Page 1

PORTFOLIO ALLISON

SCHULTZ


design manifesto The places that have shaped me If I were to sum up who I am as a designer, I wouldn’t be able to do it without telling you about the places I have traveled, the things I have seen, and the people I have met. The architectural collages that you will see displayed throughout my portfolio are my personal representations of these three influencing factors- each photograph taken by myself during one of my travels. These pieces of art manifested through my quest to find the perfect image from all of my travels to use as a singular cover photo (in hopes, powerful enough to captivate even the most skeptical hiring manager). Instead, in this search, I found a vast collection of defining moments in my journey as a designer. This collection of places and buildings used their unique cultural and geographical significance to tell a story of learning and discovery much more eloquently than I could have ever spoken myself. In an age of illustrious evolution and technological advancement that dominates every aspect of our lives, it may be obsolete to turn back in time and place and attend me to the principles of vernacular building practices. And yet what I learned throughout my travels spent trying to exploit the secrets to timeless design that I believed these buildings would hold,

were ways to

challenge everything I knew in a matter that could be used to solve any design-thinking problem of our time. What I learned was that none of these buildings, without access to homogenized and specialized methods, could have stood the test of time without truly innovative solutions using locally available resources and technologies..

Each design was unique to the geographic constraints and human conditions of its occupants, and no one shared solution would have been as successful in any conditions outside of its own. In this realization, at the introduction of each new project I was forced to assume what I had just learned and had always known, could be wrong. I was challenged to design with brand new eyes- with renewed vigor and curiosity that resulted in more impassioned solutions and creative problem-solving. This approach mirrored the approach that the architects of these buildings would have taken back then, and their designs resulted in buildings that were not only environmentally sustainable and culturally sensitive, but still ignite such powerful emotive responses that there is no arguing their beauty even in this day and time.

Meaningful design brings with it the amelioration of the human condition This portfolio represents more than just a collection of floor plans and renderings- in this portfolio, you will discover the passion I have for using design as a tool to make a meaningful impact on this world and the people who occupy it. Each project you will see is based around countless hours of research, a human-centered design philosophy, and my own personal belief that with good intentions and the drive to do something about them, design has the power to change the world.


SKETCHUP

DESIGN RESEARCH

MICROSOFT OFFICE

LIGHTING DESIGN

SUSTAINABILITY(LEED/WELL)

3D RENDERING

AUTOCAD

ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR

ADOBE PHOTOSHOP

ADOBE INDESIGN

REVIT (BIM)

skills + tech

education

design EXPERIENCE

B.S. Interior Design, Colorado State University, 2012-2016

Interior Design Intern, Treanor| HL, May 2015-August 2015

Minor: Global and Environmental Sustainability

Florence University of the Arts, Spring Semester 2015

cv

Project Coordinator, The Energy Institute, August 2015-November 2015 • Managed communications for interdisciplinary energy research team based in Kigali, Rwanda • Coordinated meetings, schedules, calls, presentations, and international & domestic business trips • Increased media presence by documenting & publishing project milestones on multiple online platforms

• Used Illustrator and Indesign as tools to create custom graphics for Powerpoint presentations; presentations were continuously used for marketing and business development purposes thereafter • Produced conceptual models for massing studies and storytelling purposes utilizing 3D modeling programs • Specified and selected FF&E; assisted in creating supporting specification documents

Customer ServiceShowroom Consultant, Granite Imports, October 2015-September 2016 • Key Accomplishment: Initiated Design Consultancy Service Program • Engaged previously underserved client base by providing them one-on-one design feedback during their material selection process. • Acquired multiple repeat customers and closed the gap between the fabricator and the customer when it came to realistic design expectations and final design outcome.

Pro-Bono Design Consultant, France, September 2016 - December 2016 • Worked collaboratively with international design teams focusing on Historic Preservation projects with the goal of gaining an understanding of design challenges unique to international communities • Introduced AutoCAD & Revit as tools to document existing building layout and conditions; floor plans and 3D models generated were used to help guide future treatments & as a marketing tool to generate community excitement • Researched and utilized traditional buildings methods, to ensure project would be financially feasible, environmentally friendly and technically sound


Interior Designer & BIM Co-Manager, Anderson Brule Architects, May 2017 - Present • Experience with programming, space planning, construction documents, furniture and finish specification and other relevant deliverables of commercial interior design from schematic design through construction administration • Focused on the programmatic challenges of highly complex projects; generated and developed design concepts addressing client vision while also staying within the boundaries of regulations

• Created and designed lighting plans for large commercial project; coordinated with consultants and distributors to maximize light levels and enhance the overall quality of space • Introduced Triple Bottom Line, Sustainable Design framework that focused on improving user experience beyond the functional requirements of a space while staying within the boundaries of regulations

• Established benchmarks for “levels of excellence” regarding sustainability efforts for interiors related projects; Generated toolkits to analyze project compliance to sustainability benchmarks • Implemented use of case studies and other alternative research methods to inform key design decisions; identified areas for improvement in current officewide utilization of evidence-based design strategies • Coached & supervised Junior Design and Intern Staff


PROFESSIONAL

INTERNATIONAL

Santa Clara University

Chateau Val Real

The Riverside Retreat

PROJECTS EDUCATION

HOSPITALITY

Intergenerational Daycare

Boutique Hostel


“HAVE I GONE MAD?”’ SAID ALICE

WORKPLACE

LIGHTING DESIGN

Steelcase Co-Working Offices

Residential Mountain Home

“I’M AFRAID SO.. YOU’RE ENTIRELY BONKERS” SAID THE MAD HATTER BUT I’LL LET YOU IN ON A SECRETALL THE BEST PEOPLE ARE” “alice in wonderland"- lewis caroll

RESIDENTIAL Italian Barnhouse Renovation

3D VISUALIZATION

HEALTHCARE

Chair Design

Behavioral Health Care Facility


professional work


SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY TYPOLOGY| Higher Education size| ~60,000 sq. ft role| - Generating and developing design concept and features - Design of lighting and custom lighting fixtures - Material Selection - Signage and Wayfinding Graphics Design - Consultant for any design elements related to the interior in the Historic Building portion of the project


PROGRAM overview Project Scope| Multi-Phased Renovation and Exterior/Interior Refresh of 3 Existing Buildings. Project involved reprogramming of existing spaces to facilitate housing new STEM departments in one cohesive space.

Project also involved

rehabilitation of the original interiors of one of the historic buildings.


CONNECTOR 1986

BERGIN COURTHOUSE

INSPIRATION IMAGE

HEAFEY LAW LIBRARY

1933

1967

context The departure point for the interiors concept is the hybrid history of the building. Today, in 2018, we are working on a building, which has been constructed in 3 distinct phases. In 1986, Bergin Courthouse, which was originally constructed in 1933 was connected to Heafey Law Library, originally constructed in 1967. We draw inspiration for this from the building’s history and the program, but also from the campus-wide commitment to history and innovation found beyond the project boundaries, including its notorious Special Archival Collections Museum and programs that bridge the arts and sciences. Altogether, the layering of history, innovation, and community can express and develop the identity of the school and of the departments housed within the building by....

S.T.E.M. FACILITY 2018


WHAT MAKES

DESIGN D THE BUILDING HISTORY color palette

HISTORIC COLOR PALETTE

wayfinding strategy

ARCHIVAL IMAGES

ARCHITECTURE classical forms

STAF

adapti teachi

HIGHLIGHTING EXISTING RECONFIGURABL STRUCTURE ROOM LAYOUTS A FURNITURE

KEY DESIGN


S scu UNIQUE?

DRIVERS THE OCCUPANTS

FF & FACULTY

ive ing

LE AND

STEM STUDENTS

transparency

foundational skills

GLASS WALL SYSTEMS

UNREFINED, UNFINISHED BUILDING MATERIALS

N SOLUTIONS

discipline

innovative technology

how they think

systems thinking

simplification

INDUSTRIAL THEMATICS AND EXPOSED MECHANICAL SYSTEMS

BRIGHT WHITE SPACES, CLEAN & SIMPLE ARCHITECTURAL FORMS


no more dead space.. “Nooks” for students were built into all unprogrammed circulation space so students could have intimate areas of refuge to retreat to when they needed personal work time. Not only did the students love this solution, but the owner was thrilled when he realized he

was

increasing

his

value

per

square foot in the building as well.


