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Sky 3, Leeds Dock Photo: Richard Walls


Welcome “This is my 21st year at Allied London. I have watched Manchester and London change so dramatically over this time and am very proud of our contribution to this. “I have witnessed many trends across this period and never has there been a more exciting time for our business than right now. “Cities are dynamic and commerce is rapidly changing. We are in the heart of that and are responding to it. I have worked with some great people throughout my time but the consistent ambition and focus of my fellow directors, Freddie Graham-Watson, Stuart Lyell and Graham Skinner is the main contributing factor behind our success. All of us have very different but complimentary skill-sets enabling us to deliver great, unique and important projects. “Today I see us in our third generation, beginning at the end of 2012 when we acquired Allied London outright. We now have an extraordinary set of people on board with a varied skill-set, and whilst anchored around the combined 125 years of experience gained by Freddie, Stuart, Graham and myself, I look forward to our younger, dynamic team adding something special to what we do. “We are anchored by what we have done and our vision for the growth of our cities to help us achieve this. We keep our projects as relevant today as they were when we laid down our first bricks and mortar, and ALL Magazine is our chance to say thank you and showcase our cities, people, partners and those we are inspired by, as well as highlighting our vision for the future. “ALL Magazine is fun, but it shows how serious we are at focusing on the little things that make all the difference.”

Michael Ingall Allied London, Chief Executive

Welcome to our first publication of ALL Magazine. Every quarter we will be rounding up the goings on across our busy assets in Manchester, Leeds and London and seeking out the news and views of the places and people there. As well as this we will be celebrating growth and innovation across the globe from arts and culture to city-scoping, tech hubs, foodie favourites and celebrating our thriving communities and all the talented people we work with. For those of you not familiar with Allied London we are creative property developers, creating innovative buildings and neighbourhoods across the country. We have been working hard to bring clever and bold new developments to the cities we work in, that champion art, design, culture and experience. We are lucky enough to work with a wide array of partners across our developments from brilliant architects, creative artists

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We are creative property developers creating innovative buildings & neighbourhoods across the country. and contemporary musicians to adventurous start-ups, digital whiz-kids and ambitious chefs; all of whom embrace our trailblazing vision of evolving cities and developing new and exciting places for people to live, work and play. We hope we are able to showcase just some of this activity in ALL and hope you will enjoy reading ALL from cover to cover.

Daisy Barnes Editor, ALL James Dover Producer, ALL

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Small Business, Big Ideas: Polite Stationery

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Meaty Ambitions with Rich Brown

Contributors Sam Jarrett, Rochelle Silverstein, Ben Young, David Drews, Melanie Jones, Tanya Grady, Stephen Bickers, Kim Waddle, Karen Wright, Eric Howard, Adam Pester, Grace Hilsley. With special thanks to Mark Eccles at Soko Studio for the design and production of ALL. This is our first edition of ALL and we welcome your contributions in all shapes and sizes. If you have any feedback or would like to see your idea, concept, business or product in ALL please get in touch at all@alliedlondon.com

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To get involved with any of our projects, take commercial, retail or leisure space, or live at one of our developments please contact us at info@alliedlondon.com

Japan comes to St. John’s

Front Cover London Marble Arch Tower 13th Floor 55 Bryanston Street London W1H 7AA 020 7758 4000

Manchester HQ Building 2nd Floor 2 Atherton Street Manchester M3 3GS 0161 834 8640

Leeds Leeds Dock The Boulevard Leeds LS10 1PZ 0113 243 0111

alliedlondon.com

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SPRING 2016 | ISSUE 1

A PUBLICATION BY

This issue’s cover is an interior wallpaper shot from inside London Road. Read more on #insidelondonroad in our hidden experiences feature on page 8. For ALL’s summer issue we need your input. Our feature length spread will be on conviction. In business, life and art. Feed in your visuals: photographs, drawings, sketches, digital art or moving imagery to all@alliedlondon.com with 50 words on what conviction means to you and what your visual represents. The winner will have their image published in ALL’s summer issue, published in July.


36 Behind the Lens in Berlin

Contents 6

A Spring in our Step Allied London’s vision for 2016

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ALL Feature: Hidden Experiences Because the best things in life aren’t always easy to find

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From our Kitchens to Yours Recipes from The Kitchens traders, Hip Hop Chip Shop and Chaat Cart

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Herbal House An East End Welcome

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Co-working 9-5 in Leeds Sam Jarrett investigates co-work spaces in Leeds

22 Let’s talk about culture

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Small Business, Big Ideas Two small businesses in Manchester tell their story

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Let’s talk about culture... We explore the meaning of culture

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Culture Vulture Arts from around the world

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Happy Cities The happiness of place

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City Scoping: Tallinn, Estonia

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Everyday Inspiration Interactive Public Art

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The Power of Social How companies are coming together to make change

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Talent in Imagination Manchester creative agency, Holdens

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Behind the Lens in Berlin A photo journey with Ben Young

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Meaty Ambitions 60 minutes with meat entrepreneur, Rich Brown

Quarantine at Old Granada Studios

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Central Village, St. John’s new centre of enterprise and excellence

A Spring in our Step Allied London’s vision for 2016. Over the past 21 years, Allied London has influenced and shaped buildings, set new design precedents and created new parts of cities.

Every project is a business and Allied London uses vision to create a product, market it, achieve maximum revenue and then realise it.

It has provided sustainable developments and investments such as The Brunswick and Spinningfields that people want to go to time and time again, won over 60 industry awards for vision, creativity and technical knowledge and provided real estate solutions to some of the UK's leading corporate companies

We tell stories and then bring those stories to life.

It has generated successful investments for leading European investors and developed long-lasting partnerships that work extraordinarily well, with a range of entrepreneurial and opportunistic partners including Manchester City Council, AERIUM and Pramerica.

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Michael Ingall Allied London, Chief Executive Herbal House, St. John’s and London Road are the next stories.


As a company, Allied London remains focused around an established skill base – yet the team are never afraid to learn new skills, as is currently taking place with residential projects at St. John’s. The skillset has expanded to operational skills in hospitality and management to ensure that parts of Allied London developments – restaurants, bars, co-work can be directly operated when needed to kick-start a desired brand identity.

St. John’s: Making waves from London to Cannes – to Japan. The ever-knowledgeable Mel Jones outside The Bonded Warehouse, for a 100 minute special on the UK and the Northern Powerhouse by Japan’s leading television broadcaster, NHK.

