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6 Award-Winning Kitchens

New England Getaway Guide

Trends In Color And Design

NEW ENGL AND

LIVING

2017

ISSUE 1

NEWENGLANDLIVING.TV

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C O M E V I S I T U S AT T H E

BOSTON DESIGN CENTER

L U X U R I O U S F I T T E D C A B I N E T RY F O R E V E RY R O O M BOSTON DESIGN CENTER SUITE 635 / BOSTONINQUIRIES@PEACOCKHOME.COM / (888) 889-8891 NEW YORK LONDON PEACOCKHOME.COM

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CANNES

CHICAGO

DALLAS

BOSTON

SAN FRANCISCO

GREENWICH

SHORT HILLS

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ENCHANTING ONLY CUMAR Exotic. Breathtaking. Gorgeous. Experience slab upon slab o f t h e w o r l d ’s f i n e s t m a r b l e, g r a n i t e, l i m e s t o n e a n d e xo t i c s t o n e s i n N e w E n g l a n d ’s l a r g e s t w a r e h o u s e a n d s h o w r o o m . T h e r e ’ s o n l y o n e c h o i c e . C u m a r.

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© Images by Jessic a Delaney Photography

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CONTENTS

2017 features

28 FE AT U R ES

28 34 38 46 50 58 68

FROZEN ASSETS When it comes to the lifestyle of today’s busy families, onerefrigerator kitchens are a thing of the past.

THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS Patio doors offer wide-open views of the great outdoors.

BEST CELLARS Outstanding in both form and function, state-of-the-art wine storage options fit a range of consumers.

KITCHEN DESIGN WINNERS See who took home top honors in the annual Clarke Kitchen Design Contest.

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ART OF INDUCTION It’s not magic, but this hi-tech cooking method comes close.

LIVING WITH THE PAST Whether driven by law or by aesthetic preference, styles of yore inform present-day designs.

CURB REVEAL Putting your home’s best foot forward begins at the early stages of design.

MODEL HOMES 6 Marvin Windows-sponsored Architects Challenge submissions are on display.

N E W E N G L A N D L I V I N G. T V

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ERIC ROTH

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CONTENTS

2017

departments

D E PA R T M E N T S 10 EDITOR’S NOTE 14 OUT & ABOUT 16 JUST IN 18 DISCOVER NEW ENGLAND STYLE FILES 78 The White on White Bathroom Trend 80 Colors to Covet

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HOME TECHNOLOGY 83 Smart phone. Smart home. 86 Apps designers (and you) can’t live without. LIVING THE LIFE 90 Bettina Doulton, owner of Cellardoor Winery AT HOME 96 Introducing New England Living TV EAT & DRINK 102 Clambake by the Sea 112 Best Brews

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ITINERARY 120 Weekend getaway guide to Boston’s Seaport District 126 7 Tide TRAVEL 130 Bath Time 136 Great Main Streets of New England 144 FINAL THOUGHT

ON THE COVER

Kitchen by Phi Builders + Architects appears in the Camden, Maine, episode of “New England Living” TV. Photo by ©Sarah Szwajkos Photography

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NEW ENGLAND LIVING | 2017

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CLK_NE


Access this one-of-a-kind experience at clarkeliving.com

New England’s Official Sub-Zero & Wolf Showroom and Test Kitchen N E W E N G L A N D L I V I N G. TV Boston

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& Milford, MA • South Norwalk, CT • 800-845-8247 • clarkeliving.com

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EDITOR’S

LETTER

NE W E NG L A ND

LIVING

I

was born and raised in New England and have lived here most of my life. After stints in big cities, I returned to where nostalgia leads people like me, seeking the smell of freshly mown grass, crisp home-grown vegetables, snowy winters and waves crashing at the shore.

VOLUME 1 • NUMBER 1 EDITORIAL & CONTENT DIRECTOR

Janice Randall Rohlf CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Sharon Bartholomew LMS EDITORS

Maria Allen: South Shore Living, Plymouth Magazine Rachel Arroyo: Home Remodeling

But New Englanders are not wet behind the ears. We keep up with the latest fashion trends (but maybe tone them down a bit); celebrities pique our curiosity (but not to the point of adulation); and at times we pack our bags for an adventure elsewhere. But home is really where our hearts are. This debut issue of New England Living celebrates life in Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont, with a particular focus on the comforts of a nice home—compelling design (inside and out), the latest appliances, high-end materials and routinechanging technology. Add to the mix good food, inspiring people and fun destinations, and we’re delighted to bring you not just a magazine but an experience too.

Kelly Chase: Southern New England Living, Falmouth Magazine Lisa Leigh Connors: Cape Cod Magazine, Chatham Magazine Rob Duca: New England Golf & Leisure Colby Radomski: Southern New England Weddings, Hingham Magazine Tom Richardson: New England Boating, New England Fishing Janice Randall Rohlf: Southern New England Home ............................................ CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Eric Brust-Akdemir ART DIRECTOR

Alexandra Bondarek ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTORS

Wendy Kipfmiller-O’Brien Jennifer Kothalanka

We encourage you to start your real-life New England Living experience with a visit to 7 Tide (Page 126), the city’s newest design destination, in Boston’s most up-and-coming neighborhood, the Seaport District. Here, you will have the unique opportunity to gather key information and find jaw-dropping inspiration before beginning a design project at home. 7 Tide is the perfect starting point for a discovery tour of the dynamic surrounding neighborhood, and we’ve even included an insider’s guide to get you started (Page 120). Don’t forget to watch New England Living TV, debuting this spring on CBS affiliate WBZ-TV Channel 4.

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Rachel Clayton DESIGNER

Kendra Sousa ............................................ TV/VIDEO SENIOR WRITER/PRODUCER/HOST

Parker Kelley TV/VIDEO SENIOR EDITOR/VIDEOGRAPHER

Jimmy Baggott VIDEOGRAPHER/VIDEO EDITOR

Tyler Adams ............................................ CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Kelly Chase, Marina Davalos, Rob Duca, Laurie Higgins, Rebecca Mayer Knutsen, Jennifer Sperry, Ken Textor CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

5iveLeaf Photography, Jeffrey Allen, Ashley Bilodeau, Kindra Clineff, Rob Karosis, Warren Patterson, Tom Richardson, Eric Roth, Jim Westphalen Published by

Lighthouse Media Solutions

Janice Randall Rohlf Editor

www.lhmediasolutions.com Single copy price $6.95/$7.95 Canada. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without the written permission of the publisher. Publisher disclaims all responsibility for omissions, errors, and unsolicited materials. Printed in the USA.

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photography by peter rymind

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NE W E NG L A ND

LIVING VOLUME 1 • NUMBER 1

PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Russell A. Piersons rpiersons@lhmediasolutions.com

............................................ CHIEF OPERATIONS OFFICER (DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT)

David F. Jensen djensen@lhmediasolutions.com PRESIDENT (VIDEO-TV)

Gene Allen gallen@lhmediasolutions.com VICE PRESIDENT SALES & MARKETING

Steve Wyman swyman@lhmediasolutions.com

VICE PRESIDENT GLOBAL ACCTS/CLIENT BRANDING

Mike Alleva malleva@lhmediasolutions.com VICE PRESIDENT ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT

Mark Skala mskala@lhmediasolutions.com

............................................ REGIONAL SALES MANAGERS Anne Bousquet abousquet@lhmediasolutions.com

Jane Cournan jcournan@lhmediasolutions.com David Honeywell dhoneywell@lhmediasolutions.com Janice Rogers jrogers@lhmediasolutions.com Suzanne Ryan sryan@lhmediasolutions.com Erin Soderstrom esoderstrom@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................ DIRECTOR ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT

Oceanna O’Donnell ACCOUNT MANAGERS

Sharon Bartholomew Ailish Belair Michelle Overby

............................................ SALES AD COORDINATOR (PUBLISHING, TV, WEB)

Hillary Portell hportell@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................

SENIOR WEB DEVELOPER

David Fontes dfontes@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................ SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

Allie Herzog

DIGITAL CONTENT COORDINATOR

Lannan O’Brien

............................................ CONTROLLER

Connie Walsh cwalsh@lhmediasolutions.com ASSISTANT CONTROLLER

Angela McPherson amcpherson@lhmediasolutions.com ASSISTANT TO CEO & OFFICE MANAGER

Laura Scheuer lscheuer@lhmediasolutions.com

Mondays at 6:30 p.m. on NESN Cape Cod Office: 396 Main Street, Suite 15, Hyannis, MA 02601 508.534.9291 Boston Office: 850 Summer Street, Suite 207, Boston, MA 02127 508.534.9291 Rhode Island Office: P.O. Box 568, Portsmouth, RI 02871 401.396.9888

Timeless design, exceptionally crafted. 508.945.4500 • psdab.com Photo: Brian Vanden Brink

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W ESTBOROUGH

D E S IG N CENTER

visit

westboroughdesigncenter.com 3 Ruggles Street, Westborough, Ma 01581

Claudette@Westboroughdesigncenter.com 508.366.7926

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EVENTS AT 7 TIDE

OUT & ABOUT 2

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ABX PARTY New England’s architecture community celebrated at a VIP reception held on November 16, following Architecture Boston Expo (ABX). Guests enjoyed cocktails, hors d’oeuvres and live music while

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exploring Boston’s newest design resource, 7 Tide and the Marvin Experience Center. 1. Hayley Purcell, Miana Hoyt Dawson, Lauren Hokenson 2. Ryan Nevidomsky, Frank Shirley 3. Tim Giguere 4. Robert T. Coolidge, Keenan Burns 5. Naomi Mancha, David Andreozzi 6. Rich Trabucco 7. Eric Thorson, Ben Norton, Dale Simmons, Todd Donnelly 8. Betsy Ellery, K.C. Williams 9.Julie Brown, Christopher Brown 10. Maryanne Cowan, Duene Cowan

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DESIGNER APPRECIATION NIGHT Clarke’s Annual Designer Appreciation Night (DAN) took place on September

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22 at 7 Tide. 1. Danielle Silvia and Dear Abby’s 2. Kyle Sheffield, Carter Williams 3. Sean Clarke, Tom Clarke, Jeannine Clarke, Jill Fotiades 4. David Annand Jennifer LaTouche 5. Kelsey Hodde, Karlie Buck 6. Jane Vitagliano, Lee Maida, Staci Rogers 7. Rosemary Porto, Richard Bertman, Sandra Bertman 8. Katie Fitzgerald, Sabrina Martell 9. Jill Muldoon, Tina Collyer 10. Jenny Mui, Christina Gonsalves

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JUST IN WHAT’S NEW IN

HOME DESIGN 3 ONE GREAT GRIDDLE

1 HOT OFF THE PRESS Wolf introduced its 36-inch Induction Range at the 2016 Architectural Digest Design Show in New York City. Perhaps the only type of cooking that could lure you away from gas, induction is a technology of startling precision and power. Wolf pairs a powerful induction cooktop with its celebrated dual convection oven, which delivers the most even heating you’ll find, plus 10 automatic cooking modes to

2 BLACK MAGIC Make a bold design statement in your home with Marvin’s new Matte Black Finish option. The reflection-free finish, available on most Marvin hardware, allows the lines and form of each piece to stand out, turning each pull, crank, lock

Wolf modules allow you to turn the smallest countertop into a cooking area. The new Wolf 15-inch Teppanyaki Module is adept at low-fat, Japanesestyle cooking. You can cook meat and vegetables quickly on high heat, using just a drizzle of oil and light seasoning. Utilizing induction, it also heats up quickly and offers very precise control. The two-zone heating allows you to sear a steak on high heat in one zone while warming vegetables or rice on low heat in the other zone.

and hinge into an architectural sculpture.

master any dish.

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4 DOOR WITH MORE The Marvin Bi-Fold Door is a simple, elegant solution for indoor/outdoor living. It opens wide to invite fresh air in and is ideal for making a dramatic connection with verandas, gardens and more, or expanding a room into adjoining interior areas.

4 COOKTOP WITH EXTRA OOMPH

7 WINE DOWN AND RELAX

A stunner in both performance and design, the Wolf 36-inch Contemporary Gas Cooktop has a striking, integrated look, with a cooking surface that sits flush to the countertop, and control knobs that mount to the cabinet panel of your choice. With the most powerful Wolf dual-stacked burner ever—20,000 BTU—this powerful central burner delivers faster boils

At just 24” wide, Sub-Zero Undercounter Wine Preservation fits in anywhere. The UW-24/S has a 46-bottle capacity and two individually controlled storage zones, so you can store and serve both reds and whites at the proper temperature. Racks glide smoothly in and out without agitating the wine. UVresistant, bronze-tinted glass prevents light exposure. Dual evaporators maintain constant, moderate humidity. Pair the wine storage with a Sub-Zero Integrated 24” All Refrigerator Column filled with soda and juice.

and restaurant-quality sears.

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6 SHADES OF GREY Suede, Gunmetal, Clay and Liberty Bronze, Marvin’s Newest Clad Colors, are designed to complement the natural and organic materials used in today’s builds. Marvin’s own backyard, in Warroad, Minnesota, served as the inspiration behind the organic color palette.