LEVEL 1- DEMO AND PHASE 1 PLAN

LEVEL 2- DEMO AND PHASE 1 PLAN


LEVEL 1- FURNITURE PLAN AND RCP

LEVEL 2- FURNITURE PLAN AND RCP


the MERGING OF TWO IDENTITIES TWO DISTINCTLY DIFFERENT FLOOR MATERIALS WILL GUIDE THE OCCUPANT DOWN EITHER END OF THE BUILDING UNTIL THEY EVENTUALLY BLEND TOGETHER AS ONE IN THE CONNECTOR BUILDING; LITERALLY AND METAPHORICALLY CONNECTING THE TWO SPACES. FORMERLY DISJOINTED BUILDINGS ARE NOW EFFORTLESSLY EXPERIENCED AS ONE.


BEFORE


A

B

PROJECT GOALS: Make the new STEM building a place where STEM and non-STEM students can come together equally. Be a showcase on campus. Proudly display the history and culture of Santa Clara University.


SCU Site Plan (circa 1930)

SCU Site Plan (circa 2018)

CONCEPT APPLICATION The concept manifested intself most powerfully through the use of glass film and printed wallcoverings displaying pictures of historic and current photos of SCU’s campus and notorious alumni. Historic images were printed on the modern materials and recent photos were applied to the original walls of the structure.


WAYFINDING

WAYFINDING + CIRCULATION


LEVEL 1

/

MAIN CIRCULATION PATHS

/

SECONDARY CIRCULATION PATHS

LEVEL 2

MAIN ENTRANCE

TO COLLABORATION SPACE ACT TO EXPOSED CEILING TRANSITION

ENLARGED REFLECTED CEILING PLAN- MAIN ENTRANCE CORRIDOR

TO COLLABORATION SPACE

MAIN ENTRANCE FLOOR FINISH TRANSITION

ENLARGED FLOOR FINISH PLAN- MAIN ENTRANCE CORRIDOR


FLOOR 2 FLOOR 2

FLOOR 1

FLOOR 1


DEPARTMENTS

? ? ? ? ? ? GRAPHICS AND DEPARTMENT IDENTITY There are many iconic objects in SCU’s special collections. Items from the special collection could be related to the departments so that an identity is created for the innovative departments through the deep history of the school. More literal versions of the images could be applied to the glass in the hallways.


AFTER

BEFORE


linework and delicate scale... We looked towards the history of SCU, S.T.E.M., and the building’s history for inspiration. The intricate linework, delicate scale, and precision found in in mathematical computations, the original technical drawings of major S.T.E.M innovations, and blueprints of the building were manifested in the materiality, graphics, architecture, lighting design, and furniture of the new re-designed spaces.


WE HAVE THIS REMARKABLY EFFICIENT SYSTEM FOR BEATING

ANYBODY’S INTEREST IN SCIENCE

OUT OF THEIR HEAD. EDUCATION IS NOT ABOUT FILLING BUCKETS,

IT’S ABOUT LIGHTING FIRES” ENLARGED FLOOR PLAN- S.T.E.M. COMPUTER LABS SCIENCE

THEMED GRAPHICS

TECHNOLOGY

THEMED GRAPHICS

ENGINEERING

MATH

THEMED GRAPHICS

THEMED GRAPHICS


GRAPHICS + BRANDING


+

Branding & Logo Design The Riverside Retreat Beauty Institute located in Jarnac, France specializes in personalized holistic therapy and beauty treatments for an international clientele. The spa is located inside of a 100 year old French cottage, in an area engulfed with panoramic views of the rolling green hills of the french countryside, nearby cognac vineyards, and the River Charente. The client wanted a contemporary, yet feminine rebrand of her salon. The result was a concept inspired by the natural beauty of Jarnac, as well as pulling from the sophisticated aura of the historic chateaus that neighbor the building. The palette of pink and purples tones was inspired by the pomegranate trees that can be found growing throughout Jarnac.

THE RIVERSIDE RETREAT

SIGNAGE|BRANDING|SOCIAL MEDIA|CUSTOM GRAPHICS


RENDERING OF FUTURE SITE AND SIGN


CONCEPT 1| EXTERIOR SIGNAGE

CONCEPT 2| EXTERIOR SIGNAGE

CONCEPT 4| EXTERIOR SIGNAGE

CONCEPT 5| EXTERIOR SIGNAGE

CONCEPT 3| EXTERIOR SIGNAGE

FINAL SELECTION| EXTERIOR SIGNAGE


SIGNAGE AND BRANDING


EDUCATION


Design Concept Translucent Energy INTERGENERATIONAL DAYCARE FACILITY A light and airy multi-generational daycare center invites the aging and young populations to learn and grow from each other in a shared care environment. Inspired by the graceful demeanor of the butterfly, their powerful journey of transformation, and their beautiful translucent wings

Inspired by the graceful demeanor of the bu erďƒ&#x;y, their powerful journey of transforma on, and their deliberately cap va ng markings


R E F L E C T I O N S A Multi-Generational Co-Care Community EDUCATIONPROJECT Situation:

Research is showing that more and more of our aging population are moving towards daycare center settings as compared to long term care facilities (Approximately a 35% increase since 2002). Additionally, it has been found that unhealthy and neglected schools impair children’s learning and devalue our educational system.

Task:

The goal of the project was to design a space where healthy individuals from the ages of 3-5 years old to 65+ years old, can be dropped off for the day to be cared for in a secure and nurturing environment

Action:

Utilized a combination of research, case studies, and WELL building concepts in order to create a less wasteful facility, increase energy efficiency, increse cognitive function of aging population, and increase children learning engagement

Result:

The design was inspired by the symbolism of a butterfly; the younger generation representing the “caterpillar” stage in life and the aging population representing the “butterfly” phase. Gardens, a fitness center for dance and yoga, a media and “human” library, and impromptu interaction areas were designed to promote social settings that aimed to bring together the two generations. The spaces were designed to be easily transformable; retractable walls, easily moveable and lightweight furniture, and inculsive design features like multiple height hand rails and high contrast material selection allows the space to be used comfortably by both the aging and young. A color palette of soft pastels and crisp whites gives a refined yet playful atmosphere to the daylight filled spaces. Materiality mimicing butterfly wings manifested through highly translucent architectural elements and rooms defined by colorful glass walls. The building has large, unifying “mixed generation” spaces with smaller “cocoon” rooms that catered more specifically to each occupant.


READING NOOK


FLOOR PLAN

LEGEND 1| Reception 2| Administration Office 3| Media Room 4| Lounge & Juice Bar 5| Activity Room 6| Zen Garden 7| Staff Lounge 8| Nurses Office 9| Reading Nook 10| 3 Year Old Classroom 11| 4 Year Old Classroom 12| 5 Year Old Classroom 13| Laundry Room 14| Great Room 15| Gymnasium 16| Media/Human Library 17| Outdoor Reading/ Learning Room

CONSIDERATIONS - All means of egress secured - The reflection of the butterfly’s organic markings on its wings over a line of symmetry inspired the space plan. An even amount of rooms are distributed on either end of the building, and the spaces are balanced, yet organically shaped. The layout in similar rooms were kept the same to prevent confusion in any of the aging occupants.


LEGEND 1

3 2 4 6 5

8 7 9

3

10

12

11

15

13

19

21

20

16 14

18 17

1| Triple-Glazed South Facing Windows 2| Recycled Concrete Aggregate Flooring 3| Outdoor Classroom 4| Automatic Exterior Shading System 5| Re-manufactured Sports Equipment 6| Recycled Rubber Flooring 7| Indoor/ Outdoor Nature Center with Heat Mirrored Glass 8| Re-purposed Gravel Flooring to Decrease Exterior Lawn Area 9| Double-Glazed Windows 10| Carbon Light Activated Curtains 11| “Mitti Cool” Refrigeration System 12| Compost System 13| “Ecovative” Packaging in Juice Bar 14| Open Floor Plan 15|Occupancy Activated Lights & HVAC System 16| Low-flow Toilets 17| Perforated Double Exterior Skin 18| Radiant Floor Heating Construction 19| Passive Stack Vent with Skylight 20|Retractable Partition 21| Borax Salt-Bamboo Reading Nooks


analysis |research| design justification

Graphic film placed over the windows helps prevent glare, increase thermal insulation, and mimic the colorful wings of a butterfly

A “Human Library” in which skills and stories can be shared between g e n e r a t i o n s . The human “books” might be the older population who can share their knowledge, or perhaps a life lesson with the younger kids.