Hello Work, has been one such instance that is proving hugely successful in setting the agenda for enterprise projects, and in forming the basis for three new enterprise co-work projects: OGS Work, XYZ Work and Leeds Dock Work. St. John’s enterprise will join up the city and form Manchester’s new enterprise quarter, Central Village, which will be a new centre of excellence connecting The Bonded Warehouse in St. John’s to the XYZ Building in Spinningfields and everything in between. Michael Ingall concluded: "We remain committed to Manchester, London and Leeds as our key business centres, focusing on projects that will add something to these cities. St. John's and London Road in Manchester, and Herbal House in London will be game-changers.

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Leeds Dock was our first serious Leeds project, but a game-changer nonetheless and one that is now home to Sky's new technology centre and the Leeds Digital Festival at the end of April. “We have a great skill base; Suresh Gorasia as our new Chief Operating Officer and Jonathan Raine as Head of Corporate, have over a decade of this business in their blood. We have many new team members who have contributed to this magazine and they are the new blood of the third generation; the generation of Allied London that for me is the most exciting yet”. To see all of the latest Allied London news, events and projects visit alliedlondon.com, you’ll also find a downloadable version of ALL Magazine there too. Alliedlondon.com

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Hidden Experiences Hidden experiences. We love them. Secret societies, club houses and masquerade balls cottoned on to this centuries ago. The best things in life are free apparently, but perhaps the most exciting things in life are hidden.

Companies are forming around this very concept, and it’s a growing trend. Sofar Sounds is a global community of music events that doesn’t release information on the venue or the artist playing until the 11th hour. The thrill of the unknown has people signing up in their hoardes and events go all over the world (231 locations) to make sure everyone can get a piece of the action, if they are able to get a ticket that is. Get involved at sofarsounds.com Secret Cinema works on a similar concept. Their mantra being ‘enter a secret world’ sets the tone for the vibe here. Their site won’t tell you this (so I won’t ruin the surprise too much) but essentially the concept is fully immersive cinema, where you dress up as a character from the film you’re about to see. Your role is released just a few days before you attend the event, giving attendees a day or two to get their costume and get into character, before being immersed into a meticulously created film-inspired world. Phones are strictly not allowed to keep the air of mystery. Even top journalists know very little about it.

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Our commercial and brand manager went along to an event last month. We would tell you what film and how it was but we’d have to kill you. Upcoming events are all at unknown London venues. Tickets can be bought here www.secretcinema.org Sofar and Secret Cinema both buck the trend of putting all their information on their website. Look online and you’ll find but an outline of what’s in store. Hidden experiences rely on the old-fashioned concept of word-of-mouth and it works. Intrigue is a powerful thing. You have to try it to understand it. In March, Old Granada Studios hosted one of Manchester’s most hyped secrets, when Grammy award-winning Kendrick Lamar descended on Old Granada Studios in a surprise gig organised by Reebok. 200 guests were invited to the launch of the new Reebok Classic trainer, with news that the Billboard 200-topping Kendrick Lamar was playing only revealed as guests arrived. The ‘awesome, intimate gig’, as described by Stuart Brumfitt of i-D Magazine, took over the entire ground floor of Old Granada Studios and caused a stir from Manchester to LA.


Sofar Sounds at Dock 29 at Leeds Dock last year

Kendrick Lamar performing at Old Granada Studios

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It’s not just the music and theatre industries that are embracing the world of mystery. Hotels are fully on board too. Crab Manor Hotel in Yorkshire has a hidden beer tap, where guests can help themselves to a free pint, and there are even hotel-finding websites dedicated to the element of surprise. crabandlobster.co.uk Hotwire sells hotel rooms at a discounted-rate to customers who don’t have any information of where they’re going. Basic information is provided – an outline of venue, amenity, customer rating, but apart from that it’s a roll of the dice. The site does tell you where you’re going once you’ve purchased your rooms and I’ve only had positive experiences with Hotwire. Le Meridian in Cancun at a fraction of the price I would have paid, and a 4* hotel in New York for £90 made my surprise hotel experiences wholly recommendable. hotwire.com

Crab Tree Manor Hotel

Bars too are getting in on the act.

Pop along to Dusk til Pawn in Manchester – a great little bar in the Northern Quarter – if you can find it that is. Tucked away behind a dubious-looking pawn shop exterior and barred windows, inside there’s a welcoming vibe with jukebox, friendly staff and an incredible array of cocktails. It has no website – but bookings can be made on their Facebook page. Dusk til Pawn, Stevenson Square, Northern Quarter, Manchester M1 1FB

Dusk til Pawn, Northern Quarter, Manchester

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Tattu Restaurant & Bar is the ‘secret garden’ of Spinningfields, hidden behind a mysterious exterior. It’s well-known for its eastern design and traditional Chinese flavours, but its best kept secret is its private dining room – The Parlour. Complete with its own entrance, bar, restrooms and performance booth, the space is unique to Manchester in both design detail and the luxurious space that it provides. From the bespoke wallpaper that depicts ‘pin-up’ characters synonymous with body art, to the two-way glass that allows guests to see out (but not others to see in), everything about this space is designed to thrill. Tattu Restaurant & Bar, Gartside Street, 3 Hardman Square, Spinningfields, Manchester M3 3EB tattu.co.uk

Tattu Restaurant & Bar

If you really want to get into character head along to Evans and Peel Detective Agency in London. The website only tells you that they are specialists in the areas of blackmail, missing persons and armed personal protection. You have to present your case to get a reservation – and only then can you get in. On digging a little deeper I find out that they serve cocktails and an above average mac’n’cheese. It’s based in Earl’s Court – about five minutes from where I live, and I’ve really never heard of it. A well-kept secret then. I shall be making my case imminently.

Abbey Farm milk bottles

evansandpeel.com

Some hidden experiences, on the other hand, are meant to be shared. A raw milk vending machine in Norfolk, tucked away behind an old priory, is the innovative idea of Alex and William Wales of Abbey Farm Dairy. What started out as a way for farmers to get a fairer price for their milk has now become an unusual, interesting and very popular way for locals and visitors alike to get their calcium intake. Hidden away in an unlocked room the milk vending machine sits unmanned, just moments away from the cattle. Customers choose first from a choice of two beautifully designed Abbey Farm Dairy bottles (plastic – free, glass £1.50 into an honesty box) and then insert £1 per litre needed into the machine. Raw milk is not pasteurised or processed in any way, just filtered and cooled. It doesn’t leave the farm, is never more than 48 hours old and is creamier than supermarketbought milk. The venture only began at the end of 2015 and is well and truly a hidden experience worth seeking out. For more info see abbeyfarmdairy.co.uk

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Raw Milk vending machine

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Beautiful things don’t ask for attention. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty

Stairwell at London Road

There's no truer case of a hidden experience than at London Road. London Road Fire Station’s interior has been inaccessible for 30 years. The intrigue that has built for this building, to the uninitiated might appear disproportionate. But the iconic nature of this building, rich in heritage, combined with its prominent presence a stone’s throw from Manchester Piccadilly Station draws people to it, from all walks of life. To go behind the walls, it is being opened up in a series of low-key events this summer, and to celebrate this - and the purchase of this hidden treasure - Allied London have created the London Road Club.

