers’ Union website to find out more about us and perhaps fill in the online form. However, if you prefer to belong to the parish branch, we are always very pleased to welcome new or prospective members to any of our meetings, services or events or just ask any member about us. Branch news The East Berkshire Summer Meeting takes place this month; this is the most local of the 3 summer meeting being held in the diocese. Everyone is welcome, including diocesan and central members and curious non-members. The evening, to be held at St James’, Finchampstead, will commence at 7.30pm with worship led by Andrew, Bishop of Reading and will be followed by the meeting, when updates on the MU’s work are given and future projects are discussed. As this meeting coincides with our branch meeting date, it will replace our June branch meeting. However, we hope as many as possible will be able to go to Finchampstead; if helpful, we are willing to share lifts (details below). Approximate numbers are requested by our hosts, but it is not necessary to book and it is perfectly acceptable to just turn up, if you are unable to commit in advance. More information on The Mothers Union’s work worldwide can be found on the website www.themothersunion.org. For branch information or a lift to meetings, please call Valerie (978 7363) or Mary (978 2678). Tues 11th Jun

9.30am

11th-15th June Wed 26th June

Corporate Communion

Wave of Prayer

7.30pm

Area summer meeting at Finchampstead Bishop Andrew

Tue 19th Nov

Diocesan winter meeting at Benson Worldwide President 19


‘Lets hold a Flower Festival’ ‘Let’s hold a Flower Festival’ is something which has been said on a number of occasions since our last flower festival in 1990 but until now we have not been in a position to take up the suggestion. Over the years I have been lucky enough to be invited to take part in a number of flower festivals. I helped stage a festival at Christ Church Cathedral which was an inspirational place to work and this gave me the chance to learn from some of the most talented arrangers in the Berks, Bucks and Oxon area. I also helped Margaret Whitaker design a festival in aid of the NSPCC at Bearwood College. Generally events such as these take about 18 months to organise. At the start of the planning process all one has are a venue, a date and hopefully a large budget! The first challenge is to design a theme which is in keeping with the venue and will give scope for flower arrangements. At Bearwood we used the whole of the downstairs of the mansion together with the chapel. There were more than 100 arrangements which helped trace the history of the building from when it was first built by John Walter, through its time as a hospital during the war to its present use as a school. The size and diversity of such a building offers wonderful scope to the flower arranger. A beautiful wooden staircase remembered the estate’s carpenters; a Victorian style vestibule was the setting for indoor and outdoor pursuits which might have featured in a weekend house party. Outside the chapel there was a very unusual arrangement depicting Robert Southey’s poem, Inchcape Rock – the loose connection here was that the chapel had been donated to the school in 1934 by the Earl of Inchcape, Chairman of P & O. After agreeing the outline design of the festival suitable flower arrangers, churches and Flower Clubs had to be invited to participate. All this was a very drawn out process as it was before the age of computers, let alone email! Then followed viewing days for arrangers to see their allocated space and then of course all the general publicity etc associated with such an event. An enormous number of stewards were needed together with a team of waterers to maintain the flower arrangements. On staging day about two hundred people had to be fed and watered, the list goes on, it was a challenge but also very exciting to work on such a large scale. Our festival ‘Worship the Lord’ is a more modest affair and will have taken only seven months to plan which is quite a 20


frighteningly short amount of time, I can honestly say that we have not had time to become bored! The short time scale has only really been possible because when we started planning we already had the 12 new vestments as our theme. Our challenge has been to find places to display the robes together with their associated floral arrangements to their best advantage without impacting too much on the everyday worship of the church. To speed planning, we have only invited a small number of outside arrangers; generally most of the arrangements will be created by the wealth of talent which we have within our own Guild. The robes, which will be made from vibrant coloured silks, will make a striking display in their own right before we even start to add all the flower arrangements. Each chasuble will be placed within a flower display which will interpret the verse around which the robe has been designed and also reflect the season in which it will be worn. When we first made the decision to hold this Flower Festival we had a number of aims. Primarily we obviously wanted to celebrate the wonderful gift of the vestments and make it possible for them to be displayed together as a collection. For the Flower Guild in addition to having the joy of arranging beautiful flowers it is an opportunity to pass on the knowledge of ‘How to organise a Flower Festival’ something which is completely new to most of the members. My other aim is to try to create an occasion to welcome many members from the wider community into our church and this is where we hope that every member of the All Saints family will be involved. A Flower Festival involves much more than just the arrangers and their flowers and as much as husbands of flower arrangers will again be called upon to move bases, stands and much more, we will also need a lot of help from the rest of the congregation. We hope that everyone will play their part and Anne King has written further about this on page 23 of this magazine. Do please read her article and see how you can be involved so that we can make July 12 th, 13th and 14th three special days in the life of All Saints and our community.