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DISCOVER NEW ENGLAND

EVENTS

T

hroughout the year in New England, there is an abundance of special events that celebrate the joys of living in these six Northeastern states. Here are several to get you started.

BOSTON DESIGN WEEK

WATERFIRE

MARCH 29-APRIL 9, 2017 BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS

MAY TO NOVEMBER, 2017 PROVIDENCE, RHODE ISLAND

bostondesignweek.com

waterfire.org

Enjoy architecture, interior design, graphic design, student and youth programs, celebrities, book signings, gala events, museum shows and more at this 12-day citywide festival. 80+ events, all open to the public and most free of charge.

This highly unique public art experience attracts tens of thousands of visitors to Providence. The event is based on an original artistic installation of bonfires lit on the three waterways passing through the capital city’s downtown. On select Saturday evenings throughout the year, WaterFire creates a magical artistic event celebrating earth, air, fire and water. Amid the flickering firelight of 100 bonfires, stroll through Waterplace Park and enjoy music and entertainment from around the world.

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BRIMFIELD ANTIQUE AND COLLECTIBLES SHOW MAY 9-14, JULY 11-16, SEPT. 5-10, 2017 BRIMFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS brimfieldshow.com Taking place three times a year, this is the largest outdoor antiques show in the country, with more than 4,500 dealers and 130,000+ visitors during the course of one week. Often referred to as “The Show,” it is comprised of 23 fields owned by promoters who lease spaces to dealers from all over the world. Most dealers opt to show their wares inside large and comfortable tents, and all fields are contiguously located next to each other.

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BURLINGTON DISCOVER JAZZ FESTIVAL

PROVINCETOWN INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

JUNE 2-11, 2017 BURLINGTON, VERMONT

PROVINCETOWN, MA JUNE 14-18, 2017

Discoverjazz.com

ptownfilmfest.org

This 10-day celebration of live music for all ages has free live music on four stages in downtown Burlington, headlining shows at the historic Flynn Center for the Performing Arts and the Waterfront Tent, and nightly showcases in restaurants and venues all over the city. The festival brings this community to life with one heck of a 10-day-long party.

Regarded as one of the country’s preeminent film festivals, the Provincetown International Film Festival presents more than 100 screenings and hosts more than 30 events honoring filmmakers from around the world in a one-of-a-kind seaside setting noted for its art and history. Each year more that 10,000 tickets are sold.

KENNEBUNKPORT FOOD FESTIVAL JUNE 5-10, 2017 KENNEBUNKPORT, MAINE kennebunkportfestival.com Six days celebrating the excellence of Maine’s chefs, artists, musicians, wine purveyors and beer makers while surrounded by the beautiful scenery, people, and enduring charm of Kennebunkport. By the beautiful Atlantic Ocean, chefs show off their culinary skills while you sip cocktails and converse in fabulous seaside homes opened up for you and a few other special guests. And the Maine Craft Music Festival provides an afternoon of beer and live music.

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BAR HARBOR MUSIC FESTIVAL JULY 2-30, 2017 BAR HARBOR, MAINE barharbormusicfestival.org Acclaimed by Phi Beta Baton as “one of the nation’s proving grounds for gifted young artists,” the Bar Harbor Music Festival, in its 51st season, has gained national recognition as one of the few music festivals in the United States whose mission is to provide essential performance opportunities for outstanding up-and-coming talent.

MAINE LOBSTER FESTIVAL AUGUST 2-6, 2017 ROCKLAND, MAINE mainelobsterfestival.com Thanks to the world’s largest lobster cooker, this festival cooks up a jawdropping 20,000-plus pounds of fresh lobster. Covered by such programs as “The Today Show” and “Good Morning America,” this beloved event has been a summer tradition for 70 years.

HAMPTON BEACH SEAFOOD FESTIVAL SEPTEMBER 8-10, 2017 HAMPTON, NEW HAMPSHIRE hamptonbeachseafoodfestival.com This is one of the largest seaside festivals in New England and attracts more than 150,000 visitors each day. The family-friendly event has it all: mouth-watering seafood (and more) from over 50 restaurants, three entertainment stages, children’s activities, craft fair and fireworks!

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DISCOVER NEW ENGLAND

EVENTS

WELLFLEET OYSTERFEST OCTOBER 14-15, 2017 WELLFLEET, MASSACHUSETTS wellfleetspat.org A celebration of the town’s famous oysters, clams and its deep-rooted shellfishing traditions. The weekend full of food, art, music, fun and games includes local musicians, storytelling, cooking demonstrations, nature walks, oyster grant tours and much more. Enjoy New England beers and ales, plus locally made wine. Over 80 carefully selected artisans and artists offer handmade jewelry, pottery, ceramics, clothing, paintings, photography and furniture. Don’t miss the Oyster Shuck-Off: The OysterFest’s most popular attraction!

ANNUAL NEWPORT MANSIONS WINE AND FOOD FESTIVAL SEPT. 21-24, 2017 NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND

VERMONT FINE FURNITURE & WOODWORKING FESTIVAL AND FOREST FESTIVAL WEEKEND SEPTEMBER 23-24, 2017 WOODSTOCK, VERMONT

newportmansions.org/events/wine-andfood-festival

vermontwoodfestival.org

Held in one of the most spectacular settings in America, this event has quickly taken its place among the most anticipated food and wine events in the country. The remarkable weekend experience features hundreds of wines from around the world, fabulous food, cooking demonstrations by celebrated chefs, live and silent auctions and a gala celebration.

Two great family events on a single weekend! Shop for finely crafted Vermont wood products and furniture, with 18 wood artisans at Billings Farm & Museum. Listen to music and enjoy local food. This is also Forest Festival Weekend at the Marsh Billings Rockefeller National Historical Park: enjoy woodworking demonstrations, wagon rides, forest walks, museum tours, hands-on activities and more.

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22ND FINE FURNISHINGS SHOW NOVEMBER 3-5, 2017 PAWTUCKET, RHODE ISLAND newenglandhomeshows.com For unique artwork, home accessories or a piece of fine handcrafted furniture, look no further than the annual Fine Furnishings Show. The weekend-long event, located inside the Pawtucket Armory, showcases more than 100 talented local, regional and national artists and craftsmen under one roof.

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36TH ANNUAL CONNECTICUT HOME & GARDEN SHOW FEBRUARY 22-25, 2018 HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT ctflowershow.com Truly a sight to behold, each year the Connecticut Convention Center transforms its hall into a collection of lush landscapes, designed by some of the region’s most talented landscape designers. You will also find educational exhibits and seminars as well as more than 300 booths filled with plants, flowers, fertilizers, garden tools and anything you’d ever need to create the backyard of your dreams.

NEW ENGLAND HOME SHOW

A TASTE OF VERMONT

FEBRUARY 23-25, 2018 BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS

MARCH 17, 2018 STRATTON, VERMONT

newenglandhomeshows.com

strattonfoundation.org/taste-of-vermont

Don’t miss the longest running home show in New England! The three-day event, now in its 68th year, takes place at the scenic Seaport Trade Center and is Boston’s largest home expo, attracting hundreds of exhibitors who display the very latest in products for the home, from mattresses and tile to furniture, lighting and seemingly everything in between.

The annual “Taste of Vermont” is a mountain favorite event where the best of southern Vermont restaurants, professional and amateur chefs, caterers, bakers, delis and more come together in culinary camaraderie to offer their favorite recipes for tasting! It’s a fun and satisfying event for the whole family.

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CONNECTICUT SPRING ANTIQUES SHOW MARCH 24-25, 2018 HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT ctspringantiquesshow.com Held at the landmark Hartford Armory, this fantastic pre-1840s antiques show is a must-attend event for those interested in quality, early-American furniture and decorative arts. Collectors, historians and antique enthusiasts will enjoy a look back at our country’s past as well as the opportunity to own a piece of history. Nearby, visit The Mark Twain House & Museum, the Harriett Beecher Stowe Center and the Connecticut Science Museum.

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FROZEN

ASSETS

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O FR ZEN A S S E T S

BY

R E B E C C A M AY E R K N U T S E N

When it comes to the lifestyle of today’s busy families, one-refrigerator kitchens are a thing of the past.

I

n today’s kitchens, grabbing a friend a cold drink from the fridge is not as straightforward as it may sound. Do you go to the main side-by-side unit camouflaged by a customized panel front? A refrigerated drawer built into the island that holds juice and soda? A similar drawer in the butler’s pantry that holds just beer?

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Historically, the refrigerator has gotten more play than any other kitchen appliance, with the door repeatedly swinging open and shut at every meal and countless times throughout the day to dole out snacks, cocktails and midnight munchies. Today more and more, homeowners are encouraged to consider the particular demands of the home’s occupants and guests, and choose appliances that best suit their lifestyle. Modern refrigeration is a perfect example of how picking and choosing among an increasingly broad spectrum of options results in a very personalized space, the perfect blend of aesthetics and functionality. So, when the time comes to select new refrigeration, where does one begin? Consulting a designer is always a good idea, but before that homeowners remodeling a kitchen or building a new home are encouraged to get the advice of friends and family, visit an appliance showroom and brainstorm must-haves.

Zero in on Lifestyle Needs “Refrigeration is the cornerstone of the kitchen,” shares Rosemary Porto, sales manager and senior designer at Poggenpohl Boston. “It directs how a kitchen is laid out so it’s helpful when clients arrive with an idea of what they want and how they plan to use it.” Porto suggests homeowners envision a typical day at home to determine the most important individual needs: Do you cook most meals at home? Who is responsible for cooking? Do you entertain? What food items are regularly stocked in the refrigerator? Do children need to be able to reach refrigerated items? Claudette Andrew, interior designer at Westborough Design Center in Westborough, Massachusetts, agrees that lifestyle drives the appliance selection process. “The refrigerator is an essential item, but what product is needed varies by client,” she adds. With so many custom features available in Sub-Zero appliances, homeowners can check each item off their refrigeration wish lists without sacrificing function. The wide variety of options can be customized to suit any kitchen’s style whether it’s traditional, retro, contemporary or somewhere in between.

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surrounding cabinetry. Other homeowners may prefer refrigeration as a focal point, which can be achieved with a sleek stainless steel design. Either way, today’s Sub-Zero refrigerator and freezer options have elevated kitchen outfitting to a new level. The elegance of Sub-Zero units is matched by their flexible and customizable options to suit virtually any kitchen. A home with vast space may splurge on a 48-inch side-by-side unit, whereas a cottage may require mixing columns and drawers to satisfy the refrigeration needs. Others may choose to group a bunch of elements together, or relegate the sporadically used freezer to the pantry to save on space in the main kitchen.

Options for Every Style & Space A kitchen’s design and flow relies on the commingling of various elements including countertops, storage and appliance space. “Refrigerators, cooktops and ovens each have specific roles as appliances, and to work well, they need to go in the most appropriate location,” Andrew explains. The overall goal is to produce a cohesive, functional and aesthetically pleasing kitchen, but that’s not as easy as it sounds. Once homeowners have a clear idea of their needs, consulting a professional to assess the space and design the most efficient layout is the next step. An interior designer can provide feedback based on lifestyle, needs and the space available to determine which Sub-Zero product is the best fit. “In the end, where and what appliances are included in a kitchen design comes down to the space available,” Andrew explains. A homeowner who cooks often, for example, will need enough refrigeration to house fresh ingredients, conveniently located in the heart of the kitchen. For a formal, classic presentation, integrated units with a wood panel overlay and no visible hinges or grilles blends refrigeration seamlessly with N E W E N G L A N D L I V I N G. T V

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25

MEET DESIGNER Rosemary Porto OF POGGENPOHL BOSTON

Thinking Outside the Box The new generation of Sub-Zero products offers consumers design flexibility without sacrificing the quality standards on which the 72-year-old company was built. The internal water dispenser, one of the newest features to be unveiled, fulfills an unmet need in the market. According to Porto, no other 36-inch refrigerator in the luxury

Q: WHERE DO YOU FIND DESIGN INSPIRATION?

market currently offers this highly

A: My clients inspire me. Their accomplishments. Their unique viewpoints of the world. I soak

regarded feature.

it all in and try to create something spectacular that speaks to their needs, their lives. Modern

Other coveted Sub-Zero attributes include high-powered air filtration systems, dual refrigeration systems, and

European architecture and furniture inspire my kitchen designs. As an interior designer I look at kitchens as just another room that needs furniture. Of course the need for appliances adds sport to the game.

Q: HOW DO YOU APPROACH THE DESIGN PROCESS?

shelves with nanotechnology to stop spills in their tracks. Refrigerator drawers conveniently stock children’s items like juice boxes within easy reach of tiny hands. The drawers can also be installed to increase the kitchen’s refrigeration footprint or in place of full-sized units for space-challenged areas. In addition to Sub-Zero’s full line of wine storage solutions, refrigerator drawers are increasingly being installed as versatile beverage stations throughout kitchens. From housing milk below

“My clients inspire me. Their accomplishments. Their unique viewpoints of the world.”

A: I ask my clients about their lives, how they cook, how they live. There’s always a little something that is special that comes through. Maybe a trip they took, or a particular piece they treasure. I start to weave the idea of their kitchen around that special moment so the room is a reflection of their lives.

