The Saints Magazine - Winter 2019 Edition

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SAINTS THE

Community

All Saints Anglican School SEMESTER 1, 2019

y l t c i r St l a n o i t Sensa Α Ω

STRICTLY BALLROOM POSTER INSIDE | FIDO | RUGBY TOUR All Saints Anglican School

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CONTENTS All Saints’ School Council

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About the men and women who lead us with heart

The FIDO transformation

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Inside our school’s new learning management system

Keeping it Strictly Ballroom

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Yet another sensational musical in review

Enquiries We always love hearing from members of the All Saints community. For updates and editorial enquiries please contact us on the details below. All Saints Anglican School - Office of Marketing and Public Relations Highfield Drive Merrimac 4226 Ph: +61 7 5587 0309 Email: saints@asas.qld.edu.au

Production Editors Maria Egan, Head of Marketing & Public Relations Camilla Jansen, Managing Editor Business News Australia

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Discovering the heart of Africa

Journalists Paris Faint David Simmons Matt Ogg

A life-changing journey for our rugby boys

Design Paris Faint Photographers David Perry Luke Marsden Tim Marsden Ant Satori

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The lifelong impact of learning a second language

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Holly Voges’ scientific success

‘Good boy’ Charlie on the job

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Oliver Kidd’s journey from startups to the ASX

Nina Fan’s prodigious music career takes off

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A look at Messy Church and family services at All Saints

All Saints Anglican School

Publisher Business News Australia PO Box 1487 Mudgeeraba QLD


From the Headmaster

BEYOND LIMITATIONS Welcome to another bumper edition of The Saints magazine, which I hope you will agree has something for everyone. There is much to be celebrated as this first semester of 2019 draws to a close. I was particularly pleased to read about the inaugural Year 7 Orientation Camp and the Year 9 Service Learning Camp, both of which, in my view, contribute in significant ways to the healthy development of our young men and women in those crucial adolescent years. It is particularly important that we encourage our children in the middle years to be individuals. As everything begins to change, both physiologically and emotionally, young teenagers tend to seek comfort from their ability to blend into those customs and styles that are deemed acceptable by their peers. As parents and teachers, we need to help our children to challenge the assumptions that underpin such conformist practices in favour of just being themselves. From a school’s perspective, the best way of doing this is by providing opportunities for our students to try things that take them out of their comfort zone. Getting boys to read, and cook, and play music and draw, and dance and sing, and laugh recklessly, to care for others and themselves and valuing them for such pursuits, will assist their growth into healthy adults. Encouraging our girls to embrace technological opportunities, to delight in scientific and mathematical enquiry, to expect and exploit the challenges of leadership, to feel comfortable in their bodies, to work backstage in the theatre,

to also laugh recklessly and care for others and themselves, and valuing them for these things will inspire them to become the women of the future that our world so desperately needs. The curriculum and co-curriculum in the Middle School at All Saints is designed to challenge students to take risks in a safe and secure environment, and thereby to discover aspects about their own characters and personalities that might help them to discover their own uniqueness. Another equally important part of encouraging children in the middle years to forge their own path in life, obvious as it may sound, is to actually treat them as individuals. As parents we must try to celebrate their quirkiness and their difference. As a school, we must try to find teachers who are prepared to look out at a sea of faces confronting them on day one and be determined to develop relationships that will reveal the particular learning needs of each individual. Here again, I feel we are unbelievably blessed at All Saints. In order to fit in to the culture that operates here, as teachers we simply have to love children. We have to be able to see beyond the limitations and focus rather on the possibilities. The true secret to our success, however, lies in our ability to work together as parents, grandparents, friends and teachers; to pool our resources, in the certain knowledge that together will always be better than apart.

There is a short poem on this subject, a little ‘Christmas-cardy’ in its simplicity, but worthy nonetheless. It goes like this: I dreamed I stood in a studio And watched two sculptors there. The clay they used was a young child’s mind And they fashioned it with care. One was a teacher, the tools he used Were books and music and art; One was a parent with a guiding hand And a gentle, loving heart. Day after day the teacher toiled With touch that was deft and sure, While the parent laboured by his side And polished and smoothed it o’er. When at last their task was done, They were proud of what they wrought, For the things they had moulded into the child Could neither be sold nor bought. And each agreed they would have failed If they had worked alone, For behind the parent stood the school, And behind the teacher, the home. To all our parents I thank you for your gentle, loving hearts. To the staff for whom I hold such a profound respect, I thank you for continuing to bring the books and the music and the art and everything else that you can muster to lead your students to that oasis where true learning and discovery takes place. Together we will forge a generation of whom we can all feel proud.

Patrick Wallas All Saints Anglican School

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GETTING DOWN TO

BUSINESS

A group of Year 12s has proved that the skill of an entrepreneur isn’t limited by age. At Launch Pad 2019, five business students presented their ideas in a Shark Tank style pitch-off before a panel of judges and an audience of local business leaders, family and friends. Zac Bell revealed the concept for an over-50s health and wellness centre, while Louise Horthy Banks pitched a mobile platform where bakers can easily sell their goods from the comfort of home. Tayla Forbes created the idea for a hi-tech ski boot liner designed to keep feet warm in the snow while Erin Hegarty unveiled a technologically advanced sleep mask as a healthier alternative to waking up than the traditional alarm clock. However, it was Skagen Fielding who stole the show with Wave Watcher, a bracelet for surfers which is an all-in-one shark-repellent, GPS tracker and surfing statistics collector. Skagen’s idea won over the judges and secured the coveted ‘Audience Favourite’ award on the night. He was commended for creating a carefully detailed business plan for a highly attractive product that could easily be taken straight to market.

L-R: Skagen Fielding, Louise Horthy Banks, Erin Hegarty, Zac Bell, Tayla Forbes

The best part about Launch Pad is providing students the opportunity to go out of their comfort zone... - Danielle Edwards

Hayden McEvoy

Launch Pad organiser and Senior Business Teacher Danielle Edwards said the event helps students succeed in overcoming a unique and perhaps slightly daunting real-world scenario. “The best part about Launch Pad is providing students the opportunity to go out of their comfort zone and bring together what they have learned both theoretically in class and realistically from their business mentors,” said Ms Edwards. “We like to provide our students with unique opportunities to equip them for life after school.” At Launch Pad, attendees heard from esteemed guest speaker Hayden McEvoy who is the entrepreneur behind national tutoring company A-Team Tuition. Mr McEvoy was open about grappling with ADHD and how he managed to harness his ‘learning disability’ into one of his greatest business strengths. A-Team Tuition is now one of the most sought-after tutoring companies in Australia. In addition to being guest speaker on the night, Mr McEvoy sat on the judging panel alongside esteemed entertainment entrepreneur Jonathan Shorter and national business journalist Paris Faint. Although 2019 marks the last official Launch Pad event before the senior school curriculum changes, Ms Edwards is excited to see how business nights will evolve at All Saints in the future. “Entrepreneurship is a significant concept in education and in life at the moment, and the importance of having entrepreneurial skills is constantly stressed,” she said. “Having some kind of evening or event that celebrates those skills will remain important for the future.”

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School News

YEAR 7 TAKES A WALK FOR WATER Children these days can be constantly saturated with challenging images and footage showing the daily struggle faced by those who are less fortunate. Aid organisations, the media and volunteers often share difficult stories of people living in third world hardship, hoping it will inspire people to support their causes. But sometimes when overshared, the impact of this content is softened. That’s why Middle School teacher Karen Couch was determined to bring a unit of relatable learning into the classroom for Year 7 students, so the plight of children living in Kenya would not only be recognised but experienced firsthand. As part of World Vision’s Walk for Water initiative, Year 7 students essentially lived out a regular day that a child of the same age in Kenya would experience. Each student was given two three-litre milk bottles and had to walk three and a half

kilometres to the school’s wetlands area to collect water. They then walked their six litres of water back to the school, where they had to make the water last for the rest of the day.

students. I saw that so many kids had that lightbulb moment where they were saying, ‘is this really what they drink, I can’t believe this is what they have, it’s not fair, I can’t believe that goes into their bodies’.”

Not only did they have to carry the water back, but each student was then required to purify the water for drinking.

“That was a real eye-opener for them, seeing the amount of bacteria, animal faeces and organic matter that is actually in untreated water.”

