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Whenever I see a picture of Hilda Ogden, I get that warm homely feeling. 45 years ago every Monday and Wednesday we would sit with beans on toast watching Hilda, Stan, Ena, Minnie, Ken, Bet and Mrs Walker do their stuff. Coronation Street was an institution to us; it was part of our home, so I saw with sadness the death of Jean Alexander in 2016, the iconic Hilda Ogden. She made us laugh, she made us real, and after all those years her spirit still pervades Allied London’s Old Granada Studios. We will ensure the memory lives on.

Michael Ingall Chief Executive, Allied London

Hilda Ogden 1964 -1987 Jean Alexander 1926-2016

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Welcome Welcome back to the second edition of ALL Magazine and what a great year it’s been. We coined ALL an ‘enterprise, arts and property’ magazine when we launched it, in a somewhat impossible attempt to encapsulate what it is we do here at Allied London. It is the final word, ‘property’ so persistently successful in rousing enthusiasm in both young and old, that animates me the most, because it is so very wide and all-embracing. Property is your first home, your favourite restaurant, a new art gallery to explore. It is the facilitator of culture and the mother of progress. The term ‘development’ too, so powerful in its potential, can be substituted with words such as evolution, growth, maturing, blossoming, success, scope. Property is where we live our everyday lives and it is the opportunity to grow, innovate and change. It is with that every day detail that we operate at Allied London.

I’ve been lucky enough to have a co-pilot for this second edition, in the form of Tom Ingham, our new comms and content exec in Manchester. A huge thank you for your incredible writing skills; you have brought life to the pages of ALL with style and energy. Massive thanks also to our other editorial contributors: Clancy Walker, Andy Morgan, Jonathan Schofield, Sam Jarrett, Ted Hewins, Grace Cooper, Phil Dawson, Tim Gee, Kerry Clark, Mel Jones, Tanya Grady, Laura Gill, Kim Waddle, Rochelle Silverstein, James Sidlow, Millie Killeen, David Drews and every member of Allied staff who participated in the Rituals and Routines project. Enormous thanks also to our infallible photographer, Karen Wright (where would we be without you?!) and the very brilliant ALL Magazine designer, Mark Eccles of Soko Studio.

We care deeply about the envelope of the space; its architecture, design, layout and flow, and well into the minutiae of how you want to live your every day in our developments. From the finish of a tap, or the way you’ll book a meeting room, to the way you might ask for a restaurant recommendation. 2016 saw us take every step of this process inhouse to make sure it works for you, the consumer and you, the tenant.

We would love to hear your feedback on ALL Magazine. We’re running an Instagram competition for a free 10 course tasting meal for four at Spinningfields’ Manchester House. Just upload a photo of yourself with your favourite ALL article to @startersmcr on Instagram or Twitter to be in with the chance of winning. The competition will close at midnight on June 30th 2017, with the winner announced in July.

ALL Magazine is a slice of that pie; a looking glass into the way we are developing our urban landscapes in an ever-moving global society, a snippet of what we do and what we are passionate about. We’ve been lucky again to talk with some fantastic people, businesses and innovators for this issue and we hope it’s an inspiring read.

As always please do get in touch with any feedback, comments or ideas at all@alliedlondon.com Until next time, Daisy Barnes Editor, ALL Magazine

Front Cover London 33 Cork Street, London W1S 3NQ 0207 758 4000 Leeds Leeds Dock The Boulevard Leeds LS10 1PZ 0113 243 0111

Manchester HQ Building 2nd Floor 2 Atherton Street Manchester M3 3GS 0161 834 8640

SPRING 2017 | ISSUE 2

alliedlondon.com A PUBLICATION BY

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This issue's front cover is of the iconic 'Coronation Street' character, Hilda Ogden. Played by Jean Alexander who passed away in 2016, Hilda was arguably the most popular character in the soap's history with her trademark hair curlers and head scarf. Hilda's look influenced much of Britain's 'granny chic' 60s style and made impact as far as New York. Coronation Street is the world's longest-running TV soap opera in production and was filmed at Granada Studios, Quay Street, Manchester, before moving to Salford in 2013.


10 The Production House: OGS

25 Ted Talks

40 City Scoping: Lisbon

Contents 40

City Scoping: Lisbon Through the Senses

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Making Technology work for you

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The Future of our Cities: Bringing the Outside In

Tech Tales: Bringing Buildings to Life 2.0

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London Road Fire Station: A Lifelong Community

Leftovers: How much food are you wasting?

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The Rise and Rise of the Experience Seeker

Homegrown to Home Cooked: Local, Leeds, Life

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Ted Talks: Friday Floating Houses

Suspended Spaces Explored @ Spinningfields and Leeds Dock

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The Where we Work: Wacky Offices Debriefed

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Soundtrack to Success: By Handlebar Coffee

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Bringing Home the Bonded: An Architect’s Account

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Find Your Story

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Support to Work: The Business of Hope

Small Business, Big Ideas: Noir Agency

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Rituals and Routines

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Britain's Movers and Makers: The UK Furniture Industry

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A note from Allied London's Chief Executive: Brexit, Trump and Jean Alexander

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The Production House: Old Granada Studios, St. John’s

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A note from Michael Ingall, Allied London's Chief Executive

No.1 Spinningfields topping out ceremony with BAM and guests, February 2017

Brexit, Trump and Jean Alexander.

stead for the last 17 years. Now, more than ever we must continue to be bold, whilst being careful to closely consider every move we make that involves the risk of capital.

What a year 2016 has been: the art of the possible.

We completed XYZ in 2016, our original workplace disruptor building and are well on the way to completing No.1 Spinningfields - a 20-storey world-class office later this year. It will be almost 20 years to the day from when we began construction to when we complete No 1. Spinningfields, which will be our last development within Spinningfields, the last piece of the puzzle. A remarkable achievement, to have created and completed an entire city neighbourhood. We will feel proud and may even celebrate, but really its success is a testament to our outstanding partnership with Manchester City Council.

I'm glad to say that Allied London has come through the last year well and brimming with new ideas, concepts, and ways of making our development programme really exciting. I have no doubt we have yet to feel the full brunt of Brexit, but I believe that we are coming into a time of hope and possibility for businesses and individuals, with a Government that we hope will do us well. With divisive politics over the pond too, we continue our endeavours to own and develop the very best assets in the UK. At Allied, whatever we do or touch must be the best; there is no second best for us. We want to excel in everything we do. Some may call it ego but I call it ambition, and it has held us in good

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This partnership will be the backbone of our next neighbourhood, St. John's, encompassing large-scale arts facility, Factory, residential towers, Nickel and Dime and Enterprise City, our creative and digital workspace group.


Enterprise City (ECUK) will consist of five unique buildings for enterprise: Globe and Simpson, Manchester Goods Yard, South Village, Bonded Warehouse and of course Old Granada Studios. We are designing a programme of support for all businesses here, from start-ups to grown-ups, so the essence of place goes far beyond the physical building. There is a sideways strategy here to keep people on the site and allow them to grow with us. We are fast approaching construction on site and are delighted to have the likes of Soho House group, Crystal Maze, Manchester International Festival and Nadler Hotels already part of our growing community. They will be joined by a number of operations designed by our own operating companies, the newly launched ALL Studios and ALL Work, currently operating the Old Granada Studios Film and TV and co-work space, OGS Works.

Our residential sales at St. John's South Village and The Tower at St. John's Place have surpassed our expectations and we will be holding a launch event for the further phases in the summer of this year. St. John's is without doubt going to be our best development yet. Down South, London is really picking up pace as our Herbal House project in Farringdon reaches completion. We have a growing demand from media, tech and creative businesses all coming together to create London's best factory workspace. A wise man once said "don't wait too long, you may miss your chance". It is going to be quite something.

Manchester Goods Yard and one of two Nickel and Dime Towers

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Inside St. John's Place Tower

St. John's Place Tower, View from Quay Street

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Herbal House


South Village, St. John'sÂ

At this point, with personal sadness I wish a happy retirement to Sir Howard Bernstein, Chief Executive of Manchester City Council. Sir Howard has been our partner and to me, so often an unconscious mentor. He knows when to inspire and encourage and he knows when to appreciate and consider; these are rare skills but he is a rare man, without whom Manchester will need to take time to readjust.

Michael Ingall & Sir Howard Bernstein

He has style and with it, Sir Howard delivered a huge agenda for Manchester, the list of achievements is long, but then so are his qualities: honesty, intelligence, experience, integrity, and transparency. These are qualities of a fine and confident man, who I worked with for 20 years and who has become a great friend. I will greatly miss working with Howard, who I have no doubt will continue to do great work in various capacities. I can't see Sir Howard sitting at home! I hope you enjoy our second edition of ALL Magazine, thanks to Daisy Barnes for bringing together a great publication, and to all our budding writers, contributing to our second annual report with a difference. Thanks also to all our consultants and partners for their continued support as we strive to great things in our industry. Best wishes,

Michael Ingall

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Old Granada TV Studios

The Production House: Granada Studios, St. John’s The historic Old Granada Studios is an idiosyncratic maze of studio spaces, recording facilities, green rooms, a co-working hub and offices. Once home to some of the most cherished TV shows in the UK, this building has a rich and varied heritage that is still celebrated to this date. Whilst the past is ever present around here, the future is becoming just as interesting. Following the recent announcement of the revival of the Old Granada Studios in March 2017, OGS at St. John's, run by new Allied London company, ALL Studios will once more provide valuable studio space for the Film, TV and Music Industries. Designed by architect Ralph Tubbs and influenced by Sidney Bernstein, Old Granada was built in 1954 and started broadcasting to the North of England on weekdays in 1956. The world's longest running soap Coronation Street was filmed on Quay Street for 53 years, as were popular TV shows University Challenge, The Royle Family and World in Action. The New York Times described Granada as 'the finest television company in the world'.

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In 1982 the Studios expanded, making use of the Bonded Warehouse for the outdoor scenes on Corrie. The Bonded was also used during this time to store sets and costumes as well as housing the Baker Street set for The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. Following these expansions, Grape Street was absorbed into the Granada site. The Studios closed in June 2013 and were bought by Allied London, now forming an integral part of the new St. John's development. “Filming has increased threefold since I joined in May 2016. We’ve done no marketing of the spaces, it’s all been through word of mouth” says Kerry Clark, Assistant Estate Manager for Allied London. “The demand for our studios has been astounding”. “Most recently Old Granada Studios has been home to the BBC production ‘To Walk Invisible’ along with US/UK collaboration ‘Snatch’ TV Series starring Harry Potter’s Rupert Grint and Gossip Girl’s Ed Westwick, among others. It’s really showed us the potential for this wonderful, historical property we have in our hands and so far our interaction into the world of film and television has really been positive”.