Vintage wallpaper

Members of the London Road Club receive a series of weekly exclusive photographs from inside London Road, as part of 'The Inventory'. Working its way from floor to floor, The Inventory will be issuing a series of previously unseen photographs from inside the building. The Inventory has been issued to the London Road Club across March and April, with 'The Interval' being published only in ALL Magazine. Photos printed here show exterior detail and shots of vintage wallpaper and stairwells as photographed by Rob Evans. To sign up to become a member of the London Road Club and receive, ‘The Inventory’, visit createlondonroad.com. See @LondonroadMCR or use the hashtag #insidelondonroad on Twitter for updates as and when they happen.

Exterior of London Road

London Road will be an international destination for Manchester with a mixture of uses – including a hotel, signature and all day restaurants, workspace, apartments, visitor attractions, live music venues, cinema, museums and galleries. createlondonroad.com

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The roof at Old Granada Studios HQ

With no one there to guide you, the confusion of the internal spaces is overwhelming. Any room could be a set and a functional space at once; a staircase to get you from one floor to another is lined with mirrors to mimic a nightclub. The multi-purposing of space is fascinating.

Old Granada Studios has opened its doors to a unique architectural photography project, Granadaland. Not ones to do things by halves Allied London’s celebration of hidden heritage doesn’t stop at London Road. Granadaland, by photographer Andrew Brooks, with accompanying descriptions by architectural writer Hayley Flynn, celebrates the site's contribution to architecture and culture, before the development of St. John's begins later this year. Brooks and Flynn went through the site like urban explorers making field notes to document everything they experienced. From derelict theatres to eerie dressing rooms and city skylines, the intricate imagery provides a unique insight into the heart and soul of the iconic site. Hayley Flynn commented: "With no one there to guide you, the confusion of the internal spaces is overwhelming. Any room could be a set and a functional space at once; a staircase to get you from one floor to another is lined with mirrors to mimic a nightclub. The multi-purposing of space is fascinating.” To view the entire collection see granadalandgallery.com

By Daisy Barnes with special thanks to Kim Waddle

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From our Kitchens to Yours

Recipes from The Kitchens traders, Hip Hop Chip Shop and Chaat Cart. Street-food concept ‘The Kitchens’ at Spinningfields’ Leftbank area is home to seven up-and-coming street food traders who sit amongst The Garden, a new area of public realm with a 75-inch film screen and accompanying wii consoles. Now trading for nearly a year and a firm foodie favourite, two Kitchens traders share a recipe with ALL for your home cooking pleasure. For an interview with Rich Brown from The Kitchens' Bangers and Bacon and Well Hung turn to page 38. The Kitchens, Irwell Square, Leftbank, Spinningfields, Manchester M3 3AG thekitchensleftbank.com

Bhel Puri

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Bhel Puri by Chaat Cart. Ingredients: 2 cups of puffed rice 1 medium onion ¼ cup roasted gram (chana dhal) 2 medium potatoes (boiled and diced) 1 small potato (chopped) 1 cup sev (Bombay mix) 5 crisp puris (lightly crushed) ¼ cup green chutney and ½ cup tamarind 1 teaspoon lemon juice 2 tablespoons fresh coriander (chopped) Method: Combine the puffed rice, onion, chana dhal, potato, tomato, half the sev and crushed puris in a large bowl and toss well to mix. Add the chutneys (adjust to taste) and mix well. Garnish with coriander and remaining sev and serve immediately. (At Chaat Cart we like to sprinkle pomegranate seeds as a final flourish).


Shell L Cool J

The Garden, Leftbank

Shell L Cool J By The Hip Hop Chip Shop.

Crab cake ingredients 235g white crab 85g coley 85g potato 35g lemon juice 1tbsp creole seasoning 10g salt 5g flour 5g egg 5g panko breadcrumbs

Method: 1. Boil the potatoes till soft and mash. Add the crab, lemon juice, creole seasoning, salt (to taste) panko breadcrumbs and mix into a consistent mixture. Form the mixture into balls and chill in the fridge. Whilst the mixture is cooling, set up three containers, one for plain flour, one for a whisked egg mixture and the third for the panko breadcrumbs. Take the crab cake balls and first thoroughly coat the outside, then place into the egg mixture and coat thoroughly. Thirdly, coat in the panko breadcrumb and set to one side.

Battered bacon ingredients 1 rasher smoked back bacon 750g plain flour 1tbsp malt vinegar 176ml beer or soda water ½ tsp baking power

2. Cook off the bacon till it’s cooked through and cool, cover in plain flour and submerge in batter mix. 3. Shred the red cabbage and white onion, and grate the carrot. Add all the veg to a bowl and add a splash of white wine vinegar and mix in the mayonnaise.

Coleslaw ingredients ¼ of red cabbage 3 carrots 1 white onion 200g mayonnaise 1 tbsp white wine vinegar pinch of salt

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4. Deep fry the crabcake for six minutes till golden brown, deep fry the bacon for five minutes, turning after two and a half minutes to cook evenly on both sides. Add a generous spoonful of coleslaw to the brioche bun, stack the crabcake and bacon on top and put the lid on. You may need to skewer the Shell L Cool J as it’s a bit of a monster.

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Herbal House An East End Welcome First impressions are long-lasting and often indelible. We explore how the importance of ‘The Reception’ has influenced design precedents at Allied London’s incoming London workspace building, Herbal House. Nestled in the heart of Clerkenwell, just around the corner from Farringdon Station, you’ll find a place with a story to tell. Constructed in 1928 and boasting an astonishing past, Herbal House was the Daily Mirror’s printing headquarters, the backdrop for iconic music videos like Robert Palmer’s ‘Addicted to Love’ and home to the London School of Printing and Central Saint Martins. Now in 2016 the building is taking shape for its next phase in the heart of East London’s creative quarter, and first impressions are forming. Playing with the theme of ‘Industrial Deco’, the Herbal House reception and entrance relates to the industrial warehouse aesthetic and Art Deco era of the original building. The ‘Industrial Deco’ approach is an evolution of the ‘Rough Luxe’ style that has become so prominent in East London. The design alludes to the history of photography in the building, used by the Daily Mirror to photograph many high-profile people and takes inspiration from photographers such as Erwin Blumenfeld, made famous

in the 1940s for using reeded glass to create timeless silhouettes. The reception also makes reference to the film Metropolis, released at the same time as the construction of the building, whilst also giving a nod to the Italian architect and industrial-designer Gio Ponti made famous for his classic design in the early 20th Century. Herbal House’s reception desk is made of polished, reeded brass and sits alongside contrasting industrial steel blocks salvaged from existing machinery found within the building. These elements sit in front of a blackened steel frame screen containing different glass types that play on the Art Deco history of the building and create a variety of visual effects as people move behind in the adjacent café space. Finally the lift wall provides an intense splash of colour, complimented by waiting area furniture, which combines reclaimed large-scale steel lifting cogs used as tables and classic Gio Ponti inspired pieces of furniture. Clever and collaborative design features combine to create a new design style, combining heritage and cutting-edge techniques; fitting for a building draped in creativity. Following the ideology that function can follow form, Herbal House’s present day welcome is a celebration of its past. Herbal House will open in 2017.