Q: WHAT IS THE GREATEST VALUE YOU PROVIDE YOUR CLIENT? A: I am a very good listener and therefore I have been successful at fulfilling my client’s vision for their new

a coffee bar to providing convenient

kitchen. After the kitchen is completed and they tell

access to alcoholic beverages, the

me “You heard me,” I am truly rewarded.

options are endless. One caveat, according to Andrew, is setting

Q: WHAT ARE SOME OF THE CURRENT DESIGN TRENDS?

additional cooling configurations away

A: Contemporary designs are really taking off across the country. Of course this is exactly

from main food preparation areas so

what I have been doing for the last 14 years since I joined Poggenpohl. We have a special way

they enhance rather than disrupt the

of mixing finishes that warms up the modern look. We also understand what it really means to

kitchen’s flow. NEL

design in this style. Going minimal is not easily done.

Q: WHERE DO YOU SEE KITCHEN DESIGN GOING IN THE NEXT 5 YEARS? A: To accommodate the housing trend of building smaller more efficient housing, as an industry we must create the most functional kitchen designs in smaller floor plans. Throughout Europe this has been a way of life. That is the reason companies like Poggenpohl have the edge on the American market when it comes to understanding how to make the most functional kitchen smaller. Baby Boomers are moving from their suburban homes into city condos and apartments. There will be a growing need for smaller footprint, super-efficient kitchens over the next 5 years.

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A NEW WAY TO DESIGN A KITCHEN

Come Taste Your Future hen many think of kitchen design, they think cabinetry first. Yet, with today’s extraordinary kitchen technology, it’s smart to start your planning with a deep dive into kitchen appliances. Start with function, and form will follow

beautifully. Your kitchen is the most sensual room in your home. It’s the place where your family will gather to cook, talk, laugh, eat wonderful meals and so much more. Imagine designing an entire space and then realizing there is a spectacular Wolf Convection Steam Oven that offers ways to cook that makes life so easy that you need to find space for it. Or you find out that the new 18” Sub-Zero Wine Storage Column makes it viable to tuck this incredible

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option right between your refrigerator and freezer, creating a stunning and functional food preservation statement. Perhaps you discover that the new Wolf M Series Ovens offer a gourmet mode that simply will not allow your meal to be anything but perfect or - game changer - you learn that Wolf just came out with the only 36” Induction Range - your quickest route to delicious. There is truly only one place in New England where you can do this kind of research with no pressure to buy a thing: Clarke, New England’s Official Sub-Zero & Wolf Showroom and Test Kitchen. Clarke realizes that both cooking and tasting during your kitchen design research are essential to create the kitchen you deserve. That’s why your trip to any one of Clarke’s showrooms (Boston or Milford, Massachusetts or South Norwalk, Connecticut) not only offers an opportunity to see spectacular appliances in inspiring kitchen settings, but also allows you to cook on the appliances and taste the results. Every visitor enjoys

a Small Plate. This Clarke culinary program allows you to taste how Wolf treats the freshest of ingredients and catch a glimpse of what your future holds as a Sub-Zero and Wolf owner before you commit to your favorite appliances. For information on showroom hours and the benefits of making an appointment, simply visit clarkeliving.com.

New England’s Official Sub-Zero & Wolf Showroom and Test Kitchen Boston & Milford, MA • South Norwalk, CT 800-845-8247 • clarkeliving.com

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THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS Available in a variety of styles, patio doors offer wide-open views of the great outdoors. By Rebecca Mayer Knutsen

Scenic doors bring the outdoors in by elegantly and effortlessly connecting your inside space with the environment found right outside your doors. You don’t want anything to stand between you and your view.

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The glazed exterior doors leading from a cozy mountainside living room to an endless grassy knoll are charged with effortlessly blending beauty and function. For today’s homeowner, settling on a well-suited patio door is an exercise in breaking down the disconnect between the structure’s interior and exterior areas. So where to start in the pursuit of the perfect patio door? The selection process largely boils down to whether the homeowner is adding a new door or replacing an existing unit, which limits the options unless the door opening can be altered, shares Pi Smith, architect and owner at Smith and Vansant Architects in Norwich, Vermont. “When adding a door, we make sure the scale and height of the opening ties in with the home’s interior and exterior design,” she shares.

AN EXTENSION OF STYLE According to Kim Deetjen, principal at architecture and interior design firm TruexCullins in Burlington, Vermont, the home’s architectural style helps pinpoint the most complementary door. “The specific door depends on the style of the house—is it traditional or modern? Formal or informal? The context is always the first determining factor,” she explains. To reflect a modern feel, Smith steers clients toward a corresponding finish on doors and windows, surrounded by minimal trim to remove the fussiness. In a more traditional home with divided lites on the windows, homeowners should mimic the same configuration and organization on the patio door. For a pulled together result, Smith recommends using one brand for windows and doors. A home styled with Marvin Windows, for example, will have the same cladding color, munton profile and hardware finish throughout. “Universal features tie the whole look together in a home,” she adds.

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To achieve an integrated look, the experts recommend consistent window and door heights from room to room. “A lot of planning goes into determining the access and clearance of a patio door,” Smith shares. “Speaking with an architect or designer can help figure out a home’s options and suggest spacing strategies.” In addition to the home’s style, homeowners are encouraged to think about how a patio door can be used to enhance—and not disrupt—the room’s flow. The right door creates a seamless handoff from the interior to exterior realms, while making the interior space appear larger and more in tune with the view.

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BRING THE VIEW INDOORS Assessing the home’s setting and the surrounding landscape can help homeowners zero in on the right patio door, Deetjen explains. A mountain rustic-style home generally warrants a natural wood frame such as Marvin’s Hazelnut on Pine stain, whereas, a contemporary farmhouse style home would favor a traditional painted door. Either way, the rule of thumb is to bring the outdoors in and frame the view. Deetjen notes a rising preference in darker door sashes and muntons, offset by trim and casing that match the home’s general paint scheme. “White accents produce divided light,” she explains, “Dark sashes provide the greatest connection to the outdoors because they just disappear, and the contrast is beautiful from both interior and exterior perspectives.” Alternatively, homeowners interested in playing up the patio door as a focal point—rather than a means to the view—can play with dark contrasts to achieve the look they are after. Frames drenched in dark colors can elevate a door to focal-point status in a room angling for a dramatic effect. Lastly, viewing a patio door from the exterior is just as important as maximizing the view from its interior counterpart. Marvin offers a range of products that allow the color palette of door cladding to match exterior trim and windows. NEL For more inspiration, visit marvin.com/plan/inspiration-gallery.

MADE IN THE SHADE Many a strong person has reached her breaking point when searching for an attractive and functional window treatment for patio doors. Look no further! Marvin Fully Integrated Interior Shades, available in 15 colors, appear as a seamless part of a window or door and are installed at the same time. Functionally graceful, there are no unsightly cords or pulleys, and the trim around the glass remains a visible element of a home’s décor.

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FROZEN

ASSETS

best

CELLARS

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bes t

cellars Outstanding in both form and function, state-of-the-art wine storage options fit a range of consumers BY ROB DUCA

I

magine purchasing the Bordeaux or Barolo of your dreams and waiting patiently for just the right occasion to savor it, only to discover that the cork has dried out and the wine is

undrinkable—all because it was improperly stored.

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A Precious Commodity Like any investment, wine must be safeguarded and monitored, regardless of whether you’re storing a special vintage that won’t be opened for several years or a bottle that will be consumed within the next few months. In order to derive the most enjoyment from your wines, they must be protected from the elements. The days of laying bottles in an open wine rack, leaving them vulnerable to heat and light, are quickly disappearing as custom-designed, temperature-controlled wine storage units have become more affordable and efficient. “Consumers are more educated now and they’re seeing the benefits of Sub-Zero wine storage units,” says Jeremy McCulla, showroom manager at Clarke, New England’s Official Sub-Zero & Wolf Showroom and Test Kitchen, which has three locations, Boston and Milford, MA, as well as South Norwalk, Connecticut. “Back in the day, people would use wine coolers, but those only chilled the wine. They didn’t do anything to protect the wine from elements that are harmful to it.” The fearsome foursome of harmful elements to wine is temperature, humidity, vibration and ultraviolet light. All four can strip wine of its complexity and character. Sub-Zero wine units allow consumers to set separate temperatures for red, white and dessert wines, to control humidity, to limit any jostling of the wine and to protect it from light with UV-resistant, dark-tinted glass.

“Consumers are more educated now

Customization For Connoisseurs At Clarke, consumers can choose from a wide selection of wine storage models including gleaming stainless steel and panel-ready options that allow homeowners to blend their wine storage with other cabinetry. They are available in three widths, ranging from 18” to 30”, with 46- to 147-bottle capacity. “Our fully integrated line has just been released and it includes enhanced lighting and some really nice accessory options including a special bulk wine drawer, preprinted wine inventory tiles, door locks and more,” says Marco Barallon, corporate showroom manager for Clarke. “The 30” Integrated Wine Storage models even offer an option for a cherry wood humidor, which fits perfectly in place of one of the wine storage racks.” But wine storage isn’t solely about practicality anymore; it can now serve as an additional element in the design of a kitchen, living room, wet bar or even a wine

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an


w

cellar. Units can be custom-designed with wood paneling that matches kitchen cabinets, the furniture in a dining room or the various accoutrements in a den. When Jennifer Quinlan of Duxbury, Massachusetts, wanted to remodel an area of her kitchen to serve as a wet bar, she called on designer Julie Lyons of Roomscapes Luxury Design Center. The Quinlans entertain frequently and, Jennifer says, a wine refrigerator was “a logical piece to add into the area.” The particular Sub-Zero unit she chose preserves and protects up to 86 bottles of wine, while down below, there are two commodious refrigerator drawers items. “It is fully integrated within the bar area,” explains designer Lyons. “The finish on both the wine refrigerator with refrigerator drawers and on an identical tall cabinet is a soft glazed gray, further enhancing the furniture appearance of the Sub-Zero and the bar itself.”

SHELLY HARRISON PHOTOGRAPHY

for sodas, beer, lemons and other bar-appropriate

DESIGNED AND DETAILED BY JULIE LYONS, SENIOR DESIGNER, ROOMSCAPES LUXURY DESIGN CENTER

and they’re seeing the benefits of Sub-Zero wine storage units.”

Versatile and Attractive A pair of 18- or 24-inch storage units can be integrated into a hutch, with a countertop or sink inserted in between. Homeowners can also cover the unit or leave the glass portion visible. “You can literally change the look of the unit based on the design of the space. And you can use any species of wood, from cherry to oak,” Barallon says. Many consumers are now choosing to use multiple wine storage units in the basement, thus saving the expense of designing a wine cellar that is properly temperaturecontrolled. “Instead of building a wine room, they are creating one with Sub-Zero wine storage. It’s almost endless what people can do with these units,” Baraillon says. NEL

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E D S I GN CL ARKE KITCHEN

WINNERS

Clarke's Annual Designer Appreciation Night took place on September, 22, 2016, at the newest Sub-Zero & Wolf Showroom and Test Kitchen at 7 Tide in Boston Seaport.

T

he centerpiece of the event was the celebration of the architects and designers who entered Clarke's 2014-15 Kitchen Design Contest (71 entries to be exact). Six spectacular kitchens were honored with recognition and awards. The distinguished panel of judges for the 2014-15 Clarke Kitchen Design Contest were David Andreozzi - Andreozzi Architects; David Hacin - Hacin + Associates; Laurie Grabowski - Fay's Fine Cabinetry; and Lindy Weaver - Lindy Weaver Design Associates.

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HOME

FEATURE

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Traditional

 First Place Traditional Kitchen

 Second Place Traditional Kitchen

Jan Gleysteen, Jan Gleysteen Architects

Mark Haddad, Haddad Hakansson Design Studio

The homeowners wanted to bring a taste of their northern

The team at Haddad Hakansson (Susan Cracraft, Louie

European heritage to their new home in Boston. While they

Kerbici along with Mark Haddad) took a limited amount of

preferred a clean, functional and modern design, they also

space and transformed it into a light-filled room with smart

gravitated towards the warmth of New England architecture.

storage that blended with the homeowner's antique pieces.

This kitchen blends all sensibilities beautifully.

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 First Place Transitional Kitchen Julie Lyons and Cameron Snyder, CKD, Roomscapes Luxury Design Center The kitchen in this new dream home encompasses the entire first floor and the homeowners were keen on maximizing the magnificent water view right outside the window. Julie and Cam collaborated to create a gracious space that would be flexible for small family dinners and large-party entertaining.

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Transitional

Â

 Second Place Transitional Kitchen Veronica Campbell, Deane Inc. This project transformed a very choppy space on different floor levels into one gracious living area. With the help of Michal Gallin of Gallin Architects and Interior Decorator Renae Cohen of Renae Cohen Designs, the team created a sleek, inviting room combining rich wood tones, luxe textures and beautiful appliances.

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Contemporary

 First Place Contemporary Kitchen Richard Bertman, Ellen Perko and Emily Cotter at CBT Architects This kitchen remodel was done in partnership with Rosemary Porto and Yaoying Huang of Poggenpohl and resulted in a spectacular space that links the interior of the home with the beautiful, natural exterior, while maintaining a clean, ergonomic kitchen.

