South Shore Living - January 2019

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You Could Live Here.

We will get you the results you deser ve. Just ask some of our clients from 2018!

At Michelle Larnard Real Estate Group our mission is to provide a smooth and effortless end-to-end transaction for each and every client. With our White Glove Service, you will experience a professional team of agents working for you every day. Your goals are our mission!

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781-383-5100 Michelle@LarnardRealEstate.com 9555070

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FALL 2018

SPRING 2018

FALL 2017

SPRING 2017

FALL 2016

SPRING 2016

SEVEN A’S FOR PATIENT SAFETY Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital-Plymouth received its seventh consecutive A rating for patient safety from The Leapfrog Group—the nation’s leading nonprofit watchdog on hospital safety. The A rating puts BID-Plymouth in the top 6% of all hospitals in the United States for patient safety.*

We’ve come a long way so you don’t have to.

bidplymouth.org *Fall 2018 Leapfrog ratings.

FALL 2015


contents january 2019

40 Entrepreneurs to Watch

Local business owners who aren’t afraid to think outside the box.

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48 Unbelieve-A-Bowl

Five of our favorite smoothie and acai bowls.

52 Ticket to Ride

From trolleys to buses, Plymouth & Brockton Street Railway Company celebrates 130 years of serving South Shore riders.

58 New Year, New You

Local experts share tips for decluttering your home and your mind and inspiring positive change in all aspects of your life.

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John Grant Marshfield photographer John Grant captures vibrant winter wildlife images.

Cover: Blendah Babes smoothie photographed by Jack Foley

January 2019, Volume 15, No. 11 SOUTH SHORE LIVING (ISSN 2162-4313) is published monthly by Lighthouse Media Solutions with offices at 396 Main St., Ste 15, Hyannis, MA 02601. Periodicals Postage paid at Hyannis, MA and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send Change of Address to: South Shore Living, Subscription Services, PO Box 3000, Denville, NJ 07834-3000. Š Copyright 2015 Lighthouse Media Solutions. South Shore Living is a registered trademark of Lighthouse Media Solutions. All rights reserved. Publisher is not responsible for omissions or errors. Contents in whole or part may not be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. Publisher disclaims responsibility to return unsolicited material, and all rights in portions published thereof remain the sole property of South Shore Living and Lighthouse Media Solutions.

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JANUARY 2019

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contents january 2019

64 52

58 DEPARTMENTS 11 Coast Lines

69 The Dish

News and notes from the South Shore

15 Living It Up

70 Restaurant Profile

Photos from local fundraisers

Su Casa comes to Plymouth

17 Living Arts

72 Restaurant Guide

Local arts, crafts, music and books

20 Date Book

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Culinary Champion Mulanje Tea Imports

Events you won’t want to miss

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78 Look Back Dreaming of Life on Third Cliff

80 Last Scene

“Town Brook in Winter,” remembering photographer Ron Wilson

Where to dine in the region

76 Open House

A Seaside Getaway in Scituate

JANUARY 2019

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editor’s note

Happy Anniversary!

V O LU M E 16 • N U M B E R 1 VICE PRESIDENT, EDITORIAL & CONTENT

Janice Randall Rohlf

South Shore Living is celebrating its 15th anniversary in 2019. Time flies when you’re having fun! I was lucky to be part of the original team that launched the debut issue back in 2004 and it has been such a joy to help the magazine grow and change over the years. I am so thankful to our wonderful team of contributing writers and photographers and all of our loyal readers who have supported us along the way. Speaking of anniversaries, this issue includes a story by writer Dave Kindy about the Plymouth & Brockton Street Railway Co., which has been serving the South Shore community for 130 years. This month’s issue also shines a light on new businesses. You can read all about local “Entrepreneurs to Watch” who are daring to think outside the box. Historically, January is a month when many people make resolutions. Whether your goal is to lose weight, kick a bad habit or tackle that mountain of junk in your basement or attic, the feature “New Year, New You” can help you get on the right track. Writer Laura DeSisto picked the brains of three local experts to learn methods for decluttering your life (your closet and your mind) and inspiring positive change. If you’re looking for a way to refresh your diet, be sure to check out the feature “Unbelieve-a-bowl,” penned by editorial intern Victoria Hubley. Her story uncovers five of the region’s most delicious and Instagram-worthy acai and smoothie bowl dishes. Lastly, this issue features a story about local nature photographer John Grant whose beautiful images capture images of wildlife in the winter landscape. As always, our Date Book is filled with fun events for the whole family. Be sure to follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @SSLivingMag.

EDITOR

Maria Allen: South Shore Living, Plymouth Magazine, Hingham Magazine LMS EDITORS

Lisa Leigh Connors Cape Cod Magazine, Chatham Magazine, Falmouth Magazine Kelly Chase New England Living Rob Duca New England Golf & Leisure Colby Radomski Southern New England Weddings Tom Richardson New England Boating Janice Randall Rohlf Southern New England Home, Home Remodeling ............................................ CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Eric Brust-Akdemir ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR

Wendy Kipfmiller-O’Brien DESIGNER

Kendra Sousa ............................................ CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Laura DeSisto, Judy Enright, John Galluzzo, Dave Kindy, Jen McInerney CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Jack Foley, John Grant, Kris Hughes EDITORIAL NTERN

Victoria Hubley Published by

Enjoy!

Lighthouse Media Solutions www.lhmediasolutions.com Single copy price $4.95/$5.95 Canada. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without the written permission of the publisher. Publisher disclaims all responsibility

Maria Allen, Editor mallen@lhmediasolutions.com

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for omissions, errors, and unsolicited materials. Printed in the USA.

JANUARY 2019

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Special Advertising Section in This Issue

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EDUCATION

READER SERVICES SUBSCRIPTIONS Your one year subscription includes 12 issues of South Shore Living, home delivered for only $16.95. If you have a question about your subscription, call us toll free at 855-264-9001, write to South Shore Living, Subscription Services, PO Box 3000, Denville, NJ 07834-3000, or visit us at www.ssliving.com/sslsub.

GIFT SUBSCRIPTIONS South Shore Living makes a great gift. To order a gift subscription, visit us at www.ssliving.com/sslsub or call us toll free at 855-264-9001.

CHANGE OF ADDRESS Send us both the old and new address and a mailing label, if possible. Or change the address online at www.ssliving.com/sslsub or by calling us at toll free 855-264-9001.

BACK ISSUES Back issues can be ordered online at www.neshopathome.com for $4.95 plus shipping and handling, or by calling 508-534-9291 x114.

LETTERS We welcome letters and comments. Send letters to South Shore Living, 396 Main Street, Suite 15, Hyannis, MA 02601. Or, send an e-mail to mallen@lhmediasolutions.com.

MARKETING AND EVENTS For information about promotions, marketing and special events, or to inquire about magazine donations for special events, call us at 508-534-9291 x114 or e-mail us at info@lhmediasolutions.com.


contributors

PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Russell A. Piersons rpiersons@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................

CHIEF OPERATIONS OFFICER

David F. Jensen djensen@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................

VICE PRESIDENT FINANCE

Connie Walsh cwalsh@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................

REGIONAL SALES MANAGERS

Jane Cournan Associate Publisher, South Shore Living jcournan@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................

South Shore native JEN MCINERNEY is an award-winning writer and editor with nearly 25 years of experience in journalism. She has been a regular contributor to South Shore Living since 2011. Her work has appeared in Hingham Magazine and Plymouth Magazine, South Shore Living’s sister publications, as well as Boston Homes, Global Traveler, Club Business International, MAX Magazine, and Gatehouse Media publications, among others. For this month’s issue, she spoke with Scituate artist Becky O’Toole about the gift of painting through cancer recovery and her launch of The Pink Frame, which gives back to the Dana Farber Cancer Institute.

LAURA DESISTO is a Cohasset resident who got her start writing copy for Boston ad agencies. She has also penned stories for our sister publications, Plymouth Magazine and Hingham Magazine, writing about everything from local celebrities to education. Since January is a time when many people think about making New Year’s resolutions, DeSisto set out to interview several local experts to discover methods of decluttering your life and achieving a renewed sense of well-being.

Anne Bousquet abousquet@lhmediasolutions.com Brian Ferrara bferrara@lhmediasolutions.com David Honeywell dhoneywell@lhmediasolutions.com Janice Rogers jrogers@lhmediasolutions.com Suzanne Ryan sryan@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................

SALES AD COORDINATOR PUBLISHING

Laura Scheuer ads@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................

ASSISTANT TO CEO & OFFICE MANAGER

Laura Scheuer lscheuer@lhmediasolutions.com BOOKKEEPER

Kelly Heitmann

............................................ FUELWIRE

Russell A. Piersons Chairman Savash Kalay CEO and President Todd Fitz Creative Director Independent Sales Representatives Mike Alleva, Brian Ferrara, Steve Wyman Oceanna O’Donnell Director Customer Success

New Hampshire native JUDY ENRIGHT began her writing career covering Lake Sunapee Star boat sailing races for the now-defunct Claremont Daily Eagle newspaper. A longtime journalist as well as a photographer, Judy’s stories have appeared in magazines including Ireland of the Welcomes and South Shore Living. She has written for The Nashua (NH) Telegraph, The Lowell Sun, The Patriot Ledger and Mariner newspapers, where she was editor of The Norwell Mariner for 14 years. She has been the travel writer for more than 20 years for The Boston Irish Reporter. For this issue, Judy met with John Grant and enjoyed talking with him about photography while viewing his extraordinary wildlife and landscape shots.

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DAVE KINDY is a lifelong lover of history. He has read, studied, researched and written about a wide range of historical topics, including the American Revolution, Civil War, World War I, World War II and the Pilgrims. Currently, he is writing a book about an event that happened in Plymouth, during the American Revolution. For this issue, he penned a feature about Plymouth & Brockton Street Railway Company, which is celebrating 300 years of serving customers on the South Shore. A frequent contributor to South Shore Living, Kindy lives in Plymouth with his wife Elynor and dog Harry.

JANUARY 2019

Account Managers Ailish Belair, Gabby Dieter, Allie Herzog, Michelle Overby ............................................