By David Drews

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Co-working 9-5 in Leeds Sam Jarrett, Leeds Dock’s Marketing Manager investigates co-work in Leeds. You only need to walk around the centre of Leeds to see what an exciting time it is for the city in terms of growth. Major developments in the leisure market including Leeds Trinity Shopping Centre and the soon to open Victoria Gate, all make Leeds an incredibly desirable place to be. 6,926 start-ups were formed in Leeds in 2015, and with a boom in new, fresh and exciting start-ups comes a new way of thinking. Gone are the days where the burden of a long-term boring office space was where a start-up would call home. Today, a creative collaboration is the preference for many, opting to share opinions and ideas, as well as the kettle and fridge. This way of thinking; co-working, has a number of benefits for not just start-ups but also those wanting to freshen up the environment in which they create. We review some of the most popular co-work spaces Leeds has to offer, prior to the launch of Leeds Dock Work this summer.

Duke Studios Undoubtedly the King (or Duke) of shared workspace in Leeds. Duke Studios proudly host 51 businesses, 100 people with a combined turnover of £2.5 million. The majority of the start-ups at Duke operate in the creative industries across a number of disciplines such as architecture, graphic design and tech design. In their words this rightly makes them “a pretty nifty creative powerhouse”. Location: No.3 Sheaf Street, Leeds LS10 1HD duke-studios.com

One Aire Street They say location is everything. One Aire Street has that box well and truly ticked. They are based inside Leeds Train Station. You can quite easily hop off your train from London Kings Cross on platform 6 and be at a co-work desk in three minutes (actually don’t quote us on that, those ticket barriers can be a bit temperamental). One Aire Street is owned by workspace giant, The Office Group who offer their Leeds members the opportunity to co-work at Eastgate, Kings Cross, should they ever be in the capital for the day. Location: One Aire Street, Leeds LS1 4PR theofficegroup.co.uk/locations/leeds-station

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Round Foundry Media Centre Round Foundry provides flexible work spaces and virtual office services aimed at the creative, digital and media sectors. The site itself is set within an impressive former engineering works in Holbeck. Significant regeneration investment in the first phase of development rightly led to a number of industry awards. Location: Round Foundry Media Centre, Foundry Street, Leeds LS11 5QP roundfoundry.net

The Wild Card This is going to be a controversial one. Transdev recently invested ÂŁ3.3 million on 14 new buses from Harrogate to Leeds. They all contain free wifi, leather seats and USB charging points! Proving that you can co-work anywhere at any time! harrogatebus.co.uk/36.htm

Leeds Dock Work Coming soon to Leeds Dock is the new banner for Hello Work, which partnered with Google to launch the Digital Garage last year. Expect a similar vibe from Leeds Dock Work; Toast are back to provide a brilliant programme of enterprise events including talks, round tables, inspiration, mentoring and support. Leeds Dock Work will sit within The Union, a mixed-use hub, comprising flexible event space, rotating street food traders, digital art space, co-work on the ground and mezzanine floors and access to the wider Leeds Dock community. Set to open this summer, Leeds Dock Work hosted its first event at the end of March with Yorkshire’s own, Julian Kynaston, founder of the global Illamasqua make-up brand. Location: Leeds Dock Work, Leeds Dock, The Boulevard, Leeds LS10 1PZ leedsdock.com

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Small business, big ideas Two small businesses in Manchester tell their story. The co-work space at Old Granada Studios is having a shake-up, with new banner ‘OGS Work’ and a new venue opening up on the studio level in May. We grabbed five minutes with two OGS Work members to get to know more about their businesses. Interviews with Polite and ShinDigger courtesy of Tanya Grady.

Jack Jackson from Polite

What are you passionate about? I love good design, simplicity, and usefulness. That has led to a passion for architecture, art, photography, music and food – but always about things being the best they can be without the things they don't need.

What's your working philosophy? I believe in loving what you do and working well at it so that it compliments your life without taking it over.

What's your top business resource? Friends.

Biggest lesson you've learnt? To be more instinctive and trust my ideas rather than working in the way you think you should.

How did the idea for Polite come about? At the time I was a picture editor for a magazine. I was meeting lots of great artists and designers, and distributing the magazine to some brilliant shops, so it seemed like a good idea to connect the two things. I started making products with artists and supplying them to the stores, the products were popular and it grew from there.

Where did the name come from? I wanted to find a name for the company that reflected my approach; that was considerate and didn't shout about the products. It was about well designed products I wanted people to find and love rather than being sold to.

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What are you grateful for? Aside from the obvious family and friends I’m grateful that I’m interested and curious.

Biggest upcoming excitement? I’m making a short film to compliment the release of the Durutti Column image archive which I’m really excited about releasing.

Favourite book? The Year of the Hare by Arto Paarsilinna. politecompany.co.uk


George Grant & Paul Delamere from ShinDigger

How did the idea for ShinDigger come about? The idea came about in 2012 when we were both students in Manchester. We bought a home brew kit, for a bit of a laugh and to make cheap beer - but ended up getting really into it and eventually moved on to selling our beer at student house parties. At the time there wasn't a great beer choice available for people like ourselves so instead we were making American style beers that have far bolder, fruitier flavours.

What are you passionate about? I guess our passion boils down to making other people happy. Walking to a bar and seeing happy faces drinking our product is what we get the biggest kick out of. We started ShinDigger on the philosophy that beer is all about chilling with your friends and enjoying their company. For ShinDigger I think it's always been about asking how can we make these moments better through the medium of beer? We've put in a lot of work over the past three years trying to create the perfect range of beers to do this. Now moving into 2016 we're looking into how we can improve this by looking at the wider holistic drinking experience too.

How do you work well together? We're a really good complimentary team and have achieved a lot together so far. We have a tiff every once in a while, but that's part of the parcel when you’re working very closely with someone and having to make many decisions together each week.

What's your top business resource? Our mentors.

Biggest lesson you've learnt? Tighten up our weaknesses. Understand our biggest strengths and be bold in making the most of them.