 Second Place Contemporary Kitchen Treffle LaFleche, LDa Architecture & Interiors This kitchen remodel was an addition and expansion to the rear of a traditional-style home, and the design bridges the architectural language with a kitchen that is now the gathering place of the home. Once again, Rosemary Porto of Poggenpohl collaborated to bring this kitchen to life. N E W E N G L A N D L I V I N G. T V

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EAT & DRINK

RECIPE

IT’S NOT MAGIC, BUT INDUCTION COOKING COMES CLOSE What if there were a way to combine the sleek aesthetics of an electric cooktop with the functional superiority of a gas range? Well, there is: Induction. Faster, safer and more energy efficient than gas or electric, this magnetic cooking technology has been used in Europe and Asia for decades but Americans have been much slower to warm up to the idea, one that The New York Times has suggested is “the iPad of the kitchen” with technology that “could forever change everyday tasks.” At the 7 Tide showroom, where anyone can test drive a Wolf appliance, people are amazed by how quickly a pot of water comes to a boil on an induction burner. It simmers in about two minutes and then goes quickly to a rapid boil. A simple touch of a finger returns it to simmer instantly. It is this precise, consistent, low heat delivered by an induction burner that has made the technology the darling of restaurant chefs, masters of the eternally simmered sauce, and of confectionary wizards who dabble in chocolate. Similarly for home cooks, the beauty of induction is that you’ll never scorch the contents of a pot, and you’ll never again need to fumble around with a double-boiler. Nancy Salter recently acquired her first Wolf induction cooktop as part of a second-home kitchen remodel spearheaded by Jane Anderson of Apex Kitchens & Baths in Middletown, Rhode Island. Used to an electric range, Salter says she liked the “instant control and quick response” of induction. But most of all, she “loves that it is so easy to keep clean.” A convert to the new technology, Salter has also installed an induction cooktop at her primary home.

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Brittany Wezner, chef at Clarke in Milford, Massachusetts, and at 7 Tide, has high praise for the “low and slow” way induction caramelizes onions, and her counterpart at the SoNo Clarke showroom in South Norwalk, Connecticut, Chef John Craig, praises the technology for facilitating his jammaking. Craig also points out that searing and stir-frying are a breeze with induction.

BENEFITS OF INDUCTION COOKING

In induction cooking, there is no direct heat. Electricity flows through a coil to generate a magnetic field under the ceramic glass surface. When a pan is placed on the cooktop, currents are induced in it and instant heat is generated.

Because there are no open flames, cooks are less likely to get burned. The absence of raised burners keeps children out of harm’s way as well.

When you remove the pan from the cooktop, the heat ceases immediately. There is no risk of getting burned by a flame nor (best of all for distracted multi-taskers) forgetting to turn off the cooktop. As soon as you take the pan off the cooktop, the surface is cool.

Clean-up

With all its promising attributes, why would anyone hesitate to choose induction? “Because of the way an induction cooktop looks, many people think it’s similar to electric so they shy away from it,” says Chef Brittany. “We have to smash these misconceptions.” Asked if seasoned cooks are more reluctant than the younger generation to make the switch from gas or electric to induction, Chef John cites enthusiasm across the board. However, he says, people sometimes are unaware that their tried-and-true pots and pans will transition seamlessly to induction; any iron or steel pan is fine. Cast iron, including enamel-coated cast iron, and many stainless steel pans are suitable. If you’re not sure, try this simple test: if a magnet sticks to the bottom of a pot or pan, it will work with induction.

Speed Cookware heats up very quickly; water begins to boil extremely fast. Safety

Induction cooktops have a flat surface made of ceramic glass. Because it always remains cool (only the vessel gets hot), the surface is easy to clean. Efficiency An induction cooktop automatically shuts off when there is no pan on it. So no energy is wasted and the cost of electricity stays low.

No matter what generation of cooks you belong to, two benefits of induction cooktops and ranges are sure to please: energy efficiency—cooking faster means less heat is lost in the process—and the easy clean-up factor of the black ceramic surface. So, if you want to cook faster, safer and cleaner and score eco-friendly points as well, induction is for you!

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TOUCHDOWN TEA

BRUSCHETTA WITH CROSTINI

Talk about refreshing! You can keep this one virgin or add your favorite vodka for a fabulous adult cocktail.

This simple recipe is great year-round but fabulous in the summer during tomato season! Serve it hot or cold with Parmesan cheese, mozzarella or any of your favorite cheeses. Leftovers? No problem, this recipe tastes great over pasta.

12-20 black tea bags 2 quarts boiling water 2 quarts ice 1 cup sugar 1 cup water 1-2 cups frozen peaches 16 oz. pomegranate juice Bring water to a boil. Meanwhile make simple syrup. Combine water and sugar in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Gently swirl the pan, no need to stir. Boil until all sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat and set aside, this will be very hot. Steep tea bags in boiling water for 10 minutes. Remove bags and add simple syrup. Pour over ice and add the pomegranate juice and peaches. Allow to chill or serve over ice. Adding a sprig of mint will not only add lovely flavor but great color too.

BRUSCHETTA 2 tablespoons olive oil ¼ cup or 1 medium shallot, minced 2 teaspoons or 2 garlic cloves, minced 4 cups cherry tomatoes ½- 3/4 teaspoon salt (*if using capers, you may not need as much salt) ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 teaspoon sugar ¼ cup chopped basil ¼ cup chopped parsley 1 tablespoon thyme leaves 2 tablespoons capers (optional) 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar In a large sauté pan, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add shallots and garlic and cook until translucent, about 3-5 minutes.

CHOCOLATE COVERED STRAWBERRIES With the Wolf induction cooktop, there is no need for a double-boiler. 1 pint (about 2 cups of strawberries), rinsed and stems attached 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips 1 tablespoon butter or vegetable shortening Melt butter and chocolate chips in a medium saucepan over low heat. Pat berries dry if needed and dip into melted chocolate. Place on a piece of wax paper and cool at room temperature until chocolate hardens. You can enjoy right away or store in an airtight container in your refrigerator for 1-2 days. Tip: try other varieties of fruit like grapes, banana slices or clementine segments!

Add tomatoes, salt, pepper and sugar and turn up heat to medium-high. Cook tomatoes 5-7 minutes, until soft. Using the back of a spoon, gently press tomatoes so they pop open if they haven’t already done so. Add herbs, capers and vinegar and continue to cook 7 more minutes, until slightly thickened. Serve with your favorite cheese and crostini, enjoy!

CROSTINI 1 store-bought baguette, sliced into ¼-inch slices Olive oil Salt and freshly ground black pepper (about 1/3 teaspoon salt and ¼ teaspoon pepper) Preheat oven to 400° or 375° for a convection oven. Place a cooling rack onto a baking sheet. Arrange bread slices on the rack and drizzle with olive oil, then season with salt and pepper. Bake 8 minutes or until lightly golden and crisp.

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BERRY COULIS SAUCE This is a fantastic, traditional addition to any dessert or pastry. It adds a pop of color and sweetness. 1 cup frozen unsweetened strawberries 1/2 cup sugar (or ¼ cup sugar and ¼ cup honey) 1 tablespoon lemon juice Pinch of salt

CARAMELIZED ONIONS Caramelized onions can be used in a great variety of ways. They can be served on their own on a cracker or crostini with some goat cheese and fig preserve for a tasty appetizer. Try adding them to a sandwich, or stirring some into your favorite rice side dish or mashed potatoes. 2 medium onions (sweet or Vidallia) Sliced thin 4 tablespoons salted butter 2 tablespoons olive oil 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt or to taste Preheat griddle to 350°. Add oil and butter. Once butter has melted and oil is hot, add onions and sauté for 3-4 minutes, until slightly browned. Turn down heat to 250°. The onions should still be cooking but not continuing to brown. This phase is “low and slow” to allow the onions time to cook down and bring out their natural sweetness. Continue to cook onions, stirring occasionally until reduced. This will take up to 25 minutes. Don’t let the onions burn or crisp; add more oil or butter if necessary. Optional step: at the end of cooking, drizzle onions with a balsamic reduction (store-bought is fine). This will add more sweetness and turn them a beautiful color.

In a medium saucepan, combine the strawberries, sugar and lemon juice. Bring to a boil over mediumhigh heat. Cook until berries are soft, about 2 minutes. Transfer hot berry mixture to a blender. Purée until smooth. Using a fine mesh strainer/sieve, strain and set aside. Store in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

CHOCOLATE MOUSSE This is a great recipe to make a day ahead! 4 ½ oz. semi-sweet chocolate 2 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 cup heavy cream/whipping cream 1 teaspoon vanilla exract Sugar (to taste) Over the lowest simmer, melt chocolate and butter, gently stirring to combine. Once melted, transfer to a large mixing bowl. In a stand mixer or using a hand mixer, whip cream just until stiff. Add sugar and vanilla extract and continue to whip until desired texture is reached. If you choose to leave the whipped cream plain, it will be just as delicious, but consider using a better quality chocolate. Add half of the whipped cream to chocolate, and using a rubber spatula gently fold in the whipped cream until it starts to come together. Add remaining cream and fold until very few streaks remain. Scoop mousse into a dish or into individual ramekins or dessert bowls. Chill for at least 1-2 hours, or until mousse is set.

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living

past W I T H

T H E

Whether driven by law or by aesthetic preference, styles of yore inform present-day designs. by JE N N IFE R SPE RRY

Name a favorite New England destination—Boston, Portland, Watch Hill, Nantucket—and there’s one important common draw for residents and visitors alike: a pervasive sense of history. From city blocks to country roads, these locales are studded with architectural gems that represent a visual, even tangible slice of America’s past. Factors that go into maintaining the historical authenticity of buildings in these areas range from the sheer conscientiousness of homeowners who don’t want to disturb the flavor of the neighborhood to extremely rigid historic district commissions that provide the most legal protection for significant historical properties via planning and zoning boards and building permit functions. Today, thousands of cities and towns throughout the U.S. have some form of historic district zoning in place, ranging in size from a couple structures to a couple hundred. Nantucket, Massachusetts, is known for having one of the most rigorous historic districts in the country (see sidebar). Although each district has its own rules and regulations, most of which are modeled after standards established by the Department of the Interior, they all share a common purpose: first, to preserve significant historic structures, and second, to retain the marked personality, the enduring appeal of their collective neighborhoods. N E W E N G L A N D L I V I N G. T V

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ARCHITECT MICHAEL MCKINLEY DESIGNED THIS WATCH HILL, RHODE ISLAND, HOME AS "NOT A REPLICATION OF THE [ORIGINAL] 1886 HOUSE, BUT RATHER A HIGHLY ORCHESTRATED COMPOSITION OF THE BEST ELEMENTS OF THE WATCH HILL SHINGLE STYLE."

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JUDGE A BOOK BY ITS COVER Local historic districts concern themselves with home exteriors and in general do not govern interiors. For existing homes, preserving what’s in place is of primary importance. “If a piece of molding or window is in good shape and can be restored, it should be restored,” relates David Andreozzi, principal of Andreozzi Architects in Barrington, Rhode Island. If replacement is warranted, then the new should mimic the old to whatever extent possible in an effort to maintain the original character. Tobin Shulman, an architect at Siemasko + Verbridge who has worked extensively in Boston’s Beacon Hill elaborates: “Everywhere you see the building in a public way, up close and from a distance, is judged with the same level of scrutiny by the Beacon Hill Historic Commission.” He notes that “windows, siding, roofing, masonry, railings and stairs” all have to fall within the commission’s guidelines.

INTEGRITY VS. AUTHORIZED DECREE

KINDRA CLINEFF PHOTOGRAPHY

Not all historic districts are as strict as Nantucket and Beacon Hill. Architect Michael McKinley doesn’t do preservation, but he works extensively in historical conclaves like Watch Hill, Rhode Island, and Stonington, Connecticut, where, he says, he “comes up against the forces of history.” For “Surfside,” a recent project in Watch Hill, the original 19th-century home had to be gutted but historical integrity was present in all aspects of the rebuild. “The renovated home is not a replication of the 1886 house, but rather it is a highly orchestrated composition of the best elements of the Watch Hill Shingle Style,” explains McKinley. “We had the opportunity to collaborate with some of New England’s finest craftspeople who had learned the trades of woodworking and masonry from previous generations.”

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Surfside uses the materials of the old structure, the entry is in the same location and the front gable is very similar to the original one. According to McKinley, unlike synthetic siding, the red cedar shingling, has a “very expressive character … a real personality”. Eventually, Surfside will turn a silvery gray, like other houses in the vicinity. “Modern architecture has not played a role in Watch Hill yet,” says McKinley. “Our clients don’t want [their houses] to stand out as an image breaker.”

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JEFFREY ALLEN PHOTOGRAPHY

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NEW CONSTRUCTION A variety of factors can influence new construction in a historic district, from setbacks to height limits to footprint caps based on lot size. Even in a luxury real estate market like Nantucket, house size is capped by these regulations, regardless of budget.

