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ALLEY APPLIED THEATRE 2018–19 EDUCATION ANNUAL REPORT


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Educate Gather Support Nurture Engage

Applied Theatre at the Alley is a national driving force for innovative arts education. We pioneer arts integration, cultivate the next generation of theatre artists, and foster community discourse.

NUMBERS AT A GLANCE

301,918 CONTACT HOURS

87,690

STUDENTS/COMMUNITY MEMBERS

3,570

1,206

354

46

CLASSROOM HOURS

SCHOOLS/GROUPS

DISTRICTS

TEACHERS

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F R OM T HE A R T I ST I C D I R EC T OR

ROB MELROSE

I have been at the Alley seven months and I am over the moon about the Houston community and about this Theatre. As the Alley’s new Artistic Director, I hope to usher in a new era of equity, diversity, and inclusion. Whether of staff, artistic offerings, audience enrichment or community engagement activities, one of my primary goals is to align our institution with the cultural legacies and diverse heart of this city. This year, building upon Alley’s Education and Community Engagement Initiatives department, we launched our “Broadening Perspectives Initiative” that will unfold along with our diverse 201920 season. The Alley will burst its walls with even more meaningful programs. Through a suite of audience enrichment and community engagement activities, we will embrace new patrons, support our existing audiences, and reach more deeply towards our diverse families and their neighborhoods. The Broadening Perspectives Initiative will provide diverse experiences in our lobbies through facilitated discussions designed to spur investigations and invite fresh debate. Additionally, on our stages through simultaneous translations and community projects designed with and for our local community. Essentially, our goal is to support a multiplicity of opinions, expand points of view, and embrace difference through this fresh take on what the Alley Theatre stands for.  Meaningful work will require our commitment to an expansive sense of belonging grounded in learning from, working beside and with our community to serve the diverse and rich Houston community and heartily welcome the generations to come. Sincerely,

Rob Melrose

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FR OM TH E ED U CATION D I R EC T OR

MA RY SUT TON

In his essay, “What is Art?,” I was struck by visual artist Fred Babb’s statement, “Art and music are the drugs of choice for thousands of kids. If we expect them to just say no, we must recognize the healing alternative, their own creativity.” Through our education and community engagement efforts, the Alley Theatre is profoundly committed to building an institution that welcomes children into the world of theatre early and create a home for them throughout their lives. In the end, we recognize that our future as an institution and, dare I say, society depends on the strength of these “artsfriendly” relationships. It is our pleasure to be joyously working beside Houston’s families and schools to develop imaginative visionaries, workforce-ready problem-solvers, and insightful citizens. Indeed, it is our obligation to our community. The community that literally created the Alley Theatre, one of America’s premier theatrical institutions. Nina Vance did something significant when she created Merry Go Round, a school of theatre for children and teens. So that as the Alley grew in national prominence, she simultaneously deepened the local audience’s love of this art form that truly changes, and in some cases saves lives. Fifty years later, we are still following in her footsteps! As the 21st century rushes forward, we are more certain than ever that our children, their families, and schools need our space to safely explore critical problems, cultivate creative solutions, and envision healthy scenarios. Nurturing our children’s art-making passions is important work, a kind of service that lifts, ignites, embraces, and celebrates the best of ourselves. Sincerely,

Mary Sutton

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This was the third successful year of our El Zócalo Initiatives. It was a boon to hire a new fully benefited Manager of Community Partnerships. Upon this hiring, Tony Diaz, a community leader, told us, “I want to commend the Alley for engendering some tremendous work. 72 Miles/72 Stories is a potent example of a major institution working more closely with the community. I am also excited to see the upcoming lineup, which is a vast change, in terms of inclusion, from past line ups. The additional bilingual support is great. I also applaud the hiring of Benito Vasquez as an important step to work with the Latino community. This is excellent work and I am proud to serve on the Alley Latino Advisory Committee. I am excited to see these tangible changes.”