Biggest feat? Three or four years ago we were doing our first home-brew. Now at the age of 26 we own a beer company that’s selling 30,000+ pints a month around Manchester. Kind of crazy when we look back on that!

Favourite book? Malcom Gladwell's books are really interesting. They give a lot of food for thought, since a lot of what he writes about is challenging basic assumptions we take for granted.

What's your working philosophy?

Favourite beer destination outside of the UK?

Paul: I work a lot. There isn't much of a disconnect between my working life and normal life, but I enjoy my work so much that it's out of choice. The good thing about working for yourself is that I can also make time whenever I want to go out with friends, see family, etc.

shindiggerbrewing.co

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We haven't been on any beer pilgrimages to the US or Germany yet. I can tell you my least favourite destination for beer though... Dubai - had to pay £12 for a pint of Stella or Fosters!

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Let’s talk about culture… Culture means different things to different people. It can mean a way of living, an acceptance of something, a celebration of something that has happened in the past or a participation in art, music, theatre, performance, photography or almost any creative medium of expression. If you think that description sounds complicated, the Oxford English Dictionary struggles to shine any such further light. Of six possible definitions the top three define culture as “the arts and other manifestations of human intellectual achievement regarded collectively”, “a refined understanding or appreciation” and “the ideas, customs, and social behaviour of a particular people or society.” Confused? Me too. Arguably then culture is a tricky one to define.

What isn’t under dispute, however, is that the Old Granada Studios site, soon to become St. John’s, and its Manchester surroundings are rich in the stuff. Be it hard to define or not. Something remarkable happened on this site in 1956. One of the UK’s most successful production houses was born. The creative output in the first four years alone included everything from comedy, current affairs and drama, to fly-on-the-wall documentaries and what went on to become Europe’s longest running soap opera. The rest is television history. The St. John’s site has some much older culture too, drawing back to the 1800s when the plot was used as a pig market, potato market and flour mill as well as a trade portal for slate, glass, concrete, asphalt, timber, brick and stone.

The Avenue Fashion Show at Studio 6, Old Granada Studios

Denis Jones performing at the St. John’s launch event

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Fluid in its nature then, many things can contribute to an overarching sense of culture. Much like property development it is ever-evolving and always changing. Culture is as likely to mean visiting a local art exhibition as it is a trip to Japan; a feeling as much as a tangible ‘thing’. Culture in Manchester is a sum made up of many parts and we are grateful to feed into it and be a part of Manchester's powerful cultural standing. St. John’s new arts building, The Factory will become an iconic landmark that will come to be world-renowned as a pioneering cultural space for the UK. Designed by Dutch architects, OMA, who have designed buildings across Rotterdam, Seattle and Portugal, The Factory will be a space that joins these many strands of culture together. Incoming St. Johns projects, launching in the summer, will span the multiple disciplines of culture, and explore how St. John’s can contribute to this ever-evolving space. Four people who work onsite describe what culture is to them. The results are, as you would imagine, rather diverse.

BEN YOUNG Culture is the anchor of society, evidence of a shared belief in knowledge, beauty and tradition. MICHAEL INGALL Culture is what you are and it's what you want it to be, it's an important part of sustaining communities and in creating places. KATIE POPPERWELL Culture is a set of values and practices that articulate our sense of community and humanity. PHIL DAWSON Culture is driven by passion and consumed by those looking for inspiration. It informs, feeds, inspires, drives, questions, humbles, strengthens, shatters and sticks with us. Have your say on the great culture debate at @alliedlondon and follow the future of Old Granada Studios at @StjohnsMCR and @oldgranadaMCR #greatculturedebate By Daisy Barnes

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Culture Vulture Arts from around the world.

Music to work by Take five people, five computers, five speakers and one office. You’ve got a soundclash. Think a relay race, but with music. Just remember to wait your turn. All the below deserve to be added to your daily commute playlist. Sound clash at Leeds Dock by Lucy Whalley, Alex Webb, Phil Dawson, Stephen Bickers and Daisy Barnes. Never be like you – Flume Jackson Sisters – I believe in miracles Medicine chest – Prince fatty meets nostalgia 77 Hozier – Work Song EMBRZ - Home ft. Eleni Drake

In Rogue Rogues are the new darlings of the shoe world. Founded in 2015 by Leeds University alumni, Katie Harland, after growing frustrated with her surprising inability to find the perfect flat shoe. Pumps were unsupportive, heels uncomfortable, trainers unprofessional and traditional brogues unflattering. Step forward Rogues - a well-made and beautifully designed alternative making huge waves in the fashion industry. Stocked at Harvey Nichols and featured in Marie Claire, Stylist and Tatler to name a few it’s fair to say that Rogues are very much in vogue. Rogues from £79 - £169. www.roguesshoes.com

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Girl Power Take a collective of independent, creative female designer/makers from across the globe and throw them together in a virtual reality and you’ve got Object Style. Their site featuring homewares, jewellery and accessories is a feast for the imagination. They they also run a brilliant lifestyle blog and DIY workshops and tutorials. These winter rain coasters by The Vintage Vogue are our personal favourites. £20, objectstyle.co.uk

Thirsty Work Stephen Bickers opens our eyes to a unique type of movie genre: comedy/horror. Be afraid, by very afraid. What We Do in the Shadows is a mockumentary telling the story of a goofy unique group of individuals living in a shared house in modern day New Zealand. The horror/comedy is brought to screen by the New Zealand comedians and actors Jermaine Clement and Taika Waititi.

It’s in the detail Literature Patternity is an open source inspiration archive founded five years ago in order to share the founders’ ongoing research into patterns as a tool to inspire, explore and innovate. Their work asks questions like can the way we look at the smaller details enhance our understanding of the bigger picture? If we visualise the unseen, can it drive forward innovation? Does being more mindful make us happier and healthier? The uniquely curated research archive has a growing online community of over 1 million pattern enthusiasts and was cited by The Telegraph as one of the world’s ‘Top 10 Most Influential Style Blogs’ and Voted 6th in Wallpaper* Magazine’s 20 ‘Best Things On The Web’. You can buy their first book, PATTERNITY: A New Way Of Seeing: The Inspirational Power Of Pattern for £20 at Amazon.