Ms Couch visited Kenya last year where she saw firsthand what the children at Mbetwani Primary School need to do every day in order to survive. She says the activities were designed to be as close to the Kenyan experience as possible and were very eye opening to the Year 7 cohort. “We looked at the little critters that were inside the water under the microscope and tested the oxygen levels and salinity levels,” says Ms Couch. “They had to design a filter they felt would best remove the solid particles from the water. That was probably the most effective station because it was so real for the

The Walk for Water day also doubled as a fundraiser, where students ended up raising just over $7,000 for a new water tank at Mbetwani, far overshooting the initial goal of $1,700 which is the price of a single tank. Ms Couch is hoping that the extra funds raised will go towards putting a water pump in Mbetwani so that the kids there will never have to walk for water again. “Service learning is such an important part of education because it makes all the learning we do in classrooms real,” says Ms Couch. “It’s all about being aware of what goes on in the world outside of students’ daily lives.” All Saints Anglican School

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YEAR 7: RECIPE FOR A TIGHT-KNIT COHORT

Earlier this year students and staff travelled to the beautiful Lake Ainsworth in Northern New South Wales for the inaugural Year 7 Orientation Camp. Year 7 Coordinator Andrew Watkins says the purpose behind the shift was creating a closer-to-home experience where new students and existing students could interact and bond in a more effective way. “We have this situation each year where 100 kids move up from the Junior School and around 75 kids join All Saints for the first time, so there are already pre-existing friendship cliques which new students need to navigate,” says Mr Watkins. “Starting at a new school is always tough and trying to break into new friendship groups is even tougher. “The Year 7 Orientation Camp gives students time to bond and to really make those new connections in a positive, structured and fun environment, rather than just relying on them to find their way in the playground at lunchtime.”

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The three-day camp involved several team building activities, bonding exercises and challenges against the backdrop of Lennox Head’s beautiful coastal dunes, freshwater lake and bushland. Mr Watkins says running the camp earlier in the year has had a tremendous impact on how quickly students have made new friends and become involved with the All Saints community. “With this new format, we have seen how quickly and positively those relationships between new and existing students have been built this year,” he says. “Parents have been talking to us about how great it has been to see their kids make new and different friendships this year, particularly noting how quickly that’s happened.” Feedback from students, staff and parents on the camp’s new format has been overwhelmingly positive. It’s safe to say the Year 7 Orientation Camp is the new mainstay for getting Middle School life off to the best possible start.

The Year 7 Orientation Camp gives students time to bond and to really make those new connections. - Andrew Watkins


CAMPS OUT

Feature

YEAR 9 SHOWS HUMANITY By David Terblanche, Year 9 Coordinator In Zulu, the term ‘ubuntu’ means ‘humanity’. It is often also translated as ‘humanity towards others’, but is more often used in a philosophical sense to mean ‘the belief in a universal bond of sharing that connects all humanity’ or ‘I am a human through others’. During their transition to adulthood, young adults sometimes have a tendency to become more introspective. This is why a camp focused on servant leadership and service learning is well placed in Year 9. Earlier this year, students travelled to Alexandra Park Conference Centre on the Sunshine Coast where they took part in many sessions on day one with good grace. The cohort quickly realised the camp was not focused on personal physical challenges, but rather on shifting their perspectives towards outward thinking. The activities were designed to show Year 9s the importance and value of helping those around them, whether at school, at home or in the wider community. During the camp, activities included a beach cleanup and a visit to the elderly in several aged care facilities. After visiting the residents in aged care, students wrote letters to the people they had spent time with. In many instances, the cohort was challenged to view leadership as being about more than just themselves and the badge. They were encouraged to see that leadership is about serving their community. The camp was also a great opportunity for students to unwind between official activities and balance the serious with the fun. They enjoyed sessions in the pool to cool off, table tennis matches in the games room and a ‘White Dinner’ and dance event on the final night of camp. That event highlighted what a talented group of ‘Just Dancers’ we have in Year 9. I look forward to seeing how the seeds of leadership sown on camp will germinate into worthwhile initiatives throughout the year. Several Year 9 students have already suggested worthwhile community initiatives or have continued their excellent work in causes close to their hearts. All Saints Anglican School

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Leading with

HEART By Patrick Wallas, Headmaster

All independent schools operate under the auspices of a governing body of some kind. Here at All Saints this group is known as the School Council. It comprises men and women who care about and value education and who, because of this, are prepared to give up their time to support our various endeavours and to provide strategic governance designed to enhance, improve and ‘future proof’ our school. Embedded within School Council are various specialist committees designed to oversee particular areas of our operations. Mr Scott McMurtrie (past parent) chairs our Finance Committee; Ms Lesley Englert (past parent and current grandparent) chairs our Education Committee; Mr Timothy Elliott (past student and current parent) chairs our Governance and Risk Management Committee; and Mr Graham Buntine (past parent) chairs our Building and Grounds Committee. These various committees tend to meet a week or so before our School Council meetings which occur six times a year. As I am sure you all know, our Chair of

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School Council is Mr John Fradgley (past parent and current grandparent) for whose support over the last 18 years I have been profoundly grateful. John and I meet each Wednesday morning when we attend a chapel group for staff, parents and students followed by a meeting in my office where we discuss whatever issues are on our minds. John is without doubt one of the most decent men I have met in my life. His only agenda is to serve the school and to support the staff and members of School Council in any and every way he can. This sense of selfless service permeates through to all members of School Council and I consider myself profoundly blessed to operate under the benevolent influence of a dedicated group of talented individuals where there are no personal agendas, no factions, no conflicts of interest but rather an urgent interest in the ongoing welfare of our school community. During my 18 years as Headmaster, I have learned through my many relationships with colleagues in similar positions, that this is not always the case. The relationship between the Headmaster and the Chair of School Council is of

primary importance to a school’s success; when it breaks down, disaster always ensues. Similarly, when boards seek to extend their influence into operational areas of a school’s activities, wanting to make decisions better left to the school itself, then a breakdown of trust can occur which is often debilitating. The School Council of All Saints Anglican School never seeks to involve itself in operational matters, preferring to trust the leadership team and the staff of the school. I am one of the few Headmasters I know who genuinely looks forward to School Council meetings where robust discussion occurs which centres entirely on the governance and future directions of a school which each individual around the table longs to see thrive and flourish. All Saints also enjoys a close and fruitful relationship with the Anglican church (the Right Reverend John Roundhill, Bishop of the Southern Region, is a most valued member of our School Council). There are 24 Anglican schools in Queensland, most of which are owned by the church. All Saints, however, is an


Feature

From our Chairman By John Fradgley, Chairman of School Council It is often said that life, like God, moves in mysterious ways. Nothing could be more certain in the case of my involvement with All Saints Anglican School. Having lived in Mudgeeraba since our marriage in 1978, Tina and I were attending the Anglican church in Mudgeeraba Village when a new priest came into our midst. This was in the presence of Leonard Hilton Nairn who had recently moved from Canberra and who, as he said, was to be the foundation Headmaster of a new Anglican school to be built on a “yet to be purchased” parcel of land on the east side of the highway. Our eldest child at that stage was still many years from entering school and Tina and I had decided that Josh would attend Somerset College which had been founded by my then business partner A.J.D. (Lex) Bell. The charismatic personality of Len Nairn quickly changed those plans and it was surprising when we later spoke to our close friends, Michael and Ann Baumann, who told us about seeing this young Anglican priest “spruiking” on a soap box in Mudgeeraba Square and that they had also decided to enrol their children at this school to be built “somewhere over there”.

independent or ‘separately incorporated’ school. Whilst we have always enjoyed and appreciated our relationship with the Brisbane diocese, whose support has been a great blessing over the years, our independent ownership has allowed us a certain latitude in terms of our planning and governance. It is my sincere belief that the School Council has played a hugely significant role in the successful development of All Saints Anglican School. As a body it has never been afraid to lead with its heart as well as its head. It has allowed bold, unique developments to occur (the Wetlands and Wonder come to mind). It is ever mindful of the children in our community whom we serve and it has allowed a sense of mutual trust to underpin the various decisions it is called upon to make. It operates from the premise that however well we might think we are doing as a school, we can always get better and it takes very seriously our vision of being ‘a world class Christian school where everyone joyfully reaches their potential.’