It is so exciting to see all of the strides being made at the Alley to produce productions that are more inclusive of Houston’s multilingual population. –John Pluecker, Antena Houston

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868

112

56

6

303

40

CONTACT HOURS

STUDENTS

HOURS

TEACHERS

AUDIENCE

ARTISTS/ PARTICIPANTS

Our 2018 –19 El Zócalo journey kicked off on

In total, 463 community members were served by El

January 24, as playwright Hilary Bettis watched

Zócalo’s 72 Miles|72 Stories activities this season. El

300 pairs of eyes transfixed on the Neuhaus stage,

Zócalo continues to foster community and reinforce

witnessing – often for the first time – themselves,

Houston’s presence as a diverse arts center that

their families, and their own struggles validated

serves every neighborhood.

by her remarkable play, 72 Miles to Go…. In the talkback and often through tears, the first time theatregoers shared their personal experiences that echoed the story on stage. Inspired by these Latinx high school students, Bettis vowed, she would to never stop writing for those kids. We were inspired to go deeper too, wondering, “How many of these Latinx stories exist in our community, and how can we help share them?” To explore those questions, the Alley engaged seven schools and community organizations, totaling 113 Houston participants, to develop their own compelling stories inspired by the themes of 72 Miles to Go… through 8-week residencies of the Alley’s First Draft Personal Narrative curriculum. From the beginning to the end, participants wrote, revised, and rehearsed their stories leading up to our culminating event, 72 Miles/72 Stories. In 72 Miles/72 Stories, 20 selected community storytellers, ranging from 4th graders to senior citizens, told their personal stories in the Alley’s Neuhaus Theatre. This three-day curated celebration also featured performances from 40 diverse local Latinx artists, including Ballet Folklorico and Modern dancers, Latin jazz musicians, slam poets, and visual artists sharing powerful artistic expressions of the same themes. We brought audience members into the action through an interactive community mural in the lobby and by ensuring an inclusive bilingual experience through simultaneous interpretation provided by Antena Houston in both Spanish and English.

ALLEY THEATRE 18/19 EDUCATION ANNUAL REPORT

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Anastasia Wade, a 3rd grade teacher at Goodman Elementary in Fort Bend ISD, calls for students to stand in Actor’s Neutral – focusing their bodies, minds, and voices - before entering the classroom. The arts integrated learning objective is posted on the board and Ms. Wade challenges students to transition to the carpet moving as tigers they will later learn are “secondary consumers.” She dives into a physical warmup, activating previous knowledge and vocabulary through kinesthetic games. Four years ago, Ms. Wade joined the Arts Integration Network (AIN), adamant her students would not be successful and doubting she could use the arts to support demanding academic gains. Four summer intensives and 64 in-class coaching sessions later, Ms. Wade has transformed her teaching practice to epitomize arts integration, leading to more successful classroom structures, joyful engagement, enhanced social-emotional skills for herself and her students— and importantly increased test scores. “You just have to do it,” she declares to a cohort of beginning arts “integrationists.” In this program, our reach grew to 42 teachers, including new teachers in Spring and Houston ISDs. AIN teachers report increased student engagement, decreased behavioral issues, and better content comprehension—making arts integration an invaluable tool for teachers and students alike. Our rigorous assessments tell us that our program works as teacher’s ability to arts integrate grew from 12.5% to 99%. Teachers reported a 75% increase in student comprehension. 97.7% of the teachers who participated would recommend this program to others.

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This year, both my morning and afternoon class had 100% and 99% respectively passing grades on the first round of STAAR administration. – Daphny Bradshaw, 5th Grade Goodman Elementary Teacher

56 HOURS

5,523 STUDENTS

64,084 CONTACT HOURS

324 TEACHERS


ARTS + SOCIAL EMOTIONAL LEARNING Imagine a group of feisty 5th graders mingling safely around the room as atoms in the states of matter, changing speed as the Teaching Artist applies more “thermal energy” with the shake of a tambourine. In this exercise, students are not only reinforcing core science and theatrical concepts, they are practicing the social-emotional skills of collaboration, active listening, and self-control.

With all the tests and results, your program makes it so the child doesn’t always feel like they’re data. – Karen, Rucker Elementary, 5th grader

26,750 CONTACT HOURS

208 CLASSROOM HOURS

875 STUDENTS

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In 2018–19, Applied Theatre at the Alley received our third grant from the BridgeUp at The Menninger Clinic to promote mental health and Social Emotional Learning (SEL) through the arts at Rucker Elementary. In partnership with the Houston Ballet, Houston Symphony, and the Houston Galveston Institute (collectively the “Arts + Social Emotional Learning (A+SEL) Intersections Alliance”), our team taught SEL through various models of arts and artsintegrated programming in core content classrooms, ancillary classrooms, and professional development. Through activities like the one described above, students became more aware of their own social-emotional needs and gained a greater grasp on SEL competencies. One student even reported, “All the art things helped me stop and think when I get upset, and helped me want to participate and try things I wouldn’t try before.” In addition to developing SEL competencies, the BridgeUp grant also allows us to connect struggling students to much-needed mental health support. By the second semester, the most vulnerable 20% of the student population began receiving small group or individual therapy from our mental health partner, HGI. Likewise, Rucker’s teachers and staff benefited from embracing the importance of self-care and the dangers of unknowingly enduring secondary trauma in the workplace, ensuring a lasting impact on our students and the school culture.