What We Do in the Shadows stars Viago, Deacon and Vladislav. The three are vampires who struggle with everyday modern life. The group are trying to fit in with each other, make friends and get into the popular haunts (sorry!), whilst managing their unique gifts and thirst for blood. And, obviously, all along with the troubles of petty feuds with their natural bitter enemies - the local werewolf pack. What I like about this film is the humour and shift in portrayal of a modern day vampire. We have seen films in the past such as Queen of the Damned, and Underworld, which focus too much on eternal troubles and modern fantasy war. However, What We Do in the Shadows focuses on the ordinary lives we take for granted, albeit, through the life of a vampire. Horror or Comedy may not be your bag, but I guarantee What We Do in the Shadows will have you laughing and allow you to say there is a horror/comedy film you enjoy. Watch What We Do in the Shadows on Amazon Prime or Netflix.

www.patternity.org

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Happy Cities The happiness of place. Author, Eric Weiner, by his own admission a ‘grumpy man’ travelled tens of thousands of miles, exploring so-called ‘happy nations’ in order to better understand the happiness of place. His book ‘The Geography of Bliss’ takes him to The Netherlands, Bhutan, Switzerland and our own small island, Great Britain to get some answers. After encountering a number of different and often conflicting factors that equally contributed to happiness he somewhat settles on difference – or options – as a good bet for happiness. “Places are the same” – he says, “It’s not the elements that matter so much as how they’re arranged and in what proportions.” Property developers are ultimately interested in this – the concept of place – and how how these elements are arranged. It’s what drives people to countries near and wide, following suit with Weiner. We are not sitting still, but seeking and searching for that perfect arrangement of elements.

Our focus is creating the right environment and occupier mix to ensure that our developments work, and that our cities are evolved. “Ask my office - I’m never here,” said Allied London’s Chief Executive, Michael Ingall in conversation with Simon Creasy, of Property Week. “Whenever something is new I go and see it, wherever it is in the world. Last week, I was in Copenhagen. Before Christmas I went to Berlin and Hamburg. You can’t bring everything into your developments, but you can at least know what’s out there, and I like to know what everyone else is doing.” “I came back from Copenhagen and it’s actually changed my approach to the London Road Fire Station. I went to see two restaurants that were in towers and I thought we should put a restaurant at a certain level of our tower. ”Our focus is creating the right environment and occupier mix to ensure that our developments work, and that our cities are evolved.”

The Barn Coffee in Berlin

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Photo: Ben Young

A study of over 2,500 employees - by business psychologists, OPP in January 2016 - revealed the 10 happiest UK cities to work in - and interestingly London didn’t make the cut for the top 10. Topping the list was Norwich, closely followed by Liverpool and Birmingham, with factors including workload, salary increases and changes in management reported to have the biggest impact on job satisfaction.


OMA’s Casa de Musica in Porto

There is much research into the relevance of Alpha, Beta and Gamma cities in the Global City Rankings. London as one of the only Alpha ++ cities in the world, alongside New York, is often presupposed to have an edge over UK Beta and Gamma underlings. But a number of studies are beginning to suggest otherwise. London will always be an epi-centre for innovation, but Beta and Gamma cities – Manchester the former and Leeds the latter – have enormous potential for growth. And with this growth – and difference - potential for happiness. The ability to have an impact on your surroundings is evidently more feasible in a Beta or Gamma city – and the opportunities for arranging your own elements are more prevelant. Buildings create new places – and in turn spaces for ideas. The Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao has prompted an ongoing social, economic and aesthetic revitalisation

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in Bilbao, likewise OMA’s Casa de Musica in Porto has put the city on the map. New ideas, innovation and ‘cultural experiences’, as noted by a number of ‘world city’ measurements, are areas that when properly nurtured form the building blocks for enterprise and growth that provide an international reach and world city status for Beta and Gamma cities. The happiness of place isn’t a one-size-fits-all strategy, according to Weiner. Where some like structure others like freedom. Developments shouldn’t all be the same either. There’s no formula - but choice. Special thanks to David Drews for his superb knowledge on city-changing buildings.

By Daisy Barnes

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City Scoping: Tallinn, Estonia

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A city growing its reputation, Tallinn, Estonia’s capital city is fast becoming a hotbed of activity and progression. Rich in culture; old and new, Tallinn has its own World Heritage site, is a hive of technological innovation and has a thriving start-up scene, as well as an ever-evolving artisan coffee culture.


With only 1.3 million people populating the country, Estonia has a tiny population compared with other up-and-coming places. Yet this is seen as an advantage by those who inhabit it. Paap Pihelgas, head barista at East London-vibe restaurant, Truhvel Kohvik believes one of the advantages of the booming Tallinn scene is the size of the country as a whole. “When everyone knows each other it’s easier to get people involved.” An excerpt from @Caffeinemag Creative people like proximity and the closer they are to one another, the easier it is to share ideas and pass on knowledge. A tight knit community exists in Tallinn and this, combined with progressive government laws, such as access to the internet being deemed a basic human right, has allowed this small city to flourish. And flourish fast. Despite only half of the country having a phone line in 1991, by 1997 97% of Estonian schools were online. By 2003, three young Estonian entrepreneurs had developed the back-end for Skype. And in 2012, 94% of the country's tax returns were being made online, compared to 82% of UK applications in that year. The country is fast on its way to becoming paperless.

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So confident are the Estonians in their superior digital infrastructure that they are actively encouraging those in the UK and Europe to run their businesses through the Estonian system due to the strength of its digital interface. Read more on Ben Hammersley becoming an Estonian e-citizen at wired.co.uk The Estonians themselves don’t need any reminding of this. Garage48 is a co-working community for the many like-minded entrepreneurs that are popping up across Tallinn. Running events from Hackathons to Innov-a-thon’s the Estonian Digital Mafia are unlikely to be losing momentum anytime soon. Supported by an innovative coffee scene, the tech, start-up and coffee industries appear to be developing well in tandem with one another and show no signs of slowing in the near future. CoffeeBar 10133 is the perfect espresso pitstop, Gourmet Coffee roasts beans from all over the globe and Sinilind, which is off the beaten track, offers live gigs all inside an old renovated cinema. For a great list of coffee shops see likealocalguide.com/tallinn

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Everyday Inspiration Interactive Public Art Sometimes unnoticed but always present, public realm art influences how we integrate with our surroundings. In November of last year Spinningfields, Manchester, unveiled the first in an annual series of public art installations. Through No.3 by acclaimed artist, Liz West was an eye-opening six-metre long corridor of colour and light in situ in Spinningfields, injecting some colour and culture into the winter months. Its purpose was to invite those working at or visiting the estate to see Spinningfields through a new light.

Described by art influencer, Thom Hetherington as: “A significant work by one of Manchester’s most exciting artists", it became an integral part of Spinningfields, quietly inspiring people’s days. As Hetherington explains, West’s work “allows people to literally view Spinningfields in a very different way, using colour and light to bring a playfulness to the architectural vernacular”.

Man A at the Digital Festival, Leeds Dock 25-30th April

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The Comedy Carpet at Blackpool


Historic England recently spoke out about the need to protect the medium of public art after a growing number of post-war public art pieces were stolen, defaced or sold. “Pieces that were commissioned and designed with a social spirit to add colour to our local places and our daily lives [Historic England] are now being moved into storage or forgotten.” They have launched a campaign to seek out old public art, which coincides with a new exhibition, Out There at Somerset House, London. Showcasing public and private art, including Barbara Hepworth’s Winged Figure for John Lewis, right, the exhibition will tell the story of public art created between 1945 and 1985.