It is my sincere belief that the School Council has played a hugely significant role in the successful development of All Saints. - Patrick Wallas

As the plans for the school slowly materialised, I found myself in late 1986, early 1987 attending working bees on a Saturday morning as All Saints readied itself for the first intake of students in 1987; this all in spite of the fact that our eldest child would not start at All Saints until 1989. In 1989 I was invited to join the School Council of All Saints and must say without question it has been one of the most rewarding experiences I have been involved in during my life. In 2001, I was shocked when School Chairman Ron Burling announced his intention to retire from the role of Chairman and advised me that the School Council wished me to take up that role; one I felt totally unprepared for. The School Council is charged with the responsibility of governing All Saints as well as setting the strategic direction for the school. It has never been, nor will it ever be, the function of the School Council to be involved in the day-to-day management of the school and each member of School Council clearly understands the differentiation between governance and operational matters. This has been one of the hallmarks of the success of the School Council over so many years. It was sad to see the retirement of Mr Geoff Burchill last year, as Geoff was the last remaining member of the foundation Council. However the only thing constant in life is change and the Council has been fortunate to welcome many amazing and talented people to its ranks over the years since its formation. In its 30 plus years, I can only recall one or two occasions when the vote of Council on any decision was not unanimous and on those occasions there was simply one abstention. This bears testimony to the cohesiveness and common purpose of the Council to ensure the delivery of an educational experience for each student which will provide a solid foundation for their future. All Saints Anglican School

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Transforming learning with

FIDO Clear, open and honest communication between all sections of our school community has always been our aspiration at All Saints. Engaging our parents and their children in a way that makes learning fun and accessible is a matter of the utmost importance to us. With this in mind, we are introducing a new teaching and learning platform which is already transforming the way that students are interacting with their learning. FIDO, which stands for Finding Information Directly Online, is the All Saints name for the new learning management system Schoolbox which amalgamates several technology processes used by the school. FIDO is intended to be a one stop shop where students, teachers and parents can access all information related to school. Amanda Worlley, Head of ICT (Pedagogy), answers a few of the biggest questions about FIDO and its impact on school life.

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What is FIDO? FIDO is an all-in-one learning management system (LMS), community portal and engagement platform. Students can log in and find updates from teachers about assignments, classes and extra-curricular activities. The messaging and noticeboard capabilities massively streamline and improve on older systems, enabling teachers to filter their audience by classes, groups and clubs. FIDO offers a toolbox of features – like blogs, forums, collaborative documents and chat – that facilitate collaboration and creativity where students are working together on projects. For our senior students, the familiarity of using an LMS will assist their transition to higher education institutions who all operate with these types of systems.

FIDO will simply serve as one of our many tools for teaching and learning: a way to streamline the distribution of information. - Amanda Worlley


Feature

How will FIDO improve student life? In line with our ethos, the whole child the whole time, FIDO will support the learning of the whole student. There are numerous tools integrated to improve workflow, encourage academic growth, manage extra-curricular involvement and promote student wellbeing.

Khyja makes her

MAYORAL MARK

These include a personalised calendar and noticeboard, and an assessment submission portal which enables timely and effective teacher feedback. A wellbeing area is also being developed within FIDO which is centred around cyber safety and digital wellbeing, as well as student wellbeing outside of the digital world. Rest assured, the school remains adamant that technology will never be allowed to dominate the classroom in a way that might inhibit the development of meaningful, mutually beneficial relationships between students and their teachers, relationships that we believe provide the foundation from which all learning flows. FIDO will simply serve as one of our many tools for teaching and learning: a way to streamline the distribution of information, increase collaboration and improve workflows. It will never replace face-toface teaching at All Saints.

Can parents use FIDO? Absolutely. One of the most exciting features about FIDO will be the ability for staff, students and parents to communicate all in one place. The platform will give parents access to personalised and relevant information relating to their children including calendars, notices and assessment schedules. It will also allow parents to keep in touch with what is happening across the whole school. The rollout for parent access to FIDO will begin in Semester 2 this year. We will launch with a series of informative resources to help parents navigate the new platform including how-to guides, weekly tips in Saints Alive, live workshops and a dedicated FIDO enquiries email. We hope this will encourage the involvement and partnership of parents in their child’s learning journey.

Where will parents access FIDO? Parents will be able to access FIDO anywhere, anytime from desktop and laptop computers, or handheld, wireless and mobile devices. The platform will also be integrated into the All Saints app. It will of course take a while for us to learn how to navigate this innovative system, but a huge amount of time, consideration and research has gone into choosing this platform and we are confident that it will eventually have a transformative and entirely positive impact on the accessibility of information and the learning journeys of our students.

Mayor Tom Tate with Junior Mayor Khyja Miller

Khyja Miller (Year 11) has stepped up into the role of Junior Mayor, leading the Gold Coast Youth Council as it tackles some of the most pressing problems faced by the city’s young people. The role is a two-year appointment packed with a serious amount of responsibility and Khyja already has big plans for her tenure. As Junior Mayor, Khyja regularly meets with students from other schools on the Gold Coast to work on projects that benefit the entire community. The Youth Council has so far been involved in initiatives like planting gum trees for koalas to live in, hosting and volunteering at concerts for young people on the Gold Coast and helping out at community events in Mudgeeraba. Khyja says while community support is a top priority, she is also interested in getting more students excited and engaged with politics at every level. “I heard on the radio the other day that some kids don’t even know what a library is, which is strange to me,” says Khyja. “I want to focus on things like helping students learn about

politicians and politics, because it can sometimes be very confusing to wrap your head around. “I think it is important that young people learn about these things, because knowing what rights you have and who you are voting for and making an educated decision is very powerful. “We as a public and a population do have a lot of power with who we vote for, and if we are making decisions that aren’t educated then that’s dangerous.” Khyja is a born public speaker and is often involved with initiatives that take her out into the community, beyond the boundaries of a more insular schooling experience. Senior Teacher Christine Miro says that this is part of what makes Khyja a perfect candidate to represent All Saints with pride as Junior Mayor. “It is a credit to Khyja individually because she has a lot of initiative and she is very interested in contributing in the wider community,” says Christine. “Khyja is a very proactive person. She is what I would call a real optimist. “She has a strong work ethic and she brings a lot of enthusiasm and positivity to her role, and I think that’s what inspires people.”

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Some things may change...

The

SAINTS

Semester 2, 2018

It might be hard to believe when looking at the school, but All Saints was once a few humble buildings and eight classrooms upon a tract of farmland. The Nairn Theatre, Burling Centre for Scientific Inquiry, Holloway Music Centre, the Chapel; all pipedreams to the school which was once a secondary home to cows and sheep. But oh, how times have changed. All Saints has transformed into arguably one of the most beautiful and practical campuses on the Gold Coast. To the current Year 1 students who are just beginning their own All Saints journeys, the concept of ‘change’ made for one of this year’s most engaging study units when teachers used the school as a prime example. Year 1 teachers Joy Wikaire, Nicky Buckley and Pip Dafforn-Smith were excited to deliver the unit with the help of Chief of Staff Sue Daly, who has worked at the school since its inception. “For our children today, change is accelerating so quickly, and I think that the concept of change is

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very important to teach at a young age so they can understand where things have come from,” says Mrs Wikaire. “Change is generally a very difficult thing for students to understand, because time is still an abstract concept. By investigating change through various learning areas and contexts, this unit has really helped with that understanding.” As part of the unit, Mrs Daly took the children through a photographic journey of All Saints. Formal hats, which were part of the original uniform, reappeared courtesy of some first-generation families. Mrs Buckley said it was amazing to see how engaged the students were in learning about the history of their school. “It’s very rare to see 75 six-year-olds all engaged, but with this unit there was not one student who was not absolutely mesmerised by Mrs Daly’s talk,” she said. “Not only did they get to see all the old photos, but they got to take pictures with the old school hats on and we also walked up and saw the foundation stone, the first stone at All Saints. It was just such a beautiful thing to see.”

The concept of change is very important to teach at a young age. - Joy Wikaire


Sue Daly with Year 1 students

By Lola

By Sandy

Mrs Daly and the Year 1 staff all agree that engaging with this thematic unit was a testament to how much the children love All Saints and how connected the school community really is. Mrs Dafforn-Smith said it also highlighted how strong the retention is at the school, for both students and staff. “All Saints is a thriving, supportive community; a second home for most of the students and staff,” she said. “We are still in touch with our early history through teachers and families who have been here since the very beginning.

“It is lucky to have those people here so that they can pass on their knowledge about culture and history to the children. They get so much out of it.” The adage goes, ‘some things change, and some things stay the same.’ While the buildings have certainly changed at All Saints, the inclusive and connected culture has always remained the same. Mrs Daly believes that even though the school is a relatively young place, the school’s rich culture and heart are second to none.

“The relationships which this school is built upon are stronger than any building,” she said. “It’s a lovely sense of connectedness. There is a community feel among the students and staff, it’s a beautiful place to teach and learn.” “It comes out every year at those same community events; the tunnel of love, the foundation students’ dinner. There’s always a fondness in remembering.” Due to its success, it’s safe to say the Year 1 unit on change is now the school’s newest institution.

...but others stay the same All Saints Anglican School

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NOW WE’RE

TALKING “Many studies show that thinking in a foreign language helps reduce biases in your decision-making.” - Hiro Suita

Jesse Adler

Learning another language is as much food for the soul as it is for the mind. It increases employability, improves cognitive and analytical abilities and most importantly it helps the learner become a true citizen of the world. All Saints is home to a dedicated team of language teachers who are not only fluent speakers themselves, but they truly love the cultures and places behind the languages they teach. They know first-hand how learning a second language can help a person flourish in just about any career, as they have personally taught several multilingual All Saints alumni

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who have gone on to excel overseas. Senior Teacher and French Coordinator Jerome Richalot says being multilingual gives All Saints graduates a leg-up in an increasingly globalised world. “Whether you are a high-flying executive in an international corporation or a local plumber, you are always going to deal with people from different countries and different cultures,” says Mr Richalot.

one’s respect for others and helps develop cultural sensitivity. “Not only can students communicate with others in their own language, but they can understand the cultural differences inherent in dealing with people from different countries,” says Mrs Spinella. Senior Teacher and Chinese Coordinator Marian Wilkes certainly agrees language studies help build better careers.