McKinley says that Surfside’s 50 or so windows “represent the entire Marvin catalogue.” He has high praise for the people at Marvin as well as for the variety of high-end windows readily available, including awning, double-hung and arch windows. “Marvin takes a lot of pride technically and is so in tune with its design intentions.” In comparison, adds McKinley, “a more modern beach house might have three or four window types and doesn’t speak to the history nearly as directly.” Building materials that would have been readily available to craftsmen in the past, such as local hard woods, stone, brick and slate, are commonly approved materials. Some engineered products, such as fiberglass roof shingles or aluminum-clad simulated divided lite windows, are possible in less rigorous zones. Overall, the new does not have to replicate the old exactly but should be compatible in terms of site placement, height, massing, proportion, scale, materials and architectural characteristics, such as ornamentation and fenestration. In fact, preservation activists prefer that designers do not try and carefully replicate history as this creates a “Disneyland effect,” notes Andreozzi, whereby it’s hard to tell period from replica.

HOMEOWNERSHIP Owning a home in a historic district is a double-edged sword. On the plus side, a district’s regulations ensure a neighborhood’s cohesive look, maintaining that classic charm that keeps property values high. On the down side, these same regulations can restrict common home improvements, such as a new porch, driveway or addition, and make certain exterior alterations cost more due to high material and architectural standards. “When you decide to live in a historic district, you’re committing to abiding by a governing body telling you what you can and cannot do with your home,” explains Andreozzi. “At first, all of the rules can be intimidating, but in reality, it’s an amazingly strong benefit to guarantee that someone isn’t going to come in and negatively impact a neighborhood’s look with a poorly designed project.” NEL N E W E N G L A N D L I V I N G. T V

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JEFFREY ALLEN PHOTOGRAPHY

Windows are a vital consideration to the overall look of a new-old home, and the ultimate historic window is single pane with true divided lites. In fact, industry leader Marvin Windows and Doors recently released a “Nantucket Window” to meet the aesthetic and performance needs of communities requiring historically accurate replication. It features 5/8-inch divided lites and a narrow muntin profile, not to mention a deeply profiled muntin bar inside and a simulated putty profile outside.

NANTUCKET Nantucket, Massachusetts, is known for having one of the most rigorous historic districts in the country. In December 1966, its historic downtown and village of Siasconset were listed on the National Register of Historic Places and, in 1975, this designation was broadened to include the whole island. However, Nantucket’s local historic district has been active since 1955, making it one of the country’s earliest to be formed. Throughout the island’s 30,000-plus acres, an application to and subsequent approval by Nantucket’s Historic District Commission (HDC) are required for the following exterior changes: re-roofing, arbors, window placements, retaining walls, hardscaping/paving, changing colors, decks and new construction. “Nothing on-island can be constructed or altered without the commission’s written approval,” says Stephen Theroux, a principal and designer with Nantucket Architecture Group. “The HDC guidebook, Building with Nantucket in Mind, was introduced in the late 1970s and describes in depth how to alter, add on to or construct buildings. It addresses everything from shape and massing to colors and materials, in both town and rural settings. “And even when a design is approved, any subsequent changes must also receive approval,” he continues, adding that other town departments like the conservation commission can further complicate a home’s ultimate design. In strict districts like Nantucket, even exterior paint colors are part of the review process. “On-island we have a limited palette of only 11 approved color choices for shutters, doors, trims and sashes,” notes Theroux.

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Architect Kevin Latady, a board member of the Historic Commission in Lexington, Massachusetts, shared these guidelines taken from a much larger set of town-specific regulations. KNOW YOUR BUILDING What is meant by “appropriateness?� Every building has architectural features, or characteristics that make it look the way it does. Every building has walls, windows, a roof, and at least one door. The size, shape, materials and color of each of these elements help to define the style of the particular building. Appropriate changes or additions acknowledge and are sympathetic to the style of the original building and to the neighborhood of the building.

PETER VANDERWALKER PHOTOGRAPHY

Say, for example, that you are the owner of a Cape-style house. It probably has a simple gable roof, is one story in height and has double-hung windows with a 6/6 windowpane configuration. It is covered in either shingles or narrow clapboards. An appropriate addition would repeat or play off of these architectural features. The addition would probably be one story in height with a similar roofline and eave line, have similar windows and be covered in similar materials. But proposing to add a two-story addition with tall, narrow windows and elaborate trim details would not be appropriate for your Cape, even though it would be acceptable for a Victorian-style house.

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MATERIALS

Natural materials, such as wood, glass, brick and stone are the preferred building materials in the HDC. These are the materials historically used in construction, and it is appropriate to use the same materials when building, renovating or expanding. Synthetic materials, such as vinyl or plastic and usually aluminum, are generally not appropriate. These materials frequently try to imitate natural materials but usually with limited success. Synthetic materials often look “fake” or “cheap” because they do not have all the same properties as the original material and cannot be detailed in the same way. Synthetic, substitute or imitation materials are often described as “no maintenance.” Unfortunately, this means that the materials cannot be maintained. When the vinyl windows or aluminum siding or plastic signs fade, chip, dent, scratch or crack, they cannot be repaired, repainted or repointed. They can only be replaced. Synthetic materials do not age gracefully. They are disposable, most with a relatively short life expectancy when compared to the natural materials they hope to replace. Vinyl, aluminum and plastic are better suited to construction that is completely rebuilt every 20 years or so. But the architectural fabric of the historic districts should be woven of wood, brick, stone and similar materials that will last generations when properly maintained.

SIZE

The size and scale of a proposed addition in relation to that of the existing and neighboring buildings will be evaluated. Additions or new construction should not overpower the original structures. The following features should match or harmonize with the existing building and the neighborhood:

KINDRA CLINEFF PHOTOGRAPHY

Eave Lines - Eave lines should align with the original house. An inappropriate proposal would attach a two-story addition to a onestory house.

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Building Width, Depth and Height (referred to as “Massing”) - A proper addition is not overwhelming. Its width, height and depth are similar in scale to the original structure. An inappropriate addition would be taller and wider than the original building. Roof Configuration - A roof is one of a building’s most prominent features and a key element in defining its style. Roof types include gable, hipped, mansard, shed and flat. Sloped roofs may have a shallow or steep pitch and a deep overhang or none. The rafter tails on sloped roofs may be exposed or they may be enclosed in a soffit. Proposed additions should match or harmonize with the roof style and details of the existing building.

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TMS ARCHITECTS/ROB KAROSIS PHOTOGRAPHY

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curb R E V E A L

TMS ARCHITECTS/ROB KAROSIS PHOTOGRAPHY

Putting a home’s best face forward begins at the early stages of design.

by REBECCA MAYER KNUTSEN

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A home’s allure is as much about scale and proportion as it is about the little touches such as a cobblestone pathway lined with blooming perennials or a crisp new American flag swaying on a mahogany flagpole. Architects and designers follow a few basic principles to boost a home’s street-side presentation, regardless of personal preferences and style. Appropriate scale and proportion, including properly situating the structure on the lot, and selective use of quality exterior materials will not only elicit oohs and ahs from passersby but also give the homeowner a sense of pride and satisfaction every time she or he pulls into the driveway.

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TMS ARCHITECTS/ROB KAROSIS PHOTOGRAPHY

TMS ARCHITECTS/ROB KAROSIS PHOTOGRAPHY

veryone knows how important curb appeal is when trying to sell a home, but a pleasing façade and landscaping are equally integral to enjoying the house while you’re living in it.

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HOME

PHOTO: PAUL CROSBY

FEATURE

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STREET-SIDE SENSATION Before mapping out a plan for a new home or renovating an existing home, architect Andrew Reck of Oak Hill Architects in Weston, Massachusetts, surveys the site to determine the home’s approach. “It’s critical that a home’s scale is fitting, seems inviting and relates well to surrounding buildings,” he says. Patrick Ahearn, owner of Patrick Ahearn Architect in Boston and Edgartown, Massachusetts, agrees that a home’s appeal begins with scale, alluding to what he calls “the greater good theory.” With a nod to the McMansion phenomenon of the early 2000s, Ahearn stresses the importance of respecting the scale of other homes in an existing neighborhood while considering how the house’s orientation will affect its appearance. Proportion comes into play when selecting the size of prominent features, including windows and doorways. “Windows are one of the most defining characteristics of a house and its curb appeal,” observes Timothy M. Giguere, project architect and technology manager at TMS Architects in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Quality windows can enhance interior light patterns and maximize the view while meeting the proportional needs from an exterior perspective. Marvin Windows’ eye-catching exterior clad window sashes allow homeowners to sit back and enjoy the view from wood-trimmed interior windows. “With clad sashes on the exterior only, the look isn’t compromised but the client benefits from better performance and deferred maintenance,” Reck says. Giguere enjoys Marvin’s extensive product line, often settling on different colors for the window sashes and trim for a unique look. A favored combination is a cranberry sash, sage trim and taupe shingles. “The colors add depth and play off each other, making the window more of an architectural element,” he explains. At Birdseye Design in Richmond, Vermont, architect Jeff McBride’s clients are in the market for aesthetically pleasing customizable windows that stand up to climate demands. In Vermont, he says, “the landscape dictates much of the work we do, and the climate requires that we’re always paying attention.” PHOTO: PAUL CROSBY

Battling cold, ice and snow in the winter months, and humidity in the summer, New England has its challenges. “Materials must pass durability standards first and foremost,” McBride says. As for materials that stand the test of time, he lists cedar and Corten steel right up there with Marvin Windows.

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HOME

TMS ARCHITECTS/ROB KAROSIS PHOTOGRAPHY

FEATURE

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FAÇADE FACTORS A welcoming approach to a well-maintained home is sure to grab the attention of all who pass by, particularly those with an invitation to enter. A prominent entry, whether formal or informal, is one way to warmly greet guests. “The main entrance should feel welcoming,” Reck adds. “We add features to highlight the entry so there’s no confusion on how to enter the home.” Ahearn suggests adding a gate or arbor that sets up the shift from the public to the private realm, ushering guests to the main attraction. Other elements worth the investment, in Ahearn’s opinion, are stone and brick veneer foundations, wood and slate shingles, blue stone steps, copper flashing and wood gutters. “Everything you touch, feel and see should be selected to enhance the home’s curb appeal,” he says.

New England residences are often built to celebrate and reflect their surroundings. “Homes in Vermont are turned and rotated depending on the topography and layout of the property,” McBride shares. “The landscape is always present so our buildings need to fit in instead of interfering with the area.”

JEFF THIEBAUTH PHOTOGRAPHY

TMS ARCHITECTS/ROB KAROSIS PHOTOGRAPHY

A WORK OF ART

As such, architects at Birdseye Design emphasize the connection of a house to its landscape, whether that’s opening the house to a river, mountain or lake view. “We design house concepts that celebrate the landscape in a unique way,” McBride says. Giguere encourages clients to visualize how the texture of the space, the color of materials, and the types of patterns being created will vary throughout the year. “Architecture is a piece of art that is seen during different seasons and at different times of day,” he shares. “It can be inviting in the spring but cold in the winter depending on the color palette and materials used.” Tying all of a home’s elements together into one cohesive vision is perhaps one of the biggest challenges. “Sometimes that means letting a few things go, no matter how much you want them,” Giguere mentions. “Less is definitely more when it comes to a home’s features. A trained eye can help steer clients in the right direction.” NEL

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Join Parker Kelley in discovering the best of New England Living!

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JIM WESTPHALEN

Lake Champlain house designed by architect Brian Mac of Birdseye Design. 3-D model of the house, opposite page.

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M O D E L H O M E S INTERVIEWS BY ROB DUCA

At the Marvin Experience Center at 7 Tide, six 3-D models of actual homes are prominently displayed. They were selected from submissions to the Marvin Windows-sponsored annual Architects Challenge. “These homes are meant to stimulate conversation and to inspire people to think about what they like,” says Barbara Bradlee, a brand consultant for the Marvin Experience Center. “With Marvin products, you can design anything in size and scale, from contemporary and traditional to a ski house or a coastal home.” We asked each of the architects represented to discuss their design approach, what inspires them

JIM WESTPHALEN

and what it means to be included in the Marvin Experience Center.

All 3-D models were designed and created by David Munson (munson3d.com).

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TMS ARCHITECTS/ROB KAROSIS PHOTOGRAPHY

Home Location: Hampton, New Hampshire

JUSTIN K NOWLTON TM S AR CH ITECTS, P O R T S M O U T H , N E W H A M P S HIR E

M uch of my inspiration comes from client feedback.

Sometimes a client will have a vision, but they’re not able to put it on paper, so I take the words and descriptions and bring that vision to life. We were looking at rigid lines on this house, with a Gambrel shape. I wanted to soften up the exterior, so I installed circular and arched windows to break up the hard lines. The property is on the ocean, and I wanted to reflect the environment. There are many different things you can do with windows. There are different grill patterns and ways to operate the window that create a different aesthetic. We used a heavier grill pattern to give the house more of a coastal New England feeling that we felt was appropriate for the location. It’s a unique honor to be selected for this gallery. We take a lot of pride in our work, so it’s pretty cool to see it on display. Having our name on a project like this has definitely given us recognition and has been a huge help to our business.