Spinningfields and Liz West’s Through Number 3

The quest to help protect missing outdoor art and keep the medium of public realm art alive is no easy task. Public realm art requires investment and maintenance – and above all creative thought and energy to make it relevant and evocative to those who will see it. A project at the top of the public realm art game is the comedy carpet in Blackpool. It quite literally doesn’t get much bigger than this. Commissioned by Blackpool Council in conjunction with artist Gordon Young and graphic designer, Andy Altmann of Why Not Associates the carpet took five years to create and was completed in October 2011. The team spent many months gathering hundreds of jokes, catchphrases, songs and sketches from the past 100 years and the piece has become a visitor attraction in itself, bringing a new generation of people to Blackpool and providing hours of thought-provoking interaction. Leeds Dock is pushing the boundaries of public realm art, with its digital public art festival – in partnership with the international Lumen Prize Exhibition – from 25-30th April. Taking public art to the next level the festival includes seven mind-bending interactive and immersive digital art installations, accompanied by a night of music and visual performance. Among the Lumen Prize exhibits is 2015 prize winner MAN A, a unique piece of ‘camouflage art’ that sees life burst from seemingly flat geometric surfaces of distorted patterns and military dazzle by those using an augmented reality mobile app. Headline piece, Portee, is a project at the crossing of light, technology, architecture and music. Luminous wires stretching down from towering concrete pillars, mysteriously linked to a solitary grand piano can be played like a giant harp creating an immersive layered soundscape as audience members interact with the piece. Tim Gee from Leeds Dock added: “Leeds Dock wants to celebrate digital culture in all its forms and the Lumen Prize at Leeds Dock showcases some of the very best in worldwide digital art. To support the emergence of new

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Digital art smartphone projector £22 Oliver Bonas

Winged figure, John Lewis

digital art, we are inviting amateur artists to a special ‘Bring Your Own Beamer’ project on Friday 29th April. This will be a creative free-for-all night of moving image, projection, participation and experimentation, accompanied by an array of local music, food and drink.” To further explore the medium of digital art – Leeds Dock will be hosting a Digital Art Debate, on 28th April, with Lumen Prize Project Director, Serena Wallace-Turner, Digital Curator of the Museum of London, Foteini Aravani, and Tessa Jackson, OBE, curator, arts consultant, and ex CEO of Institute of International Visual Arts, debating the nature of digital art. It will also host a ‘Bug Club’ for kids, on 30th April, in partnership with Sky, teaching kids aged 7-12 how to create digital art by writing code to draw graphical objects.

Read more on Historic England’s public realm art campaign here historicengland.org.uk

All events at the Leeds Digital Festival are free and running from 25-30th April. For more info see leedsdock.com

Visit the Comedy Carpet at Tower Festival Headland, Promenade, Blackpool FY1 1AP comedycarpet.co.uk

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The Power of Social Steve Bartlett from Social Chain on how he founded a collaborative of social media whiz kids and Jemma Tanswell from Reform Radio on how community radio programming is supporting Manchester’s unemployed. Tackling unemployment isn’t easy. Governments have spent centuries debating it and it is a fractious, isolating and deep-rooted issue that is unarguably difficult to break. Like all complex problems it needs creative thinking and inclusive solutions that build skills up instead of knocking confidence down. Step forward Reform Radio, an online radio station that supports young adults into employment. Launched in 2013 and based at Old Granada Studios, they have grown a team of incredible local DJs, writers, producers and artists offering live as well as on demand content around the clock. Behind the scenes, Reform run creative workshops and digital programmes to support individuals as they develop transferrable skills to take with them into future careers. Taking place this spring is Harry, a Big Lottery funded, creative writing project now in its third series. A group of over a dozen 18 - 30 year olds will record, edit and showcase a six part series before it is broadcast over the radio weekly for six weeks. Jemma Transwell at Reform Radio commented, “The skills developed within this time are all transferable. Confidence and moral is boosted for those suffering long term unemployment and career support runs parallel to this engaging and alternative approach to tackling youth unemployment. Harry is also a young man struggling in the current economic climate to gain work and stability and embodies the groups true experiences of unemployment today. The fictional element allows for moments of comedy and make the subject accessible to those who might not understand or want to listen to these issues.”

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Workshop at Reform Radio

The Harry Series 3 showcase will be at the end of April. Keep your eye on social media Facebook or Twitter for dates. www.facebook.com/reformradio @ReformRadioMCR To catch up with series 1 & 2 go to soundcloud.com/reformradiomanchester For more info on more of Reform Radio's creative outreach projects please contact shout@reformradio.co.uk


Steve Bartlett at Social Chain HQ

Social media, to many a dark art, relies on the power of followers – essentially linked to how popular you are or how popular your content is. Social Chain works on the idea that by linking up powerful brands – like Disney – with social media gurus who already have existing followings, often in excess of millions, if they talk about your content it is likely to make waves. This very simple concept now earns big bucks, and is something established companies – typically more used to traditional media rely on to ensure their marketing campaigns are a success. Grace Hilsley talks inspiration, passion and life lessons with Social Chain’s Founder, Steve Bartlett. “My business partners Dom, Hannah and I had built up social media pages in the past – me with my first business, Wallpark and the others with student and hack sites, ‘Student Problems’ and ‘Hogwarts and Sims Logic’. One day we realised the power of social influencers and literally had a lightbulb moment where we realised we had the potential to build a really strong social network and make it into a business. “I'm very trusting with my team, I give them free reign to work how they wish and I think this has helped to build great working relationships. I also think communication is

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key, the whole team communicates via groups on whatsapp. We all work together towards a shared vision. We really have become a family. ”The biggest lesson I've learnt is probably that you can never truly be prepared. We must stay agile and reactive, and if anything, prepare to be unprepared. Our team work together to keep each other in the loop, and stay connected – even if working remotely. “There's a quote by Henry Ford which I think really sums up my working philosophy: "If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right". If you look at Steve’s Twitter page you’ll see his description of himself as a dreamer, winner of The Drum’s Social Media agency of the year - and also the quote ‘Different in the name of better.’ What’s inspiring about Steve, though is that he’s not just on the road alone, he’s taking his social chain along for the ride with him. Social Chain open their first overseas office in Berlin this spring. Steve Bartlett will be at Glug Leeds at Leeds Dock for the Leeds Digital Festival on 25th April. socialchain.com

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Talent in Imagination Manchester creative agency, Holdens. Spinningfields’ first event for 2016, by the new in-house marketing and events team, will be ‘Tee Party'. Launching in April, Tee Party is an assortment of nine uniquely-designed crazy golf holes dotted across Spinningfields until the end of summer. From hopscotch, to the queen of hearts – the Tee Party invites people old and young, to give crazy golf a swing. New sports bar,

‘The Club House’ will be launching alongside to provide a home to enjoy Spinningfields’ summer of sport. Rochelle Silverstein interviews Ted Holden from creative marketing agency, Holdens, the team behind Tee Party and The Club House’s interior design.