“Learning a language teaches you to be a problem solver and gives you the ability to look at the world with a different perspective.”

“Being able to communicate in a foreign language, particularly a language such as Mandarin Chinese, sets you apart in the job market,” says Ms Wilkes.

Middle School French teacher Mary Spinella believes learning languages increases

“For businesses, it is essential to develop a strong footing in the world economy. This


“People tend to rely on the use of Google translators... Computer translators don’t have the human linguistic brain!”

Community

- Cindy Yeh

“All Saints language teachers are not only fluent and native speakers, they have spent years living in the target country.” - Jo Ridgers

Georgia Dwyer

is more achievable if they understand the language and the culture of their foreign clients.” There’s no shortage of All Saints graduates who have made the most out of their multilingual abilities. Jesse Adler (Class of 2012), who studied Chinese under Ms Wilkes and Mrs Yeh, now works for Apple Inc. in California but spends a few months each year in China as part of the iPhone Operations team. His job is to oversee the ‘new product introduction’ stage of manufacturing iPhones before the new design is ultimately revealed to the world. Over in France, the talented Georgia Dwyer

(Class of 2017) is studying ballet full time at the Paris Marais Dance School. She is joined by alumna Georgina Dornan (Class of 1996) who works as a lawyer in the banking industry, splitting her time between London and Paris. Both ladies studied French at All Saints; Georgia from Mr Richalot, and Georgina from Mrs Spinella and Barry Hills. Stuart Sharry (Class of 2007) and Chris Yamanoi (Class of 2010) are another two alumni who have put their bilingual skills to good use in securing exciting positions in Japan. Stuart completed his Master of Medical Research in Neurochemistry at Tokyo University in 2015 and now works

as a Medical Editor at Forte Science Communications, Japan’s leading science communications company. After completing a six-year stint as an Electronics Technician Nuclear for the US Navy, Chris currently works as a customer support engineer in ASML’s Nagano office. Both completed Japanese at All Saints, learning from Scott Leisemann and Hirochiyo Suita respectively. It’s safe to say such amazing career opportunities for each of these alumni wouldn’t have been possible without knowing more than one language. Enrolling in a class could very well be the first step towards a life abroad that most people only dream of.

All Saints Anglican School

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Semester 2, 2018

GOOD BOY ON THE JOB Kylie Donnolley and Charlie

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Feature

Unconditional love, devotion and compassion.

“We want Charlie to simply spread joy and happiness throughout the school, and we also want to use him to enhance the school’s Wellbeing Curriculum.”

These are all traits exemplified by the All Saints community, but arguably no one upholds them better than the school’s newest furry addition, Charlie.

The first official classroom Charlie will visit for the purpose of a Wellbeing lesson is 2L.

Charlie is a nine-month-old Lhasa Apso / Toy Poodle cross and alongside his owner and trainer, School Counsellor, Kylie Donnolley, his job is to bring happiness and joy to All Saints while learning to be a certified therapy dog. So far, he is doing that job extremely well. “Charlie is really helping with that sense of belonging and connection with kids, and certainly also helping quite a few with emotion regulation,” says Mrs Donnolley. “When kids are feeling quite heightened in terms of anxiety, when they are upset or feeling overwhelmed, it’s incredible to see how quickly they calm down when they start petting Charlie,” says Mrs Donnolley. While he is still in his learning phase, Mrs Donnolley says Charlie is settling into the school environment and mastering his training very well. In a few months Mrs Donnolley will be taking Charlie to Brisbane where the pair will undertake a clinical course to become a certified Animal-Assisted Therapy team. “It’s a learning experience for both of us, but the goal is that he will assist in therapy which means when kids come to us, we can use him to reach our therapeutic goals in different ways,” says Mrs Donnolley. “Animals can provide a sense of calm, comfort, or safety while shifting their attention away from stressful situations and toward experiences that provide more positive feelings. “Developing a bond with an animal such as Charlie can help kids to develop a better sense of their own worth and trust, stabilise their emotions, and improve communication and socialisation skills.

Mrs Donnolley plans to talk about how Charlie makes friends and how he can show that he is a kind friend to others. Then she will encourage the kids to apply those same principles to their own friendships with humans. Mrs Donnolley also uses Charlie to highlight that making mistakes is a part of learning. Charlie often makes mistakes and that is OK because he learns from those mistakes. In this way Charlie helps to reinforce growth mindset principles in a very relatable way for kids. “After we do that lesson, the kids will go and write a letter to Charlie where they will give examples of how they have been a good friend to someone or how someone has been a good friend to them. They can talk about difficulties and ask for help or advice as well. They are also invited to share their feelings,” she says. “I have also organised a group of Year 12 students to help Charlie to respond to these letters through the mentoring program. The older students are very excited to help to support the younger students in our community.” Unsurprisingly, Charlie is already a rock star on campus.

Developing a bond with an animal such as Charlie can help kids to develop a better sense of their own worth and trust... - Kylie Donnolley

“Everybody says hello to him in the morning, everybody knows his name,” says Mrs Donnolley. “The kids come up and pat him in the mornings which is so nice because you can just see people sparking up and having that sense of happiness right before they head off to class. It’s a brilliant way for them to start the day.” The school’s resident ‘good boy’ may have his work cut out for him, bringing joy to so many students, but he is certainly rising to that challenge.

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Keeping it

In anticipation of opening night the directors of Strictly Ballroom, Chantelle Flint and Chris Cherry, promised All Saints would see a musical like “nothing they’d ever seen before”.

had never tried before. It added a whole new dynamic element to the show.”

On that score, the team overachieved. Strictly Ballroom was a singing and dancing extravaganza that brought a brilliant Baz Luhrmann tribute to the Nairn Theatre’s main stage.

Guitarist Ben Thomas rose to the spotlight with a stunning flamenco solo as the rest of the cast performed the unforgettable ‘Paso Doble’ scene.

The cast performed seven sold-out shows and the directing duo are proud of how the iconic growth story of a maverick Aussie ballroom dancer and his amateur partner was brought to life. “That was where we started the planning, by asking the question ‘how do we make Strictly Ballroom Baz Luhrmann-esque.’ We needed to make it pop and find those non-realistic conventions,” said Mr Cherry. “With shows we’ve done in the past like Oliver, Singing in the Rain or Grease, there is so much out there to borrow from, to have a look at and become inspired by. For Strictly Ballroom, the only point of reference is the film.” The lack of precedent became a blessing for the show’s creative team who had free rein to create a zany, interesting and undeniably Australian set. Jatz, Milo, Weetbix and Fosters iconography peppered the highly stylised set comprised of moving stage pieces and a ‘rooftop’ rise where the orchestra played. “A real highlight of this show was the set which was made by Matt Dean and co-designed by Chris Cherry. It became its own dancing feature of the show,” said Mrs Flint. “Having the band on stage rather than in the orchestra pit was also something fantastic that we

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Thomas McCluskey and Briana Dorrough delivered stellar performances as show leads Scott Hastings and Fran, supported by a talented cast including Leah Humbert as Shirley Hastings and Rishi Bliss as Doug.

Mr Cherry and Mrs Flint commended the entire cast on delivering such a demanding musical with precision. “The biggest highlight from the show was the talent we had, everybody who sung was a high-calibre performer,” said Mr Cherry. “The band also did a brilliant job. They handled the difficult and professional score masterfully.” Mrs Flint added that the depth of talent was astounding, and she was especially proud to see the young men of All Saints rising to the occasion. “This was the show where we have had the most boys ever participate. Seeing those boys up there creates a legacy of encouragement within the community,” she said. “Younger boys will look up to those performers and be inspired to take part in the future. Over time, that culture has definitely developed at All Saints.” The show was choreographed by Michelle HopperDoyle and Elaina Mullins was the stage manager to a gifted crew of student theatre technicians. Planning has already started for the next musical which will take place in 2021. Mr Cherry and Mrs Flint look forward to All Saints once again raising the bar on performing arts.


Community

Ben Thomas Leah Humbert and Rishi Bliss

Thomas McCluskey and Briana Dorrough

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THIS SEMESTER IN THE ARTS

Leah Humbert wins Theatrefest

By Scott Mason, Director of Performing Arts

Senior School TheatreFest Presenting a memorised speech for eight minutes is difficult for anyone, let alone including drama, poetry, dance, mime and song as part of a themed presentation. There were 17 Senior School students who participated in this years’ event. The talent of the students left us all in awe.