Chat show set at OGS

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DJ Shadow performing at Old Granada Studios, October 2016

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Granada TV HQ

Piers Read, former Founder and MD of Wimbledon Film & TV Studios, who has joined Allied London to head up ALL Studios commented “The reason we are bringing the Old Granada Studios back to their original purpose and design is simply market-led. Demand for studio space in the UK is at an all-time high and ALL Studios must be at the forefront of this new market for Manchester. Over the past decade Manchester has done a great job putting itself on the media map. It now has a chance to become the go-to city for film, TV and music over the next five years and we are uniquely positioned to cater to the demands and needs of this growing market.” The idea of Old Granada transmitting to just the North of England in the 1950’s seems alien now in an age of global video streaming. Fast forward half a century or so, and our TV’s have become vast portals, allowing the viewer to peruse hundreds of channels and the reigns of the remote have been evolved by the likes of Netflix and Amazon Prime. Landmark sitcoms like The Sopranos and Breaking Bad have demonstrated how cinematic tales with exceptional writing can travel across the globe. Now, the appetite for quality viewing, around the clock, has driven demand, and producers have turned to the UK, and in particular the North for studios space. For consumers, the age of ‘Peak Television’ means that streaming services and broadcasters are constantly fighting to bring new, original series, as well as procuring the classics – like Amazon Prime’s recent acquisition of US mega-sitcom, Seinfeld. Born in 1997, Netflix now has over 75 million subscribers. Turning over the channel now equates to cancelling a service. Affordable costs are big business in this industry and with the announced closure of the ITV Studios on London’s South Bank in February 2017, production in the North is a lucrative option. Combined with the unique nature of the filming spaces themselves,

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Everything Everything at Low Four, Old Granada Studios

TV and film crews are queuing up to get into the new OGS Studios. OGS tenants themselves are also keeping the legacy alive with a constant stream of creative and curated output. Low Four Studios is an ultra HD, online music channel that has been streaming the likes of Poliça, Dutch Uncles and Everything Everything live to the world from Old Granada Studios, St. John’s. Curated by Salford Uni Lecturer, Dan Parrott and music producer Brendan Williams, these historic studio walls once saw The Beatles rehearse before their television debut on Granada in 1962. Low Four is bricks and mortar, as a music channel it gives every act the same platform and tools to do with what they want, there’s no hiding. “Our raison d’etre is to create our own legacy and not to be simply upholding the existing, this is perhaps and often in response to a continuing problem that younger Manchester artists and audiences struggle with. Manchester's musical legacy is important and should be celebrated but this should not be at the expense of the future”, commented Low Four's Parrott. The curators of Low Four aren’t interested in running a conveyor belt of artists who happen to be hot right now. There’s much more of an investment in talent and in the city here; new acts have the chance to record for free with some of Manchester’s best producers, and more established artists have the chance to create something unique and intimate in these historic surroundings. With the likes of Low Four, Reform Radio (see page 34), ALL Film and TV Studios and other St. John’s projects, Manchester’s production house looks set to carry on creating.

By Tom Ingham

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Trinity Islands Vertical Village

The Future of our Cities: Bringing the Outside In

Our cities are growing at a rapid rate. Look up in any urban environment and you’ll undoubtedly see a mixture of cranes, scaffolding and half-built structures. As a nation we’re on the up. As of February 2017, there were over 65 million people in the UK, 81.9% of whom are urban residents. Yet figures by the ONS, printed in the Telegraph suggest that by 2025 there will be a 6% increase of rural inhabitants, leading to a major boom in England’s countryside economy.

One such trend that mirrors the human inclination towards open and natural spaces is the ‘greening effect’ of urban buildings. Bringing the outside in appeases our natural human instinct and alleviates the ‘cold’ development effect. It is also a playful way of having some fun in our new spaces.

Lamented for over-pollution, crowded transport and squashed housing, are cities getting themselves a bad reputation? Liz Truss commented, when Secretary of State for the Environment that: “there’s a myth out there that innovation happens in cities, that it happens in major towns. In fact, we’re seeing lots of innovation, lots of exports, new technology start-ups, in rural areas.”

The Cool Hunter wrote that: “Green is in. In more ways than one. We are seeing more plants and greenery in designer homes, hotels, restaurants, offices and public spaces than ever before. It is clear that we crave more nature in our lives. We want the benefits that being in nature can give us and a lifestyle that includes time spent outdoors, not just on special occasions but regularly, as part of our everyday lives.”

How then can our cities evolve? To endure as the best places for innovation, inspiration and business opportunity but also as desirable places for living and not just places for passing through. Developers are having to think up increasingly innovative ways to respond to these questions and create new trends to keep our cities ahead of the curve.

In China they are even creating ‘plant-power’ buildings that have pollution-fighting properties. Designed by Steffano Boeri architects and known as ‘forest buildings’, they could provide a solution to urban China’s severe air pollution problems.

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Underground burrow office in Madrid

The two special buildings, which are due to be completed by 2018 will be home to more than 1,000 trees and 2,500 shrubs and bushes. The greenery should absorb the pollution in the air, helping to filter and make it cleaner as well as producing clean oxygen for the inhabitants of the Chinese city of Nanjing to enjoy. Clever architecture is also being employed across the globe to allow nature to infiltrate our built spaces. In Korea’s second largest city Busan, The Waveon café by IDMM architects comprises a series of concrete volumes, stacked and rotated to optimise views of the East Sea. As quoted in Dezeen the architects commented: "Depending on where and how we see the beach, the sea shows diverse views for us. The significant matter of this project is how we can grasp and deal with the relationship between natural scenery and architecture." “Spanish studio, Selgas Cano went with the “Into the woods” concept by building their Madrid office underground. Iwan Baan had made an underground burrow with a transparent roof so that employees can view the trees above them. Their office space is painted with lime green to make the office’s ambiance cool and pleasing to the eyes.” (From an excerpt by interior-guru.com) Both projects perfectly juxtapose the utilising of new materials and existing vistas, both of which work better when they work together.

Waveon café in Korea

Forest buildings in China

Allied London is also bringing a new green public realm area to Spinningfields for 2017. The Field, which will be on the doorstep of new office building, No.1 Spinningfields will house drinking and dining options as well as green gardens for all to enjoy. A city ever keen to revolutionise, other Manchester initiatives include ‘City of Trees’, an innovative and exciting movement set to reinvigorate Greater Manchester’s landscape by transforming underused, unloved woodland and planting 3 million trees – one for every man, woman and child who lives there, within a generation.

Breakout space at Hok London's Fitzrovia office

Tony Hothersall at City of Trees, commented: “Trees are an essential part of the future of any city or town. They create healthier, happier communities, help combat climate change and provide essential habitats for wildlife. City of Trees has ambitious goals and in order to realise them we need organisations from across the City region to come together and put trees and green infrastructure firmly on the agenda”.

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The Field and Pavilion, Spinningfields

Cities are growing at a faster rate than any other habitat on Earth. David Attenborough’s Planet Earth 2 asks: “As the architects of the urban jungle, can humans choose to build cities that are homes for both them and wildlife?” It is clear that cities need to embrace many of the characteristics of their rural cousin to continue to evolve. This will need to be actioned on a much larger scale and the positive effects will need to be felt by a much denser – and more varied population of inhabitants. But more and more the need to consider the ‘green effect’ is born out of as much necessity as it is style. Whereas previously supposed as a duty of care to nature, perhaps the relationship is more symbiotic than we previously thought? It would appear that the need for nature in our urban environments is as crucial for the wellbeing of humans now as much as it is for the benefit of wildlife. With the Pantone colour of 2017 announced as green too, it feels as though this movement is not going anywhere fast.

By Daisy Barnes

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Väkst Restaurant, Copenhagen


Some quick-fire foliage facts (courtesy of The Cool Hunter)

Indoor plants release oxygen and absorb carbon dioxide.

In England, a Royal College of Agriculture study found that students were 70 per cent more attentive in rooms containing plants. The results of the same study indicated that attendance was higher for lectures given in classrooms with plants.

A Norwegian study showed that using plants indoors decreased the incidents of dry skin, colds, sore throats and dry coughs.

A study by the Agricultural University in Norway found that adding plants to offices resulted in sickness rates decreasing by more than 60 per cent.

A Kansas State University study found that when plants were introduced into hospital rooms, patients asked for less pain medication, had lower heart rates and blood pressure, and less anxiety and fatigue. All of this lead to shorter hospital stays and ultimately, cost savings.

Former Rotterdam Steam Factory turned office by jvantspijker studio

Photo by: RenĂŠ de Wit

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London Road Fire Station: A Lifelong Community

Public Drill Display, October 1956. Held as part of London Road's 50th Jubilee celebrations.

Lord Mayor Thewlis declared London Road “the finest fire station in the world” when it opened in 1906. A symbol of civic pride and a representation of Manchester’s standing in an imperial age, this Grade II Listed building was home to not only firefighters, but their families too, and over the course of its life as a fire station it witnessed births, deaths, weddings, break-ups and a fair few merry nights, until its closure in 1986. London Road Fire Station was a centre of excellence for The British Empire and recruits travelled up from as close as Oxfordshire, and as far reaching as Africa. Children weren’t allowed in the courtyard during the week, for fear of interrupting drills, instead they would play on the balconies and watch events from above. Chief Fire Officer Bayliss, a tinker's son from Wiltshire, worked his way up to the top ranks and lived at London Road with his nine children. The other officers occupied the 38 flats, with most of their children attending what is now the Manchester College, also built as a statement reflecting Manchester’s success and wealth.

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Paddy Moore, a retired fireman, recalls the Fire Station’s sense of community “I have good memories of working and living there, it was of a parochial nature – although it was in the city centre, everyone knew everyone else”. Those who passed the rigorous and demanding physical tests and exams to work at London Road, cherished it. “It’s a special building because it was not just the fire station, it was a community within the centre of Manchester” says Alex Heap, a retired fireman. “It’s completely over the top” says Bob Bonner of the Greater Manchester Fire Service Museum “It’s got statues and sculptures – there’s never been a fire station so ornate. It’s magnificent”. Such an extravagant building caused some controversy at the time, but in its relatively short life it became a much-loved Manchester landmark, and still to this day greets visitors and residents to the city.