TEACHERS

ALLEY THEATRE 18/19 EDUCATION ANNUAL REPORT

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8

45,564

4,007

CONTACT HOURS

STUDENTS

363

165

HOURS

TEACHERS

26

37

SCHOOLS

RESIDENCIES

A Kindergarten classroom transforms into a jungle. A group of 5th graders work together to build a circuit with their bodies. 2nd graders travel to the moon. These are just some of the ways that our Staging STEM program incorporates the magic of theatre into classroom content. During the 2018–19 school year, Alley Theatre Teaching Artists worked to integrate the arts into 167 classrooms throughout four school districts. We worked with K-8th grade students, exploring topics such as: Food Chains, Writing Sentences, Earth and Space, and Multi-Step Multiplication Word Problems. For two weeks at a time, students engaged physically, vocally, and imaginatively while simultaneously learning concepts and vocabulary important for mastering state standards. Through pre- and post-assessments administered in each residency, we have the opportunity to quantify the students’ remarkable growth. On average, understanding of a concept improved by 33% in a two-week period. Bilingual classes generally saw an even higher increase of 39%.


Staging STEM’s kinesthetic approach allows students to get out from behind their desks and start thinking creatively. Our data proves that this has a positive effect on their learning, but we also see positive effects in other important areas:

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Classroom teachers note increased engagement during lessons.

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Our theatrical activities inherently promote SEL development, such as relationship building, communication, and critical thinking.

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Students get to practice public speaking skills and boost their confidence.

Watching these teaching artists work with the kids made me rethink how I should be doing my lesson plans. –Sandra McMillan, 2nd grade teacher, Hirsh Elementary

ALLEY THEATRE 18/19 EDUCATION ANNUAL REPORT

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This was one of my favorite workshops. I haven’t stopped writing since then. –Amy Duty, Kleb Intermediate

SLAM POETS @ ALLEY THEATRE Alley Theatre’s Slam Poetry Teaching Artists are competitive, renowned slam poets. They bring a profoundly personal touch to their work across the Greater Houston area, helping teens from all walks of life mold their experiences into dynamic, powerful poems. Over the course of 8-12 hour long in-school residencies, students build the skills and courage necessary to articulate their innermost thoughts and struggles. We strive to dispel fears and instill a long-lasting passion for communicating personal ideas in a public forum. Selected students from each residency move on to perform at the Alley’s semi-annual Poetry Slams in the Neuhaus Theatre, competing for cash prizes and coveted spots on state and national Slam Poetry teams. We worked in close partnership with Savannah Blue Arts & Outreach to give winning poets the chance to perform at the Women on the Bayou Poetry Slam.

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WOMEN ON THE BAYOU POETRY SLAM Back by popular demand, Savannah Blue Arts and Outreach held its 2nd annual Women on the Bayou Poetry Slam in the Neuhaus Theatre on March 23, 2019. A lively, diverse audience of all age groups and races packed the house at this sold-out performance. The Slam featured 20 of the world’s top female poets in fierce competition. Ranked as the top poets in the poetry circuit, competitors came from as far as New York, Los Angeles, and Atlanta. This marks the third year of collaboration between the Alley Theatre and Bayou City Slam events—a relationship that provides crucial opportunities, connections, and experiences for all involved in Slam Poets @ the Alley.

4,020

570

196

19

CONTACT HOURS

STUDENTS

HOURS

TEACHERS


HARRIS COUNTY JUVENILE PROBATION DEPARTMENT It’s rare to see someone who works in a correctional facility cry on the job. But that’s what happened on March 20, 2019 when the Alley Theatre produced a Poetry Slam featuring poems created and performed by incarcerated teens. Many of these students were victims of violence, abuse, and even human trafficking. Our impactful Slam Poetry curriculum provided them with a new creative outlet which allowed them to process trauma and grief in a new way. The culminating program led to an afternoon of laughs, hugs, tears, and solidified a fruitful partnership with the Harris County Juvenile Probation Department (HCJPD), shepherded by Theatre District Houston. For six weeks, the Alley Theatre’s Slam Poetry residency at the HCJPD’s Youth Village served 15 students and one ELA teacher through 455 contact hours. Students quickly bonded with the two awardwinning Teaching Artists as they all shared personal tribulations and stories of triumph, offering hope to students who often feel marginalized. Student assessments reported such gains as, “I have more confidence in myself,” and ”It opened new doors for me.”