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JIM WESTPHALEN

JIM WESTPHALEN

TMS ARCHITECTS/ROB KAROSIS PHOTOGRAPHY

Home Location: Northern Vermont

BRIAN MAC B IRDSEYE D ESI GN, R IC HM O ND , V E R M O N T

T he house is sited on Lake Champlain,

so we were going for big views out to the lake and north up to Burlington. That led us to choosing a combination of awning and casement windows. We were looking for the largest glass we could find within the budget and for windows that did not require maintenance and could withstand Vermont’s changing seasons. Compositionally, we grouped the windows at corners to gain as many views as possible. With most of our projects, we attempt to connect to the outside by integrating into the landscape as much as possible. Therefore, the choice of window is critical both in terms of visibility and the thermal relationship to the interior and exterior. Our clients are generally looking for us to provide them with something unique and artistic. They’re not concerned about the window itself, but about the overall effect it will create. There is a strong connection between the performance of the window and the composition as to how it relates to the overall architectural aesthetic. Being part of the Marvin tradition and family is important. I like the idea that it’s a family-run business. I feel honored to be selected for this showroom.

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ERIC ROTH PHOTOGRAPHY

Home Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts

GARY WOLF WO LF AR CH ITECTS , IN C . , B O S T O N , M A S S A C H U S E T T S

M

y starting points for a project might be related to a feature or quality of the site, a characteristic of

the homeowner, an unusual element or a client’s specific request. Ideally, all of these factors interact to generate the initial inspiration. For the project that we called the “Sustainable Urban Villa,” we selected a combination of fixed and operable windows, choosing them for function, based on the views and the sunlight, and for the look. That gave us the opportunity for a customized pattern of muntin bars that sub-divide the windows into stacks of horizontal lights and panes. Marvin’s Ultimate Sliders afford the greatest sense of opening without intruding into or out of the room the way a casement window would. We also used awning windows at the stairs and in a bathroom for ventilation. When you’re connecting the inside to the outside, the types of dividers in the windows, especially the mullions and frame sash that separate each window, is important. For example, the horizontal sash bar in a double-hung window often ends up at eye level, obstructing your view to the outside. It’s gratifying to have this house selected for display because it is a very individualized residence that was designed to specific conditions and to the goals and personalities of the homeowners. The fact that no one was thinking of such recognition makes it all the more special.

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Home Location: Sunapee, New Hampshire

DUE NE CO WA N COWAN G O U D REAU AR CH ITECTS , C O N C O R D , N E W H A M P S HIR E

I am inspired by architecture and my life experiences.

Architects tend to notice specific things like ceiling heights, materials, textures, colors, the way the sun comes through a window. When I meet with clients, I listen to their lifestyle and what they want, and I associate what I’m hearing with my own life experiences. If I don’t have a certain expectation for a project, I go looking for it in magazines, television—all the imagery that we’re exposed to. But all of that flows through the filter of my experience. Some clients are very strong-willed and have a good idea of what they want. I like to be able to say to a client, ‘How about trying this, because I think it meets what you’re saying.’ It’s their house, so I’m going to do what they want, but they’re paying me to find the best solutions. This lake house is the homeowner’s retreat, so they wanted something comfortable and casual. To me, a lake house is all about comfort, with the stone, the wood, the shingles, the heavy timber, the fireplace. With the double-hung windows we did grill work on the upper sashes to allow more depth and detail. I like designing custom-shaped or custom grills, and Marvin does that without any problem. I like to gang windows together, so you have two singles and a triple as the centerpiece to provide balance. It’s humbling to be chosen for this gallery. Only six architects across New England were selected, so I’m very lucky. It tells me I’m going in the right direction. Home Location: Sunapee, New Hampshire N E W E N G L A N D L I V I N G. T V

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Home Location: Boothbay, Maine

RICHARD MANZO, ROBERT KNIGHT KN I G HT A S S O C I ATES , A R C H ITECTS , I N C ., B L U E H I L L , M A I N E

T

he home is overlooking Barters Island and Sheepscot Bay, so in order to take advantage of the views we added a gabled end on the water side that gave us the opportunity to place lots of windows. We wanted it to look like a coastal farmhouse, so that influenced our choice of window styles. We wanted light coming in from everywhere. It’s a very simply designed house that looks like it has always been there. We used mostly casement windows, which were factory painted and energy efficient. There are approximately 70 windows in the house, so it was important to use quality windows that would meet the energy codes. That’s why we choose Marvin. Clients usually come to us with ideas and we send them back to come up with a list of things they think they really need. We then look at the site and help them determine what is best for the surroundings. We try to blend in rather than make a statement. We try to respond to the surroundings to make homes look timeless. We didn’t get too exotic with this house. It’s a Shaker-style farmhouse with a cottage feel. We had very talented people who took our design concepts and brought them to life. For this home to be selected is really a success story for lots of people.

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Home Location: Guilford, Connecticut

R O B E R T T. C O O L ID G E BRANFORD, CONNECTICUT

T

he house is on the shoreline, not directly waterfront, but up a hill with a view over a cove, so designing it was all about the view. The entire house is lined up for great views of the water.

For a traditional Shingle Style home like this, we used mostly double-hung windows, except for in the bedrooms, where building codes make it difficult to do that because you have to meet the code for egress. So we went with some Marvin casement windows that have wide muntin bars to make them look like double-hung windows. We needed to do that in at least one bedroom for egress. There are also casements in the living room that open 100 percent to provide great views and quite a bit of fresh air. To some extent an architect is like an actor in that we play a different person every time we take on a role. I have to take on the personality of my client. I draw lots of inspiration from the site, but much of it also comes from the client. The style of the house and the site has a lot to do with choosing window styles. Double-hung windows seem too traditional in a modern house, while casement windows can look wrong in a Shingle Style. I’m always trying to weave all the various elements into a cohesive whole. I’ve had a great relationship with Marvin over a period of decades, so it’s nice to receive this recognition. I’m really proud of this house. It’s one of the best projects I’ve done. NEL N E W E N G L A N D L I V I N G. T V

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FROZEN

STYLE ASSETSFILES

the WHITE on WHITE bathroom trend: 3 ways to get inspired

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Crisp, pure and clean, a white-on-white palette can have an extremely powerful effect on the mind, clearing visual and mental clutter and paving the way to total relaxation. From tile to fixtures to vanities and accessories, a room drenched in white is calm and peaceful, whether it’s steeped in tradition or sleekly modern. No matter the size of your bathroom, white palettes invite in light for a blissful, spa-like atmosphere.

A Traditional Take on the White Bathroom This relaxing beach-house retreat blends a palette’s worth of white

shades for a casual, tropical vibe that’s just right for relaxing. A marble floor feels cool on sun-warmed toes, and extends up the wall for a clean look with visual texture. Add spa-like luxury with a freestanding tub and programmable, personalized shower, and you can skip the day spa in favor of your own perfectly private space.

TIPS FOR A TRADITIONAL WHITE BATH • Bronze faucets add warmth and softness to the vanity and crown molding’s strong Craftsman-style details. • A room with several shades of white captures and reflects light in a unique way. Bright and refreshing in daylight, it glows with warmth at dusk. • Rinse off the sand under a rainhead, body sprays or a handshower, all controlled by a shower system you can program exactly to your liking.

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STYLE FILES

the WHITE on WHITE bathroom trend: 3 ways to get inspired

COLORS TO COVET GO GREEN IN 2017

By Marina Davalos

The Pantone Color of the Year is Greenery. Just saying the name evokes images of spring, the outdoors and new beginnings. Indeed, this verdant shade was selected for its implications in bringing forth feelings of promise, hope and renewal, according to Leatrice Eiseman, executive director at the Pantone Color Institute. Eiseman is none other than the woman in charge of choosing the color of the year.

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How is the color of the year chosen? “We look at lots of indicators,” says Eiseman. “We’re at tradeshows worldwide, and we look at what we think are ascending colors.” These are what color forecasting groups look for in terms of what’s hot. “The fashion industry is always a big indicator,” Eiseman adds, noting that greens have been growing in popularity over the last year. Other indicators are signage, brand image, even stage lighting, in industries such as arts and entertainment. “We look for the symbolic meaning of color, and the fact that Greenery has been on the rise indicates a general feeling of ‘going green,’ or nature, or that of ‘fresh.’” Judith van Vliet of the Color Marketing Group (CMG) agrees. “CMG’s collaborative color tribe had predicated and announced at the 2015 San Diego International Summit how important green would be for 2017, so we were not surprised by Greenery,” she says. Based in Alexandria, Virginia, CMG is a nonprofit color forecasting association that focuses on color trends in four global areas: North America, Europe, Asia and Latin America. According to CMG’s executive director, Sharon Griffis,

The shades of green in nature influence designer Nina Farmer's choices of interior colors.

CMG holds color forecasting events throughout the year in global locations. Participants from all industries discuss color trends and influences and how these will impact color directions. The results from these events are curated by CMG members to form CMG’s World Color Forecast™ which is revealed annually at the International Summit. The World Color Forecast™ comprises 16 colors from each region that CGM members believe will trend two years out. So what does all this mean for interior design in New England? That, according to Nina Farmer of Bostonbased Nina Farmer Interiors, ultimately comes down to the client’s own personal taste. “It’s always interesting to me to see where color choices are going. But ultimately, it’s up to my client what they want to surround themselves with.” She adds that her Boston clients are more apt to decorate with classic colors than the “hottest new thing.” With many greens such as emerald and hunter green being on the “classic” side, Farmer can see Greenery being used as an uplifting accent color. Connecticut-based interior designer Lynn Morgan of Lynn Morgan Design echoes Farmer’s sentiments. “It can be a great accent color to those classic greens and blues,” she says. She’s enthusiastic about Pantone’s choice of Greenery. “It’s fresh and new, and it speaks to everyone, whether it be about being outdoors, Nina Farmer Interiors used the vivid green from the map for the trim and door in a child's bedroom.

gardening or ‘going green.’” Color of the year or not, Morgan says that she happens to like Greenery, and has used it often in creating styles with splashes of color, pairing it with blues, whites and creams. “We look to the symbolic meaning of color,” Pantone’s Eiseman says. “Greenery, again, is symbolic of nature. It’s fresh, it’s being outdoors at a park. If a person can’t get out too often, for instance, they can bring Greenery into the home.” Splashes of color add a touch of brightness and inspiration for 2017. “Green stands for a refreshing new start,” concurs CMG’s van Vliet. “Maybe we have finally arrived to this tipping point and real change is at the horizon.” NEL

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D E S I G N E R

S P O T L I G H T

Transformation

– 2015 –

NE REGIONAL

Best of Best Kitchens

PHOTO BY GREG PREMRU

is defined as a thorough or dramatic change in form or appearance

Let there be light...

BEFORE

Transformation is what makes this kitchen innovative. Where there once was dark-wood cabinetry, now there are aluminum cabinets in a lightfilled room. Where there once was a congested cooking and prep space, now there is a wide-open interior landscape.

Rosemary Porto Senior Designer & Sales Manager 135 Newbury Street, Boston, MA 02116 617-236-5253 ext. 13 rosemary.porto@poggenpohl.com www.poggenpohl.com

Poggenpohl senior designer Rosemary Porto created a timeless contemporary kitchen that enhances both her client’s cooking experience and fulfills her desire to entertain there. A center island of Calcutta marble provides seating for up to six people as well abundant space for cleanup and serving. All of the client’s and designer’s goals were achieved within the existing footprint, transforming a dated traditional kitchen into a state-of-the-art center for cooking, dining and entertaining. Sub-Zero and Wolf appliances make this dream kitchen come to life!

Find all the latest trends on Houzz http://www.houzz.com/pro/poggenpohlboston/poggenpohl-boston

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B y Rob Duca

THE IQ OF

SMART HO MES JUST KEEPS RISING

Save money. Reduce stress. Increase your sense of security. Keep a watchful eye on the kids. And impress your friends at the same time!

Smart homes are becoming increasingly more popular as costs dip and applications expand, allowing homeowners to have remote control access over everything from climate, lights and music to security cameras and so-called “nanny cams.”

safety, and soothing music can be playing, brightening your mood after a stressful day at the office. Using your smart phone, your house can be illuminated from your car as you pull into the driveway. You can even set your oven to preheat on the drive home.

Thanks to advances in technology, a smart home can be controlled at the touch of a finger, without paying through the nose. Although there are certainly many extravagant home control systems that only the one-percenters can afford, options also exist for middleclass Americans who can wire their house without dipping into their children’s college education fund.

With home automation, you don’t need to worry if you turned off the lights, armed the security system or locked the doors. You can check that on your smart phone.

“There are consumer products now with companies like Nest that are providing some nice solutions for entry- to mid-levels home, which the consumer can install on their own,” says Nick Mark, president of DC Home Systems in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. “You move into more professional grade solutions in homes when they are bigger and more sophisticated.” With smart homes, homeowners are able to control electronic devices and appliances from wherever they happen to be, which means they can arrive home on a frigid winter night to a warm house, or have the air conditioning already humming during a summer heat wave. The lights can also be switched on, enhancing N E W E N G L A N D L I V I N G. T V

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The ELAN g! app offers mobile device access to home automation via your iPad, iPhone or iPod touch as well as Android smartphones and tablets. “There are also doorknob locks where you put your palm on the face of the lock when you leave the house and it locks the door, turns off all the lights and backs off the thermostats,” Mark says. One of the few things a smart home can’t do is pour that first glass of wine. But it can provide peace of mind with security cameras that monitor your property when you’re away and can be viewed on your smart phone. That peace of mind is priceless. Footage from surveillance cameras can be saved for future viewing by combining them with a digital video recorder. Many parents enjoy the fact that surveillance systems can function as “nanny cams” or to make sure their children arrive home at the expected time.

