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ALLISON BAKER

PORTFOLIO

STUDIES IN TRANSPARENCY AND GEOMETRY


ALLISON BAKER

STUDIES IN TRANSPARNECY RANSPARENCY AND GEOMETRY TABLE OF CONTENTS Representation of Motion | Graphic Design Discovering a Form | Form Investigation Sculpture Walk | Spatial Sequencing Exercise A House for Tina Fey | House on a Hill Project Currency Redesign | Graphic Design Glass Education Center | Investigation of Glass Woodland Elementary School | CEFPI, VA Competition Restroom Redesign | Third Year Competition Various Graphic Proects | Graphic Design


EDUCATION

RÉSUMÉ

Allison Baker abaker13@vt.edu 630.217.0722 1071 Cheswick Dr. Gurnee, IL 60031

BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE, expected completion May 2016 Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Blacksburg, VA Minor in Industrial Design Current GPA: 3.72 Dean’s List (5 semesters of 5) University Honors program member WARREN TOWNSHIP HIGH SCHOOL, Aug. 2007-May 2011 Gurnee, IL GPA: 4.5/4.0, Graduated summa cum laude School does not rank, but graduated in top 2% of class

EXPERIENCE GRAPHIC DESIGNER, The Chocolate Sanctuary, Inc. Part time, Nov. 2013-present; Gurnee, IL -work with owners to develop logos, design identity, aesthetic concept for restaurant STORE MANAGER 2d2c, Inc. SafePlug kiosk May-Aug. 2012; Gurnee, IL -managed a temporary retail location for 2d2c, Inc.’s SafePlug electrical outlets -scheduled shifts, assigned duties, trained employees -performed demonstrations and sold products

SKILLS Proficient: AutoCAD 2D | Graphic Design | Adobe Photoshop | Adobe Illustrator 3D Studio Max | Rhinoceros | Model Making | Laser Cutting Basic (at time of print): Adobe InDesign | Revit | SketchUp


COMPETITIONS THIRD YEAR COMPETITION, Virginia Tech College of Architecture and Urban Studies, Dec. 2013 -see “Restroom Redesign”, edited version of competition board included STEM SCHOOL COMPETITION Council of Educational Facility Planners Int’l, VA Chapter, Oct.-Nov. 2013 -see “Woodland Elementary School”, edited version of competition board included -Honorable Mention ENCLOSURE EDUCATION CENTER COMPETITION, RCI, Inc. Region II, Aug.-Oct. 2013 -see “Glass Education Center”, elements of competition boards included CHICAGO FIRE JERSEY DESIGN COMPETITION, Chicago Fire Soccer Club, July-Aug. 2013 -see “Graphic Design”, entry included SECOND YEAR COMPETITION, Virginia Tech College of Architecture and Urban Studies, Jan. 2013 NAEF TOY COMPETITION, Virginia Tech College of Architecture and Urban Studies, March 2012 FIRST YEAR COMPETITION, Virginia Tech College of Architecture and Urban Studies, March 2012 AUTOCAD 2D COMPETITION, Illinois Drafting Educators Association -Regional Level: Participant March 2009, March 2010, First Place March 2011 -State Level: Participant April 2011

ORGANIZATIONS ALPHA RHO CHI, Fraternity for Architecture and the Allied Arts Fall 2011-present -Positions: Historian (2013), Secretary (2014) HOLLY HOUSE COUNCIL, Residential College at West Ambler Johnston 2012-present -Positions: President (May 2012-May 2013), Vice President and Public Relations (May 2013-present)


fall 2011 first year studio

REPRESENTATION OF MOTION professor dave dugas three weeks

This graphic design exercise captures the frenzied motion of a pair of hands solving a Rubik’s Cube puzzle.


spring 2012 first year studio

DISCOVERING A FORM

professor marie paget nine weeks

An exercise in patience and form, this object was sculpted by hand from a 3� cube using only sandpaper.


fall 2012 second year studio

SCULPTURE WALK professor erin putalik four weeks


Left: view through the entry point of the sequence Center: side view of the model in the site and with connections Right: looking back up the ramp from the bottom This project is an exercise in spatial sequencing. Each student was tasked with creating a sequence of spaces within the parameters of a 12” cube of space that transitions into the sequences of two other projects. Collaboration was involved to establish the transition points and the topography that a continuous loop of eight projects would work with. This project investigates the passage of light through material by using the edges of cardboard as a screen-like enclosure. The particular angle of each cardboard layer works to direct light and control lines of sight in order to guide a visitor through the sequence. The form of the project is derived from the irregular grid to the right. This grid can be seen in the x, y, and z dimensions of the structure. The grid corresponds with the entire 12” cube of space, therefore when the structure is viewed from the four elevations, the bottom “row” of the grid is represented by the 2” between the bottom of the structure and the absolute zero level of the project.