The Engine House, 1956

A procedural 'jumping sheet' drill practice, as common in Victorian and Edwardian years

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We knew it was something special, it was like being sent to a naval college. You realised you were touching something historical and special. It’s not just bricks and mortar, it had been living and breathing for 60 years. I felt privileged to be allowed to work in there. Left to Right: Vincent Gillibrand, John Godman, Les Reid, Bob Bonner, Geoff Bottomley, Ron McGregor

The family element is a crucial part of the London Road Fire Station story. People lived, socialised and created memories here, as Lynne Bairstow, a retired firewoman recalls “It was my first station. I’ve cried, I’ve laughed, made good friends and met my husband there – I became part of the London Road Family. She (London Road) needs to be warm and friendly – brought back to how she was – for people to go in that building and say wow, it’s fantastic, because it really is”. With the creation of Greater Manchester in 1974, the fire station slowly fell into disrepair, becoming too expensive to keep fully operational. Naturally, the closure of such an iconic building was a huge disappointment to those who had lived and worked there.

In March 1986, the officers held a closing party for around 600 people. At midnight, amongst the merriment, a fire engine came through the doors and brought the station's flag down. Meanwhile a lone piper under spotlight played Amazing Grace, bringing a tear to everyone in the fire station – well, those not too intoxicated to notice proceedings. Alan Hardman, the last officer in 1986, chopped up one of the fireman’s poles and took it with him as memorabilia. London Road Fire Station was not just the result of a moment of great wealth in Manchester, it was a fully functioning human building that went right to the heart of the city.

Special thanks to Jonathan Schofield, tour guide at London Road Fire Station and to Bob Bonner, head of Greater Manchester Fire Service Museum. By Tom Ingham

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A children's bedroom at London Road as photographed in 2016

Michael Joseph Askew, (left) 3rd generation firefighter who served and lived at London Road Fire Station between 1906 – 1974

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The Rise and Rise of the Experience Seeker Generation Z, those born between 1995-2000 (they’re the ones after the Millennials) are driving the charge of the experience seeker. Less hedonistic than the 90s thrill seeker, the experience seeker is motivated by making things happen. Digitally intuitive doers, driven by new experiences, they engage with the world through stories and are always on the lookout for creative inspiration. Although many are just now coming of drinking age, the way in which Generation Z operates is already making waves in the hospitality industry worldwide. With new restaurants, bars and, hotels popping up near daily we, the consumer now want something more to stimulate our senses. “Give us intrigue, drama, something unusual. Please.” comments The Cool Hunter “We at Allied London have always sought to create experiences as typified by our Brunswick, Bloomsbury and Spinningfields, Manchester developments,” comments Michael Ingall, Allied London’s Chief Executive. “We want to provide experience, both through a curated mix of commercial operators and via our own concepts, which can serve as inspiration for our potential tenants or become operations we run inhouse. “The Oast House, The Lawn Club and The Kitchens at Spinningfields are unique and acclaimed Allied London concepts that we have developed and/or operated. At Leeds Dock we created hospitality and events venue, Dock 29, a much-needed ‘local’, providing social glue for the Leeds Dock community.”

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Now, 2017 sees Allied London taking hospitality concepts to the next level, by launching an operational brand, called ALL Concepts. Ingall continues: “At London Road Fire Station we are going to work on two ALL Concepts at the Engine House and the Coroners Court; one a hospitality venue with a difference and the other will be a new music and meeting institution. “At Spinningfields’ XYZ Building, we will be launching X & Y Work and X & Y Club, a private members space, business lounge and events venue aimed to harness Spinningfields’ growing digital scene.” Over at St. John’s Enterprise City plans are underway to launch a multi purpose hospitality and event venue in the Bonded Warehouse in Manchester. Ingall concluded: "ALL Concepts will be a number of things for us, from concept designer as part of a marketing strategy for our developments to a translator and operator, where we want to offer a new and varied experience to the consumer. “ALL Concepts is a new Allied London business with us investing our own capital into our ideas, with the intention of adding serious value to our developments alongside unprecedented consumer experiences.”

To whet your appetite and offer a flavour of what’s to come, we have done a little experience seeking of our own to bring you some of the globe's best Ex-Factor destinations.


Faena Hotel, Miami Beach For those of you who've dreamt of diving into your favourite movie, there's an emerging trend that sees Hollywood meet hospitality. A growing number of film directors are designing their own leisure operations across the globe, from Wes Anderson's Grand Budapest Hotel inspired 'Bar Luce' in Milan, to David Lynch's 'Club Silencio' in Paris, which is an arts members club by day and a public bar come evening. The latest to diversify his portfolio is acclaimed director Baz Luhrmann, who has recently created the new Faena Hotel in Miami Beach for the Faena hotel group. Famous for his iconic, flamboyant sets on The Great Gatsby, Romeo and Juliet and Moulin Rouge, Luhrmann's Faena opened in December 2016 and is a luxurious explosion of colour, art and glamour. The perfect spot for anyone wanting to live the life of a movie star. Even just for one day. Disclaimer: Leonardo DiCaprio not included.

Faena Hotel, Miami Beach

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Manchester House, Spinningfields

Pancakes at The Wolseley

WC, Clapham Common, London A converted loo might not sound like a place you’d want to eat your dinner, but this place is one of South London’s most treasured haunts. This once public toilet has reinvented the meaning behind the letters WC from ‘Water Closet’ to ‘Wine and Charcuterie’ and it’s been on a winning streak ever since. The venue sits directly on top of Clapham Common tube station and is a dusty, underground spot that stays true to its 100-year-old heritage. The wine (as to be expected) is an experience for your tastebuds and the perfectly cured meats are served alongside an oozy, gooey array of effortless cheeses. The tartiflette trumps anything I’ve ever tasted in the mountains and is a must. Go hungry and expect to leave sufficiently intoxicated. WC is a small place so there will likely be a queue but add your name to the list - head over to the nearby Wetherspoons while you wait ;) and before you know it you’ll be whisked away to your very own WC.

By Daisy Barnes

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Breakfast at The Wolseley, St. James's, London One of the greatest British institutions of our time, breakfast at The Wolseley is Great Britain at its very best. So great that this much-celebrated morning ritual now has its own book. "Breakfast is everything. The beginning, the first thing. It is the mouthful that is the commitment to a new day, a continuing life," writes the late A. A. Gill in the introduction to his book 'Breakfast at The Wolseley'. Elect for Eggs Benedict, Grilled Kipper with Mustard Butter, Pancakes with Berries or Haggis with Fried Duck eggs. A visit is a must for any experience seeker, yet if a reservation is proving tricky, allow A. A. Gill to offer you an insightful glimpse into this perfect British brasserie, one page at a time….

Manchester House, Spinningfields, Manchester One of Living Ventures’ finest establishments, Manchester House has been impressing its diners since 2013. As written in The Essential Journal, “making fine dining accessible to all is a philosophy central to Manchester House, and it was important to Aiden Byrne to devise a lunch menu which offers excellent value for money without compromising on the experience.” Regional produce, style backed by substance and outstanding views of the city centre have cemented Manchester’s House place in the heart of locals and culinary-explorers alike.

If you'd like to experience Manchester House for yourself, skip back to page 4 to enter our competition to win a 10 course tasting menu for four.


Ted Talks Ted Talks? A global series of non-profit, idea-spreading talks, right? Well not quite… Ted Talks, a new feature for All Magazine sees Ted Hewins, from Allied London’s Refurb Team get under the skin of an innovative global business. This issue he’s getting to know Professor Fernando Seabra Santos, Founder and CEO of Go FRIDAY FloatWing® floating houses, based in Portugal. Launched only in 2016, the company has already turned over 1 M €

sales in its first year of production activity. Ted, who began his Allied London career on the Leeds Dock team, spent one solid week, researching workspace environments for Leeds Dock’s forthcoming co-work space, Dock Work. Uncovering Friday on his search as a benchmark for new-age waterside structures, their product was an inspiration to the Leeds Dock team.

By Ted Hewins

For Friday, the future will always be a Treasure Island, the happiest day of the week, when all the expectations are permitted and the weekend spirit emerges in all its marvelous power.

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Only a well-organised company can produce good results without a great deal of permanent effort.

Ted Hewins: Why do you think a growing number of people are attracted to living/working on the water? Fernando Seabra Santos: The appeal of water, which we clearly perceive to be growing, comes more from the need to escape the confusion and hustle and bustle of the city, whether for a weekend getaway, a longer stay, for a place of work or even in a permanent way in the context of an alternative lifestyle.

Are people attracted to the sense of having no fixed abode? The house has a highly modular design (more than three hundred different standard lay-outs) and can be shipped to almost anywhere on the planet. So whether people are looking for a cosy studio or a fully furnished three-bedroom house, the freedom of nature can always be within reach in a FloatWing速. A romantic getaway for two or a mobile house in the middle of a lake for the entire family or a group of friends: the possibilities are almost endless.

In a digital age, are people switching off to switch on? How does the Floatwing速 enable this? The recent evolution of communication technologies has radically transformed our lives. The evident

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advantages it provides are, however, accompanied by a strong sense of limitation of our freedom, as we are permanently connected and therefore supervised, controlled and exposed. The emergence of a growing public seeking to break free from this pressure can help explain the success of FloatWing速. The FloatWing速 spirit allows us to regain control of our state of connection to the world for a period of time, ranging from a weekend to several months. The house produces all the energy it needs, most of which comes directly from the Sun (from 40% up to 100% depending on the location, the season and level of equipment). It has been designed with materials to reduce environmental impact and technologies that reduce its carbon footprint and lower its energy needs. With a fully equipped kitchen for everyday use, air conditioning system and AC generator, a barbecue on the upper terrace for sunny days and a wine cellar and pellet stove to keep us warm on cold days, the list of facilities included guarantees a great living experience in full autonomy. For me, I have no doubt in choosing a restful and welcoming environment to escape the secondary distractions present in our daily lives and to focus on a specific project. A positive trend is emerging, showing that a growing number of professionals are now willing to work outside of the traditional frame of a typical office in a big city to find a place where ultimately productivity is enhanced.


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The FloatWing® is a good example of innovative design where neither practicality nor architectural integrity are compromised. How has your team managed to achieve this? Taken separately, the ideas behind the FloatWing® concept (a floating house, thermal insulation, solar technology, environmental concerns, pre-fabrication, modular design) were not really innovative. However, put together, they produce a highly innovative product that is, in many aspects, unique to the world market. The interdisciplinary development team worked closely to form a well-integrated product where all elements of the design were considered. With limitations on space, the shapes, the materials, the equipment and the dimensions were always designed with architectural, structural, electrical, mechanical and environmental characteristics in mind.

Can you tell us a bit more about your business start-up journey? I cannot say that everything turned out as we had planned. The company faced many complex problems within the first few years of creation, as can be expected with any technologically focused start-up. The company was created as a university spin-off, and planned to work together with an industrial partner. This industrial partner meanwhile withdrew from the process. This challenge obliged us to reformulate the company's strategy and resulted in the company creating our own production unit capable of producing the orders that were beginning to emerge. Our marketing strategy was based on a traditional approach; presence at international shows, articles in media publications and online via architectural sites.