The retractable roof walkway that connects the admissions area to the heart of the building, not only acts as a extra layer of security to prevent clients from wandering off, but also provides calming and beautiful views as soon as the building is entered

The organically shaped form of the building reduces the visual perception of the main circulation spaces and removes the institutional feel that one long corridor would create

Studies have found that frequent cognitive activity during old age, such as visiting a library or attending a play, was associated with reduced risk of mild cognitive impairment, and less rapid decline in cognitive function (Frequent Brain Stimulation In Old Age Reduces Risk Of Alzheimer’s Disease)


Hallways are kept wide, and closed off spaces minimal, so there is never a panic inducing sense of confinement for the elderly with dementia Allowing the occupant to customize their space allows them to feel as comfortable in the space as possibleretractable, glass partitions provide parenthesis-the spaces can then be opened up and joined for large events or gatherings

Getting rid of rows in classrooms and arranging organic groupings of furniture promotes collaboration through the creation of “in-between� spaces

Daylighting was prioritized to prevent overuse of energy.This meant situating the most used spaces on the south side of the building, where light was the strongest.


The school’s main circulation is lined with a “double railing” which helps the children and the elderly navigate and orient themselves, by providing varying heights in the handrails.

JUICE BAR & LOUNGE


WAY FIND ING = FLOOR INLAY


FORT COLLINS, CO population: 118,652 proposed site selection: here considerations: - proximity to: other care facilities schools and daycares public transportation natural areas

Polished Concrete

Sand

Native Grasses

SITE KEY Bamboo Flooring

Japenese Pagoda Tree

Recycled Rubber Flooring

Peach Trees

Aspen Trees

Polished Concrete

Pink Mulhy Grass

Lavender Shrubs

Daffodils

Pergola

Vegtable Garden

Recycled Barnwood Bench

“Fairy” Garden

Outdoor Ampitheatre


SITE SELECTION

SENSORY VS CREATIVE "learning playgrounds"

The sense of an implicit connection to nature was created by emphasizing a seamless transition between interior and exterior spaces. Solar tubes, skylights, and an opening of the roof between the admissions building and daycare rooms bring in an abundance of natural sunlight. Two interior gardens provide opportunities to be immersed in nature, regardless of Colorado’s harsh winters. Sense of outdoor space was expanded by minimizing the enclosed footprint of the building and providing ample views of the surrounding landscape. Identifying the need for opportunities to engage a wise range of clients with a wide range of cognitive abilities, two exterior “classrooms” were designed.

3 2

Outdoor Ampitheatre

Herb & Vegetable Garden

1

4

“playscapes“

The main focus during the planning of the site was developing two exterior “classrooms”. A “sensory” learning site allowed occupants to immerse in the scents, textures and colors of plants, and a “creative” learning site used abstract and organic structures to stimulate imagination and creativity. • “Fruit and scent trees contribute to creating shelter and, just as the herb garden and the interior greenhouses, they provide the children with the opportunity to learn about the life and nature of plants” (Laylin, 2011) • The rationale is that exposure to frequent and various sensory stimulation will facilitate both dendritic growth and improve synaptic connectivity in those with damaged nervous systems (Ansell, 1991; Kater, 1989), leading to improved cognitive functioning and environmental interaction (Bos, 1997)

• Playgrounds that provided unstructured play “promoted play between children who had not played together previouslyincluding children who had formerly been excluded,” (Ferro,2014) • Unstructured materials that encourage sensory exploration have the potential to reduce obesity and even bullying. • In organic play environments, children are not pigeonholed into any certain type of play, but allowed to let their creativity guide them because it encourages children to create their own stories

CONCLUSION: INCORPORTATING THE 5 SENSES 1- Zen Garden 2- Reading Garden

3- Creative Plascape 4- Natural Playground

Touch| Sand pit, Open grass areas Taste| Edible fruit trees, Vegetable and Herb Garden Sound- Life-sized wind chimes

Sight| View of the Rocky Mountain skyline, Various colorful flowers Smell| Lavender shrubs, Herb garden fragrances


INTERNATIONAL WORK


chateau val real Outside of Aix-En-Provence lies a sleepy village called Jouques. Here, the Chateau Val Real laid it’s foundation over 600 years ago. The elegant exterior facade is a stark contrast to its deteriorating insides, and many years of work will need to be done to ensure this beautiful structure continues to stand to tell the story of it’s mysterious past..


YOU ARE HERE


CHÂTEAU VAL REAL-BACKGROUND Size: ~11,100 sq. ft Description: Renovation and Restoration/ Historic Preservation Project Location: Jouques, Aix-En-Provence, France Original Construction Date: 1896 Situation: After decades of neglect and

Task: Identify current structural issues and

deterioration within the unoccupied wings

concerns. Identify, retain, and preserve the form

of the Château, the Château had fallen to a

and detailing of those architectural materials

dreary state. The château was being used as a

and features that are deemed important in

private residence for the last 30 years, but the

defining the historic character of the property,

owners wanted to open up the chateau to the

whether for repair or replacement. Improve

public; converting the top floors into private

energy efficiency of existing building. Establish a

apartments, an artist residency, shooting space

Plan of Preservation. Document restoration and

for filmmakers, and rooms for volunteers to

renovation project for records. Conduct Surface

stay in. With a limited budget, and lack of any

Mapping.

construction background or knowledge on

Action: Created a Preservation Plan to educate

historic preservation, the homeowners were left

and inform future homeowners and volunteers

with little guidance before calling in the help of

of the building’s significance, so no future

various volunteers. The previous owners of the

harm would be done to the interior structure.

Château had destroyed over 95% of the original

Developed different design options to address the

frescos painted on the walls by covering them in

re-purposing of rooms with also keeping them

bright green paint. The paint from the 70’s was

true to a period-style restoration.

in fact lead paint, and needed to be removed immediately. Parts of the timber foundation was rotting, the original plaster was chipping off the walls to the point where a constant dust filled the air, and there was no light fixtures on the top two floors. Most of the structure and interior finishes were original, minus the green paint.


FLOOR PLANS|EXISTING|

ORIGINAL BUILDING PLANS

FLOOR PLAN- LEVEL 0


FLOOR PLAN- LEVEL 2

ORIGINAL BUILDING PLANS


HISTORIC ANALYSIS & DOCUMENTATION

LEVEL 2- FUTURE STUDIO APARTMENT


ORIGINAL STAINED GLASS

ORIGINAL PARQUET

ORIGINAL CHANDELIER

ORIGINAL MARBLE FLOORING

RENOVATION PROGRESS


ELEVATION- ENTRANCE


PHOTOGRAPH OF ENTRANCE


HOSPITALITY


ORIGINS BOUTIQUE HOSTEL A sustainably-designed boutique hostel, accommodating

young,

international

travelers from all over the world. Designed for the traveler who seeks more than just a place to rest their head, but a community where they can exchange stories, find adventure, and become immersed in a melting pot of different cultures and peoples all ecstatic to learn more about one and other. Your story originates here..


BAR & LOUNGE

Sustainable materials were used to decrease the building’s environmental impact, and align with the eco-friendly traveler’s values. Vibrant, bold, and eclectic material selections are intended to spark conversation between strangers, and ignite curiosity in the wandering traveler’s soul.


PROJECT BACKGROUND PROJECT SECTOR| Hospitality (Boutique Hostel) TYPE OF WORK| Academic (Indivdual Project) CONCEPT| “Not just a destination, but a journey” PROJECT SCOPE| Students were given an empty floor plan and instructed to design a commercial project that focused on sustainable material selection

LOBBY VIEW


LVT FLOORING- COMMON AREAS

COPPER FINISH- ACCENT TABLE

TILE- BATHROOM BACKSPLASH

FLOOR PLANS

UPHOLSTERY- SOFAS


11

9

12

10

6 8

7

FABRIC-ACCENT PILLOWS

4

4

UPHOLSTERY- CHAIRS

UPHOLSTERY- SOFAS

3 2 1

KEY

TILE FLOORING- ACCENT

“Spontaneous Interaction” spaces are designed to break communication barriers, and encourage travelers to get to know one and other. Playful activities, such as oversized chess, swing sets, and checkers carved into the floor can be enjoyed by everyone together, regardless of the language they speak.