Pam Gilbey Chairman of Flower Festival 21


Pippa Liddell

ROWENA WELSH

FSSCh DipPodMed MBChA

The Lady Painter and Decorator

Qualified Surgical Chiropodist HPC Registered Surgery at: Sherwood School Road Barkham Wokingham RG41 4TN

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sykespippa@hotmail.com

Mobile: 07749 898656

0118 976 0099

Email: rowenaywelsh@hotmail.com

07540 349052

CHIROPODIST Helena S Gold M.S.S.Ch., M.B.Ch.A Registered Member of the British Chiropody & Podiatry Association And Health Professions Council * Modern surgery in Binfield Village * 10 minutes from Wokingham * Very easy parking * Evening appointments * Cryosurgical treatment for Verrucae and Warts

Tel: 01344 459 371 67, Knox Green Binfield Bracknell RG42 4NZ 22


Situations vacant Very part time (two hours only) and very temporary (one weekend only) at the Flower and Vestment Festival There are lots of jobs to choose from. Could you help us Collate programmes Deliver leaflets Sell programmes in advance Move furniture Make a cake Be a steward Host a tea party or children’s activities Serve refreshments ? Offers of help please to Pam Gilbey, Anne King or Sue James or to 07768 923608 or flowerfestival@allsaints.wokingham.org.uk

Worship the Lord Flower and Vestment Festival Reunion tea party Sunday 14th July at 3 pm This is a special invitation to all who used to worship at All Saints but have moved away to come back and join us for the Festival. If you are one of those and are reading the Magazine, please consider yourself invited and let us know if you can come to tea. If you know someone who has recently moved and would like to come back, please invite them on our behalf. And this means anyone – younger people who have now set up home elsewhere, others who may have retired or those who have moved for any reason. We have special invitations for our reunion tea. Please e-mail flowerfestival@allsaintswokingham.org.uk or ring 07768 923608 for an invitation and tea ticket to send by post or e-mail. Fliers available too!

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PASTORAL CARE AT ALL SAINTS

Sunday 28th April 2013 was indeed a “red letter” day in our worship at All Saints! This was the day that eight members of the congregation and the clergy were commissioned to form the pastoral care team who committed themselves to work as a united group to offer a coordinated response to pastoral care needs in the parish. This is not to say that these needs have not been addressed to in the past. We only have to remind ourselves of those groups who have, in been offering pastoral and healing care in the parish, remembering that the provision of pastoral care is all part of the ministry of healing. The list of those groups which have been involved in pastoral is quite remarkable, and includes, baptism care, bereavement care, emergency food bank provision, healing prayer group, home communion and visiting team, house groups and other fellowship groups, marriage preparation, ministry to residential care homes, children’s and youth groups, and all the activity-based groups which share a caring concern for their members. So what has changed with the commissioning of the pastoral care team? Firstly it is important to acknowledge that much thought and prayer has gone into its development. Secondly all the team have undergone a course of training, recognised by the diocese, to provide an in depth understanding of what is involved in pastoral care. This will have included the acceptance of the vital importance of Christian listening in all aspects of personal relationships. Furthermore the object is to make widely known that this ministry is available to all those who are in anyway associated with our church. All it requires is a word to any one of the members of the pastoral care team, or a phone call or email message to the Parish Office. Some definitions of pastoral care include: “walking alongside those in need”, 25


“being mirrors of Christ’s love” “a messy mixture of momentary meetings”! The pastoral care teams’ aims will be to;     

be a listening ear, respecting confidentiality be a contact point for needs of concern visit parishioners at home or in hospital offer a prayerful ministry support the work of pastoral care groups and other small groups in the parish.

Another activity which is included, and which we as a prayer group have been anxious to introduce, is that of discreet prayer and listening in church before or after a service. This, of course, can be made available at any time, by arrangement with the clergy. Our readers should be made aware that with the introduction of the pastoral care team, this will need continuing publicity, particularly in the magazine, and may result in a reduction in our privileged allocation of two pages for our prayer group each month, to which we made a commitment when we first formed nearly 23 years ago. We hope that we may be able to contribute smaller items of news and comment specifically associated with the subject of the healing ministry, including information of forthcoming healing services.