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COAST LINES •••

NEWS AND NOTES FROM THE SOUTH SHORE

PHOTO BY ERIK FR ALICK

Practice Makes Perfect nyone who has ever had a musician living in their home knows that it’s pretty tough to keep the sound of live music contained. While it can be fun to hear blaring electric guitar riffs echoing up the basement stairs, if a band is practicing regularly it can be wise to seek out alternative practice spaces. Enter Soundcheck Studios, a new facility in Pembroke that seeks to serve the South Shore’s music community by providing fully equipped rehearsal studios that can be rented by the month or by the hour. Hourly studios are outfitted with top-of-the-line gear (amps, drum kit, mics etc.) so that all a musician needs is their instrument and they can plug in and rock out. Monthly studios allow musicians to leave their gear completely set up in a secure environment. Renters have access to their studio space at all hours of the ssliving.com

day so they can play at whatever time is convenient (no more worrying about waking up the neighbors). The business was the brainchild of brothers Andrew and Eric Herman and their friend David Zuckerman, who all share a lifelong passion for playing and listening to live music. Their mission when creating Soundcheck Studios was to create an affordable, fun and innovative environment where musicians of all ages and skill levels can rehearse and collaborate. The facility, which also has a small stage where bands can perform for groups of up to 180 people, hosted its first show in October, with performances by local bands Jay & Friends, The Quins and QuadraFunk. We can’t wait to see (and hear) what’s in store for 2019. To learn more, visit soundcheck-studios.com —Maria Allen

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Fashionable Fitness Wear one are the days when fitness attire consisted of bulky sweatpants and baggy t-shirts. Not only do people work out to look their best, they also want to look good while doing it. Hingham resident Kimberley Paddon has fused fashion and functionality with a new line of modern, high-quality fitness and athleisure wear called Core Studio Apparel. An Australian native who’s travelled and lived all over the world, Paddon settled in Hingham with her husband and two children six years ago. “When we first moved here I wasn’t working, but I realized I needed to do something I love. I was meeting so many women who liked to work out and I thought to myself, I really like working out and I also love fashion … how can I combine the two?” Core Studio Apparel features a capsule collection of leggings, tops, sporty bomber jackets and outerwear and socks that are durable enough to withstand intense workouts, yet stylish enough to wear while meeting with friends or running errands. The collection also includes a line of leggings embroidered with Hingham High School’s logo. “I got the idea when I was at my son’s homecoming. I saw so many girls wearing black leggings to school,” says Paddon. “We also wanted to partner with Hingham Sports Partnership to give them some of the proceeds from our sales.” Paddon teamed up with fellow Hingham resident Michelle Friedman of Verseau Design to design the packaging as well as with photographer Susanne Malloy. “I have discovered a wonderful community of driven, smart, creative women who I am proud to call friends.” Stay updated through social media for upcoming events and trunk shows. For more information on Core Studio Apparel, visit Corestudioapparel.com. — Colby Radomski

Kimberley Paddon Core Studio Apparel 12

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Comedian Steve Sweeney reviews a scene with director Lisa Aimola and writer Bill Braudis on the shore at Squaw Rock in Quincy.

Directorial Debut n August 2017, Lisa Aimola took a couple weeks off from her job as the director of communications for the City of Quincy to pursue a lifelong dream. Two months earlier, the Quincy resident signed on to direct her first feature-length film, “Sweeney Killing Sweeney,” a gritty, fantastical comedy whose main character is Boston stand-up comic Steve Sweeney. The film premiered at the Boston Comedy Festival in September. For Aimola, getting the opportunity to direct the film was like having the stars align.

PHOTO BY DAVID ELMES

Aimola first met Sweeney by chance, nine years earlier, when she was filming a scene for a 48-hour film contest. She and friend Sorboni Banerjee, a former Boston news anchor, were out at Squantum Point Park when they realized that the scene they were filming had a dog in it— and they didn’t have a dog. Who should come along at that very moment, but Steve Sweeney, walking his dog. “He volunteered to help that day and who knew we would be working together all these years later,” says Aimola. For “Sweeney Killing Sweeney,” Aimola worked with people like script writer Bill Braudis and fellow Quincy residents like executive producer Kris Meyer (who co-produced films like “Stuck on You” and

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“Fever Pitch”) and assistant director Mark Carey, among others. The movie was filmed at various Boston locales, including Aimola’s home turf, in Quincy. The cast included a string of local comedy legends, such as Tony V, Frank Santorelli and Jonathan Katz, with cameos by people like Steven Wright, Lenny Clarke, Nick DiPaolo and Bobby Slayton. “We laughed every day that we were filming,” says Aimola “It really was a joy to work on this project..” In the movie, the “character king” gets an opportunity to do a national cable show in Los Angeles, but Sweeney must drop his beloved portrayals of colorful Boston characters. When Sweeney makes the hard decision to switch up his act, his characters “come to life” and seek their revenge. “The theme of the film is never giving up on your dreams and being proud of where you came from,” says Aimola, who hopes her own mid-career pivot will be inspiring to others. What’s her advice to people who want to make movies? “I would tell them to pick up a camera, write a story and give it a try.” For more infor– mation about the film, visit SweeneyKillingSweeney.com. —Maria Allen

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Chatting with

Pam Smith and her daughter Alyssa Smith sell localized gifts and apparel at Sixteen Twenty in Plymouth.

Alyssa & Pam Smith, Co-owners of Sixteen Twenty When did you open the shop and what do you specialize in? Sixteen Twenty launched an online store in January 2018 and we opened our physical location in Plymouth’s Village Landing Marketplace in October. Our shop offers a curated line of hometown apparel as well as gifts with a local feel. Our apparel and gifts are made in USA and our apparel includes a selection of organic/recycled options. What inspired you to create the Sixteen Twenty product line? Sixteen Twenty was created not only for anyone that wants to represent America’s hometown in a simple, sustainable and stylish way. We felt there was a need for high-quality, casual clothing that symbolized our community and we have worked hard to create a brand that offers that. What do you love most about Plymouth? Aside from its history and culture, Plymouth is such a pretty coastal town with great shopping, good eats and most importantly, awesome people. We love the sense of community that Plymouth has to offer. Starting a new business has certain challenges but the people of Plymouth have been so supportive and welcoming. It is a great place to visit and an even better place to live.

Sixteen Twenty 170 Water St., Plymouth, MA 02360 508-591-7875; sixteen-twenty.com

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CREWNECK This crewneck is Sixteen Twenty’s No. 1 selling sweatshirt. Made in the USA, it pairs great with an upcycled scarf. 14

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SIGNATURE LONG SLEEVE Made from certified organic cotton, the signature long-sleeve shirt is super soft and cozy.

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GIFTWARE

CAP & TEE

Sixteen Twenty carries a variety of giftware from all over the United States.

A Sixteen Twenty baseball cap is a classic choice and this Plymouth T-shirt is stylish and comfortable.

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LIVING IT UP •••

E V ENTS A N D C H A R ITI ES A RO U N D TOW N

Jordan Hospital Club held its fifth annual Hopefest fundraiser at 1620 Winery in Plymouth on November 16 in support of Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital-Plymouth’s Integrated Healthcare and Substance Use Collaborative. 1

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1) Jordan Hospital Club board of directors 2) Emily Collins, Todd Sexton 3) Sue and Paul Giovanetti, Deb Muido, Shelly Phillips, Chris Bates, Vinny deMacedo, Shannon Murphy 4) Karen Wood, Kevin Coughlin 5) Amanda Courchene, Gina Rosales, Jen Pinto, Josh and Lizzi Rioux 6) Ann Meyer, Paula Maddock 7) Theresa and Andrew Harmon, Dan Holland, Chris McDonnell ssliving.com

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LIVING IT UP •••

E V ENTS A N D C H A R ITI ES A RO U N D TOW N

Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital-Plymouth (BID-Plymouth) hosted a Women’s Health Symposium October 25 from 6-8 pm at Indian Pond Country Club. 1

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1) Sandra Tuthill and Kelley Tuthill 2) Joan Durante, Fran Tango, Dianne Stratton, Dorothy Quirk, Joslyn Reed 3) Nancy Lecuyer, Bella Doumbia, Chantal Krowel 4) Jane Goodwin, Cynthia Fischer 5) Mary Giannini, Debbie Comerford, Susan Frost

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America’s Hometown Thanksgiving Celebration kicked off a weekend of festivities with a VIP reception at Memorial Hall in Plymouth. 4

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1) Vinny deMacedo, Maureen deMacedo, Meghan deMacedo, Erin deMacedo, Catherine deMacedo, Olly deMacedo 2) Cindy Fitzgibbon and Randy Price 3) Michelle Stratton and Michael Byrne 4) Lina and Christian Grant, Jim Sanderson and Debbie Berry 5) Hannah Woodbury, Michelle McGrath, Kate Holl

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LIVING ARTS •••

The Pink Frame Paintings with Purpose BY JENNIFER H. MCINERNEY n the devastatingly short space of three years, Scituate resident Becky O’Toole endured the “double lightning strike” diagnoses of breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. When she first arrived at the hospital, she noticed that all of the cancer patients’ rooms were dark, with the curtains drawn and very few lights on—an atmosphere that did not seem conducive to hope and healing. Facing what turned out to be more than 100 days of treatment in the hospital, O’Toole found comfort in the solace of paintbrushes, canvas and acrylic paints. “If I hadn’t been able to paint throughout that experience, I don’t know what I would have done,” she reflects. “It was a form of therapy for me.”

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Today, O’Toole is in remission from her dual diseases, but she continues to consider the plight of the patients who are still undergoing treatments at the hospital. During her monthly checkups, she distributes paintings as a gesture of solidarity. “Everyone in those rooms feels doom, this sense that this could be the end. When I give them my paintings, I’m trying to send them a little bit of light in the darkness.” O’Toole creates coastal scenes in a variety of sizes, all the way up to 36 by 60 inches. Her vivid renderings are inspired by the seascapes of the South Shore, including Peggotty and Minot beaches in Scituate and the picturesque expanse along Jerusalem Road in Cohasset.

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LIVING ARTS

About two years ago, O’Toole launched The Pink Frame, an initiative that enables her to give back to the cancer community through her artwork. For every painting sold, The Pink Frame donates a portion of the proceeds to the Dana Farber Cancer Institute in support of patients and their families. She also offers smaller ornament-sized paintings in three formats, which have proven to be popular gift options throughout the holiday season. “The Pink Frame has been a true gift for me: it’s brought me into this cycle of goodness that I never thought I’d have the opportunity to be a part of.” The Pink Frame paintings by Becky O’Toole are available locally at Joye and Be Well Studios in Scituate Harbor, Acquire Good in Hingham Square. For additional information, visit thepinkframe.org.

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Education


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Education

Get Your First Lesson FREE Get started today! All instruments and voice. But hurry... space is limited and offer expires March 2019.* Hingham One Conservatory Drive, 781-749-7565 Duxbury 64 St. George Street, 781-934-2731

sscmusic.org * Offer good for new students only. South Shore Conservatory admits students of any race, color, nationality or ethnic origin to all rights and privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school.

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CAPE COD ACADEMY 50 Osterville-West Barnstable Road, Osterville 508.428.5400 capecodacademy.org Celebrating more than 40 years of educating students, Cape Cod Academy is the only independent, co-educational, college preparatory school serving students from kindergarten to grade 12 on Cape Cod. We encourage curiosity, leadership, and academic rigor. Our curriculum is not driven by standardized testing, and our classes enable students to develop leadership skills that are imperative for future success, including critical thinking, problem solving, effective communication, and collaboration. Classes are led by accomplished faculty who develop new teaching approaches based on the best research and their own experience. Over 80% of CCA teachers have advanced degrees. Our mission is to instill a love of learning in students as they pursue academic excellence and develop life skills in a safe, values-centered community. We take pride in the fact that 100% of our graduates are accepted to four-year colleges. ssliving.com


WORCESTER


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Education DERBY ACADEMY 56 Burditt Avenue Hingham, MA 02043 781-749-0746 www.derbyacademy.org Founded in 1784, and one of the oldest co-educational day schools in the country, Derby Academy continues to be the best educational choice on Boston’s South Shore. Serving students in Pre-Kindergarten through Grade 8, Derby’s rigorous academic programs and robust offerings in the arts, athletics, STEM, global citizenship and service learning prepare its graduates for many of the most competitive independent schools in New England. The school strongly emphasizes the development of strong moral character and personal responsibility in all its students, building upon its motto of “Improve Both Mind and Heart.” Derby’s faculty are highly talented, passionate educators who inspire and intellectually challenge their students, and guide them as academic advisors, athletic coaches and club mentors. Signature programs at Derby Academy include Model UN; interscholastic

rugby; lab science, STEM/MakerSpace and foreign language curriculum at all grade levels; personalized secondary school placement counseling; public speaking; performance and stagecraft opportunities in a professional theater facility; Winter Term electives; and rowing and golf programs.