WRITING PUBLIC PRIVATE PRIVATE EXTERIOR

1/4” = 1’-0”

spring 2013 second year studio

A

ROOF AND SITE

HOUSE FOR TINA FEY

professor erin putalik seven weeks

15 11

16

17

10

12

FLOOR 2

13 14

FLOOR 1.5

4

3 prompt: house on a hill for a writer, located at the intersection of Church Hill Rd. and Village St. in Eggleston, VA

1: Garage 2: Laundry 3: Mechanical 4: Covered outdoor 5: Kitchen 6: Dining 7: Bathroom 8: Living 9: Levelled outdoor

10: Bedroom 11: Bedroom 12: Bathroom 13: Sitting area 14: Master suite 15: Collaborative writing 16: Composing studio 17: Tina’s writing space

5 6

2

7 9

1 8 FLOOR 1


This split-level house was designed for the family of Tina Fey, writer and actress for television and film. The site is situated on a hill overlooking the New River as it runs through Eggleston, VA. Sight lines toward the river and toward the distant mountains, combined with living and working patterns described in Fey’s autobiography give the house its loop-like form.

river view

mo

unt

ain

view

Fey’s writing finds humor in the sometimes mundane, sometimes frustrating, and sometimes awkward interactions that she has with others. This house facilitates those interactions as well as more everyday interactions by connecting the public spaces to Fey’s writing space where the loop overlaps itself. In addition, the private spaces are intentionally small to encourage the familiy and their visitors to spend more time in the public spaces so that more interaction can occur. One termination of the loop form occurs at the end of the family room with large windows framing the view of the mountains that serve as a natural piece of art for the public areas of the house. The writing space includes a large writing table for when Fey works with other writers, as she does for television shows, as well as a private office at the loop’s termination that features a sweeping view of the river.


summer 2013 industrial design minor studio

CURRENCY REDESIGN

professor bill green one week


This set of currency was designed to celebrate six classic Disney princesses and their respective films. Each bill features the princess, her residence, a significant scene from each film, and the film’s original release date. Transparency plays a large role in the design of each bill. Each features a unique transparent pattern overlay on top of the harlequin background as well as lines that fade from white to black. These act as security measures like those in place on existing currency.

The bills are printed on denril, a smooth, semitransparent material. When held up to the light, the harlequin patterns on the front and back of the bill overlap, creating a secondary pattern. The portrait of the princess also appears behind her name when the bill is viewed from the back. Between the two layers, a third layer of denril is cut into a diferent shape for each princess--for Snow White, an apple. This acts as a watermark when the bill is held up to the light. (Apple is shown on the images on this page)


3

A

fall 2013 third year studio

B This educatinoal center for glass techniques serves to teach students and visitors about the properties of glass as well as finishing methods. The building itself showcases glass as an enclosure system and a design element.

1

GGLASS LASS EDUCATION CENTER EDUCATION CENTER professor elizabeth grant six weeks

3

A A

B B

workshops REFRIG

offices

The form is derived from programmatic needs as well as the site, both immediate and distant. On the north side, a diagonal cut breaks the rectangular footprint in order to create a covered public space along Main Street. This new form is mirrored along its own centerline to create the second floor, where the diagonal cut serves to highlight the mountain view in the distance and create a patio space.

classrooms mechanical

A

The glass envelope follows this generated form exactly. To contrast this strictness, the concrete masses supporting the glass take on a more sculptural quality. The shapes of the concrete are a response to the light needs of the interior spaces.

B

2

SITE

prompt: building enclosure education center, located at the intersection of Washington St. and West Main St. in Pulaski, VA

VIEW 1


SECTION A-A

VIEW 2

VIEW 3

SECTION B-B

NORTH ELEVATION

WEST ELEVATION


fall 2013 third year studio

WOODLAND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

professor elizabeth grant six weeks

SECTION A-A

The Woodland Elementary School building aims to create a playful, collaborative learning environment through the division of the school into three-classroom “nests�. These nests provide ample spaces for group activities and exploratory learning as well as a sense of home within a larger school. There are two nests for each grade level, kindergarden through fifth, as well as a smaller nest that houses special education, preschool, and art and music rooms. The community is integrated into the school as well, with Parent-Teacher Association rooms adjacent to the administrative area of the building. VIEW 3

A

A

VIEW 2

CEFPI Virginia Chapter Student Design Competition Honorable Mention site: 4237 Prices Fork Rd, Blacksburg, VA

VIEW 1

SINGLE NEST PLAN 5 0 ft

20 10

40


At the core of each nest is a flexible space that can be closed off for quieter activities or opened up for large group activities or display space. This space acts as the trunk of a tree with classrooms and other open collaborative spaces branching out from it. The building itself brings students close to nature both in the woodland motif throughout and through nature-oriented learning opportunities around the building. A vegetative roof atop the cafeteria allows students to observe the process of growing some of the food that they will eat, and trellises stretching up the exterior will come alive with plants and seemingly immerse the classrooms in their own forests. The renderings to the right depict: Left: the interior of a classroom looking out through the trellis. Right: the flexible core space opened up and displaying student artwork. Bottom: view of the nest’s common spaces from the entrance to the nest that branches off the school’s main hallway. In this image, the core space is closed.