1| Lobby 5| 2| Bar/Lounge 6| 3| “Spontaneous Interaction” 7| Spaces 8|

Male Restrooms Male Dorm Rooms Internet Lounge Community Kitchen

9| Guest Lockers 10| Laundry Room 11| Female Dorm Rooms 12| Female Bathrooms

5


Repurposed Existing Wallpaper

LED Light Fixtures

Campfire Slim Table by Steelcase

INTERNET CAFE


Low VOC Painted Mural

C2C Certified Fabric- Assam by Climatex

100% Recycled Content Carpet Tiles by Interface


workplace


steelcase next co-working space NEXT is a forward-thinking, progressive coworking organization at the forefront of the shift in how people choose to work today. Work is changing – freelancing and small business formation are surging and this trend is only projected to accelerate. NEXT is a place designed to attract these contingent workers – independent freelancers, contractors, or solopreneurs, who are redefining the workplace with a new set of needs, behaviors, and values: Technology enabled, Entrepreneurial, Sense of community, Sharing mindset


RECEPTION| LEVEL 1


co-working offices DESIGN DRIVER| How can you design a space to cater to the specific personality type that most entrepenuers posess, in order to facilitate optimal working conditions to allow for unrestricted growth and creativity? Project Scope| 1st and 2nd Floors (approximately 11,500 ft²) Project Sector|Workplace Type of Work| Academic (Indivdual Project) BAR AND LOUNGE (LEVEL 1)

NEXT is an innovative, and cutting-edge coworking space attracting motivated, dynamic, and energetic millennial “soloprenuers”, who believe in the power of a good conversation, an inspirational community, and the successes that come with dreaming big. PERSONALITY TRAITS OF ESTP &ENTP TYPES: •Go-Getters • Spontaneous • Conversational • Low-Patience • Territorial • Learn Best When Aroused • Prefer Dynamic Settings • Enjoy Vibrant Colors, Lots of

Texture, and Busy Aesthetics • Talkative • Observant • Personable and Socialble • Focus on New Ideas • Challenge Convention • Don’t Limit Themselves with Structure

OPEN OFFICES (LEVEL 2)


LVT FLOORING- COMMON AREAS

LVT FLOORING- RECEPTION

WALLPAPER- ACCENT

FLOOR PLANS

WALLPAPER- ACCENT


ACCENT CHAIRS- RECEPTION

COUNTERTOP- LOUNGE/BAR

SEATING- COLLABORATION SPACES

CONSOLE TABLES- EMPLOYEE AREAS


Accent Wall- Porcelain Wall Tiles

Upholstery- Accent Chairs

Accent Wall- Re-purposed Aluminum Cladding

INTERNET CAFE


Table Tops- IceStone Recycled Glass Surface

Upholstery- Sofas

Flooring- Dining Area


analysis |research| design justification

Different Lounge Areas and “Snack Zones” include: 1. Self-Serve, Air-Popped, Organic Popcorn Station 2.Coffee/TeaStation 3. Living wall with in season herbs grown 4. Refrigerator/Cubbies so you can BYOL (bring your own healthy lunch!) 5. Reusable Water Bottle Fill Stations

The “Active Work Zone” satisfies EN(S)TP’S need to stay active and moving, their need for interaction with others, and their desire for fun and stimulation, by providing a variety of game opportunities such as skee ball, billards, and corn hole. Yoga Mats and exercise balls allow for a quick workout session in between meetings, keeping the NEXT employees happy and inspired.

Research has proven that food and/or drinks present the best chance of sparking up a conversation with someone, and while ENTP/ESTP Personalities have no problem doing that already, different snacking, and drink stations were placed throughout the top floor to ensure that no opportunity for networking would be missed.


Circular Project Rooms, filled with circular furniture arrangements allow for the constant face to face interaction that EN(S)TP’S need and thrive off of

Circular and rearrangeable desk options provide ample opportunity for conversation and collaboration which EN(S)TP’S crave

Floor to ceiling frosted glass columns resembling tree trunks surround a faux moss floor area. The area, filled with swings, treadmill work desks, and pendant lights that resemble clouds, creates a playful and indulgent work environment where ENSTP’s can do work on the move, all while looking out towering window that provide panoramic views of downtown Atlanta


RESIDENTIAL


ITALIAN BARNHOUSE RENOVATION


LIVING ROOM| LEVEL 0


TUSCANY, ITALY

Project Scope| Renovation of Abandoned Farmhouse

elevations

Project Sector|Residential Year of Work| Spring 2015

Type of Work| Academic (Indivdual Project)

Elevation(SCALE (Scale 1:50) 1:50) SOUTH South-East EAST ELEVATION

Within the old walls of a forgotten farmhouse in the Italian countryside, I sought to create an atmosphere of “Eclectic Elegance� by taking pieces of iconic Italian design and juxtaposing them with the natural beauty of the rural home. The result was an updated home that tread the line between modernism and postmodernism with industrial finishes, bold displays of art, colorful patterns, dramatic shapes, and raw textures. The building was broken up into multiple floors in order to create a more intimate setting. Warm hues were chosen to reflect the natural landscape around the farmhouseTuscan most

from

sun, popular

to

yellows

burgundies

Chianti

wine

that

echoed

the

that

paralleled

the

from

the

region.

SOUTH WEST ELEVATION South-West Elevation(SCALE (Scale 1:50) 1:50)


FRONT ENTRANCE

B CLOSET

GUEST BATHROOM DINING AREA GUEST BEDROOM

LIVING ROOM

A

A KITCHEN

Double Sided Fireplace

BACK PATIO

B

LEVEL 0

B

HOME OFFICE

A

A

B

LEVEL 1


B

MASTER BATHROOM

PATIO

WALK-IN CLOSET

MASTER BEDROOM A

A

B

LEVEL 2

FLOOR PLANS


MASTER BEDROOM|LEVEL 2


MASTER BATHROOM|LEVEL 2


SECTION A


LIGHTING DESIGN


MOUNTAIN HOME LIGHTING PLAN Raw Refinement /raw· re·fine·ment/ adj. : 1. Symbolizing transitions from: old to new, unfinished to finished, glamorous juxtaposed with natural elements 2. the journey from a single couple to a family; the transition from old traditions to new memories, 3. the progression from classic and contemporary style to cutting-edge sustainability.


DURANGO, COLORADO “The

reconfiguration of the lighting design in the Robinson family homes plays off the natural beauty of Durango, Colorado that surrounds their home.

By fusing raw elements found locally in the area, with the contemporary elements that the Robinson’s tend to prefer,

a refined and modern

place is created that the family can call home. As the occupants enter the space, whimsical sculptures of light harmonize with subtle overhead lighting; allowing optimal visibility and a creating a welcoming ambience. The refreshed lighting design of the Robinson family home dictates not only their playful movements throughout the home, but their playful attitude towards life.


Project Scope|

Lighting Design for Existing Home

TYPE OF WORK|

Academic (Indivdual)

Project Sector|

Residential

YEAR OF WORK|

Fall 2015

Custom lamp concept desgined for the Robinson home. Made entirely out of recycled and repurposed materials.


ELECTRICAL PLAN


REFLECTED CEILING PLAN


FURNITURE PLAN


+ SOLUTIONS

BATHROOM VAN

• A variety of exterior fixtures provide adequate lighting to ensure sufficient visibility, prevent the “fishbowl” effect, and act as security • Only LEDs, Compact Fluorescent, and Fluorescent lighting were specified in consideration to energy savings • The most efficient and highest performing fixtures were chosen based on their CRI ratings,

DINING ROOM

voltage, watts, and finishes • Minimum luminance levels met for every room • Dimmers and three way switches allow for flexible lighting solutions • Hand-blown and customized fixtures with mixed textures and finishes visually stimulate, excite, and create a unique experience for each occupant in every room • Select ADA rated fixtures specified

LIVING ROOM

• Colored lamps and fixtures provide visual cues in order to aide occupants with disabilities or aging eyes

KITCHEN SCO


NITY LIGHTS

+ CONSIDERATIONS • Foot-candle requirements calculated for each room to prevent over-lighting of a space • Over 80% of the selected fixtures utilize LEDs as their specified lamp • Due to the phased elimination of incandescent lamps, no fixtures were chosen that specified

CHANDELIER

M SCONCES

ONCES

incandescents as their required lamp. the lifetime of all the fixtures now can be ensured to be as durable as possible due to readily available replacement parts) • The savings resulting from using LED’s instead of incandescents results in over $6668.75 per household (Energy savings over 50,000 hours, assuming 25 bulbs per household, averaging each led should cost around $35.95 per bulb) • By limiting the amount of artificial light sources, occupants are encouraged to utilize daylight as an alternate option to illuminating a space


3D VISUALIZATION


3ds max

CHAIR DESIGN Students were told to select a piece of furniture in their design lab, and then model it using a 3D program. I choose to select a chair that is found throughout CSU’s computer rooms. Using 3DS Max, I was able to recreate the chair with its exact dimensions. I then put together an assembly poster to show how the chair would be put together in real life.