50 Osterville-West Barnstable Road, Osterville 508.428.5400 • capecodacademy.org

Learn more. Become more. Celebrating more than 40 years of educating students, Cape Cod Academy is the only independent, co-educational, college preparatory school serving students from kindergarten to grade 12 on Cape Cod. We encourage curiosity, leadership, and academic rigor. Our curriculum is not driven by standardized testing, and our classes enable students to develop leadership skills that are imperative for future success, including critical thinking, problem solving, effective communication, and collaboration. Classes are led by accomplished faculty who develop new teaching approaches based on the best research and their own experience. Over 80% of CCA teachers have advanced degrees. Our mission is to instill a love of learning in students as they pursue academic excellence and develop life skills in a safe, values-centered community. We take pride in the fact that 100% of our graduates are accepted to four-year colleges. To learn more, join us for a Coffee & Conversation held every Wednesday at 9:00 a.m. See our classrooms, meet our faculty, and enjoy a studentled tour of our gorgeous 46-acre campus. For more information, visit www.capecodacademy.org.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

INLY SCHOOL 46 Watch Hill Dr., Scituate 781-545-5544 inlyschool.org An innovative, independent school on the South Shore, Inly School inspires students to be creative thinkers and self-motivated, lifelong learners. Inly’s toddler, preschool, full-day kindergarten, elementary, and middle school programs blend proven Montessori curriculum and educational best practices at all levels. In addition to academic excellence, Inly students receive the intangible benefits of confidence, independence, and social and interpersonal responsibilities. Visit InlySchool.org for a virtual tour of our 10-acre campus, and you’ll see how hands-on, experiential learning; world languages for all ages; and an arts-rich, integrated, rigorous academic curriculum prepare Inly students to be forward-thinking global citizens who succeed at their choice of secondary schools, and in real life.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

wait…

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TODDLER–GR ADE 8 • SCITUATE, MA

OLD COLONY MONTESSORI SCHOOL 247 Gardner Street, Hingham Phone: 781.749.3698 www.oldcolonymontessori.org Old Colony Montessori School (OCMS), currently enrolling students ages 2.9+, has been the premier Montessori education leader on the south shore for over 55 years. OCMS offers 3-day and 5-day programs, including elementary (grades1 - 3,) and after school care. The foundation Montessori provides createsa love of learning that lasts a lifetime. Our students approach the worldwith confidence, curiosity, respect and heart-felt joy.

Derby has been a leader on the South Shore for three centuries because our students are leaders. Our faculty inspire girls and boys to love learning, take joy in service, and PRE-K TO GRADE 8 CO-EDUCATIONAL HINGHAM

strive for excellence. This is how we Improve Both Mind and Heart.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SAINT PAUL 18 Fearing Road, Hingham 781.749.2407 stpaulschoolhingham.com For over 65 years, Saint Paul School has been rooted in Catholic values and committed to academic excellence and instilling a love of learning and service to our community. Saint Paul School offers Preschool (age 3) through Grade 8 students an education model based on a personalized program of study that is mission-driven and nurtures the whole child. Learning and growth take place inside and outside the classroom as we are committed to a well-rounded education and offer our students opportunities to explore, evolve and excel in academics, athletics and the arts while developing skills they will need in the 21st Century. Additional offerings: Half-day and Full-day enrollment offerings for Preschool and PreKindergarten, Before & After School Care, Enrichment Programs & Band Instrument Lessons, Middle School Excursions, After school Athletics Program

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SOUTH SHORE CONSERVATORY One Conservatory Drive, Hingham/781-749-7565

HOUSE

64 St. George Street, Duxbury/781-934-2731 www.sscmusic.org South Shore Conservatory (SSC) has been enriching the lives of South Shore residents through music and the arts for nearly 50 years. A national model for arts education, SSC is the largest non-profit community school for the arts in Massachusetts, serving over 4,000 students, all ages and abilities, at its Hingham and Duxbury campuses, and in partnership with South Shore schools and organizations. Students participate in over 50 diverse programs in music, dance and drama, including a unique arts-integrated Preschool/ Prek/K program. Through innovative partnerships, SSC’s Creative Arts Therapies department supports the mental, emotional, and physical health of some of our community’s underserved members, while its arts and literacy ImagineARTS program strengthens pre-reading skills for young learners in Brockton schools.

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s r u e n e r p e Entr h c t o a t W ss e n i s u b l a c o L ren ’ t a o h w s r e n ow ink afraid to th box outside the ORE AND MORE COMPANIES ARE

realizing the importance of incorporating social responsibility into their business models. When Cohasset residents Kimberly Reilly and Megan Hayes started researching the global water crisis two years ago they decided to create a product that would give consumers a way to give back. “One fifth of the population in the world doesn’t have access to clean water,” says Hayes. “We knew we wanted to be part of the solution.” Launched in the fall of 2018, Everybody Water produces single-serving drinking water packaged in sustainably produced paperboard boxes (which cuts down on the amount of plastic going into landfills) and bio-based caps made from sugar cane. The company donates three percent of their gross sales to the global water charity Water1st International, which brings clean water to communities around the world by installing sinks, showers and toilets in family homes. Last year, the two friends traveled with members of the nonprofit to Honduras and most recently to Bangladesh to see how the funds are directly improving the lives of hundreds of people. With the first shipment of Everybody Water launching in early 2019, South Shore residents can look forward to their first taste of “water with a heart” available locally at Seabird Coffee Co. and Balance Studio in Cohasset as well as other retailers in the months to come. For more information, visit everybodywater.com.


FRESH WATER ADVOCATES Kimberly Reilly and Megan Hayes, founders of Everybody Water

BY MARIA ALLEN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JACK FOLEY

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IT’S A SCENE THAT EVERY PARENT can identify with: You’re at the grocery store with a young child sitting in the shopping cart. You turn your back for a moment to select an item off the shelf and turn back around to discover your pint-sized Houdini-child has somehow managed to climb out of their seat and is reaching precariously over the edge of the cart. Fed up by the stress of such incidents, Marshfield resident Kaitlyn Litchfield set out to solve the problem. Unable to find an existing product that would keep her child secure while she shopped, the young mother decided to invent one. A photographer by trade, Litchfield had no prior experience in product design, but she was fueled by passion for her product idea. Having served as the executive director of the South Shore Young Professionals for several years, Litchfield tapped her extensive network to find local businesses that could help make her dream a reality.

CHILD SAFETY INNOVATOR Kaitlyn Litchfield, founder of Lamb & Lou

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“I watched a lot of Shark Tank,” says Litchfield, who came up with her child safety device in March and launched her business, Lamb & Lou, in September. Her invention is a durable zipon vest with straps that clip onto any ordinary shopping cart. The product makes the child feel safe and gives parent’s a little peace of mind. The first batch of Litchfield’s products are due to be released in early 2019. For more information, visit lambandlou.com JANUARY 2019

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PLANT-BASED CONNOISSEUR Pat McAuley, Owner of Rewild

WITH LONG BEER HALL TABLES AND whimsical spray-painted murals by Quincy artist Brand Rockwell on the walls, customers know they’re in for something different as soon as they walk through the door at Rewild. Weymouth resident Pat McAuley opened the plant-based Quincy eatery back in October and there’s been a buzz about the business ever since. McAuley is a major proponent of living a plant-based lifestyle, which he says has helped his own health issues, but he’s not preachy about the concept. Instead, Rewild is designed to be welcoming and fun while offering approachable plantbased (vegan) alternatives to a range of traditional comfort foods. Standout menu items include a deliciously spicy Buffalo Pizza made with house-made cashew “cheese,” and the Wild One Burger that features an Impossible Burger patty (that tastes, smells and sizzles like real beef) topped with fried pickles, pickled onions and a chipotle aioli that will have you licking your plate clean. McAuley was part of the team that established the Weymouth brewery Barrel House Z back in 2016 and his enthusiasm for the local craft beer scene is reflected in the array of local beers on tap at Rewild. Guests can also sip on wine, kombucha, tea or artisanal coffee. In the back of the restaurant there’s a stage that hosts live music on weekends. “We’re not a juice bar,” says McAuley. “We want people to come in and have a pizza and a beer and leave satisfied.” For more information, visit eatrewild.com.


HEALTHY FAST FOODIE Carley Dunphy,founder of The Blendah Babes

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IF YOU’RE AIMING TO EAT HEALTHIER, food prep is key. But who has time for that? Thankfully, there’s a new South Shore product to make it easier to incorporate more wholesome fruits and veggies into your diet. Kingston resident Carley Dunphy got her start operating a smoothie food truck four years ago, but sold the truck last year to focus on a new business model. She is the founder of The Blendah Babes, a business that sells ready-to-blend nutritious smoothie ingredients in the freezer section at local grocery stores. Dunphy is a young mother and a wellness advocate who understands how busy families are and she hopes that her products make eating healthy a little easier. The Blendah Babes currently offers five different smoothie options, which are all made from organic produce, plantbased protein and super seeds. The smoothies are all vegan, gluten-free, soy-free and dairy-free and they last for up to six months in the freezer. Favorite flavors include the Peanut Butter Cup and Strawberry Fields Forever. “I do all of the shopping and I wash and chop everything by hand,” says Dunphy. The produce is then frozen and packaged in 16-ounce cups, which are sold locally at places like The Fruit Center in Hingham, Clements Market in Manomet, The Market at The Pinehills in Plymouth, Scituate Village Market, Good Health Natural Foods in Hanover and at the Lola Grace Farmer’s Market at the Hanover Mall. Dunphy also offers a delivery service for orders of eight or more smoothies. For more information, visit blendahbabes.com. ssliving.com

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PAMPERING PET LOVERS Ryan and Cynthia Dreyer, owners of unFURgettable Pet Resort & Spa

AFTER SPENDING THE 2017 HOLIDAY SEASON

teamed up with Dreyer’s mother, Mary Lou, to create one

apart from their family because they couldn’t find a suitable boarding facility for their dog and cat, Ryan Dreyer and his wife Cynthia Cano-Dreyer were inspired to found unFURgettable Pet Resort & Spa. “We toured about 10 different facilities and none of them were up to our standards,” says Dreyer. “Some would only take dogs, some charged extra to take your dog outside for a walk, none of them offered 24-hour supervision after the lobby closed or webcams so we could watch our pets while we were away.” Feeling that there was a need for a more thoughtful and upscale pet care service, the couple

from the ground-up.