Over the six weeks, I witnessed amazing transformations. I loved the slam poetry at our campus to showcase newly acquired skills! –Ms. Holloway, Youth Village’s ELA Teacher

Our strong relationship with HCJPD allowed us to offer the students an unparalleled opportunity. Utilizing positive behavior reinforcements, we rewarded 15 of those students with a trip to the Alley Theatre so they could compete again, this time alongside other Houston area students. After touring the facility and meeting our artists, the students poured their hearts out onto the stage. The beaming smiles and the roar of the crowd made it clear that we had completed our mission: their voices were heard.

ALLEY THEATRE 18/19 EDUCATION ANNUAL REPORT

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It’s not easy to pin a teacher down for a meeting. Before the meeting even begins, you can clearly see why. As a teacher approaches a conference room, they are usually carrying more than seems reasonable for two hands, and they may even be slightly out of breath as they rush from one thing to the next. But, something magical happens as the door closes. Despite the challenges ahead, the room fills with laughter, dedication, and passion. They are glad to have the Alley Theatre team in the room, and we are happy to be there. Together we explore ways in which we can achieve our shared goal: providing Houston’s students with unparalleled experience via the art of Theatre.

The purpose of our partnership is to help

“Critical Links,” a report with 62 academic research studies, backs our classroom experiences with hard data. These studies demonstrate that our work “helps close the achievement gap, improves academic skills essential for reading and language development, and advances students’ motivation to learn” (Arts Education Navigator). Alley In Residence provides rigorous arts education residencies to public and private middle and high schools across Houston in a myriad of ways. The Alley’s education staff work closely with partner teachers to design packages that enhance and complement existing curriculum through residencies such as Shakespeare, Slam Poetry, Playwriting, and various eras of theatre history. Our work not only enhances student knowledge of theatre arts, but it also builds valuable transferable skills in presentation, collaboration, and communication. Time and time again, teachers comment on the keen ability of Alley Teaching artists to get students out of their comfort zone and engaged in new learning experiences.

22,430

886

109

CONTACT HOURS

HOURS

TEACHERS

change our student lives through higher level theatre exposure. –Julio Morales, Sharpstown High School

3,138 STUDENTS

18 SCHOOLS


As the fog rolls into Ye Olde Victorian London, the sounds of the ominous stringed instruments are drowned out by the audience’s gasps as ghosts from eras past tiptoe out of their crypts and lunge toward the front row. The fog pours off the stage, as teachers frantically try to encourage theatre etiquette by shushing the excited students. The shushes are drowned out as lighting strikes and thunder claps, resulting in screams of surprised terror from the students and teachers alike. All decorum delightfully dissolves as the ghosts dance from their ghastly world into the bedroom of Ebenezer Scrooge. Thus begins another season of A Christmas Carol Student Matinees. A Christmas Carol is always a huge hit with our student crowds of all ages. We also gave older students something special to experience. We inspired future theatre technicians when we wowed

them with real rainfall during Twelfth Night. Our community was thoroughly touched by Alley All New El Zócalo programming which included a student matinee showing of 72 Miles to Go…

Most of my students have never been to a live professional play...

Student Matinee audiences continually seem to be the most rewarding performances for our actors and production team. The energy that comes from a novice theatre crowd encourages the actors to stay on their toes, and to give the best performance for these budding theatre aficionados. The reactions from the mouths of these babes are a refreshing reminder of the ever-evolving nature of theatre. Each student matinee confirms that the Alley is creating theatre-lovers of the future.