Jack Hayley Members of the Group are Gill Allen, Maggie Davies, Jack Hayley, Mary Hughes, Ann Penn, Rosemary Sturmer, Joan Thomason and Joan Watts). Please let us know of any need for healing prayer support. Confidentiality is assured. The next Laying on of Hands will be made available at the Parish Communion on Sunday 16th June. The next Healing Service will be held on Sunday 28th July at 6.30pm.

26


Youth page by Kat Allwright So, what does a youth worker do? I have now been here for 6 months. You might be wondering what I have been doing in that time, and asking yourself, ‘What exactly does a youth worker do anyway?’ Believe it or not, I don’t spend all my time playing table tennis and having coffees in coffee shops, although they are both very worthwhile pastimes. Let me share a little of what I have been doing/ involved with over the last 6 months. I have been getting to know the ropes of the job, the way things work, who does what, and why? I have been spending time getting to know the young people, parents and other people in the church. We have had a couple of fun youth socials to help this happen, and help to get their opinions on what they want a youth worker to do/ provide for them. I have taken on responsibility for running and organising FDI (Friday Drop In), and also the Sunday morning youth activities. The younger youth session on a Sunday (Tweenagers) is now running weekly, and the older youth are also continuing to meet weekly as well. I have also been involved in preparing the young people for Confirmation with Caroline. I have been involved with Christian lunchtime groups in both St. Crispins and in the Holt school, and have exciting plans in place for both All Saints School and St Crispins, especially regarding the yr6 into yr 7 transition. Similarly, I have gotten involved with the Wokingham Youth Leaders network who run the Warehouse and also the WOW (Wokingham youth worship) sessions. These are on alternate months, and see a variety of young people from the community and churches coming together in a safe and secure environment. We have also, recently, just started a new older youth group (Xpansion) on a Wednesday evening in conjunction with Norreys church. This is for yr 8+, and is an opportunity to come to a safe environment and chill, and we make spaces for discussions and chances to talk to the young people. Also, since I started, I have been involved with the ‘Easter Experience’ with the Baptist church, that saw over 300 yr 6 pupils from 8 primary schools learn the real meaning of Easter. This is just a taste of what I have been doing. Please feel free to come and chat to me, and ask me questions about my work, what is going on, and ways that you can get involved, both in the groups but also behind the scenes! None of these things can happen without people praying, and people volunteering!

June dates Sunday morning groups - 2nd, 9th – in church. 16th, 23rd, 30th. (9.15am for breakfast) FDI – 7th, 14th,21st, 28th . (7.30-9pm @ The Cornerstone) Xpansion – 12th and the 26th (7.45- 9pm @ Norreys Church) Youth Social – Movie Night – June 8th (7 – 8.30pm @ The Cornerstone)

27


28


Worship the Lord Programme for the Festival Weekend Thursday 11th April 8 pm

Opening event

Friday 12th April 10 am - 5 pm 2.30 – 3.30 pm

Festival open Tea party for visitors from local residential homes

Saturday 13th April 10 am - 5 pm 2 pm - 4 pm Sunday 14th April 12 noon till 5 pm 9.30 am 11 am - 1 pm 3 – 4 pm 6.30 pm

Festival open Special activities for children in The Cornerstone Tower open to see the bells and views of Wokingham Festival open Festival Eucharist with the blessing of the vestments Junior Church summer picnic Reunion tea party Thanksgiving evensong

Throughout the weekend - Children’s activities including Churchyard Trail—for younger children Treasure Trail—for older children Get your trail sheets and then your rewards from the stewards in the church In The Cornerstone Exhibition of other vestments and crafts Collages and competitions and Refreshments throughout the day for everyone Luscious lunches - filled warm baguettes, sandwiches and salads. Indulgent cream teas and delicious homemade cakes. Children’s option also available

29


Wokingham & District Association for the Elderly ARE YOU OVER 60 YRS OF AGE ? A warm welcome awaits you at WADE Day Centre in Wokingham if you are over 60.

PC, Laptop and Printer Support Repairs, Installs and Upgrades Data Migration and Recovery

We provide morning coffee, a hot two course lunch and afternoon tea. The centre is open from

Internet/Wireless Support Virus Checking and Setup

10.30am-4.30pm

Friendly Service – Work Insured and Guaranteed

Activities range from quizzes, entertainment, gardening sessions to outings and sing-a-longs. We have a mini bus so may be able to collect and return you. Please phone for details of costs WADE 01189 787 025 and ask for Jane Porter