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Located in Hanover, UnFURgettable Pet Resort & Spa opened its doors in October. The facility offers 15 private dog suites for overnight stays, including five “luxury” rooms. Each room is outfitted with either a twin or toddler-sized bed, a TV on the wall that streams dogTV and a webcam so the owner can watch their pet from anywhere. There are also nine cat suites that have a hidden litter box, multi-level shelving and a comfy cat bed. “The cats also get a huge aquarium in the middle of

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the room to entertain them and if they’re social they can come out and play together on our Kitty Mansion,” says Dreyer. The facility also offers expert grooming services and doggie daycare. “The most gratifying part of our job is when a shy or anxious dog comes to stay with us and by the time they’re ready to go home they’re acting relaxed and happy,” says Dreyer. “Seeing a smile on the face of both the owner and the pet reminds us why we’re doing this.” For more information, visit unFURgettablePetResort.com

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PHOTO BY JACK FOLEY

A e v e i l e b n U


l w o B Ahey’re fresh, they’re flavorful and oh-so Instagram-worthy. Smoothie bowls and acai bowls have been a trend for some time now. The nutrient-packed foods can be found on the menu at many local juice bars and eateries. Smooth and creamy, yet thick enough to enjoy with a spoon, these blended dishes are packed with produce and topped with dazzling garnishes of sliced fruits, nut butters, seeds and more. Here are five beautiful bowls worth digging into.

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Matcha Energy Bowl at The Organic Juice Barn One of the most popular “Barn Bowls” on the menu, this delightfully green smoothie bowl contains Matcha powdered green tea, which is high in antioxidants and will boost your energy, as well as pineapple, spinach, banana, almond milk, blueberries, goji berries, coconut, granola and honey. “We are 100 percent organic, which is extremely important when it comes to soft-skinned fruit and veggies,” says owner Allison Barnes. In addition to healthy food and drink, the Organic Juice Barn also offers nutrition and wellness coaching. 412 Washington St., Norwell, 781-659-2060, organicjuicebarn.com

BY VICTORIA HUBLEY AND MARIA ALLEN PHOTOGRAPHY BY JACK FOLEY AND KRIS HUGHES ssliving.com

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Charcoal Bowl at Smoosh Juice Bar

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Organic activated charcoal is the ingredient that gives this smoothie bowl its signature dark color. This bowl also contains strawberries, kiwi, coconut flakes and homemade granola. “Our Charcoal Bowl is one of our most popular items and very unique for our area,” says owner Rachel Latta. “The charcoal itself has no flavor or texture. It’s a great detoxifier, is antiinflammatory and aids in digestion. Our charcoal bowl is so refreshing, once you try it you’ll be hooked.” 254 Church St., Pembroke, 781-924-3148, smooshjuicebar.com

PHOTO BY KRIS HUGHES

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Protein Acai Bowl at Vela Juice Bar The hero of this dish is the ever-popular acai (ah-sigh-EE) berry, which is native to South America and high in antioxidants. The acai is blended with blueberries, strawberries or bananas as well as almond milk and a choice of either whey or plant protein powder. Toppings include gluten-free granola, fresh berries, bananas, homemade peanut butter and agave. “Our Protein Acai Bowl is packed with protein that will keep you full for several hours,” says owner Ana Dabrowski. “People can have it for breakfast or lunch and it’s made from whole foods with no preservatives.” 71 Court St., Plymouth, 508-591-7718, velajuicebar.com

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PHOTO BY JACK FOLEY

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Raspberry Truffle Bowl at The Daily Press Juice Bar

Bowl at Lido Juice The low sugar, high fat ratio of this acai-based bowl is perfect for anyone following a KETO diet. The dish also contains avocado, coconut meat, Brain Octane MCT (an energizing nutritional supplement extracted from 100 percent pure coconut oil), raw cacao, stevia, alkaline H2O and almond butter. Customers can top their smoothie bowl with add-ons like seasonal fruit, coconut, cacao nibs, goji berries and raw cashews and a choice of chia seeds, flax seeds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds or hemp seeds. Coconut Cult yogurt is also available upon request. “Our KETO Bowl is our second most-popular bowl behind our Nutty Professor Acai Bowl,” says owner Brian Murphy. 60 South St., Hingham, 781-741-5436, lidojuice.com

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As beautiful as it is delicious, this acai bowl is prepared with coffee granola, rich Belgian chocolate shards, fresh raspberries, unsweetened coconut cream, coconut chips and mint. “The coconut cream is made from unsweetened coconut milk. We refrigerate the coconut milk for 24 hours and take the solid portion and whip it,” says Tami Guiney. “The result is a dense but light cream that just melts in your mouth.” 132 Chief Justice Cushing Highway, Cohasset, 781-261-6099, thedailypressjuicebar.com

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712 190

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YEARS OF TROLLEYS AND BUSES ON THE SOUTH SHORE

BY DAVID KINDY | PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE KINGSTON 712 PUBLIC LIBRARY LOCAL HISTORY ROOM

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he next time you pull up next to a Plymouth & Brockton (P & B) bus, look below the familiar blue and gold logo at the small letters near the front wheel well. That’s where you’ll find the company’s full name: Plymouth & Brockton Street Railway Company. Street railway? Translation: trolley. P&B hasn’t always used buses. When the company started 130 years ago, trolleys were the main mode of transportation, clang-clang-clanging their way along the tracks from Plymouth to Kingston, Sandwich, Brockton and many other towns around the South Shore.

Founded in 1889, the family-owned Plymouth & Brockton Street Railway Company has been providing passenger service for 130 years.


“I remember riding the trolleys,” says P & B’s 92-year-old president, George Anzuoni. “It was fun. My favorite place was in the back where I could watch everything.” P & B was founded in 1889 as Plymouth & Kingston Street Railway. Three years earlier, Charles Stone and Edwin Webster, owners of the formidable Stone & Webster Engineering of Stoughton, had visited Plymouth and realized there was a need for a trolley service on the South Shore. The partners used their company’s considerable resources to plan, design and build the trolley system. Rather than buy electricity, Stone & Webster built a power plant next to Plymouth Rock to allow the trolley cars to travel their routes.

“This idea of taking a fun trip on your day off led to the creation of a new word in the dictionary: joyride.”

Service began on June 9, 1889, when the first trolley rolled down the tracks from Jabez Corner in Plymouth to Cobbs Store in Kingston, a distance of 4 miles. A year later, the line was increased to nine miles, extending farther south into Plymouth and north to downtown Kingston. In 1900, Stone & Webster acquired two other trolley companies and combined operations to create the Brockton & Plymouth Street Railway Co., with lines that stretched 24 miles from Plymouth to Whitman. The company

The town of Plymouth originally planned a horse-drawn system, but chose to experiment with new electric streetcar technology. Plymouth became one of the first American towns to have an electric trolley system.

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contracted with Old Colony Street Railway so its electric trolley cars could go all the way to Brockton. Initially, people would primarily take the trolleys on weekdays, to and from work. Ridership fell off dramatically on Sundays. To stimulate interest on that day, Brockton & Plymouth promoted trips to parks and entertainment destinations. This idea of taking a fun trip on your day off led to the creation of a new word in the dictionary: joyride. Back on June 3, 1886 a group of approximately 30 men met at the Samoset Hotel in Plymouth and organized the area’s first trolley company, the Plymouth & Kingston Street Railway.

Following World War I, an economic downturn caused Brockton & Plymouth Street Railway to file for receivership. The company’s assets were sold in 1922 and the Plymouth & Brockton Street Railway Company was incorporated. About this time, “Birneys”—smaller, faster trolleys—began showing up on the South Shore. These cars were the forerunners of the modern bus. Eventually, the Birneys were replaced by trucks with bus bodies on select lines. The advantages quickly became obvious. No longer was service restricted to trolley tracks. New routes were easily created as buses could go on just about any paved road. By 1928, P & B had stopped running trolley cars altogether. Bus service continued to expand over the decades, though the growth of the automobile industry began to

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take its toll. By 1946, P & B was again in financial trouble. Two years later, George Anzuoni’s father (also named George), the general manager the Service Bus Line in Everett, acquired an 80 percent interest in the company and began operating it with his six sons. The new owners expanded service beyond local destinations to include Cape Cod, Boston, Logan International Airport and beyond. When George senior died in 1961 his namesake son stepped up and took control of the company. The younger George ran P & B until he turned over daily control to his son, Chris Anzuoni, just a few years ago.

“We’ve always operated under one idea: ‘Customers come first, we come second,’” says George, who still goes to the office almost every day. “It’s important for us to remember that every ticket has a face behind it. We have to remember that if we are going to stay in business.”

Bus service continued to expand over the decades. While the growth of the automobile industry has taken its toll, the family works hard to provide an exceptional level of service for its riders.

The company still feels pressure from personal automobiles, rebirth of rail service and extension of the MBTA lines, but still works hard to provide an exceptional level of service for its riders and convenient routes for commuters and vacationers. While the trolley rails are gone, the trolleys themselves are still around—at least, a reasonable facsimile thereof. Today, P & B offers tours of Plymouth on America’s Hometown Shuttle—buses with trolley bodies. “We’ve come full circle,” says Chris, who joined the company in the 1990s after a successful career as an architect and now serves as P & B’s vice president. “I told my father I would help out for a few weeks and I never left,” says Chris. “I guess it’s in my DNA.”

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NEW YEAR, NEW Local experts share tips for decluttering your life and inspiring positive change ach year, when the calendar flips to January, many people make resolutions to start fresh—to lose weight, kick a bad habit or finally tackle that mountain of stuff in the basement or attic. Unfortunately, statistics show that few people keep these commitments. We asked three South Shore residents to lend some expert advice, structure and accountability. With their guidance, this could be the year you beat the odds and turn those New Year’s resolutions into lasting change.

BY LAURA DeSISTO | PHOTOGRAPHY BY KRIS HUGHES


coaching for

Clutterbugs

For the last 17 years, Cohasset resident Molly McGowan (aka “The Clutter Coach”) has been helping South Shore residents clean out and organize their homes. “In theory, this is something that anyone can do on their own,” says McGowan. “The reality is that the clutter and disarray often builds up to the point where people literally feel paralyzed. I help them get ‘unstuck’ and once we get going, the organizing process becomes contagious.” McGowan utilizes a simple, three step process for every room in the house: throw away, give away and put away. “Once you throw away and give away the items that you don’t use or love, the key is to put away the remainder in a very organized

fashion,” she says. “And that often includes the use of clear plastic containers and labeling everything so that even the young ones in your house have no excuse but to put things back where they belong.” While working with clients, McGowan is fond of repeating mantras such as like goes with like. “You can’t imagine the number of times I go into homes and the coffee cups are in a cabinet that is literally the furthest away from the coffee maker,” she says. Another one of McGowan’s favorite sayings is one in, one out. “It’s ok to go to HomeGoods and get new throw pillows, but you better give away the old ones or you will soon have a mountain of stuff,” she says. McGowan has many repeat customers who value the positive changes she helps them to make not just in their homes, but also in their lives. “What I have noticed since working with Molly is that we spend much less time trying to find things and therefore we have more quality time with our family,” says Dede Kelly of Scituate. MOLLY THE CLUTTER COACH 781-635-8207 @mollythecluttercoach

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you are what you eat

After working in the healthcare field for more than 15 years, Anne Dwyer of Hingham was in her late 30s when she began having health issues of her own. “I was getting nowhere with traditional medicine so I started looking into alternatives and eventually was able to heal myself by modifying my diet and making simple lifestyle changes,� says Dwyer. Determined to help others experience better health, Dwyer went back to school and got certified in health coaching through the Institute for Integrative Nutrition and went on to establish the wellness business Health & Harmony.