Most of my students have never been to a live professional play. My boys especially were not excited to attend but when the play

20,338

8,135

134

CONTACT HOURS

STUDENTS

SCHOOLS

was over they came to me and told me how much they enjoyed it. –Isabel Wiliams, Harmony School of Discovery

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Schools begged us to bring back their all-time favorite Oskar classics, and this year, we listened! We rolled out our popular, first-ever Oskar productions: Oskar and the Big Bully Battle and Oskar and the Curiously Colorful Clash. Oskar and the Big Bully Battle encourages students stand up for themselves, and for each other by adopting the role of the UPstander and not the passive BYstander. K-5 Students are challenged to empathize with all of their peers - not just friends - even those who may, at first glance, appear like a “Bully.” In Oskar and the Curiously Colorful Clash, Billy is new in Oskar’s town of Orange Hat Texas, and is faced with the task of staying true to himself while interacting with new friends in a new environment. Although Billy and his alter-ego, Doubting Donkey, stumble along the way, in the end, he and Oskar are able to see the value that difference brings to our own creativity and to our community. During this fantastic 2018 –19 school year, the wacky four person Oskar adventure crew was able to bring smiles to 68 schools, have 123 hilarious performances, and connect with 53,164 students.

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An amazing, fun, and totally engaging performance that is at the level for children to understand, as well as amusing for an adult. – Mireille Patman, Harvard Elementary School

68 SCHOOLS

53,164 STUDENTS

123

2,127

PERFORMANCES

TEACHERS


ALLEY THEATRE 18/19 EDUCATION ANNUAL REPORT

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Once again, the Alley’s Play Makers camps are a hit for both kids and parents! In 2018 –19, Alley Theatre hosted five two-week summer camp sessions in Houston and Fort Bend, as well as a one-week session on site at the Alley over Spring Break. Each camp day begins with a group warm up to get used to being an ensemble, and to make sure that we are all in the right frame of mind to have a great theatrically fun day. Through Acting, Movement, and Play Making sessions, campers learn the basics of theatre skills. They learn: what it means to work as an ensemble; how to create and live in a character; how to make and stick to bold choices; spatial awareness and creative movement; how to tell a story with the voice and the body; and how to create a beginning, middle, and end of a story. Campers are given ample time to play, rest, eat, and repeat, all while learning about a STEM topic and creating their own piece of theatre to be presented at an Open Workshop, which is a celebration of learning the campers share with their parents.

He has really opened up verbally since attending this camp. His expressive language has improved. – Play Makers 2018 parent

Despite the fact that Play Makers camps frequently sell out, we prioritize our commitment to equitable access by providing generous scholarships and discounts. Of our 339 campers this season, 24% received full or partial support, for a total of $46,000.

14,010 339 CONTACT HOURS

16

STUDENTS

240

28

CLASSROOM HOURS

TEACHING ARTISTS


In five weeks, our son has grown from an awkward self-conscious teenager to a confident young adult who is comfortable in his own skin in the company of others. –2018 Conservatory Parent

Alley Conservatory rounded its fifth year in the summer of 2018 with a diverse ensemble of 32 young theatre artists from across the Greater Houston area. The five-week intensive provided a unique opportunity for serious young theatre artists to work with established professionals in the field. In addition to training in acting, voice, movement, and playwriting, students worked with the Alley Master Teaching Artists to create an original piece of theatre. Students embraced the topic of “Identity” for their devised work. Junior and senior ensembles researched current events, interviewed family members and strangers, and created movement pieces in response to their dramaturgical ideas. Each ensemble created a unique mission statement - a goal they wanted to achieve through their work and devised monologues and scenes through improvisation and playwriting activities. Their collective effort culminated in a piece of theatre unique to each ensemble’s explorations of their place in the world.

TEEN ACTING Finally fulfilling a long-term goal of expanding our camp and class offerings throughout the year, Applied Theatre launched Fundamentals of Acting for Teens in the spring of 2019. Eleven diverse students with various levels of experience enrolled in the six-week course, and classes were taught by Assistant Director of Education Chaney Tullos, along with Alley Resident Acting Company Members Elizabeth Bunch and Chris Hutchison. The teens explored scene work, movement, and improvisation all designed to help students become better actors, stronger ensemble members, and more engaged citizens. Four students moved on from the Teen Acting class to become members of the 2019 Conservatory.