3DS Max was the only program used for the final renderings.


HEALTHCARE


NORRISTOWN HEALING HOSPITAL FOR PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING Located in the small borough of Norristown, Pennsylvania lies an abandoned Psychiatric Hospital. Built in 1907, it was formerly a part of a 266-acre campus then known as the, “Norristown Asylum for the Insane�. With evidence-based design as the foundation, my project intends to revive this formerly abandoned facility, in order to model a new system of integrative mental health care treatment. This model re-introduces differing levels of institutionalization back into the treatment plan for patients debilitated by a serious mental illness, with the ultimate goal of catalyzing a progression towards increasing acceptance of mental health issues and an increased well-being nationwide.


OCCUPANTS The hospital will primarily serve both long-term in-patients, and out-patients suffering from a Serious Mental Illness (SMI).

PROJECT CLASSIFICATION Psychiatric Emergency Department (Crisis Stabilization, Ambulatory Crisis Care) Short-Term Residential Unit (Acute Diversion Unit/Crisis Hospitalization) In-Patient Residential Unit (Alternative Rehabilitation and Transitional Facility)

PROJECT TYPE Renovation and Redesign of existing building/New Build Construction (additions)

KEY ISSUES

NORRISTOWN HEALING HOSPITAL For

Psychological

Well-Being

BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CARE RESEARCH FOCUS AREAS

-Restraint & Seclusion Reduction -Procovery - Jail Diversion - Integrated Medical Services -Specific Mental Illness Treatment - Cultural Enhancements & Modifications to Treatment Programs

1| The historical significance of the site challenges balancing state-of-the-art technology with local tradition and community identity 2| Designing a humane environment that balances aesthetics and safety for both staff and patients 3| Structural and architectural challenges that arise from retrofitting an abandoned building that is over 100 years old 4| Reducing the stigma associated with Behavoiral Health Facilities and people with mental illnesses

RESULT The hospital will house 3 distinct units of care: a Long-Term Residential Unit, an Acute Residential Unit, and a Crisis Emergency Department . Through the integration of in-patient and out-patient services in a single holistic psychiatric healing facility, patients will be able to receive personalized care solutions catered to the degree of their illness. Deliberately designed interior features will be unique to each unit of care depending on the mental state of the patients, as well as the degree of security necessary to ensure patients and staff alike feel safe at all times; ultimately ensuring maximum impact on healing is made. Utilizing Trauma-Informed design choices, Patient-Centered Treatment, Environmental Psychology, and an architectural approach to Neuroscience; the building is catered to the social and biological preferences of each and every user in the building in order to create an intimate environment of pure self-expression and inspired hope. Manipulation of form, light, and space will alter perception of users, and create an empowering emotion-evoking experience that facilitates the ultimate healing environment patients will endearingly come to know as the, “Norristown Healing Hospital for Psychological Well-Being�.

MISSION STATEMENT Model a new system of integrative mental health care treatment that reintroduces institutionalization back into the treatment process for human beings debilitated by a serious mental illness, in order to catalyze a progression towards increasing mental health and well-being nationwide


BACKGROUND The movement towards de-institutionalization starting in the 1960’s has left the country with a severe gap in services available for those suffering from long term, severe mental illnesses. With no where to turn for help, these individuals, as well as their families and communities, are forced to battle these illnesses on their own, with homelessness, jail time, and death being the ultimate consequences of this neglect

195 2,900

The number of Psychiatric Hospitals currently in the United States

Number of beds available at currently operating psychiatric hospitals

number of patients currently admitted to 35,000 The general hospitals who are suffering from a SMI

356,000

The number of inmates in our state prisons suffering from an SMI

number of patients and inmates suffering 391,000 The from an SMI who are currently residing in environments unfit for their medical lifestyle

9,997,100

The projected number of adults over 18 suffering from an SMI


SITE SELECTION NORRISTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA

$287.

Overcro

TO THE ROLLING HILLS OF PENNSYLVANIA I wanted to find a community that would rally behind and support a potential facility operating within it’s walls, and a community that could benefit from the building’s services in return. I decided to establish three criteria to help narrow down my choices: need, support, and probability. Once I established those criteria, I began thinking about the social, environmental, and financial factors that seem to have the biggest influence on health care policy and perception. I knew I wanted to find a site that had good quality air, scenic views, open spaces, close proximity to similar facilities, an educated community, younger-aged populations, was supported (and could be funded) by the local government, and an area that had a need for this facility. The importance of having a younger and more educated population was due to the fact that younger generations are usually more open minded, and since there is such a negative stigma associated with “asylums”, the community needed to be as welcoming, and willing to give up their preconceived biases, as much as possible.

SO, WHY NORRISTowN? Once I figured out that Pennsylvania best met all the criteria I had established before my search began, I began searching for the same information all over again, only this time comparing counties to counties rather than states to states. Montgomery County, Pennsylvania consistently had the highest scores for best health care (healthiest citizens, cleanest air, etc). Once I began searching Montgomery County for the final hospital site, I discovered the beautiful architectural masterpiece that is Norristown State Hospital.

101%

4.00-4.33 (

Mental Health

Mental Hea

Inmat

RESULTS: Pennsylvan average or abnormal of the categories men


STEP 1- assessing NEED: Mental Health Budget:

17 (per capita)

owding rate in prisons:

%-125% capacity SMI Rate:

(above normal)

I began by looking at rates of mental illness amongst the different states in the United States. I was looking for moderate to high rates of populations diagnosed with a Serious Mental Illness (SMI), as they would be the market my facility would target. Next, I looked at states with the highest number of mentally ill in prisons. This was important, because due to lack of infrastructure currently available for those suffering from a SMI, the people who are plagued by these illnesses who have no family or friends to commit to their full-time care, either end up on the streets or in these jails. Finally, I looked at rates of inmate population increase across states. This would show me where there might be higher instances of mental illness occurring, and thus would provide a bigger population that my facility could benefit

h Spending (per capita):

$161 > or more

alth Budget (projected):

Increasing

tes with Mental Illness: 24.6%-28%

nia had above l ratings for each ntioned STEP 2 & 3 {SUPPORT&PROBABILITY} Steps two and three were based off of the same maps and data, because as rates of community and government support for mental health services increased, so would the probability of the facility actually having a chance to be built. I began by looking at what states spent the most money on mental health funding per-person. This would show which governments cared the most about mental health services and funding them. Next, I looked at what states were covered by ObamaCare’s new Medicaid expansion of 2014. This was important because states who are covered under the new Medicaid policies are the ones who will receive the most money and support for public health care initiatives. Finally, I looked at state’s current and predicted mental health funding budgets, in order to determine yet again which government’s could help support and fund the hospital the most.


40.1215 N, 75.3399 W population: 34,432 land area (sq. miles): 3.52 persons per sq. mile: 9,753.9 diversity: white: 54% black: 34% hispanic: 10% asian: 2% comfort index: 45 out of 100 landscape: undulating plains soil type: alfisoil


NORRISTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA ANALYSIS & CONCLUSION Established criteria for site success: proximity to major cities, proximity to other medical facilities, proximity to state prisons and jails, accessibility via roads and major highways, variety of local amenities, access to natural landscape and outdoor recreational opportunities, location in a good school district, proximities to related medical services, amount of emergency service providers and location to those providers, and surrounding zoning.

- Outpatient areas should be located on a direct path from the lobby. Circulation paths of the outpatients should be separated from the paths of the more acutely ill inpatients - Patient rooms should be placed on the southern end of the building, in the west wing, to maximize sun exposure year round - Currently, the site is considered a “dumping grounds� for all of southeast Pennsylvania, due to the influx of mentally ill patients without the addition of infrastructure or staff to properly support them, so community image will have a large effect on the success of the hospital - The perimeter of the site is currently unsecured, or loosely secured, which is allowing patients to easily escape and wander into nearby homes and places of business, causing stress and anxiety amount community members. All outdoor patient activity should be placed on the west side of the building near the industrial zone across the street, away from the residential areas on the south and east sides.