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For the past five years, Dwyer has helped hundreds of South Shore residents find their own path to wellness through both individual consultations and her very popular group detox sessions. “Throughout the year I offer a 5-day cleanse, a 10-day sugar detox and a 21-day lifestyle change. I start with a teleconference to go over the plan and then I support the whole group through a private Facebook page, individual phone sessions and daily emails,” says Dwyer. “My plans include delicious recipes and a detox goody bag and are a very affordable way to quickly reset your health. For those who need more one-on-one support, I offer three month and six month plans.” Dwyer’s detoxes eliminate the most common ingredients that trigger inflammation and fatigue: gluten, dairy, corn, sugar and alcohol. “Most people report that they lose weight, have more energy, less brain fog, better sleep and less bloating,” she says. When the detox is over, if clients begin experiencing any of these symptoms again, Dwyer will refer them to a colleague who conducts food sensitivity testing. “It’s amazing the number of people who are walking around with hidden food allergies or sensitivities,” she says. “Eliminating these foods is often life-changing.” In addition to diet changes, Dwyer recommends that clients frequently engage in other “detoxing” activities such as yin yoga, massage and acupuncture. She is also a fan of infrared saunas, which she says can help to pull toxins and heavy metals out of your system. “Think of it as an oil change for your body,” she says. One of these saunas is available at Hullistic Health in Hull where Dwyer keeps office hours three days a week. HEALTH AND HARMONY BY ANNE healthandharonyanne.com ssliving.com


12-week

transformation


MARGOT CHEEL margotcheel.com

In 1992, author Julia Cameron published “The Artist’s Way,” a self-help book, that quickly became a bestseller and inspired creativity workshops and classes to spring up around the country. South Shore resident Margot Cheel discovered the book 20 years ago and put together a 12-week course that she has been leading locally ever since. “The course is about taking stock of your life, uncovering long forgotten dreams and gathering the courage to make changes, large and small,” says Cheel. “The approach is very creative and that is where the ‘artistic’ part comes in. The groups tend to be very lively and we have a lot of fun.” Over the last several years, Cheel has kept the same framework, but has begun using other books as the text for the class. Most recently, she has led a class inspired by the book “Your Spacious Self” by Stephanie Bennett

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Vogt. “The book focuses on clearing the clutter in your mind, surroundings and relationships and letting go of long-held beliefs that no longer serve you so as to open up to new perspectives and possibilities,” says Cheel. While it is easy to live your life on autopilot, the course allows participants to take a step back to see what is and isn’t working. “I have led hundreds of people through the course and I feel truly privileged to have witnessed remarkable transformations, including one person who quit her corporate job to lead outdoor skills programs,” she says. The course also inspired Cheel to make some bold decisions. “As a result of taking the course, I began flying in small airplanes and eventually got my pilot’s license and became an aerial photographer,” she says. Cheel plans to conduct another 12-week session utilizing “Your Spacious Self” in the spring.

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nown for his eye-catching images of New England wildlife, Marshfield photographer John Grant happily admits that he’s found his calling. “We all know success when we all find our own dreams,” says Grant, quoting guitarist Pete Townshend from the English rock group The Who. “That’s what happened to me.” But Grant’s dream didn’t come true overnight. He paid his dues with years of specialized schooling and a 35-year stint in a general photography studio on the South Shore. “I wanted to be a fashion photographer,” he says with a laugh, “but I ended up photographing babies.”


A Focus on Nature Marshfield photographer John Grant captures vibrant winter wildlife images.

BY JUDY ENRIGHT | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN GRANT

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Grant developed his appreciation for photography at a young age, inspired by his father, who was an aerial photographer during WWII. He went on to study at the Art Institute of Boston and the Hallmark Institute of Photography and credits friends like Sean Goss, from Goss Photo in Hanover, with helping him gain a deeper understanding and appreciation for photography and how it relates to the printing process. These days, Grant spends the majority of his time photographing the beauty he sees in nature and in particular the creatures that inhabit that world. Grant’s portfolio includes images depicting eagles in mid-flight, the wide-eyed innocence of twin fox kits and the amber-eyed stare of a rare Great Gray Owl. “In animals there is a freeness that I don’t see in other things,” says Grant. “I’m privileged to be able to visit their world for a little while. It’s a great stress reducer and an escape for me. My challenge is to catch [the animals] in a situation where light and shadow combine to make them even more beautiful.” All of Grant’s wildlife photos are taken in New England and the majority are shot on the South Shore at places like Duxbury Beach and Mass Audubon sanctuaries.

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“Most days I get nothing,” says Grant, “then one day I’ll walk into something and it just happens.” Occasionally, he and fellow nature photographers will exchange tips on noteworthy photo ops. He was recently alerted, for example, to a rare great gray owl sighting in New Hampshire, so he jumped in his car and drove there immediately. “That owl is usually seen only in Canada and the western part of this country. It never comes down to New Hampshire,” says Grant. Some of Grant’s most captivating photographs have been taken on cold winter days, such as a snowy owl soaring across an azure sky and the brilliant scarlet of a male cardinal’s feathers in a snowstorm. But for Grant, there is joy in the journey. “I’ve been photographing for 45 years and I enjoy it much more now than when I started,” says Grant. “I always try to take a better picture today than I took yesterday.”

To see more of Grant’s work, visit: photojfg.smugmug.com.


THE DISH •••

R E S TAU R A N T P R O F I LE • R E S TAU R A N T G U I D E • S I D E D I S H E S

PHOTO BY PEDRO BL ANCO

Culinary Champion hether facing off against his friends in the local restaurant industry or going head-to-head with esteemed chefs from across the world, Plymouth chef Stephen Coe makes winning cooking contests look easy. Back in September, Coe took home the trophy at the Third Annual America’s Hometown Throwdown Chef Competition held at Mayflower Brewing in Plymouth. Eight local chefs participated and attendees were invited to watch three fastpaced rounds of cooking. There were secret ingredients, plenty of Mayflower beer and lots of crowd encouragement to make each round of competition an engaging experience. A portion of the proceeds from the event benefited South Shore Community Action Council’s Food Resources ssliving.com

Program, which coordinates emergency food relief for hungry people throughout the South Shore. In December, Coe’s posse of bacon-loving foodies once again convened at Mayflower Brewing, but this time it was for a special viewing party of the Food Network’s Chopped Ultimate Redemption. In the episode, Coe faced steep competition, but he ultimately made the South Shore proud by winning first place. A portion of the proceeds from the party went to support two local charities, Boston Rescue Mission, which provides shelter, food and resources for those in need, and the family of a little girl named Emerson Lucier battling Leukemia. Follow Stephen Coe on Facebook to see more of his culinary adventures.

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RESTAURANT PROFILE

Local Ingredients Shine at Su Casa A new South Shore restaurant is bringing Baja flavor to Plymouth. BY MARIA ALLEN t was a craving for tacos that first inspired Plymouth residents Erin Murphy and her husband Nick Crosby to open their own restaurant. Raised in Southern California, Murphy longed for an authentic Baja-style taco and was unable to find a local restaurant that could deliver the goods. Having both worked in the restaurant industry for years, the couple set out to create an eatery that would showcase upscale Cali-Baja cuisine. Su Casa occupies a prime spot on Plymouth’s Main Street that was previously home to an Irish clothing boutique. After extensive renovations that included building a new kitchen, the restaurant opened its doors in November. The restaurant has a cozy atmosphere and an inviting Boho-chic style, with delicate string lights hung across the 70

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ceiling, a teal tile backsplash behind the cement bar and colorful rag rug pillows decorating the booths. Executive chef Patrick Gilmartin, who previously worked at Boston restaurants Park and River Bar, designed an innovative menu that celebrates local ingredients. Most notably, the restaurant makes its own house-made tortillas using corn masa that is ground fresh at the Plimoth Grist Mill across town. The menu is divided into “smalls,” which are dishes that can be enjoyed as an appetizer or in combination for a multi-dimensional meal, and “tacos and bigs” that consist of larger entrees. Fresh, local seafood plays a central role. We love the scallop ceviche, served with roasted local squashes, pickled carrot curls, citrus and scallion oil, and the artfully plated lobster tostada, with fresh

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( (

sidedish

Mulanje Tea Imports

arugula and radishes, a raw quail egg, salmon roe, jalapeno oil and delicate strips of preserved lemon. There’s also a Market Fish Aguachile, which is essentially a spicy Mexican ceviche made with “chili pepper water.” Adventurous diners can also order a whole fish, served with house-made tortillas, pickled onions and tomatillo salsa. Some of the other menu favorites include an out-of-this-world street corn, duck empanada and ribeye carne asada. No meal would be complete without a craft beer (local brews include “Winds of Change from Second Wind in Plymouth and “Sunny and 79” from Barrel House Z in Weymouth) or a flavorful cocktail. When Crosby created the drink menu he aimed to be a little different, which is why you won’t find a traditional margarita on the menu. Instead, diners can sip signature concoctions like “All the Boys to the Yard,” made with Xicaru Mezcal, Mandarine Napoleon liqueur, Peychaud Aperitivo and house-infused serrano honey, and the Nu-Tang Clan, a smooth and citrusy drink made with Bombay gin, Benedictine, Charteuse, Tang and lemon. While still the new kid on the block, Su Casa is already a crowd pleaser and on a busy night you may have to wait for a table—or you could opt to dine standing up in the restaurant’s “Stand for a Cause Corner,” created in memory of Crosby’s cousin, Boston firefighter Michael Kennedy. The cozy corner is too small for chairs, but if guests are willing to stand while enjoying a meal at the high-top table, the restaurant donates 30 percent of the check to a local charity of the month. For Crosby and Murphy, giving back to the community in this creative way was a no-brainer— and for customers it’s an easy way to do-good over dinner.

SU CASA 30 Main St., Plymouth sucasaplymouth.com ssliving.com

In the south of Malawi, Africa, Mulanje is surrounded by mountains and is home to many of the country’s tea estates. In 2015, while visiting his wife Nasha’s family, Hingham native Finn Merrill, saw an opportunity there. “The village is surrounded by tea estates and the area has some of the most fertile soil on the planet,” he says. Merrill wanted to introduce this high-quality African product to the United States market. He began working with Satemwa Tea Estate, a family operation since 1923. Through local knowledge and direct trade partnerships, Mulanje Tea Imports has grown to be an importer of responsibly-sourced, delicious teas from Africa, including green, black and white oolong teas. After receiving his MBA from Babson College, Merrill was the entrepreneur-in-residence at Alcoa Corporation, but he left that job to pursue Mulanje Tea Imports full time. “I’ve realized I am happiest as an entrepreneur,” he says. “Making the jump was scary but energizing, because it’s on you to make it work. Also, sometimes people aren’t entirely on board with you if you don’t have both feet in, so that’s what I’ve done and we’ve had some decent success so far.” To learn more, visit mulanjetea.com.