5,888

32

184

10

CONTACT HOURS

STUDENTS

HOURS

TEACHING ARTISTS

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This year we had a record-breaking number of applicants apply for our Internship Program. Out of the 73 applicants for the summer of 2019, we were able to bring on 25 new interns to start their theatre careers at the Alley! Working hand-in-hand with seasoned theatre professionals, interns are exposed to the day-to-day inner-workings across all departments and given opportunities to thrive. Each intern leaves equipped with valuable skills to land a job in their chosen field.

skills, talents, and education can lead to a myriad of career opportunities in theatre. Kids and adults alike are fascinated that we have three people dedicated to creating, applying, and maintaining wigs. Patrons are delighted to hear that engineering degrees are used to create safe and secure but stellar scenery. Students less interested in creative fields are excited to learn that strong organizational skills can translate into arts administration or stage management.

TOURS This year momentum for tours grew, giving us the opportunity to tag on more in-depth programming such as workshops, in-depth tech talks, panel discussions, discounts to shows, and customized events designed specifically for a group. An exclusive Alley Theatre Backstage tour is one of the best ways to see the inner workings of one of the most historic and renowned theatres in America. Tours begin with guests learning about the legacy of Nina Vance, and the impact the Alley has been making since 1947. Moving forward in history, participants learn about the major changes that have impacted the Alley, Houston, and the theatre scene at large while getting insider access to where the magic is made—the Hubbard and Neuhaus Theatres and the Alley Center for Theatre Production. Serving schools and groups such as the Girl Scouts, Jack and Jill, Communities in Schools, and a plethora of retirement and church groups, we reach patrons as young as second grade to senior citizens. It is our goal to tailor each tour to the interests of the group. In particular, an in-depth peek at the theatre’s moving gears gives young artists a chance to see that their

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I wanted to give my students the opportunity to see a theatre and the behind-the-scenes work that goes into making a production. – Jaime David, Love ES Teacher


Sound Designer Pierre Dupree (Constellations); Associate Producer & Casting Director and Director of The Humans, Brandon Weinbrenner; and Fight Director H. Russ Brown, who discussed stage combat work and performed fight demonstrations from The Three Musketeers.

In addition to our outstanding productions, Alley Theatre provides a forum for theatre’s original purpose: discussion. We invite audiences to join us at select performances for a series of dialogues about our work on stage. Three types of discussions were offered during the 2018-19 season:

DESIGNER TALKS

ARTIST TALKBACKS

Designer Talks give audiences a behind-the-scenes look at the design process. An hour before the Sunday matinee preview performance of each show, the Alley’s Associate Director of Design, Kevin Rigdon, leads a discussion with the production’s creative team. These pre-show talks offer audiences an exclusive opportunity to ask questions about the designer’s work and learn how they brought the script to life.

Alley patrons attended post-show Artist TalkBacks with cast and members of the Artistic staff after select performances. These question-and-answer sessions were held in the theatre immediately after the performance.

ALLEY IN CONTEXT Alley In Context is a post-show panel featuring civic leaders, distinguished academics, and area professionals discussing the themes of a play and how they are reflected in our lives today. Among the topics discussed were labor unions and factory conditions for the Detroit-set Skeleton Crew, quantum physics and string theory for Constellations, and criminal law, specifically as it relates to the treatment of battered women in Southern states for Crimes of the Heart. This season’s Alley In Context discussions also included conversations with playwright Beth Henley and director Theresa Rebeck (Crimes of the Heart); director Judith

Ivey (Quack); director Leslie Swackhamer and

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EDUCATION & COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT SPONSORS The Alley Theatre’s education programs would not be possible without the generous support of our donors. Menninger Foundation

Macy’s

Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo

John and Charlene O’Shea Family Foundation

The William Stamps Farish Fund

Vivian L. Smith Foundation

The Powell Foundation

Immanuel & Helen B. Olshan Foundation

PwC Wells Fargo Shell Oil Company Foundation ENGIE George and Mary Josephine Hamman Foundation CenterPoint Energy

Kinder Morgan Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Craig Llewellyn James Stafford and Deborah Keyser Theatre Forward Texas Commission on the Arts Miss Amy Shahda

William E. and Natoma Pyle Harvey Charitable Trust H-E-B Tournament of Champions The Lewis and Joan Lowenstein Foundation Official Airline of Alley Theatre

Photos by Christopher Diaz and Rachel Wagner.

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ALLEY THEATRE 18/19 EDUCATION ANNUAL REPORT

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Profile for Alley Theatre

Alley Theatre Education and Community Engagement Annual Report 2018-19  

Alley Theatre Education and Community Engagement Annual Report 2018-19

Alley Theatre Education and Community Engagement Annual Report 2018-19  

Alley Theatre Education and Community Engagement Annual Report 2018-19