Nigel Bardsley and Gaynor Morgan at the Performing Arts Staff Concert

The placings were: • 1st – Leah Humbert (Year 11) • 2nd – Elodie Westhoff (Year 10) • 3rd – Daniel Hutton (Year 12)

Walking the Talk As I often say to prospective parents on school tours, we are very fortunate to have Performing Arts teachers who perform professionally as well as being passionate and inspiring teachers. One opportunity for parents and students to hear this is at the annual Performing Arts Staff Concert which is held in Term 1 each year.

Twilight Concerts The school bands, string orchestras and choral groups performed at the Twilight Concerts which were held in Term 1 and 2. Rehearsals are important, but students really develop their skills by performing in public.

The Malcom Wind Ensemble conducted by Bob Evans at the Twilight Concert

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Performing Arts

Nina’s prodigious career

TAKES OFF

Music virtuoso Nina Fan (Class of 2018) recently became the inaugural recipient of the Emily Reinhardt scholarship to study at the Griffith Conservatorium of Music. The scholarship is the fruit of years of hard work that began when Nina first sat down in front of a piano at seven years of age. She’s been a guest performer at the Sydney International Piano Competition and has graced the stages of Carnegie Hall in New York. But now Nina is excited to take her first steps as a career musician outside of school. “I entered All Saints when I was in Year 7 with a music scholarship and by that time, I had already made the decision I wanted to continue my musical career,” Nina says. “Transitioning from high school to university is completely different because at the Conservatorium I am surrounded fully by music. It’s a little bit different to what I expected, but I am very happy learning there.” Nina’s first piano lessons came from Judy Sun and at the age of 13 she was chosen to take part in Griffith’s Young Conservatorium Rising Stars Pianist Program and the Senior Piano Program. She blitzed the competition at various Eisteddfods and was repeatedly named ‘Most Outstanding Pianist of the Year’. She has also succeeded in several competitions including the Australian Concerto

Competition and the Queensland Piano Competition. In 2018, Nina won the national Young Virtuoso Award as chosen by 4MBS Classic FM. Nina’s scholarship to the Conservatorium is named for the late Emily Reinhardt, who was matron of the Austrian family whose home provided the backdrop for iconic film The Sound of Music. Emily and her husband Peter migrated to the Gold Coast in 1950 and after the Berlin Wall fell, the German government compensated the Reinhardt family as they did for many other families of Jewish descent. The Reinhardts dedicated this bequest to supporting young musicians, thus the scholarship was born. Sometimes practising as much as eight hours a day, Nina hopes to do the Reinhardt legacy proud under the tutelage of renowned pianist Natasha Vlassenko. “I have read a bit about the Reinhardt family... When they moved to the Gold Coast, I found that being in the same area as them was very connecting and nice to know,” she said. Nina is looking forward to chasing her dream of becoming a renowned musician on the international stage.

I want probably what every other musician wants to achieve, to be on the world stage... - Nina Fan

“When I listen to classical music, I fall in love with the melody it has,” says Nina. “I want probably what every other musician wants to achieve, to be on the world stage and performing around the world.” All Saints Anglican School

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Discovering the heart of

AFRICA “Travel makes one modest. You see what a tiny place you occupy in the world.” – French novelist Gustave Flaubert

With a sense of compassion, welfare and kindness in their hearts, the All Saints rugby team travelled to South Africa earlier this year. The intrepid group of students led by coach Sean Bale and staff Craig Pascoe, Steve Jones and Damian Boulton spent 15 days travelling and experiencing the country’s rich culture. The team represented All Saints in rugby matches against

four South African high schools and early in the trip, they were fortunate to see how even the smallest actions can make a world of difference to others. On day two, the team visited the Mohau Children’s Centre in Pretoria which is a specialised centre providing care and support to orphaned and abandoned children whose lives have been affected by HIV/AIDS. Most of the children at the Mohau Centre, aged between 18 months to 17 years of age, are HIV positive.

To be able to go and spend two weeks immersing yourself in a place like Africa with the social and cultural issues that exist out there is very humbling. - Sean Bale

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In the lead up to South Africa, the rugby boys led a fundraising initiative with the aim of improving the lives of those living in the Mohau Centre. While on the trip, they were able to see the results of their charitable actions firsthand. “In 2017 when we first visited the Centre, we identified that they needed significant improvements to their facilities including a new kitchen, fridges and ovens – and over the past 18 months we have been fundraising to replace a lot of their whitegoods,” says Mr Bale. “Thankfully we were able to do that. We worked with Robert Ketjen who is the grandfather of Year 11 student Calvin Marias. “Robert is living in South Africa and purchased the goods on our behalf; we were able to deliver them once we arrived.” The giving didn’t stop there. School Captain Cullin Cooper-Jones organised a ‘Backpack for Hope’ drive where throughout the year the school community donated essential supplies. The initiative was driven by Cullin alongside Ned Uhlmann, Rhys Lyndon, Oscar Sims and Nate Searle. “There were 52 orphans at the centre, and we reached out to the All Saints community to donate a backpack full of bare essentials such as school equipment, shoes and clothing to each of the kids,” says Mr Bale. “Then Cullin’s father Ryan Cooper-Jones, god bless him, had them freighted over at a significant personal cost and given to each of the orphans when we arrived there. It was such an emotive and kind thing for the family to organise.” After leaving the Mohau Centre the team toured Pretoria, Krugersdorp and Pilanesberg before making their way to Oudtshoorn for their first rugby match against Noordheuwel High School. The team played three further games against Wittedrift High School, Westerford High School and Bridgeton High School on the remainder of the trip, winning two from four. Mr Bale said the standout moment was the team’s reception at Bridgeton. “Our highlight game was against Bridgeton High School in a place called Oudsthoorn which is about four hours east of Cape Town,” he said. “It was a township school and I think they had about 3,000 spectators at the game. We were welcomed like we were the Wallabies. It was spectacular.” Mr Bale says the whole trip was an eyeopening experience and the team did an outstanding job at representing the school and Australia. “Australia is the lucky country and we truly are blessed to live here and come to a school like All Saints,” he says. “To be able to go and spend two weeks immersing yourself in a place like Africa with the social and cultural issues that exist out there is very humbling.” All Saints Anglican School

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SPORT IN REVIEW: A SEMESTER OF CHAMPIONS

A SEMESTER OF

CHAMPIONS Determination, talent, perseverance and team spirit. These qualities are shared by the athletes of All Saints and were on full display at the 2019 Inter-House and Associated Private Schools (APS) sporting championships. The first event of the year was Inter-House Swimming where over two sweltering February days, Fradgley House edged out the competition to win the overall prize.

“I suppose it was a bit disappointing to be beaten by Emmanuel, but it was extremely close and I would take the superb efforts of our students over the win any day of the week,” Mr Leslie said. “It’s so nice to see the students go off campus and represent the school by giving their absolute best.” Inter-House Cross Country was the second carnival of the year where Day ran to victory as the overall best house.

Michael Jin (Year 12) and Tom Hauck (Year 11) blitzed the pool, breaking a staggering nine school records between them.

Maria Suzuki (Year 12) and Connor McLaren-Kennedy (Year 12) won the Open Division Age Champion titles.

The event preceded APS swimming where All Saints narrowly missed out on winning best school, only 29 points behind champions Emmanuel College.

At the APS Cross Country competition, students battled against strong winds on the day but gave their all to secure second prize in the aggregate rankings. All Saints was once again pipped at the post by Emmanuel College, but strong competition certainly didn’t stop our students from seizing key victories at the meet.

Despite the slim loss, All Saints swimmers performed exceptionally well on the day. Emma Steele (Year 8), Brooke Napper (Year 12), Tom Hauck and Michael Jin won the title of Age Champion in their respective divisions, while the 17+ Boys swimmers took out the top prize for their age group. Director of Sport Fergus Leslie said it was amazing to see how well the students represented the school.

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The 14 Girls and 14 Boys divisions were named age group winners, along with six further divisions which won second place. Kristin Ramsay (Year 8) was named Age Champion in her division. Most recently, All Saints held the InterHouse Athletics carnival over two days in

the final week of May. Mr Leslie said the grounds staff had their work cut out for them when poor weather threatened the competition areas. “On the Monday there were a few showers, but the grounds staff were just outstanding,” he said. “They worked incredibly hard, using their blowers and ‘super-soakers’ to mop up the rain water off the 100m track and the long jump runways. “They were even on stand-by with tarpaulins, ready to cover the track for when the next shower arrived, but we managed to get through the day and on Tuesday it was beautiful conditions.” Following the heated competition, Burchill house emerged as overall victors. An incredible 13 school records were broken including three by Royce Ramsay (Year 10) across separate 16 Boys running events and two by Charlie Carroll (Year 11) in the 16 Boys Long Jump and 200m sprint. Not to be outdone was All Saints’ overall performance during Season One Sport, competing against other schools in sports including netball, rugby, football, volleyball, tennis and hockey over a number of weeks.