JANUARY 2019

SOUTH SHORE LIVING

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FOOD & DRINK GUIDE

Restaurant Guide

The dining guide is compiled by South Shore Living editorial staff as a service to our readers. This directory is not intended as a recommendation of the establishments, nor does it include every restaurant in the region. We recommend you call ahead to check hours, prices and other details. Featured listings (highlighted in blue) are part of an advertising package. Information relating to new or closed restaurants can be sent to mallen@ lhmediasolutions.com.

RESTAURANT ORO Innovative cuisine featuring fresh meats, local produce and seafood. 162 Front St., Scituate, 781-378-2465 $$ RINATO BISTRO Overlooking the ocean and Nantasket Beach, this new-American eatery offers a range of woodgrilled meats, flatbreads, burgers and fresh seafood dishes. There’s casually elegant dining downstairs and more formal dining upstairs, and a romantic fire pit and patio for alfresco meals. 145 Nantasket Avenue, Hull, 781-925-6336 $$ RIVERSHED All-natural, creatively-crafted burgers, barbecue and a wide selection fo craft beer served up in a fun, family-friendly atmosphere. 17 New Driftway, Scituate, 781)-378-2438 $$

$ Entrées Under $15 $$ Entrées $15 – $25 $$$ Entrées Over $25

RYE TAVERN Classic New England fare with a twist, served inside a cozy country farmhouse. 517 Old Sandwich Rd., Plymouth, 508-591-7515 $$

AMERICAN

SCARLET OAK TAVERN Contemporary American comfort food. 1217 Main St., Hingham, 781-749-8200 $$$

ABBY PARK Modern American cuisine with European influences served with upscale city style. 550 Adams St., Milton, 617-696-8700 $$

FOX & HOUND WOOD GRILL AND TAVERN American comfort food with a contemporary twist. 123 Sea St., Quincy, 617-471-4030 $$

GREENSIDE GRILLE AT THE SOUTH SHORE COUNTRY CLUB Casually elegant American fare.

ALDEN PARK An American menu with a bit of Asian fu-

274 South St., Hingham, 781-749-1720 $$

sion, extensive spirits list and $5 bar appetizers M–F, 4–6 p.m. 160 Colony Place, Plymouth, 508-830-6777 $$

HINGHAM BEER WORKS American favorites and homemade micro-brews. 18 Shipyard Drive, Hingham, 781-749-2337 $$

BAR RUSTIC AND THE STUDIO KITCHEN A culinary destination featuring industrial-chic decor, new American cuisine and an onsite television studio kitchen. 101 Kingston Collection Way, Kingston, 781-582-1010, barrustic.com $$ BARKER TAVERN Intimate dining in a historic building overlooking Scituate Harbor. 21 Barker Rd., Scituate, 781545-6533 $$$ BGOOD Fast, casual restaurant that aims to make healthy choices easy by using fresh, local ingredients. 94 Derby St., Hingham, 781-741-5393 $

BRANT ROCK HOP A 50s-style eatery serving up classic American dishes just steps from the beach. 269 Ocean St., Marshfield, 781-536-8064 $ BURTONS GRILL Creative contemporary American cuisine. 94 Derby St., Hingham, 781-749-1007 $$ CASK N’ FLAGON Nachos, wings, burgers and handmade pizzas. 804 Plain St., Marshfield, 781-834-2275 $$ CORNER CAFÉ A casual restaurant with great breakfast bowls, hearty lunches, and dinners to go. 2000 Ocean St., Marshfield 781-837-8150 $$

CORNER STOP EATERY A neighborhood eatery serving modern American food with a fresh, healthy and bold take on tried and true favorites. 235 Hull St., Cohasset, 781-875-3065 $$$

CROW’S LANDING Upscale, casual dining with a healthy spin on traditional comfort food. 6 Crow Point Ln., Hingham, 781-749-2400 $$ DISCH’S ROUTE 53 TAVERN Dishing out bold flavors with fresh spins on refined American classics and seafood, like lobster quesadillas and jambalaya and wood-fired pizzas. 615 Washington St., Pembroke, 781826-2532 $$

EMBER Chic contemporary American. 459 Plain St., Marshfield, 781-834-9159 $$$

FAT CAT A snug brick-walled bar packed with tables and high stools, serving creative American cuisine. 24 Chestnut St., Quincy, 617-471-4363 $$

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KKATIE’S BURGER BAR Serving award-winning certified Angus specialty burgers with unique side dishes like deep fried green beans. 38 Main St., Plymouth, 774773-9444; 1899 Ocean St., Marshfield, 781-837-0012; 1440 Hancock St., Quincy, 617-770-1440 $$

LIBERTY GRILL Comfortable family dining. 8 North St., Hingham, 781-749-2444 $$

LITTLE RED SMOKEHOUSE Known for their authentic Southern barbeque. 145 South Main St., Carver, 508-465-0018 $$ LOCAL 02045 A newly renovated dining spot overlooking Sunset Bay Marina. Dinner guests enjoy a menu of creative New England seafood and Italian dishes and spectacular city views. 2 A St., Hull, 781- 773-1253 $$

SOLSTICE Creative American cuisine featuring fresh, local ingredients. 63 Summer St., Kingston, 781-585-2221 $$ SQUARE CAFÉ Located at the heart of Hingham Square, this casually elegant establishment has a reputation for culinary excellence and customer service. 150 North St., Hingham, 781-740-4060 $$$ STARS A modern-casual restaurant serving up breakfast, lunch and dinner across from Hingham Harbor. 2 Otis St., Route 3A, Hingham, 781-749-3200 $ STEEL & RYE Refined upscale dishes served in a one-of-akind urban-chic space. 95 Eliot St., Milton, 617-690-2787 $$ STOCKHOLDERS CHOPHOUSE AND SEAFOOD Large urban-style steakhouse offering upscale American dishes at reasonable prices. 1073 Main St., South Weymouth, 781-335-3100 $$

STRAWBERRY FAIR Creative home cooking in a cozy farmhouse. 14 Pond St., Norwell, 781-878-7878 $ SUN TAVERN Located in a quaint farmhouse, this restaurant delivers fine dining and rustic charm. 500 Congress St., Duxbury, 781-837-1027 $$ T-BONES ROADHOUSE Hearty smokehouse BBQ chicken, ribs, pulled pork, and Sunday brunch. 22 Main St., Plymouth, 508-747-2667 $$

MARSHLAND 3A Offering guests a welcoming dining atmosphere and a menu filled with home-cooked comfort foods, including award-winning chowder and stuffed quahogs. 986 State Rd. 3A, Plymouth, 508-2249400 $$

Creative New England fare served up inside a cozy antique inn. 390 Washington St., Duxbury, 781-934-0991 $$

MARTINIS BAR AND GRILL Urban atmosphere with creative American cuisine and whimsical martinis. 50 Court St., Plymouth, 774-773-9782 $$

THE FOURS Restaurant and sports bar with big- screen televisions and serving classic American favorites. 285 Washington St., Norwell, 781-659-4414 $$

MILEPOST RESTAURANT AND TAVERN Classic New England fare. 581 Tremont St., Duxbury, 781-934-6801 $$

THE JETTY “For those who don’t just love to watch sports but who also participate...a sports bar for participants.” Impressive SoCal-inspired dishes served up in a friendly, surf shack-style eatery in Brant Rock. 278 Ocean St., Marshfield, 781-319-2181 $$

PARAGON GRILL AT NANTASKET BEACH RESORT Fresh seafood, steaks, pastas and more, located across from Nantasket Beach. 45 Hull Shore Drive, Hull, 781-925-6650 $$

POOPSIE’S A casual restaurant serving up burgers and pizza. 243 Church St., Pembroke, 781-826-5282 $ PRECINCT 10 A modern take on an early Prohibition-era speakeasy, this restaurant pairs culinary excellence and an entertaining atmosphere, complete with dim lighting and plush seating. The menu features American favorites and craft cocktails. 110 Main St., Weymouth, 781-335-0010, precinct10restaurant. com $$ JANUARY 2019

THE 1803 WINSOR HOUSE INN AND RESTAURANT

THE RANGE BAR & GRILLE A lively restaurant designed to appeal to sports enthusiasts, serving contemporary American cuisine. 306 Whiting St., Hingham, 781-875-3382 $$ THE TAVERN AT GRANITE LINKS Creative twists on American standards in a casually elegant setting. 100 Quarry Hills Dr., Quincy, 617-689-1900 $$ THE TOWNSHEND Rustic, seasonal-inspired menu comprised of sharable snacks and savory dishes and a dining atmosphere that is chic, welcoming and a perfect ssliving.com


LISTINGS FOOD & DRINK

spot for gathering with friends. 1250 Hancock St., Quincy, 617-481-9694 $$

noodles, and steamed dumplings. 124 Colony Place, Plymouth, 508-732-9288 $

INDIAN

THE QUARRY RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE

TOKYO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE Japanese hibachi, sushi bar, and Shabu hot pot. 250 Granite St., Braintree, 781-380-4040 $$

INDIAN DELIGHT Serving Indian specialties, freshbaked naan bread and a variety of tandoor dishes. 428 Washington St., Weymouth, 781-331-0700 $$

TSANGS A modern Asian restaurant with fresh sushi and Chinese favorites. 644 Washington St., Hanover, 781-8260202; 45 Depot St., Duxbury, 781-934-8222 $$

PUNJAB CAFÉ Fine Indian cuisine. 653 Southern Artery, Quincy, 617-472-4860 $$

City-style eating on the South Shore. This all-scratch fine dining restaurant specializes in American favorites with a sprinkling of Italian influence. 415 Whiting St., Hingham, 781-340-7300 $$

THE BISTRO & WINE BAR Located on the premises of Mirbeau Inn and Spa, this restaurant offers delicious dishes and a casually elegant atmosphere. 35 Landmark Dr., Plymouth, 508-209-2324 $$$ WAHLBURGERS Modern/retro fast food joint featuring local ingredients and a hint of Hollywood style. 19 Shipyard Drive, Hingham, 781-749-2110 $

WATERFIRE TAVERN Cozy and colorful décor and a menu featuring fondue and tapas. 25 Summer St., Plymouth, 855-580-5665 $$

WILD GINGER Thai entrees and desserts. 124 Washington St., Norwell, 781-347-4072 $$

BREAKFAST/LUNCH ASSINIPPI EATING ESTABLISHMENT A cozy little hole-in-the-wall with a rustic feel, serving home-style breakfast at cheap prices. 2103 Washington St., Hanover, 781-982-7124 $

ASIAN

ATLANTIC BAGEL AND DELI Fresh baked bagels and sandwiches. 47 South Main St., Cohasset, 781-383-2902 $