The leading venture capital fund in Portugal, elected Friday as one of their key investments. Do you have any advice on finding investment? We don't know any miraculous way to find the right investor. The rule is that we must present as much as possible; our company, our products, our vision, our strategy, our goals, our challenges, our achievements, and expect that somewhere, someone, somehow considers the possibility and interest of investing in us. The investment of Portugal Ventures (PV) occurred in March 2014 and was key to the development of the company. Not only because of the financial investment but also by the skills and advice that PV brought aboard.

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How do you disperse the ‘Friday’ culture? Throughout the challenges, our company has maintained the marketing slogan of “Responsible Fun” meaning that we want to provide our clients with access to a better life without harming the environment or compromising its sustainability. Our internal culture embodies a ‘carefree corporate’ attitude, which is to be understood as an internal counterpart of our external marketing slogan: "Responsible Fun". The slogan is our goal for the ultimate criteria of effectiveness: only a well-organised company can produce good results without a great deal of permanent effort.

What’s next for Friday? For Friday, the future will always be a Treasure Island, the happiest day of the week, when all the expectations are permitted and the weekend spirit emerges in all its marvelous power. gofriday.eu

Leeds Dock will be launching floating workspaces later this year. For more information see leedsdock.com or follow @LeedsDock on Twitter and Instagram.


Photo by: Francisco Nogueira

Uniplaces Headquarters, Lisbon, Portugal

The Where we Work: Wacky Offices Debriefed In business, appearances matter. The immutable sea of grey suits and sensible haircuts on The Apprentice sets the tone; Lord Sugar wants someone stereotypically corporate and slick. Neckties tend to pull rank over tie-dye when it comes to doing business in this arena.

Comfort can come in many forms. Many co-working hubs and businesses allow people to hot desk and work from a variety of locations, rather than sitting in the same spot all day. Not only does this bring comfort, but it caters to the kind of flexibility the modern worker needs.

But is the reverse now true? Does an apparent lack of office guidelines, casual attire and table football make you a ‘creative agency’?

In a Stylist study into ‘what makes a good workplace’ flexible hours and good opportunities ranked much higher than a cool office and high salaries, which came in at 2.7% and 8.5% respectively. Friendly colleagues and inspiring leaders also came in high at 14.3% and 17.4%.

In Manchester, the ‘cool’ office is becoming a must for those in creative sectors, but does a beer fridge (which inevitably carries implicit rules) make you the real deal? Could a cold can of craft beer now be the secret to winning you a client? A working environment is more than just a place for the bosses to keep an eye on their employees, it’s a space that should be instrumental in aiding teams to reach their objectives. If your office often has to work long hours to devise innovative campaigns, then undoubtedly having an area for staff to let off some steam and unwind is a good thing. But being funky for the sake of it is futile. A YouGov poll found that British workers placed comfort as their top priority in their working environment. 61% of workers also said that a ‘non-traditional’ office improved their productivity.

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Numerous offices are trying to take heed of this shift in priorities and Skullcandy’s offices in Zurich feature moveable desks, aimed at improving collaboration. Moving furniture may seem a tad laborious, but the opportunity for staff to set-up shop in quiet, cosy spaces for detailed work cannot be underestimated. More hospitality-driven areas for informal meetings can create an atmosphere conducive to group or brainstorming activities. A primary school in Derby has taken to encouraging its pupils to wear slippers in lessons after a teacher came across research that found the relaxed approach to ‘comfort’ footwear improved academic results. The decade-long study, by researchers at Bournemouth University, found that allowing pupils to remove their

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Herbal House Ground Floor

9 ¾ Bookstore and Café in Medellin, Colombia

shoes, as is custom in Scandinavia, helped them to engage better in class. (As cited in The Guardian 31st January 2017). Scott Lesizza of workplace furniture provider Workwell comments in an excerpt from OnOfficeMagazine.com; “As an employer, it’s important to provide office amenities that promote an environment where great ideas blossom and a sense of community grows. But also be conscious that these reflect a mature company (hint: no beer pong). Some of the best office programming includes multiple collaborative work zones, because no one likes to spend all day at their desk. These spaces can be laid-back lounges with more comfortable seating arrangements where meetings can happen outside of the everyday conference room.” So are slides and beanbags redundant? Well, not necessarily if you need a strong team bond centred around fun and a laid-back approach. But an office has a huge impact on our day, and while gimmicks can

seem the quickest and easiest option, your fit-out may require more thought. A Virgin study found that employees stay when they are: paid well, mentored, challenged, promoted, involved, appreciated, valued, on a mission, empowered and trusted. So a pool table might not be the solution to all your HR requirements. If we’re to take stats and feelings common to us all, the ability to work in a well-lit, comfortable environment with spaces to break-out and chat are a must. The questions we need to ask are, how do we want our employees to work together? How can environment improve their productivity and morale? Do we need to make a song and dance about a keg of lager, or do we need some comfy sofas in a quiet corner of the office? Answers on an ironic, 90’s TV show note-pad please.

By Tom Ingham

Allied London has commissioned a study into the ‘creativity of the workplace’ in partnership with Creative Review Magazine. To take part in or read the results of the project report, due to be published in April 2017 please email all@alliedlondon.com

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B.Sorted offices in Bucharest

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Bringing Home the Bonded: An Architect’s Account With Grace Cooper.

Towards the end of 2016, Allied London employed its second inhouse architect, Grace Cooper. As part of a wider strategy to have a greater design steer over how our spaces evolve, Grace has spent the best part of her time at Allied London working on the Bonded Warehouse at St. John’s Enterprise City. A former industrial warehouse, built in 1869, the Bonded Warehouse was used to store maize, tobacco and flour throughout the 1900s. Repurposed in 1982 for use as television studios, rehearsal space and offices by Granada TV, the space is to be redeveloped again in 2017 to become a stripped-back, modern warehouse workspace. Coming with great historic significance and great expectations for its future form, re-purposing the Bonded is no mean feat. “We’ll strip it back to its original form,” Grace comments, “We are maintaining the heritage features, including the magnificent timber roof trusses and introducing a carefully selected assortment of new ones.”

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The intention is that the Bonded will become the new home of Allied London’s Manchester HQ, existing co-work space OGS Works and a great number of existing Old Granada Studios tenants. It will also have a number of recording studios with an option to submit planning for public-facing retail units on street level and is expecting to have a full house when it opens later in 2017. How you update a timeworn building, whilst making it work for a number of diverse uses is a process of great detail and one that required an element of uncovering. To decode the stages of restoring a dormant asset, Grace talked me through her Tender Package for the Bonded. “First we will be stripping back each of the six floors to their bare bones, leaving only the original features. No props, no partitions or floor coverings will remain and then we build it back up again.”


The process of ‘stripping-back’ is an elegantly curated one under Grace’s care. Diagrams unique to Grace’s meticulous style show carefully colour-coded areas to keep and areas to go. The same strategy applies for building the space back up again, with each of the Bonded’s eleven wall-types colour-coded to ensure contractors can cost-up the dividers effectively. Fire regulations and access are very important here, as are the positioning of the building’s WC’s. Unisex, Grace tells me, as part of a strategy to ensure easy entrance for both men and women along the building’s long floor plates, and in response to a growing trend for unisex loos. The materials Grace and the refurb team are re-introducing are part of a simple, nostalgic strategy around black matt ironmongery and green metro tiles that wouldn’t look out of place in a glamourised Rovers Return. The delivery of the concepts isn’t being left to chance either. Individual photographs in the Specifications showcase each part of the interior puzzle piece by piece. Black mirrors, industrial style pendant lamps and crittal style glazed partitions, have been picked to sit side by side the existing palette of timber and masonry, and demonstrate the careful consideration of every individual foot of the Bonded’s 80,000 sq. ft revamp. Asking Grace about the architectural design process and where she began when reinventing one of Manchester’s greatest warehouses, she responded simply: “When you’re going around a building, it tells you what it wants you to do. You can read it.” The Bonded Warehouse has now gone out to tender and construction will begin imminently for a late summer move-in date. Reflecting upon the building’s future with a greater understanding of its next architectural phase, I’m assured this warehouse refurb is going to be a good ‘un. This is the most tender Tender Package I’ve seen; perhaps better described as a Tender Loving Care Package. Nothing less for our long-standing relic, The Bonded Warehouse. As they say; third time lucky.

Grace Cooper in conversation with Daisy Barnes

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Support to Work. The Business of Hope Two companies in Manchester, both close friends of Allied London have stories to tell on the ‘business of hope’. One, Reform Radio, entered into the industry with a desire to up-skill the unemployed with creative, digital and professional skillsets in 2013. The other, Beastro are an up and coming restaurant, newly working with disadvantaged young adults to help them to find their way back into work. Tom Ingham learns more… For many, a criminal record is a huge obstacle to career development and fulfilment. The notion that everyone deserves a second chance works anecdotally, but to employers, it can still be a turn off. Beastro – a new restaurant on Leftbank, Spinningfields – has been training and mentoring those struggling to find work over the last 8 months. “We began working with Learn Direct in September 2016,” says Richard Brown, co-founder of Beastro. “They work with an array of disadvantaged, previously convicted people as well as people struggling to find work. Their programme includes teaching basic skills, then a placement and on completion, either employment or an opportunity to complete an apprenticeship”. “We are passionate about our team and want to work with people who care and want to develop skills and learn. Our initial intake consisted of six members, from a range of backgrounds; some had struggled at school, others had been unable to find employment and some had spent time in prison”. Working in The Kitchens at Spinningfields’ Leftbank, Richard, with fellow owners James and Heather Taylor, gave the six a chance to work in one of Manchester’s most exciting street-food venues.

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“We firmly believe that everyone deserves a second chance. Working with ex-cons has been an interesting and educational experience for both parties. Learning the disciplines of the kitchen as well as the structure and skills that come with it has helped to focus them and get them into the right working mentality.” Not only have Beastro opened their first restaurant, they have been operating out of The Kitchens and attending events across the UK since they won the street food start-up competition in 2016. With so many commitments and projects on the go, finding a team they can trust to do a good job has been vital. “After the four week placement we had one-to-ones with each of the applicants and took on Jordan as full time apprentice. Other applicants decided the kitchen was not for them and have taken office-based placements. As a business it is crucial to give back as often as possible; we’re grateful for the support we have been given by Allied London and want to share that love.”