Tee Party’s 6th hole - “Jenga” partnered with restaurant and bar Tattu

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Brainstorming at Holdens HQ

The Club House, Spinningfields

How did the idea for Holdens come about?

How do you work well together?

We had seen huge change in the advertising and marketing industries over the years and saw an opportunity to create a new agency that would combine our experience and expertise in a unique and highly relevant way. With Peter’s 45 years as a creative head in the advertising world, and mine and Oliver’s background in digital marketing and project management – we set out to build a multi-disciplinary creative agency, with a team that could deliver total brand experiences across advertising, digital, retail, interior design and experiential. (And more recently - virtual reality).

Creativity is the glue that binds us together and what started as a family business has become a company of like-minded individuals who work together with a mutual goal. Working hard to solve client's problems and having fun in the process.

What we do stems from the birth of modern advertising. The days when good ads were based on one simple thing: big ideas. But unlike the days of old - how, when and where people connect with brands is multi-channel, multi-layered and changing faster than ever before. So the idea behind Holdens is that we’re a truly integrated creative agency, agile and constantly embracing change.

Biggest lesson you've learnt?

What are you passionate about?

What's your top business resource? Our top business resource is very simply - our people and their unique take on each project. The internet and our extensive library play their part too.

Be positive. The power of positive thinking really does work.

What are you grateful for? The ability to stay enthusiastic and to be astonished at the number of creative possibilities for any communication challenge we encounter.

We’re passionate about the work we do - because life’s too short to be in a job you’re not passionate about. We love having great ideas for clients, the whole creative process and then the positive impact our work can have on people’s lives.

Biggest feat?

What's your working philosophy?

Growing the agency to the next stage and maintaining our creative values and unique approach whilst still having fun.

Everybody is capable of having a great idea. Anybody reading this article could have come up with Facebook. How many times have you said "that's such a simple idea why didn't I think of it?" Well that's how we run Holdens. Everyone can contribute and have their say and get involved with a project.

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Launching a successful agency in the middle of the recession.

Biggest upcoming excitement?

holdensagency.com

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Behind the Lens in Berlin A photo journey with Ben Young. I was sent the photos printed here by Ben Young in our St. John’s creative team. Taken last December on an Allied London study field trip to Berlin they evoked a feeling in me that I can’t describe. They reminded me of a piece I wrote on page 22: ‘Let’s talk about culture’. Culture is as likely to mean visiting a local art exhibition as it is a trip to Japan; a feeling as much as a tangible ‘thing’. These photos evoked in me that intangible feeling, and therefore seem to be the perfect – and only conclusion for that article and seemingly also the first edition of ALL magazine.

They showcase the quiet beauty of a place where creativity has thrived so wonderfully despite adversity and are translated beautifully – and effortlesslythrough a camera lens. If we can evoke a feeling as property developers – create an intangible ‘vibe’, ‘atmosphere’, ‘environment’ within our developments; St. John’s, London Road, Spinningfields - XYZ, No.1 Spinningfields, Leeds Dock, Herbal House - we will have succeeded. A big thank you to Ben Young. I hope you enjoy these photographs as much as I did.

By Daisy Barnes

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Meaty Ambitions 60 Minutes with meat entrepreneur, Rich Brown. We are lucky to work with such a wide array of inspiring people. Three of these come in the shape of Rich Brown and James and Heather Taylor, who are beginning the makings of a meat empire down at The Kitchens in Spinningfields. Now operating two meat ventures on site, their unit is a hive of activity and excitement. I challenge even the most stringent of veggies not to be excited by the prospect of a bacon hot dog in their midst (panic not veggies there is actually a meat-free option on the menu.) Rich, James and Heather are a rare example of true entrepreneurs and their passion for what they do is infectious. We managed to grab an hour with Rich to get to know one of Manchester’s hottest foodies a bit better.

Was food always a big part of your life? What’s your favourite childhood meal?

Favourite restaurant in Manchester? There is truly too many to choose from but I love Manchester House. What Aiden Burn and the team do there excites the fine dine passions inside.

Favourite restaurant outside of Manchester? I love the Man Behind the cap Curtain in Leeds. He is a true visionary. More further afield Burger Joint at Le Meridien in New York. You can’t beat it for an experience. Most recently a street trader I met in Columbia who was making Arepas on a bbq at the side of the road with a touch of grated local cheese. True street food.

Weirdest thing you’ve ever eaten? Deep fried scorpion in Beijing.

Food has always been a huge part of my life. It’s hard to pick a childhood favourite but if I did it would probably be a huge Yorkshire pudding filled with mince stew made by my grandma.

Most delicious thing you’ve ever eaten?

Are you the cook in your household?

Best and worst things about running your own business?

I spend most of my life down at The Kitchens so I tend to cook myself breakfast, lunch and dinner from the Bangers and Well Hung kitchens, however when I do go home it still tends to be me that cooks.

How do you continue to evolve your business and foodie ideas? Where do you go to explore? I had an amazing trip to Colombia recently where I got to experience a whole range of tastes and flavours that I hadn’t tried before. I try and travel as often as possible without leaving the business for too long. Although I don’t like the word authentic, we do try and make our brands as authentic as possible.

What country’s food particularly excites you that you’ve not yet visited? I love the food in Argentina. Chimichurri sauce in particular is a favourite of mine and sells so well on our Well Hung menu. I would love to try and see it made in its homeland and I love the vibes from South America. I also love the idea of a Cuban concept.

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Dumplings in Hong Kong for breakfast. Perfect way to start the day.

Worst: Making your own decisions Best: Making your own decisions.

Tell us something interesting about yourself: I worked in Romania for a while and became a mini celebrity cooking on TV, writing for a local magazine and staged a cooking show at a festival. Oh and I cooked for the American ambassador for Romania. Basically everything I wish to do in the UK but I’m not quite there yet! Bangers and Bacon and Well Hung are at The Kitchens, Irwell Square, Spinningfields, Manchester M3 3AG bangersandbacon.co.uk wellhungmcr.co.uk thekitchensleftbank.com

Daisy Barnes with Rich Brown


ALLIEDLONDON.COM

ALL Magazine - spring 2016 - issue 1  

ALL Magazine is an arts, enterprise and property magazine by Allied London.

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