Sport

Age champion Brooke Napper

Community Results SEASON ONE SPORT Highlights: • • •

Grand finals contested – 36 of 57 Premierships won – 21 Premierships drawn – 2

APS SWIMMING Overall position: 2nd Division results: • •

Overall Girls – 2nd Overall Boys – 1st

Age champion placings: • • • • • •

Emma Steele – 1st (13 Girls) Bailey Wellam – 4th (15 Boys) Brooke Napper – 1st (16 Girls) Tom Hauck – 1st (16 Boys) Brooke Napper – 2nd (17+ Girls) Michael Jin – equal 1st (17+ Boys)

APS CROSS COUNTRY Overall position: 2nd Age champion placings: • • • • • •

Kristin Ramsay – 1st (14 Girls) Flynn Sweeney – 2nd (14 Boys) Royce Ramsay – 2nd (16 Boys) Daisy Fahey – 2nd (Open Girls) Bali Kohring – 3rd (13 Girls) Mia McConaghy – 3rd (15 Girls)

INTER-HOUSE SWIMMING Baildon Shield: Fradgley Silver: McIntosh Bronze: Hobart Sabotic Middle School Aggregate Trophy: McIntosh All Saints contested 36 of the possible 57 grand finals, winning a total of 21 premierships and drawing in two of the Open A fixtures.

Finally, Tom Hauck was selected to represent the country in swimming and will travel to Budapest later this year for the Junior World Championships.

Sensational results and a phenomenal effort by all teams.

Although All Saints has a proud history of fostering athletic champions, Mr Leslie believes the school’s sporting culture is about far more than simply being the best.

Outside of Inter-House and APS competition, there were a few student athletes who swept the field individually this semester. Liam Georgilopoulos (Year 10) recently became the national Under 17 pole vault champion at the National Championships in Adelaide. Also from Year 10, Sakura Sugiyama was selected to represent Queensland in golf. This marks the third time Sakura has represented Queensland in a different sport, the other two being swimming and cross country.

“Our athletes are dedicated to their sport, but I think it is more so that they are dedicated to the school and are so happy to compete on its behalf,” he said. “We have some incredibly talented and athletic students who do perform very well in several disciplines, but we have far more students who love to compete. “They don’t just do it because they are asked to, but because they want to do it for the school. That to me is just outstanding.”

Senior School Aggregate Trophy: Fradgley

INTER-HOUSE CROSS COUNTRY Champion House: Day Silver: McIntosh Bronze: Hobart Middle School Champions: McIntosh Senior School Champions: Day

INTER-HOUSE ATHLETICS Champion House: Burchill Silver: McIntosh Bronze: Fradgley Middle School Champions: Burchill Senior School Champions: Hobart All Saints Anglican School

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Mother's Day MORNING TEA

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Community

Welcome

NEW PARENTS

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KATE’S GRAND DESIGN

Most students opt for university after finishing high school, but not Kate Holland (Class of 2011). Forgoing a traditional degree, she left Australia to chase the Bohemian dream of living overseas. Her first stop was London. “During my time there I enrolled to study at Shillington, a design college that was originally founded in Australia,” says Kate. Shillington is considered one of the best schools for creatives and designers to develop their skills and graduate with a polished portfolio of work. After finishing her course at Shillington and relishing the London lifestyle, Kate moved back to Australia where she worked in South East Queensland for three years. Kate enjoyed working back on home soil but her thirst to travel the world became stronger than ever. That’s when she seized the opportunity of a lifetime. In 2018 Kate won the Shillington Design Safari, a paid work and travel opportunity offered by her alma mater in partnership with Melbourne-based design studio Seesaw. Kate now lives in Africa and works at The School of St Jude, a school in Tanzania which provides free, highquality education to 1800 of the brightest and poorest students in the region. Many of the students’ families live on less than $2 a day and the pressures of poverty make it difficult for these children to stay in school. By providing, food, boarding and transport along with all the other classroom essentials, St Jude’s ensures they have the opportunity to get an education ranked in the top 5 per cent in the country. A part of Kate’s job is to help visualise and tell the inspiring stories of its students. “Working at the school and interacting with the students has been amazing,” she says. “It’s so heart-warming to hear the students’ stories and see firsthand how St Jude’s is improving their lives.” Her daily work includes designing the school’s marketing materials and helping to create videos that feature student stories. St Jude’s recently launched its annual appeal where Kate’s role was to help come up with a creative concept and marketing collateral for the whole campaign. When she’s not at work, Kate loves to soak up the rich cultures of Africa and hopes to explore more of the continent on her holidays within the next year. “Outside of school, life is just so different to home,” she says. “You’ll get on a public bus with chickens at your feet, you’ll go out for coffee on the back of a piki piki (motorbike), you’ll be approached and greeted about 50 times in just 10 minutes because you’re a mzungu (white person/traveller). It’s very full on but I absolutely love it.” Kate will continue to live and work in Tanzania for at least the next year and a half.

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Alumni

STEMMING FROM THE HEART Holly Voges (Class of 2009) is living proof that women are crushing careers in STEM. Holly currently works at the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) and is part of a team establishing a brand-new facility for stem cell research. She has previously worked to discover new ways for the heart to regenerate following cardiac arrest, created functional 3D human heart tissue and been a nominee for the Queensland Women in Stem Award. But even the highest achieving professionals must begin their journey somewhere. An avid lover of science as a student at All Saints, Holly was set on finding a career which was ‘hands-on’ in the pursuit of knowledge. Her first step was completing a Bachelor of Biomedical Science with Honours at The University of Queensland. At the end of her undergraduate studies, she was offered a PhD position at UQ which focused on developing human bioengineered heart tissue using stem cells “To make bioengineered heart tissue, we start with a human stem cell population and

turn them into cardiac cells by mimicking signalling that occurs during development. From there we create 3D functional tissues which we use as a platform to study whatever particular question we have,” explains Holly. “My specific role was to look at other cell types that are normally in the heart and what role they play in injury, repair and response.” Holly says her team achieved a few small breakthroughs in their research and she is proud to have “added a small bit of knowledge into the pool”. After submitting her PhD, Holly moved to Melbourne to work at MCRI where she is establishing the Stem Cell Disease Modelling Facility. This is Holly’s first post-doctoral position, where her job is to help create a new facility for screening stem cell organoids for drug discovery. “The new facility is to allow for high throughput screening of every type of stem cell organoid that you can imagine. All of my previous work has been using cardiac organoids, but this will be expanding to kidney, brain, liver and more,” she says.

“The focus is on drug discovery. It’s a really exciting role which I have only just started but so far it is very rewarding.” Holly was recently nominated for the Queensland Women in STEM prize where she submitted her portfolio of work and detailed its impact on the biomedical profession. While she unfortunately missed out on the top prize, Holly is very proud to have been nominated and says the experience was incredibly validating to herself and other women in science. “Most women seem to drop out of scientific studies during the early career stage where I am at,” she says. “When you get to the higher ranks, like in most industries, science is dominated by men. This award showcases some of the incredible work that women are doing and provides role models for students coming through undergraduate degrees or even high school. “It helps young women to realise that they can do science because they see other women doing it. If you enjoy science, do it, it’s not as daunting as you think.” All Saints Anglican School

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FROM STARTUPS TO THE ASX AND THE CAREER IN BETWEEN Oliver Kidd (Class of 2008) is a corporate chameleon. After graduating from Bond University in 2012, his career journey began in commercial law practising mainly in capital markets, and mergers and acquisitions. It was only a few short years before he moved inhouse and joined the C-Suite as Company Secretary for an ASX-200 mining company. Oliver spent a year overseas in 2014 before returning to Australia and the ASX as Chief Operating Officer and Company Secretary for another prominent listed tech company. But not even a string of high-profile appointments could keep Oliver from trying his hand at launching a startup. In 2016 he launched his own business Archa, a neobanking solution which is out to give traditional banking service models a run for their money. Archa is essentially a ‘mobile wallet’ that provides a clean and simple platform for managing money, paying off debts and growing wealth. Think of it as if Netflix or Uber had started a bank: mobile-first and completely focused on customer experience. “We’re following a global trend that started in the UK a few years ago where a lot of challenger banks came onto the market,” says Oliver. “Australians often point out how much we hate banks, but we are also very hesitant to change. “From our point of view at Archa, providing a better customer experience and a more functional and

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intuitive platform to do your banking on is the main reason why people would switch.” The company successfully completed its initial seed funding round in the first half of last year and has just recently closed a second, larger capital raise. Archa’s platform is slated to hit the market in the second half of this current calendar year. He says working in corporate and being an entrepreneur are two extremely different challenges, but he relishes them both. “Obviously working in legal and compliance for a company is very different to running your own startup,” he says. “While I do come from a capital markets law background, which makes the startup fundraising process marginally easier, the differences are still pretty black and white. “Running a startup can be a very taxing process, but in the end it is very worthwhile.” Looking back on his time at school, Oliver says All Saints was a “fundamentally different environment” where he started to learn the benefits of risk-taking. “It wasn’t so much a push to become a doctor or lawyer for example, the education was more foundational, and I think that approach to risk-taking has potentially followed through,” he says. “I’m not suggesting that All Saints taught me to take unnecessary risks, but certainly I always felt that I could, and should, back myself in challenging situations. I think my education made me more comfortable doing that.”

