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POINT OF DEPARTURE New works at the artist’s studio in London

ART

Sense of scale

A

A triad of brightly-coloured concave discs, reminiscent of hairdryers in old-fashioned salons, disappear into the wall at the Lisson Gallery in London. Large enough for an adult to curl up shells. This grand-scale-meets-fragility is something that Anish Kapoor, 58, has spent his proniversary, as well as a departure. The Mumbaiborn, London-based artist’s show announces a with materials mud, cement and metallic pigment. It is also a celebration of the 30 years that Kapoor as an artist—ever Nicholas Logsdail, who founded Lisson in the recalls seeing

time at the artist’s graduation show at the Chelsea College of Art. . In it, I recognised a convergence of modernism with a timelessness coming from his Indian origins,” says Logsdail, referring to a sculpture made of saturated bright powder, Kapoor tells Vogue “ art to new places,” he says of the show, which divide from what has been his most controversial piece to date: the ArcelorMittal Orbit. The Olympics may be over, but the tallest tower in Britain has gently slipped into the legacy for which it was created. This show, then, lifts the curtains off a new stage. The exhibition is on till November 10 at Lisson Gallery, London; Lissongallery.com

MEMORIES AND MILESTONES

A quick look at two iconic works in the artist’s much-dissected career

“This

exhibition is experimental and I hope it takes my art to new places” —ANISH KAPOOR

One of Kapoor’s first works, White Sand, Red Millet, Many Flowers (19 82) point to his Indian influe s nces

d Leviathan (2011), displaye is, at the Grand Palais in Par for reiterates Kapoor’s love the monumental

150 VOGUE INDIA NOVEMBER 2012 www.vogue.in

DAVE MORGAN/COURTESY ANISH KAPOOR; PETER LINDBERGH

ANISH KAPOOR’s current exhibition in London clears the air after the ArcelorMittal Orbit polarised admirers. By ALLIE BISWAS


'Anish Kapoor: Sense of Scale' - Vogue India - Dec 2012