We get involved with as much as we can, whether it’s Not just Soup feeding the homeless in Manchester, Too Good to Go, Real Junk Food Project Manchester, Foodinate or Action against Hunger.


Reform Radio Graduation Ceremony

and also explore ways to foster creative and digital, entrepreneurs as well as unsigned talent and new artists.” Despite the risk of applicants dropping out and being unreliable, Richard, James and Heather have found themselves an invested and passionate member of staff, and in return, Jordan has learnt a plethora of skills and gained experience with one of Manchester’s best loved food operators. Reform Radio is another company making a big difference to the potential of young adults in Manchester. Part of the St. John’s Projects community, Reform was formed during the recession as a community interest project, helping young, unemployed adults into meaningful roles, tailored to their abilities and interests. When you’re fresh out of school, a steer in the right direction can make the difference when it comes to finding fulfilling and rewarding work, but unfortunately the resources for such a considered approach aren’t always available. Jemma, Rachel and Sam who operate the station, made the move from a makeshift basement to Old Granada Studios in 2015 and have since moved into a larger and better equipped studio in 2016. “Since setting up here in the studios, the quality of the shows, the events and projects have all increased – meaning we can broadcast live from one studio and simultaneously hold a workshop in the other”. With over one hundred voluntary DJ’s, including the likes of Mr. Scruff and Northern Quarter’s Eastern Bloc, pumping out music 24/7, they’ve recently been voted in the top 5 online radio stations in Europe by Mixcloud. “Old Granada Studios is the jewel in Manchester’s broadcasting crown. In keeping with the spirit of the St. John’s development, we want to embrace heritage

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Despite being relatively new to the scene, Reform Radio have developed an international presence due to the eclectic nature of their shows, picking up a strong and loyal listenership as far-reaching as South Africa. However, their main manifesto is to provide opportunities for young adults by working with them in the studios, allowing them to develop skills in team work, public speaking, editing, producing, social media and event management. In December 2016, around 30 young adults graduated from their Salford City College and NLDC projects. Reform have paid travel and transport costs for trainees, but with an eye on sustainability, they’ve launched a brand new website which allows listeners to donate £3 a month to help keep those accessible to all those who need that support. As well as supporting the educational side of Reform, the new site showcases each show via four webcams and also allows users to click a button during any track, triggering a tweet to that DJ with a timecode so they can provide you with the artist and song info. “It’s a really cool feature that demonstrates why online is so much more interactive than FM radio” says Sam. It’s all too common for those with mental health issues, disabilities and criminal pasts to be hurried into a completely arbitrary role, with no signs of career progression or even creative stimulation. Reform Radio have managed to create an internationally respected product; put together by passionate volunteers and trainees who in return graduate with experience, new skills and saliently, a new-found confidence in their abilities. Reformradio.co.uk Beastromcr.com

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Movers and Makers: A Zoom in on the UK’s Furniture Design Industry. According to modern business magazine, Courier “Europeans simply do some things better than Britain and this includes the making and selling of furniture.”

For an extensive list of fantastic UK furniture designers head over to londondesignfair.co.uk

Not due to lack of talent, apparently. “There’s tons of it here in the UK. And given the particular brand of raw, irreverent, eccentric and often exciting youthful design talent that the country is famed for, it’s left many wondering what needs to be done.” Courier continues.

By Daisy Barnes

Britain’s buying habits seem to be increasingly geared towards the hospitality industry over the design industry and we’re more likely to spend £200 on a meal out than we are on a lamp. Founder of design fair, Tent London, Jimmy Macdonald believes that the manufacturing boat has sailed for the UK: ‘Italy is a manufacturing economy and we’re a service economy. It’s two different things.” The UK currently makes just 2.5% of the world’s furniture, with China owning the largest slice of the pie at 35%. (Courier Magazine September 2016).

Galvin Brothers design and make contemporary handcrafted furniture from their workshops in Beverley, East Yorkshire. Building on their Father’s 62 years of joinery and cabinet making experience, the business was formed by Matthew Galvin (designer) and Andrew Galvin (joiner) in March 2012.

Yet in this sea of higher costs and intense competition we remain an inherently creative bunch and if you look hard enough you can find great British furniture design well worth supporting. We curate some of the best...

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Galvin Brothers

With designs celebrating the uniquely wonderful properties of English Oak, the ‘Completely Imperfect’ Day Bed, pictured is made of solid oak with the Galvin Brothers signature turned leg and uses fabric sourced from another local supplier, Abraham Moon – established in Guiseley, West Yorkshire in 1837. Day bed £1,985 Galvinbrothers.co.uk


Lucy Kurrein After studying furniture design at Buckinghamshire New University, Kurrein embarked upon a number of upholstery collaborations with existing manufacturers, including British, SCP and Italian, Molinari. Her Perch dressing table, pictured is her first ‘own-brand’ piece and is handmade in the UK, using quality European oak. The quiet, modest design comes complete with generous mirror and discreet pull-out and can be hand-made and delivered within 6 weeks. Available to order via lucykurrein.com or lucy@lucykurrein.com at £1100.

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Little Deer Designed and made in Brighton, Little Deer make bedroom furniture from industrial copper pipes and fittings. Once finished the copper is sanded, polished and sprayed with a strong coating to ensure it keeps its bright copper colour. From clothes rails and side tables to my personal favourite, the Octagon Shelf Wall pictured, the pieces make an amazing statement. Each piece is made to order. Wall shelf, ÂŁ180 thelittledeer.co.uk

Lazerian Liam Hopkins is the Founder of Manchester-based Lazerian Contemporary Creative Studio, and maker of radical decoration, lighting, furniture, jewellery and sculpture. The Mensa side table, pictured is constructed from modular birch plywood units and bolted together using stainless steel fixings and echoes the Lazerian commitment to tradition sitting side-by-side with modernity. Lazerian.com

Lazerian's Liam Hopkins

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Such & Such Such & Such is a curated online platform of lifestyle and homeware goods. A brother and sister team, founded in 2013 they sell original designer/maker products with a timeless aesthetic. This reclaimed wood table-top is their first in-house design, by Nikki Sanders. Handmade in Bedfordshire, the table is left unvarnished and sealed with a natural sealant, allowing the beautiful colour, character and history of the wood to show. Tables are made to order and can be made to any specific size. Email hello@suchandsuch.co or check out suchandsuch.co to see the whole collection.

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City Scoping: Lisbon Through the Senses

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Photo by David Drews


Time Out Market Lisbon

It is a truth universally acknowledged that travel enriches the soul. Dagobert D. Runes commented that: “People travel to faraway places to watch, in fascination, the people they ignore at home.” We see a new place through a child’s eyes, experiencing our new surroundings, acutely through all five senses.

Scent: Time Out Market by Sam Jarrett

Allied London travelled en masse to Lisbon in December 2016 to experience one of Europe’s most thriving metropolises and collate our must-visit destinations, to be experienced through scent, sound, sight, taste and touch.

The digital world is full of foodies giving their two pence on where is best to eat. Time Out Magazine have put their money where their mouth is by bringing together the very best Portuguese restaurants/bars/cafes that have received praise in their publication in one all-encompassing market. When I arrived at what I like to call, ‘food heaven’ I had worked up a considerable appetite with a 25 minute stroll along the sea front, breathing in the fresh sea air. I found myself in a fantastic converted market, faced with a mammoth task of choosing what to eat with a veritable feast of operators to choose from. The smells that will hit you are unlike many other street food markets. This is carefully curated in a professional way, which is represented by an estimated 2 million visitors annually. I chose the scallops on a bed of watercress and ginger for €8 from Sea Me followed by a slab of chocolate brownie for €4. I smell a bargain. Needless to say, the walk back to the centre took a tad longer than 25 minutes! timeoutmarket.com

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Team Allied outside Kais Restaurant

Sound: Livraria Ler Devagar, LX Factory by Laura Gill The soft sounds of clockwork and delicate machinery add a unique, tranquil ambiance to Livraria Ler Devagar, LX Factory’s own magical bookshop. The winding of a chain prompts you to notice a figure on a unicycle, flying to a moon made from paper up high, leading visitors to the third floor made from an antique printing machine – home to the Objectos Cinematicos exhibition. Portuguese inventor/artist Pietro Proserpio talks passionately about each of his interactive mechanisms, made from recycled materials, telling visitors the stories behind each piece. With the lights and fans of Time Machine 2 in action, Proserpio expresses how we can project ourselves into the future, but time is always stronger and does not allow us to stay in the future long enough to realise what it will be like. Time starts again when exiting the LX Factory gates to the hustle of the city. lerdevagar.com

People travel to faraway places to watch, in fascination, the people they ignore at home. Dagobert D. Runes

Photo by: David Drews

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Allied's Design and Marketing Teams at the National Tile Museum


Taste: Ramiro by Kim Waddle The most exquisite taste to be found in Lisbon is that of the sea. Seafood is big here, and nowhere is that more obvious than Ramiro, a Lisbon institution that both locals and tourists flock to in droves. There is no greater pleasure than the classic combination of fresh, locally caught shellfish and a bottle of Vinho Verde. This Portuguese wine is such a delicate treat; lightly spritzy with flavours of lime and peach, perfectly matched with huge tiger prawns and clams. cervejariaramiro.pt

Touch: National Tile Museum By David Drews The most interesting observation to make when touching the tiles on display at Lisbon’s Museo Nacional do Azulejo (National Tile Museum) was the consistency. Ceramic tiles were introduced to Portugal in 1503 by King Manuel the 1st but have existed since the 4th millennium B.C. The examples exhibited on the walls dated from the 16th Century right up to present day and the tiles look and feel the same across the ages. This ancient craft has remained consistent in Portugal over 6 centuries and retains the same durable, cold, glazed touch as it always has done. This impermeable surface characterises Lisbon and many of Portugal’s cities and is testament to the fact that a durable design and beautiful patterns never go out of style. museudoazulejo.pt

Sight: Kais by Daisy Barnes They say that Kais is one of the Top 10 restaurants in Lisbon. Hot laminated octopus, fresh oysters on ice and Mozambique deep water shrimp curry delight Kais’ diners year round at this Portuguese hot-spot. But it is its’ visual environment that tempts most of its would-be diners off the beaten track and inside of Kais’ four walls. Housed in a late 19th century warehouse on the docks, previously used as a tram power station, Kais’ presence cannot be ignored. It is the epitome of ‘visible’. Reflected in the building, is the theory of the architect, Otto Wagner, who said that; “the actual structure and materials used to construct the building should be visible” and for this reason, the elements of the old factory were left to be seen. A stoic, historic structure, set amongst 1000 year-old olive trees and the immortal ocean welcome you to this landmark feature and demand to be watched. And if by any chance your eyes have missed the majestic, imposing warehouse, the more recently added, giant K will greet you instead. kais-k.com

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Making technology work for you Technology: Marvel or menace? There is much talk about tech at the moment. Too much time being spent on social media, combined with information overload via emails and online news platforms has led to a rise in ‘digital burnout’. France has just introduced legislation known as the ‘Right to Disconnect’ which now gives French employees the legal right to avoid work emails outside working hours and the UK is seemingly eager to follow suit with stress accounting for 45% of all working days lost due to ill health in 2015/2016. Allied London has recently introduced a policy, which encourages no internal emails from 7pm-7am unless in an emergency. It’s crucial for everyone to switch off for improved productivity and wellbeing and it’s only a matter of time until a digitally balanced way of living becomes the norm in the UK. However, for all its teething problems, we mustn’t forget the ever-evolving wonders of technology. From advanced algorithms that predict your music taste, to smart fridges and self-driving cars, we uncover some of the globe’s most fantastic tech marvels - by both start-ups and established tech companies - to restore your faith in our digitally-connected new world.