Running a startup can be a very taxing process, but in the end it is very worthwhile. - Oliver Kidd


Alumni

The

FEARLESS Approach

Alex Fitzgerald (Class of 2010) is living proof that persistent goal setting can take you just about anywhere. At the age of 26, she has already powered into the upper echelons of the property industry and currently works as Acquisitions Manager for JLF Group of Companies, sourcing land mainly throughout the high growth corridors of South Australia and Victoria. To date she has transacted more than $50 million of land and coordinated more than $30 million worth of construction projects, not to mention becoming a three-time property investor of her own accord. Alex recently appeared on Sky News Business where she revealed key advice on how to break into the property market under 30. The common thread? Set a goal, and don’t stop hustling until you reach it. “My dad always had this saying; he who has no goal has no direction,” says Alex. “Once you have set a goal and achieved it there is a certain peace within that but then you have no direction, so you just have to keep setting more.” Alex knew that after graduating from All Saints university wasn’t her calling and instead she decided on saving for her first property which she bought at 21 years of age. Now with a further two properties in her portfolio Ms Fitzgerald is a bona fide millennial investor and she stresses the importance of mentorship and reaching out for help as much as possible. “I think young people live in an age where we are so savvy, we are the CEOs of our own businesses and that’s all fantastic – but all this selfmade garbage is just that,” she says. “Nobody is self-made, everybody has a team around them and for a millennial trying to get into the property market, for me like I said on Sky News, my first point of call to get property number one was to ask my dad for a loan. “I was absolutely prepared for him to say no, but I think the lesson is don’t be afraid to ask for help. Not even help in the sense of a handout, just don’t be afraid to collaborate to get what you want.” Ms Fitzgerald recently worked with her dad John Fitzgerald, founder of JLF Group of Companies, to rewrite the eighth edition of bestselling property guide 7 Steps to Wealth. The book passes on pearls of wisdom including some of the biggest mistakes to avoid when investing, how to build your own land bank, how to have positive cash flow and why houses make better investments than apartments. She says that her time at All Saints instilled a special confidence which has permeated through her professional life. “Honestly my best memories came out of drama class, because you had full freedom to express yourself and it was in such a non-judgmental way,” says Ms Fitzgerald. “There is so much a kid can learn from that. It’s one of the most important lessons in life, learning to be fearless. If I am to summarise what I took away from All Saints, it’s a school where you learn to be fearless.” All Saints Anglican School

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Keeping it in the

FAMILY Like many graduates fresh out of high school, Alice Drummond (Class of 2002) didn’t have a steadfast career goal in mind before starting university. However, after only a few short months into law school at Bond University, she knew she had found her life’s calling. Alice went through the motions to learn about every aspect of Australian law, but it was the family law subject which sealed the deal. “When I was going through uni, I thought everything else was a little bit boring to be honest, but when I did the family law subject I absolutely loved it,” says Alice. “I loved the content, the law made sense to me and I found the social justice issues concepts thought provoking and interesting. It’s an area of law that always changes with the times and the needs of families.” Beyond study, Alice turned her passion into an impressive career. At the age of 30 she was the youngest person, and the only female, to become a partner at Ramsden Lawyers on the Gold Coast, one of the city’s largest law firms. She has been listed in the prestigious Doyle’s Guide as a ‘leading family lawyer’ for the past two years in a row and in 2013 earned her stripes as a Queensland Law Society accredited specialist. Alice has reached many of the highest benchmarks within her industry, but still says the best part of her job is being able to help people. “It might be seeing someone go through the journey of a separation and come out the end of it feeling empowered, independent and able to get on with their life,” she says. “People often say to me ‘family law must be horrible’, and I admit it does have its challenging moments, but it’s the most rewarding thing to see a client achieve their goals at the end of such a long and hard journey.” Recently Alice came back into the All Saints fold as a committee member for the Past Students’ Association (PSA).

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She is proud to have “come full circle” and is happy to work with a school that gave her so much joy and encouragement growing up. “School is such a lovely time of your life and there is a draw-in or desire to have this ongoing connection,” says Alice. Her current goal for the PSA is to create more alumni events that aren’t year level specific. “I want to help create more social events for past students that are open to everybody from all year levels,” she says. “It’s a lovely opportunity that I think a lot of other schools do well here on the coast, so I would really like to help create that same networking environment.” Alice and her husband Fergus Reid are excited to welcome their first baby into the world later this year another proud All Saints graduate in the making!

It’s the most rewarding thing to see a client achieve their goals at the end of such a long and hard journey. - Alice Drummond


Alumni

FINANCIAL ADVICE REDEFINED

Hugh Robertson (Class of 1999) always knew he wanted to help people but rather than opting for avenues like medicine or law, he decided to do things a little differently. After graduating from All Saints and completing a three-year stint at Griffith University, Hugh entered the world of financial planning and advisory services. “I started out not really sure about what I wanted to do, but one day I was sitting in a lecture at uni and I heard someone mention this guy called Warren Buffet, who is the greatest investor of all time, and sparked this idea for me that a career doesn’t have to just be black and white,” says Hugh. “I wanted to do something that was always going to be a challenge, and if a job is just black and white eventually you learn all the ropes and it is no longer challenging. ”For me, when you are dealing with people and money, there is always going to be dynamics at play… there will always be something that is interesting.”

Hugh’s first gig out of university was as a graduate in the Commonwealth Bank Graduate Program. After three years there he then moved onto esteemed financial planning firm Whittaker McNaught where he stayed for a few years sharpening his skills before the firm was acquired by the Commonwealth Bank in 2009. Instead of making the shift back to Commonwealth Bank with the rest of the firm, Hugh decided to start his own business called Centaur Financial Services. It was an exciting leap of faith that paid off and now, almost a decade down the track, Centaur is recognised as one of the Gold Coast’s preeminent financial services firms. Hugh was recently named Australia’s 2018 Adviser of the Year by the Association of Financial Advisers (AFA) and he says the prestigious award is a sign that Centaur is a cut above the rest when it comes to helping clients. “We have always done things the way we think they should be done, and it was confirmation that within Australia we are right up there as good as it gets in terms of taking care of clients, investing their money and helping them reach their goals,” he says.

“Especially last year when considering the impact of the Royal Commission, it has given our existing clients the confidence that they are with someone reputable and it has also attracted new clients to come and join us.” “For the team, sometimes to do things the right way it might feel like it takes twice as long, but it is nice to know that our way has been recognised as a good approach.” During Hugh’s time at All Saints he found a passion for sport and earned his colours as part of the basketball team which was coached by Bryn Evans. Hugh now has three children and he is proud that his eldest boy Archer has now commenced at All Saints. “I think most of us are pretty inspired by our parents from time to time and I like the fact that he is going on his own All Saints journey, which will be different to mine, but I’m just proud that we are in a position to give that to our family,” he says. “With the sporting colours for example, your name is always going to be up on a wall somewhere and then one day my kids will get to see that. It’s a great feeling.” All Saints Anglican School

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The

SAINTS

Semester 1, 2019

Pre Prep and Prep Messy Church at Anglican Church Robina

Growing with faith School Chaplain Mother Ann McGuinness believes Christian Living at All Saints is about far more than simply learning the bible. It’s about students finding their place in the world, thinking about important social issues and connecting with each other through compassion, understanding and considering the concept of faith. That’s why when it comes to embracing this important connection with religion, there is a service to support everyone at All Saints. From Pre Prep through to Year 12 all students, staff and families are invited to come together in worship at dedicated services for each year level. For the young students in Pre Prep to Year 2 it begins with Messy Church. Mother Ann says Messy Church is held on Saturday afternoons at Anglican Church Robina (ACR) and focuses mostly on storytelling and interactivity. “Usually Stewart Perry who is the Senior Minister at ACR will tell a beautiful story inspired by the bible and there will be related activities to that story where parents and children can get involved creatively by connecting with the message of the day, whatever it might be,” says Mother Ann.