ACCESSIBILITY VIA ROADS AND MAJOR HIGHWAYS| Allows for maximum exposure to surrounding communities and cities. The increased ease of accessibility encourages patient admittance, which increases the percent of the population covered for treatment. In addition, major highways allow direct access to more advanced and able facilities and resources, that are housed in major cities.


SCIENC

VIEWS

AND

OPEN

SPACES

PROXIMITY

TO

STATE

PRISIONS

AND

JAILS

DENSITY MAP

BLOCK GROUP

22,000-116,000 people per sq. mile 4,000-116,000 people per sq. mile 1,000-4,000 people per sq. mile

PLANNED PARKS PLANNED PARKS FUTURE TREE FARM PRIORITY TRAIL PRIORITY TRAIL (2ND) PRIORITY TRAIL OPEN SPACE(EXISTING) OPEN SPACE(TEMP)

0-1,000 people per sq. mile

SCENIC VIEWS SCENIC STREET

EMERGENCY SERVICES AND PROVIDERS

MEDICAL SERVICES AND PROVIDERS

ZONING MAP

residential retail/office light industrial institutional open spaces utilities undeveloped


HISTORIC ANALYSIS & MATERIALITY

The “Acute Admissions Building” otherwise known as “Building #17” was one of 57 original buildings built on the 233 acre site of Norristown State Asylum for the Insane between 1880-1970. Based on architectural examination and land records, the construction date was probably sometime between 1907-1909. Currently abandoned and uninhabitable, the interior of the structure is covered in graffiti, trash, filth and will continue to decay if left neglected as it has been for the past 40 years.

INTERIOR ROOM| UNKNOWN LOCATION


CAST IRON WINDOW BARS

SOUTH-EAST HOSPITAL WING

MAIN ENTRANCE DOORWAY

12 LITE GLASS PANEL DOOR

ORIGINAL SITE MARKER


THEORY #3 Psychosynthesis and the Healing Power of Beauty interior and exterior access to nature •Multiple points of exposure to nature will be found at: the Rooftop Gardens, Staff-Only Exterior Lounges, two exterior courtyards, and multiple interior gardens on every floor enclosed site • The site grounds will be closed off to allow for saef, unrestricted exploration and immersion in the nature of the site by the patients elegant finishes • Vibrant color palettes of rich pastels, sleek glass finishes, chic metallic accents will create an elegant atmosphere for patients and staff alike

natural daylight and adaptive artifical lighting • Natural Light will be used as the main source of lighting, and will be supplemented by hue-changing LED’s. The lights will adjust throughout the day in order to mimic what the natural hue of the light is outside. starry skies • An observatory outfitted with multiple telescopes was designed to occupy patients at night who have trouble sleeping. The observatory will have a retractable roof that can provide unobstructed views to the stars at night.

THEORY #1: Phenomenology of Architecture Design Application & Implementation: In order to create a meaningful space for each and every user, it is important to make sure that the user feels like their space is catered directyl to them; that they are an inhabitant, not a visitor Patient Personalization: •Patient-controlled room temperature, lighing, and background noise • Walls made of chalkboard that patients can customize • Holographic walls where users can change the scence of the room they are in, as they see suitable •Different types of therapy treatment choices

Facade Redesign: • Adjusting the facade of the building by adding two new additions to either side of the front of the building that are only 1 story tall. Rescaling the perception of facility size makes the building more approachable, and parallels a more residential look. Catered Experience: • A variety of programs that cater to different cultural backgrounds and lifestyles including: Multi-Cultural worship areas, outdoor recreational activities, art therapy, music therapy, zen gardens, meditation rooms, workout facilities, computer classrooms, community kitchen, yoga room, and libraries

THEORY #2 Trauma-Informed Care way-finding •All doors will be color coded to indicate the room’s use and security level (4 Levels of Security Graphic). •Each care facility (ED, Acute, and Residential) will have their own unique color associated with ceiling finishes and accents •Light levels will be increased at the end of hallways and corridors in order to draw patients in a certain direction de-centralized vs centralized nursing units: • Centralized nursing units will be supplemented with de-centralized nurse stations to allow for a larger, but more personalized and indiscrete level of monitoring by staff

proximity to security • Security stations will be placed at every point of exit and entrance, and in every unit of the hospital De-escalation model • The “3 Part De-escalation Model” will be implemented on every floor, on either end of the building wings


A 48 49

B

C

D

E

CRISIS EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

LEVEL OF RISK

Psychiatric Emergency Services Department Recommended: 10 rooms, 6000 SF (reports and recommendations regarding psychiatric emergency and crisis services)

50 51

ROOM NAME

52 53 54 55

Equipment and supply storage Clean supply room Environmental services room

2.2-3.1.2.8 2.2-3.1.6.9 2.1-4.3.8.12

Entrance (Ambulance)

2.2-3.1.2.2

Public waiting area

2.2-3.1.2.4

Communications center Reception area Triage area

2.2-3.1.2.5 2.2-3.1.3.3 2.2-3.1.3.3

Administrative center Financial Offices Support areas for families and visitors Security station Translation Kiosks

2.2-3.1.6.1 APA 2.2-3.1.8 2.2-3.1.6.2 N/A

Public toilet room

2.2-3.1.2.4

Patient Treatment room (Single Bed) Patient Treatment Room (Multiple Bed) Patient toilet room Patient Treatment Room (Bariatric) Trauma/resuscitation room Diagnostic services area

2.2-3.1.2.6 2.1-3.2.3` 2.2-3.1.2.7 2.2-3.1.6 2.2-3.1.6 2.2-3.1.6

100 sf 60-80 SF 1 toilet room per 6 treatment rooms minimum 200 sf 250 sf per single bed room, 200 sf per patient in multiple bed rooms

74 75 76 77

Human decontamination area Airborne Infection Isolation Locked Medication Room

2.2-3.1.3.6 2.2-3.1.4.2 APA

80 SF 1 per emergency department

78 79 80 81 82

Staff toilet rooms Staff lounge Permanent staff offices Storage for staff

2.1-4.3.9.1 2.2-3.1.7.1 APA 2.1-4.3.9.2, 2.2-3.1.7.2

83 84 85 86 87 88

Lounge for admitted patients Comfort Room Seclusion Room Conference and Consultation Rooms Snoezelen Room

APA 2.2-3.1.4.3 APA APA

FGI/APA GUIDELINES

REQUIRED SQUARE FOOTAGE

COMMENTS

OPERATIONAL SUPPORT FACILITIES cannot be shared with other departments

PUBLIC AND ADMINISTRATIVE AREAS

56

Area for stretchers with direct connection to the Patient Rooms. Noise isolation and privacy necessary. Generic waiting area for all . High Security concern. Receive 911/emergency calls Reception desk check-in area Needs to be located close to an entrance so there is immediate access to walk-in patients who may be unstable Process and admit patients Insurance Counseling/Quiet waiting room Need to be located at all entrances Area where Non-English speaking patients can access an electronic checkin system, in the case that the on-duty receptionist does not speak there language. Temporary until a translator can be called down to the area. Need to be in direct view of Security

57 58 59 60

61 62 63 64 65

66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73

F

PUBLIC/PRIVATE/BOTH

DIAGNOSTIC AND TREATMENT AREAS High stress patients/need privacy Low stress patients/ less monitoring

Need direct access to Ambulance Entrance Blood draw, temperature, vitals, etc. Natural lighting essential to read proper skin tone of patient. Semi-secluded location ideally 150 FT from ambulance entrance

STAFF SUPPORT AREAS

PATIENT SUPPORT AREAS APA

programming

4


design development

patient safety risk assessment Level I: Direct Supervision These are areas where patients are not allowed or are under constant supervision. Standard commercial finishes, light fixtures, air grilles, and so on are usually acceptable for use in these locations.

Actively Suicidal

Intent for Self Harm

No Self-Harm Anticipated

1:1 Observation

Periodic Observation

Completely Alone

OPPORTUNITY FOR SELF HARM (PRIVACY)

Level II: High Observation. Patients in these areas are highly supervised and left alone for only very short periods.This level of precaution may be suitable for rooms used only with staff present, however, patients have been known to work together to distract staff to one area so other patients can access hazardous items in areas that are normally under observation.