AOYAMA Snug Japanese restaurant with a great raw

BLUEBERRY MUFFIN Breakfast and bakery. 2240

bar. 14 Webster Sq., Marshfield, 781-837-6688 $$

State Road, Plymouth, 508-888-9444 and 164 Summer St., Kingston, 781-936-8848 $

BANGKOK THAI Fresh, spicy and exotic flavors are in every dish at this traditional Thai restaurant.10 Court St, Plymouth, 508-746-3299 $$ BEIJING HOUSE Beijing Szechuan Hunan cuisine. 456 Washington St., Norwell, 781-659-8188 $$ GOURMET GARDEN Authentic Japanese and Chinese food with live music Thursday-Saturday at 9 p.m. 48 Whiting St., Hingham, 781-740-0688 $$ FENG SHUI Upscale Asian cuisine with popular buffet and sushi bar. 380 Chief Justice Cushing Highway, Cohasset, 781-383-3328 $$ FUJI AT WOC Serving a variety of sushi and Japanese specialties with daily lunch specials. 1546 Hancock St., Quincy, 617-770-1546 $$ FUJIYAMA Classic Japanese and Thai dishes. 434 Washington St., Norwell, 781-659-1388 $$ KOGI BAR & GRILL Owned by a mother-daughter duo, this place serves up fresh sushi and authentic Korean barbecue specialties in an chic, downtown atmosphere. 8 Court St., Plymouth, 508-927-4105 $$ LA DALAT RESTAURANT Elegant Japanese, Vietnamese, and Cambodian eatery. 181 Nantasket Ave., Hull, 781-925-4587 $$ LIME LEAF A large range of Thai food, including varieties of noodles, fried rice, and seafood. 435 Columbian St., Weymouth, 339-499-5350 $$ MANDARIN TOKYO RESTAURANT A local favorite for great sushi and Chinese food right by the water. 43 Careswell St., Marshfield, 781-837-4440 $

PHO PASTEUR Authentic Vietnamese cuisine. 1462 Hancock St., Quincy, 617-770-3300 $$

SHABU RESTAURANT Upscale Japanese hot pot restaurant. 397 Hancock St., North Quincy, 617-689-0288 $$

BRUEGGER’S BAGELS Freshly baked bagels, deli sandwiches, and coffee. 211 Lincoln St., Hingham, 781-740-4871 $

CORNERSTONE CAFE A cozy, family-owned cafe in downtown Plymouth, serving homemade breakfast favorites and fresh baked goods. 65 Main St., Plymouth, 508-746-7773 $ CROSSROADS CAFÉ AND DELI Family-friendly breakfast and lunch. 216 Rockland St., Hanover, 781-826-9921 $ FITZY’S WAKE AND SHAKE This hidden gem is

MALLEBAR BRASSERIE A modern French brasserie focused on creative dishes and cocktails inspired by old classics. 15 Main St., Ext., Plymouth, 508-747-0471 $$

ITALIAN AVA CUCINA Cozy family owned Italian restaurant, serving up from-scratch classics like lasagna and pizza. 107 Ripley Rd., Cohasset, 781-383-8300 $$ ALMA NOVE Mediterranean-style waterfront restaurant featuring Italian favorites for lunch and dinner. 22 Shipyard Drive, Hingham, 781-749-3353 $$ BOATHOUSE BISTRO A family-friendly eatery located in Hingham Shipyard that serves up refined Italian classics and creative brick oven pizzas. 19 Shipyard Dr., Hingham, 781-749-3777 $$ CAFÉ STREGA Italian cuisine in a romantic environment. 16 Main St., Plymouth, 508-732-9996 $$$ CAFFE TOSCA A modern trattoria serving upscale creative fare in a casual, friendly setting. Full menu available for take-out. Specials posted nightly. 15 North St., Hingham, 781-740-9400 $$ CARMELA’S Home-style Italian. 138 Main St., Kingston, 781-585-2148 $$

known for their homemade corned beef hash and tall stacks of pancakes. 1 Proprietors Dr., Marshfield, 781-837-9253 $

ECCO TRATTORIA Northern Italian cuisine at reasonable prices. 1169 Main St., Weymouth, 781-335-5600 $$

FRENCH MEMORIES Fresh-baked breads and pastries, and custom-made sandwiches. 459 Washington St., Duxbury, 781-934-9020 $

CP’S WOOD FIRED PIZZA Features a custom-made brick oven, which allows pizzas to cook to 850 degrees while dough is made from 00 Flour imported from Naples, Italy. 17 New Driftway, Scituate, 781-378-2743 $$

FRENCH MEMORIES BAKERY AND CAFÉ Gourmet Parisian breads, pastries, and sandwiches. 64 South Main St., Cohasset, 781-383-2216 $ JOLLY BEAN CAFE Great for breakfast and lunch. Known for creative breakfast sandwiches and great coffee. 88 Camelot Dr. #24, Plymouth, 508-747-2328 $ KRISTIN’S Serving up morning favorites and specialty pancakes including cookie dough, Oreo, and even M&M! 349 Washington St., Braintree, 781-843-2022 $ THE PLATE This popular eatery’s menu is filled with specialty sandwiches, hearty homemade soups, seasonal salads and homey baked goods. 27 Central Ave., Milton, 617-698-8900; 10 Basset St., Milton, 617-690-3494 $

TOAST Creative breakfast and lunch menus with an ocean view. 121 Nantasket Ave., Hull, 781-925-5221 $ WATER STREET CAFÉ Classic breakfast and brunch

SIAM CUISINE Casual Thai cuisine. 370 Columbia Rd., Hanover, 781-826-1115 $$

favorites just steps from Plymouth Harbor. 25 Water St., Plymouth, 508-746-2050 $

STAR OF SIAM Revered by locals as having one of the best Pad Thai dishes. Classic Thai food. To-go only. 589 State Rd., Manomet, 508-224-3771 $$

WHEELHOUSE DINER Unique landmark diner serving breakfast and lunch standards. 453 Hancock St., Quincy, 617-328-3666 $

SUSHI JOY Classic Japanese fare including sushi, fried ssliving.com

FRENCH

JANUARY 2019

LEENA’S KITCHEN A casually elegant dining room and sleek bar entice guests to relax and enjoy a taste of Italy. The menu features tasty renditions of classic dishes made with seasonal ingredients. 63 Long Pond Road, Plymouth, 774-404-7470 $$ MAMMA MIA’S Classic homemade pasta, pizza and more. 93 Careswell St. Marshfield, 781-834-3050 $$ MARSHFIELD FAMOUS PIZZA A popular local spot that is known for their extensive pizza and calzone list. 1941 Ocean St., Marshfield, 781-834-6517 $ MEZZO MARE Cozy Italian restaurant lodged in an old sea shack. 265 Nantasket Ave., Hull, 781-925-0584 $$ MIA REGAZZA Italian and American favorites with daily specials and an extensive wine list. 287 Washington St., Abington, 781-871-5800; 1 Proprietors Drive, Marshfield, 781-837-0000 $$ NOVARA The restaurant features a large bar, private dining room, hidden patio and a theater-size screen that hangs above the open kitchen. The menu features creative takes on traditional Italian dishes. 556 Adams St., Milton, 617-6968400 $$ SOUTH SHORE LIVING

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FOOD & DRINK LISTINGS

ORTA A hip Italian restaurant serving delicious wood fired Neapolitan pizza, pastas, and meat entrées. 75 Washington St., Pembroke, 781-826-8883 $$

MEXICAN/LATIN

PACINI’S ITALIAN EATERY Italian pastas, lasagnas,

CANCUN Mexican meals and drinks. 145 Main St., Kingston, 781-585-0060 $$

and pizzas. 2053 Washington St., Hanover, 781-9820440 $

CIELO Authentic Mexican dishes and tasty margaritas. 1209 Washington St., Braintree, 781-519-4454 $$

PEEL PIZZA COMPANY The place to go for rustic Neapolitan pizzas made using a fresh ingredients and for Italian classics such as homemade lasagna and fresh calzones. 73 South St., Hingham, 781-740-2775 $$

EL SARAPE Authentic Mexican cuisine from original recipes, 15 margaritas and a long tequila list. 5 Commercial St., Braintree, 781-843-8005 $$

RIVA Serves up authentic Italian cuisine in a comfortable and casual atmosphere. 116 Front St., Scituate, 781-545-5881 $$

RUSTIC KITCHEN Serving up creative Italian dishes that are seasonally inspired and made with wholesome local ingredients. 94 Derby St., Derby Street Shoppes, Hingham, 781-749-2700 $$$

SIRO’S RESTAURANT Contemporary Italian cuisine. 307 Victory Rd., Quincy, 617-472-4500 $$$ SORELLE BAR This restaurant celebrates Italian cuisine in fresh, creative ways. 1400 Bedford St., Abington, 781-421-6156, sorelleabington.com $$$

STRACCO’S SUBS AND MORE A cozy sub shop serving up hearty Italian favorites made from family recipes. 85 Sandwich St., Plymouth, 774-343-5968 $ TOP CRUST PIZZA A destination for specialty pizzas, subs and wraps with Mayflower Beer on tap. 15 Court St Plymouth 508-747-6000, $$

TOSCA Upscale Italian dining and an extensive wine menu. 14 North St., Hingham, 781-740-0080 $$$

TRATTORIA SAN PIETRO Authentic Italian fare in a romantic dining room. 376 Washington St., Norwell, 781-659-2009 $$ ZEF CICCHETTI & RAW BAR A destination for rustic Italian small plates and fresh seafood. 1472 Hancock St., Quincy, 617-481-4848 $$

MEDITERRANEAN ALBA RESTAURANT Modern European cuisine with extensive wine list and private wine cellar. 1486 Hancock St., Quincy, 617-376-2522 $$$

ANNA’S HARBORSIDE GRILLE A blend of traditional Greek and American cuisine. 145 Water St., Plymouth, 508-591-7372 $

BIA BISTRO This intimate restaurant serves up Mediterranean cuisine with a unique twist and a seasonal patio. 35 South Main St., Cohasset, 781-383-0464 $$

OLYMPUS GRILLE Authentic Greek dishes like spanakopita and chicken and beef gyro served in a cozy atmosphere. 132 Chief Justice Cushing Highway, Cohasset, 781-923-1917 $$

SOLSTICE Fine dining served in an elegantly converted Kingston train station. 63 Summer St., Kingston, 781-5852221 $$$ SPAZIO Intimate restaurant serving a fusion of fresh Mediterranean and Italian dishes. 200 Quincy Ave., Braintree, 781-849-1577 $$

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LA PALOMA Mexican Restaurant Traditional Mexican. 195 Newport Ave., Quincy, 617-773-0512 $$ PLAZA AZTECA Authentic Mexican cuisine served in an upbeat but casual restaurant. 6 Whiting St., Hingham, 781-875-3079 $$

SAM DIEGO’S Authentic Mexican food and drink in a fun fiesta-style ambiance with outdoor patio. 51 Main St., Plymouth, 508-747-0048 $$

PUB BRITISH BEER COMPANY A relaxed Englishstyle pub serving pizza, burgers and great beer. 15 Columbia Rd., Pembroke, 781-829-6999; 2294 State Rd, Cedarville, 508-888-9756 $$ FLYNN’S IRISH PUB Creative pub fare, colossal burgers, Irish favorites, and live music at a new location. Stop in for a pint. 2240 State Rd., Cedarville. 508-888-0041 $$

JAMIE’S GRILLE AND PUB Neighborhood pub offering laid back atmosphere, fresh local seafood, and daily specials including roast prime rib. 360 Gannett Rd., Scituate, 781-545-6000 $$