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All Saints Anglican School

“These services are all about encouraging our students to get involved with the worship space and engage with faith, but also to begin forming important connections and friendships with each other.” Older primary students from Years 3 to 6 are also invited to ACR, but instead enjoy family services. The church welcomes students to its regular 9:30am sessions on a Sunday morning, where they strengthen bonds not only with their own cohorts but with the wider community as well. “Usually our students will help facilitate worship at these services; they do the readings, lead the music and singing and join the prayers all with the regular congregation that attends on a Sunday morning,” says Mother Ann. “We run these family services to help solidify the connection between the chapel at All Saints and the ACR, plus engage our students with the rest of the Christian community.” Finally, the senior students from Years 7 to 12 each attend a family eucharist service that takes place at the school. The senior eucharists are joyous occasions where students lead the service and play music

with their friends and families who come together in celebration of the community, regardless of their own subscriptions to faith. Whether students are religious or nonreligious, Mother Ann believes each school service is underpinned by important messages and values that relate to everybody. “These services are not the traditional models. Nobody is forced to do anything in terms of belief or non-belief, but everyone is invited to think about it, explore and discover for themselves,” she says. “All Saints is a place where the gospel is lived as well as taught and Christian Living here is not just about teaching the bible. “It’s about teaching students to discover who they are, what they believe and why they feel certain ways. “Also, it encourages students to think deeply about how they view the world and understand who God might be to them. “These services allow students to expose their talents and giftedness in a place that helps them in terms of moral compassing and understanding. It also helps them think in a relevant way about life.”


Community

TOGETHER IN

Harmony

In March this year All Saints came together to celebrate Harmony Day, an initiative supporting cultural diversity, inclusiveness, respect and a sense of belonging for everyone. The School Captains initially established the event at All Saints a few years ago under the broader Harmony Week celebrations that happen nationally each year. School Chaplain Mother Ann McGuinness believes Harmony Day has since become one of the favourite school traditions which is run by School Captains and students of the Saints Outreach Service (SOS). She says the event is the vital thread between celebrating harmony and creating peace through actively engaging in social and environmental justice, as the school’s Giveathon initiative is introduced on Harmony Day each year. “The overarching theme within the school this year is ‘Everything With Joy’, so our Giveathon theme for this year is ‘Joy to the World’ which we launched on Harmony Day,” says Mother Ann. “Each year our SOS students and captains get together and form an assembly which highlights various people from different multicultural backgrounds from around the school. “This year we had a Tongan student who organised a traditional type of haka with the open rugby boys, plus we had a Russian student Vladimir who spoke Russian to introduce his sister Sofiia who performed a beautiful dance. “These were two performances among so many other wonderful presentations on the day.” On the day, students and staff were invited to wear a splash of orange, Harmony Week’s official colour, in observance of the event. Mother Ann says events like Harmony Day are an important reflection of All Saints’ Christian values and the school’s commitment to being inclusive. “I think it’s an important day because of the Christian faith that undergirds it,” she says. “We are all God’s people and should treat one another equally with love, it is so much a part of who we are in community. We take seriously Jesus’ imperative to ‘love one another as I have loved you’. “Harmony Day creates a sense of belonging for everyone and allows people to express the joy we have for each other that extends beyond nationalities, cultures and abilities. We are all one.” All Saints Anglican School

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Semester 1, 2019

TEACHING OUR STUDENTS TO BECOME LIFEFIT

Literature Lovers soak up Storyfest

In partnership with Griffith University, All Saints is implementing a transformative program to improve the physical and psychological health of all students. Called LifeFit, the program has been designed from a proactive position, to support the wellbeing of our young people with this effective pastoral care program. Studies show that one-in-seven primary school students, and one-in-four secondary students have significant psychological problems. That is a startling statistic and one that LifeFit aims to combat. The initiative was developed over the past two years alongside researchers at Griffith University. It takes a holistic perspective, understanding that a number of variables contribute to how kids function, rather than looking at single aspects of the student’s life. Areas of focus for LifeFit include mental health, physical health, social and emotional health, spiritual health and academic engagement. The program involves three steps: Assess (an initial survey for students to complete), Reflect and Report (where teachers look at individual and cohort results), and Connect (where individuals, families and cohorts connect to specific and appropriate support options). This program has already been run across Years 5, 7, 9 and 11. The feedback received from students has been glowing. The goal of the program is to identify children who may be at risk in certain areas and respond appropriately to individual needs by linking students and parents into services that support positive wellbeing. The responsibility for the wellbeing of our young people is a shared one and we hope that families, school and community can work together to support the young people in our care and allow them to do their best.

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Year 9 Literature Lovers class at Storyfest

The Year 9 Literature Lovers elective class knew they were in for a treat at Somerset Storyfest 2019. The event, formerly known as the Somerset Celebration of Literature, included a star-studded mix of authors across a breadth of genres and disciplines including young adult fiction, biography, journalism, self-improvement and more. Louise Lynch teaches the Literature Lovers class and led the excursion to Storyfest. She said her students were spoilt for choice when it came to panels and discussions led by some of the most talented and up-and-coming authors in Australia.

see the possibilities of where they can go with their own writing.” Mrs Lynch says young adult fiction is an especially influential genre and at Storyfest students relished the opportunity to hear from the likes of Karen Foxlee, author of Lenny’s Book of Everything and Violet Grace, creator of The Chess Raven Chronicles. Although kids in general are becoming more easily tempted by screen time, Mrs Lynch believes there will always be students who keep the love of books alive. “There are so many kids who still love to read,” says Mrs Lynch.

“A real highlight for the students was just being given the opportunity to ask so many questions,” says Mrs Lynch.

“Social media and screens definitely place a competition for their time, but there is a strong core of kids who will always love to read no matter what the distractions are.”

“It was all about exposure to a lot of different writing styles, the kids could

“They always tend to find their way to the Literature Lovers class.”


Community

UPCOMING EVENTS JULY 16

Term 3 commences

16-19

Junior School Livewire Festival

17

Year 11 2019 Subject Selection Evening

22

Parents & Friends Committee Meeting

24

Celtic Chapel Service

26

Year 10 Dinner Dance

31

Year 12 Careers Dinner

24 JULY

Celtic Chapel Service

AUGUST 1

Middle/Senior School Tour

7

Year 12 Academic Honours Assembly

13

Evening of Short Plays

14

Senior School Honours and Chamber Music Concert

15

Gold Coast Drama Festival Senior Play

16

Year 10 Careers Morning

19

Parents & Friends Committee Meeting

20

Past Students Association Committee Meeting

21

Year 10 2019 Information Evening

23

Gold Coast Drama Festival Intermediate Play

27

Junior School Tour, Year 7 Family Eucharist

BAPTISMS AT THE CELTIC SERVICE Do you have a child who would like to be baptised? Are you, or a member of your family, seeking baptism? The theme for this year's Celtic Service is Heart of God's Hearth. The Celtic Service is a candlelight service of tranquil, relaxing music and earthy Celtic liturgy. Students and staff from our community will provide beautiful music, and you will go home feeling loved and restored.

SEPTEMBER

If you would like more information regarding baptism, please contact Lynette Barker at lbarker@asas.qld.edu.au.

3

Junior School Concert (Years 3 – 6)

3-4

Year 12 QCS Test

5

Year 3 Strings Concert

10

Year 9 Family Eucharist

16

Year 12 Music Extension Concert Parents & Friends Committee Meeting

NOVEMBER

19

End of Term 3

1

All Saints Day

3

Big Band Picnic

OCTOBER

7

Year 8 Celebration Evening and Art Show

8

Term 4 Commences

8

APS Sport Finals

14

Threads 2019

9

Year 12 Formal

15

Parents & Friends Committee Meeting

11

Parents & Friends Annual General Meeting

16

Year 11 Family Eucharist

13

Senior School Speech Night

18

Year 12 Chairman’s Dinner

14

Tunnel of Love

23

Middle and Senior Musical Showcase

15

Year 12 Graduation and Valedictory

18

Years 3 to 6 End of Year Celebration Evening

Year 10 and 11 Academic Honours Assembly

If you are not seeking baptism, please come along and enjoy the experience. Past students, families and students of all ages welcome.

24

Whole School Tour

20

Pre Prep to Year 2 End of Year Celebration Evening

26

Netball Trivia Night Fundraiser

21

Year 9 Celebration Evening and Art Show

29

Senior School Art Show

25

Year 6 End of Year Celebration

31

Year 7 Celebration Evening and Art Show

28

End of Term 4

For more information about upcoming events visit asas.qld.edu.au/ calendar. You can also download the All Saints Anglican School app to view our calendar, term dates and all Saints Alive newsletter editions.

All Saints Anglican School

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