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HOME

TECHNOLOGY

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If you’re looking to save money, smart homes have that covered. They can slice 20 percent off your yearly electric bill and another 15 percent on heating and cooling costs with a climate control system. “A typical home might have standard toggle switches where all lights come on at 100 percent, but a lighting control system can be programmed to turn certain lights on to 50 percent, some 75 percent and others 25 percent, depending on the specific light output needed from each light source. This not only provides energy savings but also increases lamp life,” says Greg DellaCorte, owner of Davco Custom Integration in Norwalk, Connecticut. A fully automated home features a centrally wired system with a “main brain” that connects to the internet and controls audio systems, televisions, surveillance, climate, lighting, shades and irrigation through the use of a smart phone, an iPad or with a universal remote control. It also teams up with a music server so you can listen to your favorite tunes throughout the house. “The music can be set to stream for each person, so there might be mom’s music, dad’s music or little Johnny’s music that can follow each person as they move throughout the house,” Mark says. Speakers are discreetly placed in ceilings or walls to blend into the home’s décor. A surround sound system that includes speakers, woofers, flat screen televisions and a screen projector transforms a family room into a home theater. Equipment can be hidden in cabinetry, while flat screens can be covered by mirrors or artwork. Underwater speakers can even be installed in a swimming pool. “The fun comes in the power of the integration and the imaginations of those involved,” DellaCorte says. “With one push of a button, lights can react, shades can move, music can play, temperatures can be adjusted, TV’s can tune into favorite programs. The home theater is one of the best places to witness this type of event where the curtains open, the screen drops, the projector turns on, the lights dim, the surround system comes to life all as you recline in your easy chair.” Home automation by ELAN g! allows mobile access to important systems via iDevices like iPad and smartphones, making it simple to control your AV system, lighting, climate, security system and more.

It is less expensive to fully automate a home during the building process because it can be pre-wired without the need to damage walls. However, homes with attics and unfinished basements can be retrofitted for full control systems without extensive labor costs. And any home can easily be wired for music, lighting and climate control. Installation requires approximately one month for a full automation system, depending on the size of the house. Homeowners are not required to purchase a service plan, although there are one-time fees for some smart phone applications. Warranties for parts and labor are generally one year. “Smart homes are less about being cool and more about adding convenience and comfort,” Mark says. “Before you go to bed at night you can hit a button that arms the security, closes the drapes and locks the doors. Yes, that’s cool, but it’s also a calming thing to know that everything is done for you.” NEL

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HOME

TECHNOLOGY

OU) Y D N S (A R E N UT G O I H S T E I D E W V I L T CAN’ EBE BY R

CCA

R M AY E

KNU

TSEN

oday’s interior designers rely on an arsenal of mobile applications to dial up inspiration, save precious time and keep pace with tech-savvy clients. Homeowners staring down a one-room remodel or a whole house affair can take a cue from the experts and arm themselves with a few apps to power the design process. With nearly as many apps as there are accessories for a side table, sifting through their various functions can be a full-time job. Staying on top of the latest design apps—and conquering the old standbys—is essential to today’s interior design business. “High-tech solutions are expected by today’s clientele,” observes Andee Schell of AMS Designs in Greenwich, Conn. “Millennials in particular are so technologically advanced that we have to keep up or risk losing them to their own devices.” When scouting a new app, Angela Hamwey, CEO and founder of MacKenzie & Company in Hyannis, wants the whole package wrapped up in a user-friendly interface. “It’s like finding the perfect guy,” she muses. “I want an app that brings all of the elements together: style, intelligence, good looks and support.” Apps range from the commonly used Pinterest and Instagram to those that are much more specific to home design. Though the mix of favored apps varies based on each firm’s needs, the two designers share how five diverse apps complement their business goals and free up time to focus on fabrics and finish hardware. Armchair designers will like these too.

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PINTEREST The app for the social bookmarking site allows users to hunt down and save style inspiration and product ideas onto boards organized by room, style, color, texture and more. Pinterest is an indispensable resource for Hamwey, both for promoting the business and pulling together private design boards for clients. “Back in the day I was a huge collage girl, so Pinterest speaks to me,” Hamwey says. “The app allows me to develop a great background of ideas to pull inspiration from.”

I N S TA G R A M The photo-sharing app is an inspiration warehouse, with endless streams of photos and videos to connect designers with ideas from all over the world. “I follow accounts for event planners, florists and food stylists, gathering ideas from the colors, textures and combinations they use,” Hamwey explains. “If I’m designing a bohemian-style room, then I find myself looking at flowing flowers and dreamy wallpaper.”

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Through this virtual marketplace, designers have access to the world’s most beautiful art, collectibles, furniture and more, without scouring antique shops and yard sales. “I can always find just the right object to show a client what we’re working toward,” Schell says. From an enormous selection of individual objects to curated collections searchable by style, the app is a designer’s dream.

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HOME

TECHNOLOGY Honorable Mentions: ColorSnap Visualizer: the Sherman-Williams app allows users to capture color inspiration on the go, making the dreaded color selection process a little bit easier.

Houzz Interior Design Ideas: a handy tool for improving and designing your home, the app offers furnishings and accessories for sale, photo inspiration and direct connections to designers, landscapers and contractors.

K R AV E T 3 D S P A C E S H O M E D E S I G N P L A N N I N G

liketoknow.it.home: the

The home design and room layout app allows users to upload a photo of a specific room or select from sample room images. To settle on design ideas, users can move furniture around the room and play with any number of fabrics and color schemes. Designs can be easily saved and shared via email. Schell uses the showroom app regularly and generally finds it produces a useful room layout, but it’s still not entirely what she needs. “I would like something softer and more realistic looking for the presentation part of my business,” she says.

app, which is integrated with Instagram, connects users with sourcing information when browsing the social media platform for style inspiration.

MagicPlan: the floor plan app measures rooms, draws up dimensions and produces cost estimates with the snap of a photo.

One Kings Lane: the shopping app bills itself as the home’s leading online destination for furniture and home accessories to dress your home.

Zillow Digs: a hub for home ideas, the app assists users with cost estimates, paint selection and product details.

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F. S C H U M AC H E R 2 4 / 7 With similar functionality to the company’s website, the app allows users to search fabric patterns and motifs, filtering along the way to narrow by style, color and textile type. In addition to gathering inspiration for clients, trade members have special access to pricing information and ordering capabilities.

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Rob Karosis Photography

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r e s id e ntial co mme r cial inte r io r d e s ig n

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LIVING THE LIFE

A couple walks through Cellardoor Winery's vineyard during an event at the 64-acre property. Details about upcoming Cellardoor Winery events in Lincolnville and Portland, Maine, can be viewed at mainewine.com/events.

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A FIDELITY ALUM FOLLOWS HER BLISS AT MAINE’S CELLARDOOR WINERY.

Photography by

5 I V EL E A F PH OTO G R A PH Y

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LIVING THE LIFE

The view from the vineyard of Cellardoor Winery's restored farmhouse and tasting room in Lincolnville, Maine.

I

n Early mornings capped off by late nights. Portfolio reviews and analyses. Stock assessments. Market fluctuations. Client meetings. High stakes. High pressure. Big rewards.

This was Bettina Doulton’s world: a 21-year career at Fidelity Investments in Boston that culminated in a power position as a mutual fund manager. Doulton was a go-to “fixer” for underperforming funds, a whiz at analyzing business models for gross margins. She loved the work, even with all its inherent stress and long hours, had an apartment in Boston and a summerhouse in Marion, Massachusetts. Her life looked good on paper but, more importantly, it felt good too. Then, in 2006, Doulton was diagnosed with breast cancer. She describes the ordeal succinctly as “a kick in the pants.” During treatment, she slowed down a little, reflected on her goals and in turn made a momentous decision. “I adored my whole experience at Fidelity; it was a wonderful part of my life, but I had always wanted to learn how to run a small business,” she explains. “After finishing treatment in 2007, I decided it was time to jump.”

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Bettina Doultan peers out from behind a patch of sunflowers on Cellardoor Winery's property.

A vetting of potential business purchases ensued, and when a friend told her about a winery for sale, Doulton decided it was worth a look. Immediately, on her first visit, she fell in love with the Lincolnville property, situated on Maine’s mid-coast near the Camden Hills. She was particularly charmed by the circa 1790 barn that was its centerpiece. One visit to Cellardoor Winery and it immediately felt like home. Ironically, after years spent analyzing businesses for their profit potential, Doulton suddenly found herself sitting on the other side of the desk, overseeing an enterprise all her own. “To be clear, I had no business buying a winery,” she says, laughing. “I called my mother in Florida to tell her that I had bought a 68-acre farm in Maine, and you could hear a pin drop,” she adds. After taking the helm at Cellardoor, Doulton embarked on what she calls a 10-year learning curve. “As a portfolio manager, I never dealt with machinery breaking down or calling in payroll; suddenly, the

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tables were turned,” she explains. Her initial naivety notwithstanding, Doulton forged full steam ahead, applying her business acumen and general can-do attitude to every aspect of her new endeavor. As the farm’s fourth owner in a century, she tread lightly in some areas, keeping the winery’s name (“It has a good heart to it,” she says) and preserving its logo, whose origin is rather unique. Back in the early 1900s, a wanderer searching for work carved the “H” symbol into one of the barn doors. It was a signal to fellow travelers that the farm was a safe haven, and Doulton has maintained this welcoming status by prioritizing visitors from the moment they arrive. “The first years were all about improving the wines and the customer experience,” she relates. Renovating the property’s farmhouse and barn while preserving their character came first. Now, enveloped by the barn’s warm, rustic ambience, visitors can pony up to its U-shaped tasting bar, peruse the gift shop or head outside to the new back deck where views to Levenseller Mountain and grape fields abound.

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A bottle of Cellardoor Cabernet Sauvignan sits on a table at the Mamma Mia-themed Grape Affair, July 2016.

PHOTO: EMILY QUALEY

LIVING THE LIFE

In an effort to enhance the existing wines and add more varietals, Doulton hired Maine native Aaron Peet as head winemaker in 2008. Along with his wife, Christina, Peet has evolved Cellardoor’s offerings into a well-rounded collection of small-batch wines ranging from light-bodied reds to aromatic whites to sparklings. Other enhancements included modernizing the winemaking facility via new equipment and an in-house lab. Doulton pushed Cellardoor one step further by replanting its five-and-a-half-acre vineyard in 2008. Cultivating hearty, cold-growth grapes such as Adalmiina and Marquette involved some trial and error, but after the first successful harvest in September 2012, two estate-grown vintages are now proud residents on the tasting list.

Dusk on Thompson's Point, home of Cellardoor at the Point.

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With 18-20 wines available for tasting and purchase, Cellardoor satisfies just about any preference. “We are a winery first and a vineyard second,” contends Doulton, who sources grapes from California, Washington and other locales as needed. “In fact, we have way too many wines for a winery our size,” she continues, “and that’s because we don’t want to just make what we like. We want to offer guests a broad spectrum of wines that appeals to their own palates.” NEW ENGLAND LIVING | 2017

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Friends celebrate a birthday in the dining room at Cellardoor at The Point, on Thompson's Point in Portland Maine.

THIS PAGE: EMILY QUALEY

Cellardoor’s most popular wines include Perfect Stranger, an off-dry white made from the Kayuga grape, sourced from the Finger Lakes, as well as Ned Said Red, a Bordeaux-style, medium-bodied red affectionately named after Edward “Ned” Johnson III, the former president and CEO of Fidelity Investments. Customers also enjoy Treasure, a dessert wine made from wild Maine blueberries and maple syrup. “When in Maine, you have to do something with blueberries,” quips Doulton.

A staff member pours a taste of wine during Cellardoor at The Point's Sunday food and wine pairings.

In May 2016, the Fidelity alum increased her brand’s reach by opening a second tasting room in the heart of Portland. The 5,800-square-foot facility includes a tasting bar, gift shop and 48-seat dining room for special events, such as cooking classes, winemaker dinners and wine and food pairings. “The move was designed to introduce our wines to a new and bigger market,” explains Doulton. “With pink suede chairs and crystal chandeliers, the Portland interior is very chic and different.” In fact, the only drawback to the expansion so far is the increased mileage on her car: Lincolnville and Portland are 90 miles apart. To date, the small business veteran also owns a construction company and sits on the board of a Baltimore investment firm. She still finds herself waking up and checking stocks first thing, but notes that Main Street economies occupy her thoughts most days.

A guest at a Cellardoor Pairings 101 class smells the wine to identify specific aromas before taking a bite of food.