Primary Sustainability Features

FIRST

Shading system on all classroom windows to minimize solar heat gain in warmer months

2

SafePlug electrical outlets in classrooms and common spaces to save energy and teach students about energy efficiency Vegetative roof on top of cafeteria to teach students sustainable growing practices and healthy eating habits

KINDERGARTEN

2

1 1: Entrance with security 2: Administration 3: Community services 4: Health 5: Extension 6: Maintenance 7: Courtyard 8: Cafeteria 9: Support space 10: Secondary entrance 11: Gymnasium

7 8

10 11

KINDERGARTEN FIRST

1

150 100

3

9 3

first and site 50

5 4

PLANS 0 ft

6

200

SPECIAL ED./ PRE-K


FIFTH SECOND

FOURTH THIRD

13 12

FOURTH THIRD

12:Vegetative roof 13: Media center

FIFTH

PLANS

SECOND

second and third 50 0 ft

150 100

200

EXTENSION


fall 2013 third year studio

DUCK POND RESTROOM REDESIGN

third year competition nine days

This competition entry aims to create a light yet private restroom that fits into its environment while respecting natural processes and a Virginia Tech landmark. V I E W O N E : Situated into the site V I E W T W O: Interior space and shadows

prompt: redesign restroom facilities near Virginia Tech’s Duck Pond, taking sustianability and waste management/reuse into account.

A metal screen is secured to the sides of the enclosure and hovers above the translucent roof and walls. The screen’s random pattern casts shadows on and through the translucent surfaces, evoking the feeling of standing under a canopy of leaves.


FAMILY

MENS’ + F A M I LY a

a

plans and site 0 ft

5

10

20

denotes existing restroom

40

WOMENS’ + F A M I LY


The project reuses both waste and rain water from the site and puts it to use in the structure. A cistern is located underground at the southwest corner of the building. A gutter system drains rain water into it, as does the slope of the roof. The composting toilet and methane generator system are diagrammed and described below.

6. 5. 4.

2.

section a-a 0 1

5

COMPOST SYSTEM 1. Compost is collected. 2. Methane is given off by the compost and rises. 3. A methane powered generator converts methane to electricity. 4. This electricity is used to heat and power the space. 5. Pipe for raw material input 6. Pipe for maintenance

h. i. a.

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10

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3.

DETAIL CALLOUTS a. Interior wood finish j. A gutter filled with gravel b. Vapor barrier drains to the southeast c. 2x8 stud wall with corner, where water is batt insulation deposited into a cistern. d. Sheathing The water collected there e. Air space is used to flush the toilets. f. Waterproofing k. The roof membrane is g. Exterior wood finish made of 4 foot by 4 foot h. Parapet Thermogal polycarbonate i. Top plate thermal insulation panels with a frosted finish.


M O D E L P H OT O S


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This jersey design for the Chicago Fire Soccer Club jersey design contest is based off the Club’s motto: Tradition, Honor, Passion. The Fire’s winning tradition is displayed on the left sleeve, where stripes are made up of the five championships that the Fire have brought to Chicago. The right sleeve honors the Club’s legends by displaying the seven names of the members of their hall of fame (the Ring of Fire). Passion for the Fire and for Chicago is represented in the other elements of the jersey, most promiently the Chicago skyline and the four six-pointed red stars that appear on the Chicago flag.

fall 2013 CHICAGO SKYLINE POSTER one week This poster was designed for personal use. Full size 18” x 24”


spring 2013 HOLLY HOUSE CREST semester-long This crest was created for the Holly House, one of four houses of Virginia Tech’s Residential College at West Ambler Johnston. It is the result of a semester-long collaboration with residents of the house (approximately 240 residents) to determine what they believed would best represent the character of the house as a whole. The shield and crossed swords represent the Holly House’s competitive spirit, the griffin represents wisdom and honor, and the house motto, “simul exortæ” means “growing together” in Latin. The crest and other related designs are used in various applications for the House. The two logos below were developed for The Chocolate Sanctuary, Inc., a chocolate-themed restaurant that is in development in the Chicago area. The larger logo on the left is intended for signage and larger applications, while the smaller logo will be used in smaller applications, such as embossing onto chocolates to be sold in the restaurant’s chocolate and wine boutique. These and accompanying materials (menus, calling cards) will be used during the development and operation of the restaurant.

spring 2014 THE CHOCOLATE SANCTUARY ongoing


THANK YOU

for your consideration

Allison Baker abaker13@vt.edu 630.217.0722



Allison Baker: Portfolio Years 1-3