Please call Alan 07789 533115 No Callout Fee – £20 per hour No Fix/No Fee info@rabbitcomputers.co.uk

or Stevie on 0791 767 2222

www.rabbitcomputers.co.uk 30


NEWS FROM THE TREASURER'S DESK We are always running to catch up when it comes to book-keeping. So at the time of writing we have the accounts made up only to March even though April is over and we are ten days into May. But the end of March means that the first quarter's income numbers are available, and I have to report that they don't look good: Last year at this time: Budgeted for this point in time (see note below): What a break-even position ought to show: What we have actually received:

£37,654 £36,578 £41,042 £35,153

Remember, as I mentioned back in February, that the budget this year is for a deficit of £18,490. That's why the budgeted expectation is so much lower than the break-even point. In summary, the break-even number is £6000 or so more than we have actually received. If this continues we will suffer a very large deficit at year-end. On behalf of both the Finance and Stewardship Committees I do ask everyone to examine their giving. Increases are willingly accepted at any time of the year! Meanwhile, across at the Youth Worker fund, the position is not that wonderful either. We have generous pledges into the fund running at £12,600 per year from eighteen donors. We are spending much more than that - well more than twice that in fact. And even if each donor represents say a pair of people, the comparison of "36" to the current electoral roll number of "302" speaks for itself. Kat is doing a wonderful job, but we cannot expect her to work just for the love of it. As a church we have a responsibility. Meanwhile, I have just got space to say that the job of PCC Treasurer is not easy. But it would be impossible without lots of help. So let me thank on your behalf John Alp, Margaret Hawkins and Dickon Snell, plus the small group of gentlemen who meet each Monday to count the collection. Steve Smith 31


Music List June 2013 Saturday

at Winchester Cathedral - 1st June

Org

Service 17.30

Choral Evensong

RS/

Introit Responses

Thomas Tallis

Psalm

8

Canticles

Dyson in F

Anthem

O God, thou art my God - Henry Purcell

Final Voluntary

tbc

Sunday

Trinity 1 - Environment Sunday - 2nd June

Service 09.30

Eucharist: Archer - St. Mark's Setting

Anthem

Ave verum corpus - W A Mozart

RS

Choir Hymn Final Voluntary

tbc

Service 11.00

Family Service

LA

Service 18.30

Choral Evensong (Altos, Tenors & Basses)

RS

Introit Responses

Plainsong

Psalm

39

Canticles

Wood in G

Anthem

In God's Word - Henry Purcell

Final Voluntary

tbc

Sunday

Trinity 2 - 9th June

Service 09.30

Eucharist: Archer - St. Mark's Setting

Anthem

Ego sum panis vivus - G P da Palestrina

RS

Choir Hymn Final Voluntary

tbc

Service 18.30

Sung Evensong: Ferial Responses (McKie Amen)

Psalm

44

Canticles

Set C

Anthem

O God, thou art my God - Henry Purcell

Final Voluntary

tbc

32

RS


Music List June 2013 Sunday

Trinity 3 - 16th June

Org

Service 09.30

Eucharist (Healing): Archer - St. Mark's Setting

RS

Psalm

5, vv1 - 8

Anthem

Lead me, Lord - S S Wesley

Choir Hymn Final Voluntary

tbc

Service 11.00

Family Service

LA

Service 18.30

Said Evensong with Piano

---

Sunday

Trinity 4 - 23rd June

Service 09.30

Eucharist: Archer - St. Mark's Setting

Gradual

Almighty and Everlasting God - Orlando Gibbons

Anthem

In God's Word - Henry Purcell

Final Voluntary

tbc

Service 11.15

Choral Matins (Sopranos & Trebles)

Responses

Plainsong

RS

RS

Venite Psalm

55, vv1 - 16

Canticles

Stanford in B flat

Anthem

Ave Maria - Simon Lindley

Final Voluntary

tbc

Service

Said Evensong with Piano

Sunday

Trinity 5 - 30th June

Service 09.30

All Together Communion - Junior & Youth Church Celebration

Anthem

tbc

Final Voluntary

tbc

Service 15.00

Holy Baptism

??

Service 16.30

Holy Baptism

??