MR. DOOLEY’S OLD IRISH VILLAGE Traditional pub offering a wide range of Irish comfort food and a fine selection of seafood dishes. 9 Depot Court, Cohasset, 781-383-3366 $$ NEW WORLD TAVERN A spacious gastro-pub with an expansive list of craft beers on tap. 56 Main St., Plymouth, 508-927-4250 $$ SPEEDWELL TAVERN Fresh tavern fare and a wide selection of specialty craft brews. 47 Main St., Plymouth, 508-927-4724 $ T.K.O. MALLEY’S A sports bar with an Irish empathy overlooking Scituate Harbor with seasonal outdoor seating and a boat dock. 194 Front St., Scituate. 781-545-4012. $ THE COTTAGE BAR & RESTAURANT This inviting dining establishment serves up authentic Irish fare, frothy brews and live music. 26 Union St., South Weymouth, 781-812-2083 $$ THE SNUG Irish-influenced dishes in a cozy pub. 114 North St., Hingham, 781-749-9774 $$

THE TINKER’S SON A welcoming destination for rustic Irish pub fare and live entertainment. 707 Main St., Norwell, 781-561-7361 $$

SEAFOOD 42 DEGREES NORTH Creative seafood dishes and New England favorites. 690 State Rd., Manomet, 508-224-1500 $$

ATLANTICA Romantic upscale seafood restaurant with views of Cohasset Harbor. 44 Border St., Cohasset, 781-383-0900 $$$

JANUARY 2019

BLUE-EYED CRAB Grill and Raw Bar Fresh seafood with a Caribbean twist and creative cocktails served up in a brightly colored dining room. 170 Water St., Plymouth, 508-747-677 $$ CABBYSHACK Casual dining with fun summer foods like hand-battered onion rings, colossal shrimp cocktail and golden fried clams. 30 Town Wharf, Plymouth, 508746-5354 $$ EAST BAY GRILLE A great place to enjoy fresh seafood and cocktails on the town wharf. Snag a seat on the patio for prime water views and live music performances. $$ ERICH’S CLAM SHACK Located on the Roht Marina dock, this clam shack offers summer favorites and picturesque sunsets. 2205 Main St., Marshfield, 781-837-2322 $$ GALLEY KITCHEN & BAR A casual harborside restaurant specializing in globally inspired small plates and raw seafood appetizers. 95 Front St., Scituate, 781-545-3663 $$ HADDAD’S OCEAN CAFE A local seafood spot for fishermen & families, located in a historic old fishing village. 291 Ocean St., Marshfield, 781-837-2722 $$ JAKE’S SEAFOOD A seafood market with a dining room on the water. 50 George Washington Boulevard, Hull, 781-925-1024 $$ LEGAL C BAR A casual restaurant and bar serving seafood and custom cocktails. 96 Derby St., Hingham, 781-556-0010 $$ LEGAL SEA FOODS Variety of local seafoods served fresh in an upscale atmosphere. 250 Granite St., Braintree, 781-356-3070 $$ LOBSTER POUND Steps away from Green Harbor beach, this popular joint has outdoor seating and fresh lobster rolls. 131 Beach St., Marshfield, 781-834-4571 $ MILL WHARF RESTAURANT Fresh seafood dishes on Scituate Harbor. 150R Front St., Scituate, 781-5453999 $$ OYSTERS BAR AND GRILLE A modern take on a New England oyster bar serving creative seasonal dishes made from scratch. 254 Church St., Pembroke, 781-924-1065 $$ POLCARI’S BRIDGEWAYE INN Harborside restaurant serving up New England seafood specialties. 1265 Ferry St., Marshfield, 781-834-2020 $$ PORT 305 Enjoy upscale pub-style dishes and local seafood specials while seated by Quincy Harbor. 305 Victory Rd., Quincy 617-302-4447 $$ SATUIT TAVERN Old-fashioned seafood. 39 Jericho Rd., Scituate, 781-545-2500 $$ TAVERN ON THE WHARF A casual yet classy establishment offering fresh seafood and water views. 6 Town Wharf, Plymouth, 508-927-496, tavernonthewharf.com $$ THE FIELDSTON Intimate seaside restaurant serving creative cuisine. 882 Ocean St., Marshfield, 781-834-2909 $$ TRIDENT GALLEY & RAW BAR This Hingham Shipyard eatery features creative, seafood-centric small plates as well as raw bar specialties. 23 Shipyard Dr., Hingham, 781-374-7225 $$

TAPAS HOLA FLATBREADS AND TAPAS Spanish small plates and flatbreads. 10 Library Plaza, Marshfield, 781837-2900 $$ ssliving.com



OPEN HOUSE •••

R E A L ESTATE O PP O RT U N ITI ES

Seaside Getaway Located high atop Third Cliff in Scituate, this seaside residence is a welcoming retreat that offers panoramic views of the Atlantic and Scituate Harbor. A private drive leads up to the front entrance, which is framed by stately white pillars and professional landscaping. The home’s main living area features an openformat design and hardwood flooring. Sunlight pours through overhead skylights into a cheerful kitchen designed to suit the needs of a home

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7 Bassin Lane, Scituate Price: $1,699,000 Living Area: 3,765 square feet Bedrooms: 5 Bathrooms: 4 Lot size: .31 acre Listing Agent: Michelle Larnard Real Estate, 781-264-6890, Michelle@ larnardrealestate.com

JANUARY 2019

ssliving.com


chef or hostess. Amenities include a dual-energy DCS oven, Leibherr refrigerator, granite countertops and handcrafted white and cherry Prevo cabinetry with plenty of storage. Adjacent to the kitchen is a spacious sitting area with a brick fireplace and large windows. Residents enjoy easy access to the home’s wrap-around mahogany decks that overlook the ocean and the private backyard. A second-story deck, off the bedrooms, offers a place to relax and breathe the refreshing seaside air. The home also features a full in-law suite with a private entrance.

2 Nottingham Drive, Kingston 4 Bed | 1.5 Bath | 1,700+ sf Offered at $359,999 Enjoy your Private Retreat Setting on almost an acre lot while still being close to all that Kingston has to offer.

MONICA SMITH C. 617.974.7020 | O. 781.749.3007 Monica.Smith@raveis.com | MonicaSmith.raveis.com MonicaMcKimSmithRealEstate.com 40 North Street | Hingham | MA 02043

40 NORTH STEET, HINGHAM MA ssliving.com

JANUARY 2019

SOUTH SHORE LIVING

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LOOK BACK •••

Life by the Sea Midwinter Dreams of Summer at Third Cliff BY JOHN GALLUZZO Well into the 1800s, most South Shore residents steered clear of the shoreline. With wild storms tossing ships and sailors overboard and yet-to-be-defined creatures of the deep threatening those who dared enter the water, most locals were happy to remain within the confines of their villages. “Third Cliff in Scituate was farmland since Native American times,” says local historian Lyle Nyberg. “Farms went up to the edge of the steep cliff by the sea. The Welch family owned much of that farmland.” During the second half of the 1800s, a sea change occurred, as increasing numbers of fishermen and harvesters of Irish moss began making a living off the

sea. With the Industrial Revolution belching smoke into the city air, city residents began seeking out the healthful benefits of fresh sea air and the coastline became a fashionable destination. By the beginning of the 20th century many Boston families were spending summers by the sea. “South Shore towns like Scituate catered to these summer residents,” says Nyberg. “George Welch and his partners began selling lots for summer homes along Gilson Road at the north end of Third Cliff. Then Welch developed his ‘Rivermoor’ summer colony at the south end of Third Cliff starting in 1906.” This collection of images and postcards depict life at the seaside.

FOURTH CLIFF AND NORTH RIVER CUT SCITUATE- POSTCARD EARLY 1900s A lone cottage stands at the top of Third Cliff. With scenic views of Fourth Cliff and the Marshfield Hills, it is separated from Third Cliff by the new mouth of the North River, which was forged during the Portland Gale of 1898. Note the walkway or seawall at the bottom of the cliff. Postcard courtesy of Paul Bowers.

RIVERMOOR, SCITUATE- POSTCARD CIRCA 1917 The Rivermoor summer colony appears in this view looking south toward the North River and Marshfield as early as 1917. A red roadster motors along Moorland Road in the foreground. Many Rivermoor summer cottages had telephone service and even an automobile garage, extravagances unheard of even just a generation earlier. Postcard courtesy of Gail Ledwig.

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CHILDREN AT RIVERMOOR BEACH, CIRCA 1912 The difference between summer in the city and summer at Rivermoor Beach was significant. Fresh ocean breezes replaced smog-filled skies. These children wear the clothing of their day. Photo courtesy of the Woodworth family

PEGGOTTY BEACH-3D CLIFF IN DISTANCE, SCITUATE- POSTCARD CIRCA 1915-1923 The beach between Second and Third Cliffs has long been known as Peggotty Beach, named for the Peggotty family from Charles Dickens’ “David Copperfield.” Victorians may have caught the reference, but by the time World War I rolled around the name may have been lost on the current generation. In this image, Third Cliff looms in the distance. Postcard courtesy of Scituate Historical Society

MODERN VIEW OF MICHAEL AVENUE LOOKING TOWARD THE OCEAN Michael Avenue was one of the earliest streets to be developed in Rivermoor. George Welch built these houses with their hip roofs and wraparound porches in 1909 and named the houses (east to west) Myrtle (#6), Maidstone (#10), Mayfair (#14), Melody (#18), and Moorfield (#22). The porch style was deliberate, to capture the beautiful sea breezes. Photo courtesy of Lyle Nyberg

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PRESENT-DAY AERIAL VIEW Summer rentals eventually became year-round homes. In 1919, the locals could walk to the new golf course laid out at the Scituate Country Club, and had their choice of their own Rivermoor Beach or Peggotty beach in summer. Once barren, Third Cliff is now a desirable South Shore neighborhood, where George Welch’s vision mixes with those of new homeowners constructing their own seaside dreamscapes. This image pictures Third Cliff, Scituate Country Club and the Spit in the foreground, and Peggotty Beach, Second Cliff, First Cliff and Scituate Harbor in the distance. Photo courtesy of Bill Richardson and Gary Banks (pilot, Ret. AAL/USAF).

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LAST SCENE HERE •••

“Town Brook in Winter” IN MEMORIAM: REMEMBERING PHOTOGRAPHER RON WILSON We were sad to hear that award-winning local photographer Ron Wilson was killed in a car crash in September. A gallery artist at Plymouth Center for the Arts and South Shore Art Center in Cohasset, Ron Wilson approached his art with the sensibility of a painter. He traveled the globe in pursuit of scenic subject matter but found many of his photographic opportunities in Plymouth. Wilson first opened a gallery in Plymouth in 2008 with pastel artist Anne Heywood and four years later he moved into a space in the Plymouth post office building. In September of 2016, Wilson relocated his 80

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gallery to an antique building across the street from the historic Mayflower Society. His photographic method, which he referred to as The Art of Seeing, celebrated the beauty of scenes that others might overlook. Wilson’s landscape images capture the detail and the magic of places like Myles Standish State Forest, Ellisville Harbor State Park and recognizable sites like the Plimoth Grist Mill. His image of “Town Brook in Winter” captures a sense of stillness and simple beauty of the trees when they’re covered in a blanket of snow.

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