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Samsung Family Hub Fridge: It’s what’s on the inside that counts. The new ‘family hub fridge’ by Samsung has three built in cameras inside your fridge that take a photo every time the doors close. You can then use your phone to access the contents of your fridge from anywhere, avoiding over-buying. The fridge also sends you notifications when food is about to expire and even transforms into a smart device, complete with digital diary, live photo frame, radio, music player and TV. Food-chilling just got serious.


Digital Bridge: Try Before you Buy Decorating an entire room is a mammoth task and one that with the increase of ‘design porn’ sites like Pinterest, more and more people want to get right. Digital Bridge is a computer generated visualisation product that lets customers ‘try on’ homeware products and furniture in any selected room environment via a 3D app. Digital Bridge CEO David Levine said: “Consumers have been calling for an undo button for their interior design choices for years, now this technology is giving them one. With so much competition in the UK’s retail sector, businesses need every advantage they can get and allowing customers to preview purchases in their own space before they have to spend any money is an entirely new offering.

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“Our research has shown how much of a commercial opportunity there is in augmented and mixed reality in the retail arena, with as much as £1bn of extra revenue up for grabs brands can no longer ignore the potential of these technologies.” A Manchester-based startup, Digital Bridge, has just received over £700,000 from a number of private investors, including John Lewis. Digital Bridge is a web based tool that will be integrated directly to e-commerce sites. Coming Soon. Digitalbridge.eu

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Uber Self-Drive: Robots on Wheels

In early 2015, Uber set up an Advanced Technologies Center (ATC) in Pittsburgh. Its mission: to make self-driving Ubers a reality. Today the world’s first Self-Driving Ubers are making their way around Steel City, Pittsburgh and the Arizonian city of Tempe. Uber’s Newsroom commented: “Creating a viable alternative to individual car ownership is important to the future of cities. We know that many drivers will have questions about this technology. It’s still very early.” Uber predicts that automated wheels will lead to more human jobs, not less: “Technology also creates new work opportunities while disrupting existing ones. Self-Driving Ubers will be on the road 24 hours a day, which means they will need a lot more human maintenance than cars today.”

Algo-rhythms: Phil Dawson reviews Spotify's 'Discover Weekly' playlists Tell You Why I Don’t Mind Mondays. The weekend may be over, the London commute imminent but to be honest, I look forward to Monday mornings. Not for the seemingly impossible task of getting my two boys ready for, and delivered to, school / nursery on time – nor the never ending To Do List. No, I look forward to Monday mornings for the simple delight of arriving at my desk, plugging my headphones in and listening to the ‘Discover Weekly’ playlist that Spotify has curated especially for me. The excellent ‘Discover Weekly’ playlist uses an innovative algorithm that learns from my listening behaviour and mines the huge amounts of data gathered from its 100 million users, and their 2 billion playlists, to select around 3 hours of music that it thinks I will appreciate. It’s rarely wrong. By matching a track that I have chosen for one of my playlists to other users’ playlists that contain the same track, the algorithm has a starting point in its search to identify my musical kindred spirits and settle on the 30 or so great tracks that make up my ‘Discover Weekly’ playlist. It’s a glorious cycle of musical recommendations, underpinned by machines and data, but relying on real people, their knowledge and tastes, providing the perfect synergy of human and robot. You can listen to my inventively titled ‘Playlist Feb 2017’ below, which has been compiled solely from February’s ‘Discover Weekly’ playlists. Enjoy

Gone for Good: Mobile Charity

Gone for Good is an app that enables its users to turn their clutter into something good for the environment and for people in need. Their aim is to re-channel 6% of the saleable clothing and other items, which currently end up in landfill, ultimately doubling charity shop income and increasing stock for those who need it. A novel way for tech to support charity, the app makes it easier than ever to transform your trash into someone else’s treasure. Mark Charnock, Managing Director commented: “Increasingly people are interacting with the world through their devices, so we want to make it simple for them to interact with good causes that way too. We also want to make it easy for them to find ways their stuff can be re-used, rather than just take stuff to the tip or dump it in a skip. And as we partner lots of charities, the user can select what kind of good cause they want their stuff to go to. Many organisations are now helping to spread the word about Gone for Good to staff and to their clients or customers to use in their own lives. The Gone for Good app is especially useful when people are moving in or out of property, as that’s often when they have stuff they want to clear out. So it may be helpful to Allied London’s tenants too when they are moving premises.” Anyone can download the app on the App store or Google play. Then just snap a photo of the item you want to donate, load up to the app and your chosen charity will collect the item(s) direct from your door. goneforgood.org.uk

To read more on today’s technology and how it is working in tandem with the design of bricks and mortar, turn over for ‘Tech Tales: Bringing Buildings to Life 2.0’ by Sam Jarrett.

spoti.fi/2lIPSym

By Daisy Barnes

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Tech Tales Bringing Buildings to Life 2.0.

“OK Google, play Phil Collins in the living room…” I’m about to transport you back to late 2016 in the Cork Street office of Allied London. A small group are huddled around a breakout area, where a member of the team is shouting out commands to an upside down mug. Each command begins with “OK Google!” They are of course demoing a new piece of tech, Google Home, following a recent experience of the Google store in New York. “We need to ensure this goes into every home at St. John’s” Despite the fact this anecdote sounds like it’d be better placed in a sitcom rather than ALL Magazine, it sums up, rather hilariously, how digital and tech sit at the core of what happens in our world at Allied London most days. St. John’s, Allied London’s new city-centre creative neighbourhood will deliver around 1000 homes within the next five years and each home will almost certainly be equipped with the latest form of life enhancing kit. Phil Collins soundtrack optional.

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Digital and tech sit at the core of what happens in our world at Allied London. If you took a trip to the Breeze Studio, the St. John’s Living marketing suite in Manchester, you would see two huge interactive digital screens, powered by what appear to be air hockey tables, that will take you on an immersive virtual journey through St. John’s. The touch screens wouldn’t look out of place with Messer’s Carragher and Neville analysing some sub-par defending on a Monday night on Sky Sports. They’re highly responsive, technical and slick pieces of kit; just one of a number of examples of Allied London’s commitment to pushing the envelope when it comes to digital evolution.

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Traditional v Digital Marketing If you speak to most connected to or operating within the property industry, I’m sure there would be an admission that there has been a communal lie-in when it has come to the migration of digital. From a marketing perspective the brochure was king. Close your eyes and imagine you’re sat in a boardroom as an oversized 100 page, A3 portrait, hardback brochure is thrown down with a thud. It has an effect that digital simply cannot compete with. There’s an element of drama; the texture and smell of the pages, the way that the words pop, telling a story at a speed which is perfectly tailored for the reader. You can’t really beat that. And at Allied London we don’t try to. It’s more a case of attempting to find a place for digital to fit without encroaching on what print does well. An example of how digital can enhance what traditional can’t, is bringing to life animations such as CGIs. Take Herbal House for instance, a joint workspace venture between Allied London and Aerium. It is situated in the trendy East London district of Clerkenwell, and will be home to one, two or more businesses from the creative sector. Our marketing strategy for this focuses on an enriching story of heritage as Herbal is the former printing press of the Daily Mirror dating back to the early 1900s. As part of the strategy we worked closely with 90 Degrees and Our Studio to create an app with 12 stunning, immersive 360 virtual reality workspace fit-out examples for potential tenants, which makes you feel as though you’re right there in your finished office in 2018.

Breeze Studios, St. John’s marketing suite

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Google Home technology

And when the office is complete, it’ll be laden with progressive tech in real life too. Our XYZ Building, launching in September 2017 will be the most tech-enabled building in Manchester. Business Manager, Millie Killeen comments: “One of the big pulls of the XYZ events space will be the state of the art, hi-res LED screens. We’re also custom-building a cutting-edge tailored AV solution, which will accommodate all manner of events from business presentations to live music performances, to surround sound cinema experiences and major product launches.”

All about the story At the heart of our marketing strategy, regardless of the project, is the story. If you have no story it is increasingly difficult to “sell” anything. Quite often we are asking our audience to imagine how their apartment, workspace, hospitality venture will look when the project is still a building site. How do you differentiate yourself from a noisy marketplace? For us it’s about telling an engaging story on the right platform, at the right time. More often than not, in perfect harmony. That’s the formula to bringing buildings to life 2.0.

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Experience the 360 tour of Herbal House through the Herbal app on the AppStore now. See the immersive St. John’s fly through at StJohnsManchester.com.

By Sam Jarrett

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Leftovers: How much food are you wasting? With £17bn of food and drink wasted in the UK each year, the true cost of wonky fruit and veg has never been higher. Many consumers buy more than they need and supermarkets and shops, despite the efforts of some, still have very little way of predicting an exact formula for zero waste on a guaranteed basis.

Faced with such staggering stats, small companies and charities have been taking action and educating both the big suppliers, and humble consumer, on how to eat and drink efficiently.

Toast Ale and you’ve rescued one slice of bread that would have gone to waste. Not only that but proceeds raised from the beer go to the food waste charity Feedback.

Toast Ale was set up on the back of charity Feedback, set up by Tristram Stuart in 2009. After publishing his book ‘Waste’ on the scale of food waste in this country and globally. Stuart found that although consumers have a big part to play in this problem, supermarkets were the biggest culprits.

“We like to think that we offer a message in a bottle. Bread is the biggest foodstuff problem because of how popular it is in our daily diet, how cheap it can be and how short its’ life is. Stats show that 44% of bread is wasted! There's potential to also brew beer with other surplus ingredients - there's a beer brewed in Amsterdam using surplus potatoes”.