Level III: Periodic Observation. These are areas where patients may spend time with minimal supervision. However, the decision to apply Level III precautions to such spaces should be carefully discussed with facility staff and any potentially hazardous features that are included should be clearly identified and documented. Level IV: Areas where patients spend a great deal of time alone with minimal or no supervision such as patient rooms (semiprivate and private) and patient toilets


“ The amazing art of Kintsugi symbolizes the truth that repair requires transformation; the pristine is less beautiful than the broken. The brilliant light within us is impossible to see without first being fractured”

CONCEPT: The beauty of imperfection

OLD & i

n

t

s

u

g

i

Kintsugi is a Japanese art form that consists of mending the seams of a broken piece of pottery with a brilliant gold resin. Stemming from a Japanese principle of aesthetic that embraces the “imperfections that come with impermanence”, a Kintsugi vessel is considered more beautiful after it has been broken than when it was whole. Rather than trying to cover up the damaged parts, this style of art emphasizes how beautiful it can be to be broken,and the honor in embracing our imperfections.

CONCEPT

K

“The beauty of imperfection” represents what Norristown Healing Hospital stands for in it’s entirety- both literally and metaphorically. It begins with the structure itself- instead of tearing down the hospital in an attempt to destroy it’s dark past, the building will be revitalized with a new vigor, as an innovative model for mental health care treatment. The beautiful Georgian architecture that constitutes the existing shell will be intentionally contrasted with sleek glass and metallic additions which will act as the strikingly different “gold resin” to the shell’s original “broken pieces”.

Not only will the design of the building and it’s interior seek to be unapologetically unique, but the patients itself will be analogous to those very same ideals. The design will seek to create a safe escape where patients will not feel like they have to be ashamed of their mental illness, but instead embrace it as a part of what makes them special. A place where patients don’t feel like they are “broken”, but instead where they can shine with the same brilliance as anybody else. A place that fosters resilience and beauty- a place that invites you to bring your broken pieces with you to the door, and still be celebrated just as you are.


NEW CONCEPTUAL RE-IMAGINING OF MAIN ENTRANCE


ADDRESSING THE GAP: 3 LEVELS OF CARE

Problem| Address need for a varying degree of treatment options

TASK| Address gap in service for those who are unable to be admitted due to lack of doctor recommendation or insurance Increase diagnosis accuracy to provide better informed treatment options

ACTION| > Psychiatric Emergency Department (Crisis Stabilization, Ambulatory Crisis Care) > Short-Term Residential Unit (Acute Diversion Unit/Crisis Hospitalization), >In-Patient Residential and Alternative Rehabilitation Facility (Transitional Residential)

RESULT| There are two different possible paths to admission that each incoming patient will experience. PATH 1- PLANNED ADMISSION ROUTE: Patient recommended from primary care doctor > Direct admission to In-Patient Facility PATH 2- UNPLANNED ADMISSION ROUTE: Patient experiencing psychotic episode admitted to the hospital via walk-in or ambulance in the Emergency Department > Patient is stabilized > Patient returns home OR > patient is admitted to Acute Treatment Unit - Patients are monitored and evaluated for up to 7 days, and from here the doctors will decide what path of treatment is most appropriate for the. Patients are either released and recommended to out-patient services or admitted to the In-Patient Residential facility.


:

+

=


|BIRDS EYE VIEW|ACUTE PATIENT ENTRANCE| COURTYARDS


|conceptual rendering: rooftop gardens


rendering: passive courtyard and worship rooms


UPHOLSTERY-ED UPHOLSTERY-ED UPHOLSTERY-ED WALL TILE-ED

1| Janitor Office

7| Laundry

2| Equipment Storage

8| Staff Bathroom

3| Environmental Services

9| Staff Nap Room

4| Clean Work Room

10| Staff Storage

5| Freezer/Food Storage

11| Call Center

6| Soiled Work Room


UPHOLSTERY

WALL FINISH

FEATURE WALL-OFFICES

FLOOR INLAY-ACCENT

FLOOR PLAN| BASEMENT


FLOOR PLAN| PLAN| LEVEL 0

C1-C3 Multi-Faith Worship Rooms C4-C5 Group Therapy C6 Yoga Room C7-C9 Community Rooms C10 Boxing Studio C11 Weight Room C12 Active Courtyard

C13 Out Patient Info Center C14 Passive Courtyard A1 Acute Reception A2-A3 Public Bathroom A4 Private Waiting Room A5 Acute Patient Lounge

A6 Transitions Counselor A7 Supervisor Office A8 Interview Room A9 Private Therapy Room A10 Chart Room A11 Medication Room A12 Storage A13 Single Bedroom

A14 A15 A16 A17 A18 A19 A20 A21

Shared Bedroom Shared Bedroom Staff Only Bathroom Closet Nurses Office Food Storage Prep Patient Bathroom Patient Dining Room

A22 Bathroom Storage A23 Patient Storage A24-A26 Quiet Room A27-28 Shared Bedroom A29 Bathroom A30 Single Bedroom A31 Shared Bedroom A32 Singled Bedroom


E1 ED Reception E2-E3 Snoezelen Room 1 E4-E5 Observation Room E6-E7 Comfort Room E8-E9 Observation Room E10-E11 Seclusion Room E12 Toilet E13 Janitor Closet

E14 Human Decontamination Room E15 Airborne Infection E16 Anteroom E17 Environmental Services E18 Supervisor Office E19 Locked Medication

Room E20 Pharmacy E21 Staff Bathroom E22 Trauma and E15 Airborne Infection E16 Anteroom E17 Environmental Services E18 Supervisor Office

E19 Locked Medication Room E20 Pharmacy E21 Staff Bathroom E22 Trauma and Resuscitation Room E23 ED Staff Room E24 Wheelchair Storage E25-E26 Patient Exam

E27 Trash/Soiled Holding Room E28 Closet


PSYCHIATRIC EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT

Design Strategies for Psy Departmen

Privacy| Rooms are designed with adjusta partitions allowing for complete situations, and complete priva

Daylight & Na All-glass room partitions, and a fill the emergency departmen of natural light, and soothin hills and gardens of the su

Finishes Calming shades of blue a light and airy ambience, r elegant and dignified atm typical emergency room. Nat laminate finishes further h patient from any pre-contr by the appearance of a typi

Safety| Blind spots are m a linear and symmet


SANITY: + BUILDING DESIGN FOR EMERGENCY

ature| window in every room nt with an abundance ng views of the rolling urrounding landscape.

s| and white create a resulting in a more mosphere than the tural wood LVT and help disassociate the rived stressors onset ical emergency room.

minimized through trical floor plan.

SITUATION

| able transparency glass e visibility in emergency acy when appropriate.

TYPICAL TREATMENT ROOM ELEVATION

SOLUTION

ychiatric Emergency nts

Improper diagnosis is one of the leading problems of psychiatric institutions. Too often, patients are committed who may not need such a serious form of treatment, or too many patients are neglected because they aren’t given adequate attention and treatment. A majority of the time this error of how to treat a patient occurs in emergency situations, when staff are forced to make a decision on the spot. A majority of the time, general care hospitals are forced to handle these patients, even though the staff are not properly trained or adequately equipped with rooms that can handle a patient having a serious psychotic episode.In fact, 1 in every 8 emergency cases is accountable to mental health disorders which puts a serious strain on unfit hospitals.

CARE

A “Psychiatric Emergency Department” was designed on the north side of the building, in order to A “Psychiatric Emergency Department” was designed on the north side of the building, in order to accomodate patients who have sudden behavioral health emergencies. Norristown Healing Hospital will work directly with general care facilities and the local police department so that after a call by a patient is made to 911 (or a suicide hotline), the patient will be redirected to Norristown Healing Hospital. The hospital design was reconfigured in order to be able to handle ambulance drop-offs, and the emergency room is designed to handle temporary medical or psychiatric emergencies. The placement of the emergency room on the north side allows the out-patient unit to have it’s own entrance separate from the in-patient unit, so normal hospital traffic is not disrupted. Additionally, by placing the emergency room on the north side, noise pollution will be kept to a minimal in order to prevent disturbing the patients located in the in-patient facility, who are located on the far south side of the building.