Service 18.30

Evening Prayer

---

---

33

RS


34


In your garden:

a seasonal guide

What’s happening now . . . . . Summer has arrived with a flourish, after such a slow cold spring. With so many plants now flowering, it’s difficult to choose those star performers. June is the month though to marvel at peonies, whose sumptuous blooms are hard to ignore. Fragrance is hard to beat also, with Philadelphus (Mock Orange) and Lonicera (honeysuckle) all vying for attention with their heady scents. The vegetable garden should be in full swing now, and early harvests can be picked and savoured. Lettuce, rocket, peas will provide that first fresh taste. Greenhouses and windowsills will be bursting at the seams, and with the risk of frost past it should be safe to plant out. This is the very best time to enjoy all our country has to offer with its glorious gardens. Get out and about to view them through the many private gardens opened through the National Gardens Scheme. Show your support and visit one during their Festival Weekend on the 15th-16th June, all open for charity. Remember though to make time just to relax and enjoy the moment. It’s a great feeling to see your garden bountiful with fruits, vegetables or flowers and knowing there is more to come. So get out the garden furniture, give it a scrub and the terrace too, sit back and sip something refreshing. tasks to be getting on with this June . . . . . . 1. Keep deadheading and weeding to keep borders and pots in their prime. 2. Water plants that need it regularly with collected rainwater and grey water. 3. Look out for pests and diseases, both outside and in the greenhouse. 4. Lawns will benefit from a liquid feed, best done in the evening. 5. Summer bedding can be planted out and watered in. 6. Continue to sow seed at intervals to maintain a succession of salad crops.

Nicola Baily Gibson at ‘Moutan In & Out of the Garden’ studio 01252 845 880 mobile 07940 801019 store 01256 701 027 email:nicola@moutan.co.uk 35


Gardening Expertise …..at your service     

Overgrown areas tamed Beds and borders enhanced and maintained One project or seasonal service Graves tidied, flowers for anniversaries etc. Competitive rates

If you would like to advertise in this space please contact the editor by email or telephone.

Contact details are on page 3.

Experienced local gardener has some availability

Phone 0118 978 6371 36


37


If you would like to advertise in this space please contact the editor by email or telephone.

Contact details are on page 3.

38


Ringing for England Sometimes we English seem to be an odd lot. The Welsh and the Scots seem to have clearer identities than we do. Maybe it is because they are smaller and were historically more cohesive than the mixed bag of Celts, Angles, Saxons, Normans, etc. that ended up in England. Maybe it is because they have less of the social, political and economic distortions that seem to set the southeast at odds with other English regions. Whatever the cause, it was noticeable that the flags and national days of St Andrew and St David always seemed to have more significance for the Scots and Welsh than did those of St George for the English. The Church has always flown St George’s flag, but until relatively recently it wasn’t seen much elsewhere. It is seen more now, but often in connection with football, or to promote nationalist politics, rather than as a symbol of English cultural identity. Likewise St George’s Day never featured strongly as an event outside the Scout movement, which always held parades on or near the day. In 2010 a small group of bellringers decided to try to promote St George’s Day as a celebration of England’s Patron Saint, and to reclaim his flag as a symbol of our cultural identity. They chose to do it through bellringing, that most quintessentially English, and very public form of rejoicing. They launched ‘Ringing For England’ with the aim that on St George’s Day there should be public ringing in as many towers as possible across England. They promoted the initiative through the ringing community, and also sought support from the bishops (to allay any concerns that ringers might be seen as supporting some of the less attractive ideas that have attached themselves to St George’s flag). In 2011 there was a slight setback when St George’s Day fell on Holy Saturday, making ringing in churches unacceptable. That won’t happen very often. This century the only other problem years are 2038 when it falls on Good Friday and 2095 when it again falls on Holy Saturday. This year at All Saints we rang a quarter peal on the evening of St George’s Day, and we hope to ring for it in future years too. Ringing for England’s website is: ringingforengland.co.uk/ John Harrison 39


Baptisms 21st April

Luc Thomas Woodham

Marriages 13th April 4 th May 4th May

Steven William Whitby with Helen Vaughan Jamie Colin Shepherd with Jennifer Louise Hay David Peter Lucas with Michelle Marsden

Burial 23rd April

David Trayton Adams

age 73

Burial of Ashes 25th April 1st May

Enid Noreen Farman Molly Finch

Age 89 Age 81

At Easthampstead Park Crematorium 18th April Edna Goatley Age 85 23rd April Mary McInroy Mitchell Age 85 26th April Derek Gibbons Age 85 30th April Lillian Clark Age 89 Followed by service in church.

Number of Sundays

4

Sundays

637

Weekdays

123 40


Flower Festival All Saints Church Wokingham

Worship the Lord A DISPLAY OF VESTMENTS AND FLOWERS July 12th 13th &14th 2013 Friday & Saturday 10am—5pm Sunday 12noon—5pm Stunning flowers With 12 new contemporary robes Additional Exhibition in The Cornerstone Morning coffee Light lunches Afternoon teas

Free Entry


ASPM June 3013  

The Magazine of All Saints Parish Church in Wokingham

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