Inspired by the opportunity to offer an afterlife to discarded supermarket loaves, Toast Ale launched the UK’s first ‘bread to beer’ ale in 2015. “The bread we brew is truly surplus” say Toast “We would rather bread was eaten, but if that not's possible then let's drink it before it goes off as waste management.” Beer is of course subjective, but put simply, drink a

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Although it’s pretty conclusive that drinking beer isn’t ‘good’ for you in the same way eating an apple is, if we can drink beer with a social conscience that could be a win-win. toastale.com


Real Junk Food Project Manchester is another innovative enterprise altering the lifespan of our leftovers. It’s no secret that consumers and big businesses don’t like being told what to do, and especially don’t like being told what they’re doing wrong. So Real Junk Food Project take a more collaborative approach, operating ‘pay as you feel’ cafés across the globe using food destined for waste. “We work with food businesses, rather than against them,” says Corin Bell of Real Junk Food Manchester. “By intercepting food from a variety of food businesses - supermarkets, wholesalers, small artisan producers – the team are able to produce a menu of nutritional food, on a pay what you want basis. “Real Junk Food Manchester is not a food poverty project, our meals are served to anyone and everyone, and just happen to be served on a pay-as-you-feel basis. “Our food system is an incredibly complex thing, and making it fair and more sustainable is going to be a long road. The simplest step, to start with, for all of us, is just to buy less”. A recent study suggested that Millennials buying more ‘faddy foods’ for impressive Instagram photos could be to blame for a rise in food waste, but this conclusion was met with a degree of scepticism. An increase in ad hoc eating out after work and intense ‘takeaway’ marketing tactics could also be playing a part in our fridge food’s destiny for the bin, but in truth we probably all end up with some ‘off’ food in our fridge

every week for a mixture of reasons. There are practical steps that we can all follow, however to help combat food waste in our homes, right now. “Adapt recipes to suit what you’ve got and what needs using first, ignore best before (not ‘Use By’ ones) dates and examine your food to decide if it's ok to eat, store food at the right temperature, don’t cook more than you need, and use your freezer to full advantage if you have one,” adds Bell. Real Junk Food Project hope to open their first venue in Manchester’s Ancoats in May, having successfully raised over £39,000 in their CrowdFunder campaign. realjunkfoodmanchester.co.uk Another company transforming our wonky fruit and veg are Rubies in the Rubble. Fighting food waste one relish at a time, Founder Jenny Costa and her team utilise perfectly edible food that would have otherwise been thrown away due to aesthetic imperfections. Unwanted curly cucumbers and pink onions, as well as ‘gone off’ regular looking produce all make their way into a growing range of chutneys, relishes, sauces and ketchups. Stocked in Waitrose, Harvey Nichols and available to buy online, they’ve just launched a banana ketchup, which is growing something of a cult following. Rubiesintherubble.com

Follow eco-chef @tomsfeast on Instagram for updates on Food Waste and #nosetotail #roottofruit and #beaktofeet eating. By Tom Ingham

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Homegrown to Home Cooked: Local, Leeds, Life Tim Gee, Leeds Dock’s Estate Director takes on Leeds Dock’s favourite, local market, Homegrown Market to source, prep, make, cook and eat an authentic, homegrown and homemade Italian pizza from the comfort of Leeds. As most of my friends and colleagues well know, my life largely revolves around what I am going to have for my next meal, so much so that I will often plan my meals days, even weeks ahead. With this character ‘quirk’ in mind I ended up starting the year with an attempt to recreate the perfect Neapolitan pizza. This is easier than it sounds thanks to our pop-up, Homegrown market at Leeds Dock. Homegrown was

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an idea of my colleague Alex Webb’s to bring the people of Leeds Dock an alternative to the onsite Tesco by giving them a chance to buy some fresh, local produce once a week, from local cheeses to fresh fruit and bread. The next step we are taking is to permanently include Homegrown into our new Leeds Dock café and general store, which will be a new venture by our onsite coffee roasters, Northstar who have been with us since the first part of last year. Krag and Holly from Northstar have been one of our great success stories with both their roastery and academy businesses thriving. They are growing month on month and we can’t wait to see them transform the new Leeds Dock general store.


Wanting to keep it classic (some might say simple) I needed world class mozzarella, the very finest passata I could lay my hands on and some chorizo to spice it up. Homegrown was able to deliver on all counts with George & Joseph supplying the cheese and Ruby’s coming through on the rest. With the ingredients in hand and back in London for the weekend, I decided to put my skills to the test by asking the world’s greatest pizza critic to test them out, my daughter Millie. To cook the pizza I used my new RoccBox, possibly one of the worlds greatest inventions. A portable wood, gas fired pizza oven that I purchased via a crowdfunding campaign has me very impressed. I couldn’t recommend it more highly as a great addition to any outdoor kitchen and is great fun for cooking with your kids as if they’re are like my daughter, making

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the pizza and watching it cook under the fire is almost as good as the eating of it. With the oven up to 400 degrees and the pizza made it only took 90 seconds for it to be cooked. I have to admit it was a little charred around the edges but you could really notice the quality of the ingredients, with the mozzarella being a real standout having so much taste for what can often be a pretty dull cheese. It also passed the toughest test by getting a double thumbs up from Millie and a request to have it every weekend.

Homegrown Market is at Leeds Dock every 2nd and 4th Thursday of the month from 4-7pm and is free to attend. See leedsdock.com for more information.

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Suspended Spaces Explored @ Spinningfields and Leeds Dock Allied London began redeveloping an underutilised plot of land nextdoor to the John Reynolds Library around the turn of the Millennium with a vision to create a new destination for Manchester. Since then the area, now known as Spinningfields has developed into one of Europe’s leading business districts, as well as a thriving cultural and dining quarter, home to street food start-ups, restaurants, bars and fashion stores and a daily footfall of 20,000. This mixed-use neighbourhood has stayed true to its ambitions over the last 20 years and in 2017 it welcomes the final pieces of the Spinningfields masterplan in the form of workspace buildings, XYZ and No.1 Spinningfields and restaurant and gardens, The Field & Pavilion. Alongside these permanent new buildings is ADHOC, a flexible, modular and contemporary space for new experiences, constructed with help from an old friend. The Lawn Club, a collaboration between James Darwent Architecture and Soo Wilkinson of Igloo Interior Design, spent two successful years on Hardman Square. It provided a much-loved bar, restaurant and terrace alongside the infamous ‘lawns’ and was also home to cinema experience ‘Screenfields’. The pop-up restaurant and bar closed in August last year to make way for the highly anticipated The Field and Pavilion, but its life is to continue in a different form and has inspired ADHOC, a new concept for pop-up retail space.

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Rochelle Silverstein, Project Manager of ADHOC commented: “As developers it is crucial that we enliven our spaces as and when they are developing to allow people to engage with the environment growing around them. We have created a number of ‘pop-up’ experiences for the Spinningfields consumer in the past, including The Lawn Club, The Club House, Tee Party urban golf and the Spinningfields Curling Rink. However, with ADHOC, we are inviting other brands, entrepreneurs – anyone with an idea to create their own experience at ADHOC. “We envisage that ADHOC will be home to a wide array of pop-up experiences, from high street designers and current tenants to makers, craftsmen and small independents, art installations, brand activations and launch events. Designed by OH OK LTD, a subsidiary brand of Allied London, this new space recycles the Lawn Club’s bespoke steel frame and will transform it into a blank canvas that can be shaped with transitional walls and fixtures to create the perfect space for any concept.” Spinningfields has become renowned for its amazing retail and leisure offering, and ADHOC promises to bring a plethora of new opportunities and events to the neighbourhood. ADHOC will launch in 2017, for any pop-up enquiries please contact info@spinningfields.co.uk


Tee Party urban golf at Spinningfields

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Over in Leeds we apply the same approach to our suspended spaces. Block F, at Leeds Dock, is a multicoloured, wood-clad building, once home to Google’s Digital Garage; a 7-month long ‘digital skills’ pop-up. The space will soon be the home of tech firm, DealTrak but in the interim the Leeds Dock team have been eager to ensure that the much-loved space remains animated. Leeds Dock’s, Phil Dawson commented: “We want to make sure that Leeds Dock is a place where people want to come 7 days a week. We have a large and growing business community at Leeds Dock from Monday-Friday but we also have 1800 residents at Leeds Dock and a number of nearby homes and schools, so we aim to curate regular, exciting experiences that appeal to the entire community. We partnered with Pop up and Play, who provide innovative, meanwhile uses for spaces for the Leeds Indie Food Festival last year to establish their dream of running a European style pop up cafe for families in Block F. The event was a sell-out success.” Formed in 2014 through a mutual love of design and belief that just because something is created for children, the aesthetic of a space should not be compromised, Pop up and Play has now developed into a company that not only specialises in family events, but also theming and visual merchandising. Working across the country to create spaces that people talk about and enjoy being in, we talk to Co-Founder, Hannah to learn more.

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Block F, Leeds Dock

How did the idea for Pop up and Play come about? We met when our children were babies and struggled to find places that children were welcome, but we also enjoyed. We toyed with the idea of a purpose built, permanent space, but we decided we wanted the freedom to work on a wider range of projects to satisfy us creatively.

What are you passionate about? We're super passionate about the aesthetic of our projects, that's what makes us unique. We bring a look, which is as interesting to adults as it is to children. We never do the same thing twice and our eye is always on the detail.

What's your working philosophy? We work very instinctively, if we enjoy working with a certain person or brand we follow that. Otherwise it may just be a project that really excites us.

What's your top business resource? Since starting our company we've always invested in photography and it's become our greatest resource. Saying you’re aesthetically driven means nothing unless you can prove it. We've worked with Leeds based photographer Tom Joy since we formed; he understands what we do and how we communicate that, which always delivers us the best imagery.

Biggest lesson you've learnt? Rather than chasing the dollar we've always taken on things that have interested us, ultimately that's led us to some of our larger clients. Smaller projects often allow for more creative freedom, which really shows off what we're capable of.

Success means different things to different people. How do you define success in one sentence? Feeling proud of the end product.