100 Lobby 101-102 Bathroom 103-105 Interview Room 106 Administrative Office 107 Financial Office 108 Out Patient

Counselor 109 Security Office 110 Rotating Art Work Gallery 111 Technology Center 112 Supervisors Office 113 Mail Room

114 Supplies Rental 115 Laundry 116 Convenience Store 117 Quiet Room 118 Snoezelen Room 119 Single Patient Bedroom

120-121 Patient Bathroom 122 Single Patient Bedroom 123 Patient Storage 124 Utility Room 125 Single Bedroom 126 Shared Bathroom

127 Single Bedroom 128 Single Bedroom 129 Shared 130 Single Bedroom

Patient Patient Bathroom Patient


FLOOR PLAN| LEVEL 1

131 Single Bedroom 132-133 Bathroom 134 Single Patient Bedroom 135 Bakery 136 Cafeteria 137 Visitor Area

138 Kitchen 139 Men’s Bathroom 140 Women’s Bathroom 141 Volunteer’s Office 142 Family Overnight Room 143-144 Patient Exam

Room 145 Patient Bathroom 146 Staff Lounge 147 Staff Bathroom 148 Staff Locker Room 149 Locked Medication Room

150 Storage 151 Environmental Services 152 Open Offices 153 Janitor’s Office 154 Clean Supply Room 155 Linen Storage Room

156 Trashed/Soiled Holding Room 157 Equipment Storage 158 Chart Room 159 Sterile Workroom 160 Bariatric Exam Room


|before: collapsing floor in main building entrance


|after: new patient admission center with commemorative glass wall feature


|after: dayrooms are converted to open offices for staff


|before: original dayrooms


FLOOR PLAN| LEVEL 2

200 201 202 203 204

Interior Garden Storage (Garden) Bathroom Dining Area Bathroom

205 206 207 208 209

Kitchen Managers Office Freezer/Pantry Gym Locker Rooms

210 211 212 213 214

Group Therapy Room Single Patient Room Shared Patient Room Shared Patient Room Utility Room

215 216 217 218 219

Quiet Room Single Patient Room Shared Bathroom Single Patient Room Quiet Room

220 DayRoom & Zen Garden 221 Single Patient Room 222-223 Bathroom 224 Shared Patient Room 225-226 Group Classroom


227 228 229 230 231

Noisy Area Music Therapy Room Bathroom Art Therapy Room Observatory

232-233 Therapy Room 234 Nap Room 235 Staff Lounge 236-237 Staff Bathroom 238 Nurse Office

239 240 241 242 243

Utility Room Seclusion Room Observation Room Comfort Room Observation Room

244 Snoezeleen Room


nursing units|by day & By night


ENGRAVED FLOORING-S.A.N.E WALL FINISH-S.A.N.E WALL FINISH-S.A.N.E WALL PAINT-S.A.N.E

300 301 302 303

S.A.N.E Nurses Unit Quiet Room Patient Bathroom Single Patient Room

304 305 306 307

Patient Bathroom Single Patient Room Patient Bathroom Patient Bedroom

308 309 310 311

Patient Patient Patient Patient

Bathroom Bedroom Bathroom BedRoom

312 Patient Bedroom 313 Patient Bathroom


LVT FLOORING-COMMON AREAS

WALL PAINT-ACCENT

COUNTERTOP-BATHROOMS

WALLS-COMMON AREAS

FLOOR PLAN| LEVEL 3


S A F E T Y SANCTUARY Standard Patients vs. S.A.N.E Patients

WHAT IS A S.A.N.E UNIT?| S.A.N.E: Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner • 51-97% of women with a SMI have been sexually assaulted (Butler, Critelli, & Rinfrette, 2011) •Focus on ensuring that treatment environments do not inadvertently retraumatize patients. HOW IS DESIGN DIFFERENT FOR A S.A.N.E UNIT?| • Finishes- Neutral tones will accommodate victims suffering from different symptoms of abuse such as: hyperarousal, disassociation, and intrusive symptoms • Segregration- Women-only floor • Furniture Layout- To prevent triggering due to boundary violations (territorality), no S.A.N.E patient will have to share any community ammenities; each having her own individual bathrooms and room. Furniture will be arranged in groupings spaced between 8-10 feet so no defensive and personal territorial boundaries are crossed RESULT| • Specialized nurses can better cater to this specific group of women when their surroundings facilitate more advanced healing methods • By placing the unit on the top floor of the building, patients get access to the best 360 degree views of the surrounding farmlands and open spaces


S.A.N.E UNIT


LEVEL 0

LEVEL 1

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 3

NURSING UNIT LAYOUT & SITE LINES

The Impact Design on Pat B

SITE LINES, DECENTRALIZED NURSING

1

A C

2

3

D A

ELEVATION| ACUTE PATIENT ROOM EXTERIOR

PATIENT ROOM DESIGN AND SAFETY

B

Used security sidelite anti-barricade doors in every patient room Built-in, recessed, units designed to be an anti-ligature storage solution Chalkboard paint wall allows patients to draw on and customize their rooms Angled observation room windows allow nurses full visual clearance of patient rooms Customizeable digital room signage creates a sense of belonging in patients


TYPICAL PATIENT ROOM

3 5

t of ROOM tient Safety

1 2

UNITS, & THE NEIGHBORHOOD MODEL

4 Seamless, solid, and heavy wood furniture bolted to floor 5 Shatter-proof digital display frames allow patients to display pictures of loved ones, as well as control room lights & temperature

controlled, C Patient recessed lighting acts as “street lights” on the exterior of every patient room D Surface-mounted “living gardens” resemble landscaping of typical residential exteriors

4


2

1

3

|DESIGN FEATURE| SNOEZLEEN ROOM RENDERING


COMFORT ROOM

SNOEZLEEN ROOMS: IMPACTS OF SECLUSION IN FACILITY DESIGN

SNOEZLEEN ROOM SECLUSION ROOM

SECURE OBSERVATION

SECURE OBSERVATION

SITUATION| Currently, by code, it is required to

measure

which

can

be

viewed

as

outfit a Behavioral Health Facility with

inhumane, traumatizing and potentially

a “seclusion or restraint room”. Though

even more triggering for the behavioral

sometimes these rooms are a necessity,

health patient.

most of the time they are an extreme

TASK| Using evidence based-design, and the

to seclusion rooms that can be used as

theoretical methods outlined in the

a model for all behavioral health care

program, design an alternative solution

facilities

action| The model will consist of 3 adjacent

they will have the option of how they

rooms that each offer a different level

wish to de-escalate based on what they

of de-escalation and restraint. When a

decide works best for them. These will

patient experiences a psychotic episode

be individual use, highly monitored, and

where they are considered to be a threat

restricted rooms.

of harm to either themselves or others,

CONCEPTAL MODEL| 3 PART DE-ESCALATION SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS

RESULT| Option #1| The Comfort Room

as a highly sensory stimulating room

The best option for a patient who

engaging all 5 senses.

wishes to unwind by suppressing their

various textures and elements that can

urges, and submerging themselves in a

be touched and grabbed, user-controlled

soothing environment. This space will

sound and light, visually stimulating

be a minimalistic living room setting,

artwork, and relatively furniture free to

with comfortable seating, neutral colors,

allow for unrestricted movement.

user-controlled lights and music, and

Option #3| The Seclusion Room

stress relief objects.

A last case scenario type of situation

Option #2| The Snoezelen Room

when option #1 and #2 are not successful

The best option for a patient who wishes

at de-escalating a violent patient.

to “get it all out” as a way to calm down and de-escalate. This room will utilize the theory of hyperarousal, and be designed

Bright colors,

OUTFITTING THE SNOEZLEEN ROOM

1 2 3

The strategic use of a plush fur rug allows the patient to engage their sense of touch, as well as act as a soft area on In order to engage the sense of smell, aromatherapy spray ducts will be mounted into the ceilings. Using an An interactive “patient panel” installed in the room will allow the patient to be in control of the LED colored inlaid

the floor where they can safely lie down. The rest of the flooring will be LED motion activated light-up tiles. remote electronic system, smells will be released into the room dependent on when the patient tells it to. lights, temperature, aromatherapy spray machines, sound system, and the LED motion floor system.


+ CONTACT

Email: alrschultz@outlook.com Phone Number: (303)258-6397 LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/arschultz/


Design Portfolio 2018  
New
Advertisement
Advertisement