What are you grateful for? I think we're grateful for the opportunities we've been given by others who've appreciated what we do. It's not always easy to convince people to step out of the norm when it comes to entertaining families so when people see the vision and want to apply that to their event or brand it's really appreciated. popupandplaycompany.co.uk Instagram: @popupandplayco

For upcoming pop-ups at Leeds Dock, including the return of the Leeds Digital Festival, head over to leedsdock.com By Tom Ingham and Daisy Barnes

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Soundtrack to success by Handlebar Coffee @ Old Granada Studios. Can music aid creativity and productivity? And if so how can you find your music groove? We asked the professionals, Andy and Louis, who curate the playlist at Handlebar, our Manchester HQ’s coffee shop, alongside being musicians: what is the secret to musical magic? Take it away boys… “Here at Handlebar Coffee, we believe that the right choice in soundtrack is an essential part of running a calm and pleasant environment, almost as essential as a quality product. Sometimes the right tune, paired with the right coffee can inspire and give people the extra push they need to get through a busy day in the office. As far as what we choose to play goes, it has to be interesting, easy to listen to, something to tap your feet to, and hopefully a conversation starter. We find interesting covers of well-known tunes, such as Bacao Steel Band’s version of 50 Cent’s ‘P.I.M.P’, or Jacob Collier’s version of ‘Close to You’ often interest customers, whereas old classics strike the nostalgia chord, See ‘I-69’ by Roman Gianarthur, and MFSB’s ‘Mysteries of The World’. Andy continues: “But personally I enjoy a good game of ‘Name that sample’, meaning a lot of the music we play will be recognisable, but we’ll dig out the original versions. For example, ‘The Edge 2001’, by David McCallum. This was sampled and is usually solely associated with Dr Dre’s ‘Next Episode’ and catches customers out regularly when it doesn’t drop into the expected expletive filled gangster rap. The Delfonics ‘Ready Or Not Here I come’, usually associated with ‘The Fugees’ also has the same effect. If all else fails, you can’t go wrong with some all-out Funk, especially for us, Eddie Harris’ ‘Funkorama’. It’s enough to get anyone going!

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Playlist

:

We love to talk music, so please feel free to come and grab a brew and chat tunes with us! We may even take requests. Handlebar Coffee, Old Granada Studios, Manchester.

P.I.M.P – Bacao Steel and Rh ythm B and Close T o You – Jacob C ollier Funkor ama - E ddie Ha Smile M rris editatio n – Vulf p Myster eck ies of t he Wor ld – MFSB Flutter – Bonob o Ready Or Not Here I C – The D ome elfonic s Ernie – Fat Fre ddy’s D rop I-69 – R oman G ianArth ur Weir – Noord d Fishes pool O A Radio head Ja rchestra. zz Sym phony

In conversation with Andy Morgan and Louis McCoy by Tom Ingham

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Find Your Story As competition for share of voice in a crammed and crowded world gets tougher, brands and businesses alike need a story to stand out. Creative and copywriter Clancy Walker, owner of tellingyourstory.co.uk takes a look at the humble story from a business perspective to find out why it’s so important for both beings and brands to learn ‘how to story’...

It sounds like a strange admission for someone who works in the business of helping others to refine and articulate their business or brand proposition, but it’s only fairly recently that I realised that the many facets of my work – creative writing, copywriting, PR consultancy, media presenting and performing – were tied together with one common thread: storytelling. Storytelling is an obsession and fascination that started very early for me, enthralled by my grandmother’s natural ability to have us hanging on her every word as she regaled the tales of her childhood and youth. Sadly she’s no longer around to ask how much of them were actually true, but it doesn’t really matter because each one had a beginning, a middle and an end, and every one was told with varying degrees of drama, humour, plot, characters, sometimes props, and always an emotional connection. Of course I didn’t realise all of this at the time, that’s something only years of experience and reflection as a writer have helped me to understand, and I now start to see how her masterclasses of making a story can be transferred into my working life and shared with brands and businesses.

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But some of this reflection got me thinking: Storytelling is most definitely an art, but is it a science too? Of course there are the elements, such as those just mentioned, that every story to needs to have to work, but is it as formulaic and prosaic as the many books on the subject of story will have you believe? I needed another expert in the field and thankfully I knew where to turn. Sita Brand is a legend in the storytelling world, and I had the good fortune to meet her several years ago and work with her on one of her many passions – the Settle Stories Festival, based in the beautiful town nestled in the Yorkshire Dales that Brand now calls home. Sita created the festival and her business Settle Stories, which also works with brands and businesses on workshops and mentoring, to provoke, inspire and broaden horizons. Certainly for her it seems it is about the emotional connections rather than a scientific formula that can be studied and replicated, but it’s definitely an art form that can be learned.


Clancy Walker

Sita explains her passion for stories and where that comes from: “Stories have a way of drawing people together more deeply. Standing between two worlds as an Indian and English woman, I know how our lives are enriched when we bring different cultures together. When we understand each other, we live in peace with one another.” The Settle Stories mission is to change the world through story by helping to increase respect and understanding between different cultures and one of their projects in development is described as ‘an inspiring call to adventure, a journey to celebrate everything momentous, awesome and transformatory about stories’. I recommend you look out for that next year. But back to how you make a story, especially in this current climate of fake news. In my mind, authenticity is the real key to a great story – the truth will always out so learning how to adapt and shape it in a way that shares your message, and tell it in a few different ways if needed (variations of the truth are always available) is where the real skill in storytelling lies. What I recommend to people I work with comes down to this: Be authentic, be truthful, be honest, be brave in the story you share. We’re all human after all, and he more honest you are about yourself the more people will be able to relate to your story and connect. And look to the art of storytelling rather than the commercial formulas that are bandied around. Life often imitates art as we know, but maybe, when it comes to storytelling, it’s time for business to imitate art as well.

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Sita Brand

Let me tell you a story... Are you sitting comfortably? Then we’ll begin… I love stories. I love finding them, hearing them, crafting them and telling them. I love what a great story can achieve. Each story is a seed that can grow or be nurtured in many different ways. People, places and products. Brands, businesses and even buildings. They all have a story to tell. A story connects and engages. A story motivates and inspires. A story explains and increases understanding… From ‘Introduction to Story...’ by Clancy Walker, a free guide available on www.tellingyourstory.co.uk By Clancy Walker

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Small Business, Big Ideas Tanya Grady and Tom Ingham speak to Alex Mellor and Anthony Logan from Noir Design Agency @ OGS Works. How did the idea for Noir come about?

What are you passionate about?

Leading on from Anthony's previous experience, having built a Fashion and Lifestyle Magazine and then moving on to work as part of the founding team at global fashion giant prettylittlething.com as Head of Design, combined with Alex’s experience as part of the founding team at Europe’s largest social media marketing agency, Social Chain. We began to understand that we had a very complimentary set of skills, with UX and Branding and design on Anthony’s side and sales and business development with Alex.

We are passionate about embracing change, embodying growth and always looking to disrupt. We love that we are an independent agency. We have a unique set of advantages that enable us to partner up with clients who share this passion.

We built the business through a combined passion for branding, business and technology. We share an interest in how quickly the digital world moves and wanted to apply our knowledge to build and grow agile, breakthrough brands through emotive, digital experiences.

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What’s your working philosophy? Starting a company requires huge effort—your blood, sweat and tears—so we try to dedicate this effort to a purpose that will have impact. We always try to push ourselves to solve big problems and to ‘think big’. This is what keeps us motivated and drives us forward.


What’s your top business resource? People. We try to speak to as many different people as we can about our business, we love to ask questions and truly respect the answers we are given. We also love to collaborate and work with a wide range of people and companies. This is how we get the best results.

Biggest feat? We recently landed a contract with one of the largest pharmaceutical companies in America, based out in Silicon Valley. This was a proud accomplishment. Particularly as this was our first client of this magnitude and we were up against some of the most established agencies in San Francisco.

Favourite designer/agency?

Favourite book?

There is a long established Global Agency called Landor. They are the epitome of always being one step ahead. The story goes that in the 60s, the founder Walter Landor moved Landor’s headquarters onto a ferryboat named the Klamath, which he’d purchased at auction and docked in the San Francisco Bay. A symbol of fresh thinking. He also said "Products are made in the factory, but brands are created in the mind.” These are the pillars of Landor’s success and two points that really resonate with us. Fresh thinking and the fact that there are so many psychological layers for branding to continuously explore.

The hard thing about hard things. - Ben Horowitz This book taught us that there is no set formula to success and that problems will arise every day, each more complex and stressful than the last, but the important thing is, to not let it phase you and keep pushing on until eventually you come out on top.

Biggest lesson you’ve learnt? For us, one of the most important things we have learnt is that at times, you need to say no. This goes against everything you are told about running a business. You’re told to say yes to everything, grab every bit of work, cling on to every client, kill yourself by saying yes, but we found that it wasn't until we said no to work and took a step back, that we were able to begin to scale and work with people and businesses that share similar values to ourselves. Too many businesses hold onto the wrong type of client, worried they won’t get any more. We try to set clear parameters and have processes that we believe in. We ensure that we are always showcasing these beliefs and as a result, we tend to attract individuals and companies who share our values and this is what leads to great partnerships. noiragency.co.uk

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The average time spent on social media in the morning before work is:

11 mins & 15 secs

Rituals & Routines Whether you’re a morning person or a night owl, everyone has their routines. For some, waking up at 5am and going for a run is the only way to start the day, others tend to sleep in as late as possible and rely on auto-pilot to get them to work. Allied London and Toast PR have followed France’s call to action by championing the ‘Right to Disconnect’. For staff at Allied, that means no emails between 7pm and 7am, putting an end to those out of hours emails that can have a negative effect on our daily routines. The positive impact of a routine has been frequently established. Theresa Cheung in her book ’21 Rituals to Change your Life’ asserts that most of us have no idea that what we repeatedly do creates our lives. “We think our future is shaped by big events, the decisions we make, the thoughts we have but it is your daily actions that are the key.” Cheung continues; “Aristotle said 'you are what you repeatedly do' and over the last few decades neuroscientists and psychologists have discovered that there is more power in 'I do' than 'I think'.” Here’s how the Allied staff fared…

Not at all Under 10 mins Over 10 mins Over 30 mins

The average wake up time for Allied London employees is:

06:54am

Most interesting breakfast items:

• Pint of water • 4 egg white omelette with mince and green beans One member of staff even has a different thing every day!

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Wake up routines:

• Listen to comedy podcasts • Go for a swim • Put on red lipstick if big day ahead

Best uplifting morning song?

• Anything by Justin Beiber • Get Lucky – Daft Punk • Uptown Funk – Mark Ronson • Gotta Work – Amerie • Elbow – New York Morning

Most interesting thing we learnt (courtesy of Mel Jones):

Experts say it’s more important for your routine to keep to the same wake up time every morning than the same bed time. 21 Rituals to Change Your Life by Theresa Cheung is available to buy on Amazon. ‘Comfort Zone’ photography series by Tadao Cern - More info via info@tadaocern.com

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SPRING 2017

65


“Ta ra chuck” Hilda Ogden 1964 -1987 Jean Alexander 1926-2016

ALLIEDLONDON.COM

ALL Magazine Spring 2017  

A property, enterprise and arts magazine by Allied London.

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