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“Looking back at it now, 10 years later, I still say the whole thing sounds improbable. But the fact of the matter is that I’m thrilled I did it,” asserts Doulton. Always one to watch, it will be interesting to see what business opportunity—Main Street or otherwise—sparks her interest next. “I have one more big run in me I think,” she says. “I just don’t know what it is quite yet.” NEL For more information, visit mainewine.com.

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AT HOME

NE W ENGL AND

LIVIN P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y W A R R E N PAT T E R S O N

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D

ING: TV House envy is a feeling that comes over us when we flip through a glossy home design magazine or drive around a neighborhood of architectural gems. Don’t you just wish you could get inside one of these amazing places? Well, now you can!

The home's crowning glory, a widow’s walk takes advantage of the magnificent views of Chatham Harbor and Nantucket Sound. N E W E N G L A N D L I V I N G. T V

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AT HOME

Nautical touches to an upstairs gathering area include mahogany around the eyebrow window, custom-designed by Marvin, and ship's ladders that lead to the widow's walk.

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This spring welcomes a brand-new TV show, “New England Living,” to CBS affiliate WBZ TV Channel 4. The show, hosted by Parker Kelley, celebrates the art of living and entertaining in this very special region of the Northeast. Each of the show’s 13 half-hour episodes focuses on the things that matter most to us all—family, friends, good food and, of course, our home, a nexus of function, innovation and beautiful design. If you love home design shows and programs geared for the foodie, then this show is for you! In its debut season, the show visits Camden, Maine; Stowe, Vermont; Bristol, Rhode Island and 10 other quintessential New England destinations. One of the episodes will take you to Chatham, Massachusetts. Chatham has a gorgeous coastline and pristine beaches, as well as a Designed by architect Patrick Ahearn and built by Whitla Brothers Builders, the year-round home is broken down into a variety of components uniform in the gambrel style—from the primary residence to the carriage house.

rich shipbuilding and salt-making history. So much of the town’s past and present is connected to the sea, and the summertime in Chatham is bustling with activity. A majority of Chatham’s homes are summer residences, but about 6,000 people live here year round.

Open and airy like the rest of the home, the kitchen is one of several rooms boasting design touches by Heather McGrath of Simpler Pleasures.

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AT HOME

Crisp, pure and clean, a white-on-white palette can have an extremely powerful effect on the mind, clearing visual and mental clutter and paving the way to total relaxation. From tile to fixtures to vanities and accessories, a room drenched in white is calm and peaceful, whether it’s steeped in tradition or sleekly modern. No matter the size of your bathroom, white palettes invite in light for a blissful, spalike atmosphere.

After arriving in Chatham, show host Parker Kelley makes her way

house’s design and construction, but that’s just part of the story.

to meet longtime Chatham residents Gail and Steve Lowe. For

In each episode, a local chef comes into the home and cooks

this couple, life is all about family. They designed their home to be

up a delicious meal. One of Gail and Steve’s favorite Chatham

both a private sanctuary for the two of them in the winter months

restaurants is Pisces, and for this show the restaurant’s co-owners

and an inviting space for their whole family to visit in the summer.

and chefs, Susan Connors and Ann Feeley, put on a spectacular

The home, just like the couple, is warm, friendly and welcoming.

outdoor party for Gail and Steve Lowe and their guests.

The construction and architectural details are impeccable and the views magnificent.

Like this one, each episode of “New England Living” concludes with family and friends gathered together enjoying a fabulous meal.

Award-winning architect Patrick Ahearn and builder Doug Whitla

Conviviality is at the heart of how we live in New England. Tune in to

of Whitla Brothers Builders join the show to discuss details of the

share the good times. NEL

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SNEAK PEEKS Star chefs. TV personalities. Boating, cycling and horseback riding. Here are some fun highlights coming up on New England Living TV. [ Episode: Hingham, Massachusetts ] A masterfully rebuilt home that sits high on a hill with sweeping panoramic vistas of Hingham Bay, Boston Harbor Islands and the Boston skyline. Architect Brian Cavanaugh and the homeowners took great care in preserving the integrity of the home inside and out while also reworking the floor plan to improve functionality and take advantage of the light and views. Host Parker Kelley cooks with local chef Art D’Allesandro, walks the property with landscape architect Sean Papich and interviews artist Page Raillsback in her loft studio in Rockland. [ Episode: York, Maine ] The home of former “American Idol” judge Kara DioGuardi sits on 16 acres on the York River. DioGuardi, a singer/songwriter, record producer and music publisher, added paint, wallpaper and a good deal of art to this modernized farmhouse she and her husband, Mike, purchased two years ago. Host Parker Kelley visits one of the couple’s favorite restaurants, Earth, in nearby Kennebunkport, where she joins executive chef Justin Walker in harvesting vegetables for the evening’s meal.  [ Episode: Camden, Maine ] With the help of Phi Builders + Architects, Lani Stiles got just the cheery, open home she wanted for her and her young son. Stiles, who moved to Camden 14 years ago, owns Megunticook Market, where locals come for everything from cold cuts and sandwiches to fresh vegetables, wine and cheese. Host Parker Kelley and Lani, who also runs a catering business, make lobster lasagna and crab cakes in the beautiful turquoise kitchen. [ Episode: Bristol, Rhode Island ] Retaining this home’s original bungalow feel was paramount for architect David Andreozzi, who specializes in historically based residential architecture. The home is designed with a nautical influence because the owners are highly regarded sailors. Host Parker Kelley cooks porcini-crusted tenderloin with homeowner Maria’s friend, personal chef Kim Hersom. In the quintessential waterfront town of Bristol, Parker visits Colt State Park with the homeowners, where she takes a spin on an electric Pedago bike, from Pedago Rhode Island, one of the top 10 dealers in the world.

"New England Living" host Parker Kelley, standing at center above, joins in the fun of an outdoor party on the bluestone patio overlooking the ocean.

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[ Episode: Newtown, Connecticut ] Extensive stonework excavated from the property distinguishes this horse farm on 63 acres (35 wooded with horse trails) and its 1700s farmhouse, extensively renovated and added on to by P|H Architects for the firm’s co-founder, Peter Paulos. Host Parker Kelley makes Raviolo do Ouvo with chefs Romelio Pauta and Claudio Quezada of La Zingara restaurant in nearby Bethel, and goes for a horseback ride with the homeowner, Paulos’s wife, Summer, who is a professional equestrian, and the couple’s four children. [ Episode: Beacon Hill, Boston ] Siemasko + Verbridge took charge of the major renovation and interior design of this five-story, Federalstyle row house built in 1828 and originally designed by noted architect Asher Benjamin. In this magical neighborhood overlooking the Public Garden, host Parker Kelley joins the homeowner and friends for the Beacon Hill Holiday Stroll and tree lighting, followed by a spectacular prime rib dinner prepared at the home by Parker and Davio’s chef/CEO Steve DiFillippo.

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EAT & DRINK

Clam Bake BY THE SEA

For the perfect summertime party, start with a beautiful setting like this one on Little Mill Pond in Chatham and add delicious cheeses, chowder, lobster and personalized touches.

PRODUCED BY LISA LEIGH CONNORS PHOTOGRAPHY BY ASHLEY BILODEAU STYLED BY JACKIE ZARTARIAN AND AMY BENZ OF BUNGALOW

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EAT & DRINK

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COCKTAIL HOUR - DOWN AT THE PIER Irish cheddar served with traditional “pub style” mustard and La Panzanella multigrain artisan crackers, The Chatham Cheese Company “Ship’s hatch” table, a 1930s solid teak hatch with original bronze hardware, Scott Feen of Atlantic Workshop Cape Cod wine glasses from Simpler Pleasures

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EAT & DRINK SERVING STATION Ice bucket and accessories provided by Bungalow Large galvanized ice bucket from Simpler Pleasures

APPETIZERS New England Clam Chowder from Backside Bakes Brillat-Savarin cheese surrounded by tarragon and topped with fresh flowers, served with Bremner wafers from The Chatham Cheese Company

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EAT & DRINK

THE GATHERING TABLE Candelabra/nautical sculpture centerpiece, by Scott Feen of Atlantic Workshop Whale bottle openers, The Mayflower Shop Red roses in silver mint julep cups, provided by Patrice R. Milley, Floral Designers Lobster napkins and customized menus from M. Smith & Company A traditional New England clambake, with lobsters, steamers, mussels, corn on the cob and potato, onion and linguica with drawn butter from Backside Bakes

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THE PERFECT ENDING - DESSERT AND A TOAST Balsamic Berries with Tangerine Balsamic Vinegar by Gustare Oils & Vinegars Chocolate Miso Pot de Crème from Bluefins Sushi & Sake Bar and a final toast to end the day. Monogrammed wine bag from Chatham Threadworks

Special thanks to homeowners Rob and Jennifer Stello of Stello Construction for allowing us to take over their backyard for an afternoon, and to chef Jonathan Haffmans for loaning us plates, cheese platters and silverware.

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RESOURCES ATLANTIC WORKSHOP, atlanticworkshop.com BLUEFINS SUSHI & SAKE BAR, bluefinschatham.com BUNGALOW, bungalowconsignment.com BACKSIDE BAKES, backsidebakes.com THE CHATHAM CHEESE COMPANY, chathamcheese.com CHATHAM THREADWORKS, chathamthreadworks.com GUSTARE OILS & VINEGARS, gustareoliveoil.com THE MAYFLOWER SHOP, themayflowershop.com M. SMITH & COMPANY, msmithandcompany.com PATRICE R. MILLEY, FLORAL DESIGNERS, patricermilley.com SIMPLER PLEASURES, simplerpleasures.com

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Snowy Owl Coffee Roasters.

C

offee shops became all the rage in the ’90s, thanks in part to television series like “Friends” and “Frasier,” and their popularity is still going strong, whether your poison is coffee black, espresso neat or an iced chai tea latte to go. They are the

perfect spot for a business convo or friendly catch-up; yet, unlike a restaurant, there is no stigma attached to hanging solo. Let’s face it, your Keurig can’t compete with the magic of a barista with a steam wand. So give in to that caffeine craving and head to the following stops for a pick-me-up. When it comes to coffee, we’ve got New England covered! N E W E N G L A N D L I V I N G. T V

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Coffee Exchange.

The typical crowd is a mix of college students and working types; at night, after dinner, restaurant goers swing through (it stays open until 10 p.m.). The Coffee Exchange on Wickenden Street in Providence is a welcoming shop where colorful notices (of the “need a babysitter� variety) provide entertaining reading material and an ensemble of wooden tables and chairs achieves a new configuration almost hourly. Mochas are touted as customer favorites because of their deep, intense flavors and the snacks include vegan and gluten-free options. You can buy a bag of house-roasted coffee and feel good doing so, since The Coffee Exchange is devoted to sustainability for coffee farmers and their employees. sustainablecoffee.com

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Empire Coffee.

The Coffee Depot in Warren sports wicker chairs, wood floors, cool murals and wainscoting and gives off a warm and inviting vibe. It has a rotating monthly art exhibit to promote local artists and also supports local farmers like Full Bloom Apiaries and Narragansett Creamery. A variety of freshly roasted coffees and teas are brewed in individual pots and, when the weather is warm, be sure to sample one of the delicious iced teas like blueberry rooibos. When a shipment of PV Donuts arrives on the weekend, don’t delay, because flavors like toasted coconut and peanut butter don’t last long. At Empire Tea & Coffee’s three locations—two in Newport and one in Middletown—the staff is friendly and prone to remembering your order and name if you’re a regular. Each shop has its own feel, with the Bellevue Avenue site marked by a touristy bustle, Broadway by its neighborhood devotees and Middletown by its order-and-go beach-loving patrons. In addition to its impressive coffee and tea selections, Empire’s baked goods are topnotch. If you happen to be there when a fresh batch of chocolate chip cookies comes out of the oven, you won’t be able to resist the wafting aroma and may notice a line quickly forming to snag one while they’re still warm and gooey. empireteaandcoffee.com The Coffee Depot. N E W E N G L A N D L I V I N G. T V

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EAT & DRINK

Coffee Obsession in downtown Falmouth and Woods Hole are funky little coffee shops with a mishmash of tables and chairs. Coffee O’ has books to read and games to play while you enjoy your coffee, latte or chai. The Falmouth location offers bagels, quiche and other baked goods while the Woods Hole shop serves breakfast sandwiches and soups. coffeeobsession.com If you’re a coffee aficionado, then Cape Cod Coffee in Mashpee should be on your radar. First and foremost, it sources the best, most consistently satisfying beans it can find and then roasts them onsite— plus all beans are grown on Rainforest Alliance Certified farms and many are certified organic. Its shelves are lined with coffee for sale by the pound as well as a variety of brewing equipment for both coffee and tea. And although it doesn’t currently have a seating area, there is a counter where you can order hot and iced coffee and maybe a donut, made fresh daily onsite, before relaxing in one of the 10 cheerful orange Adirondack chairs outside. If you have the time, go behind the scenes and tour its Snowy Owl Coffee Roasters.

roasting facility on Tuesdays and Thursdays. capecodroasters.com

In Brewster, Snowy Owl Coffee Roasters is a hip new hangout in a 200-year-old reclaimed barn. Husband-andwife team Manuel Ainzuain and Shayna Ferullo roast their coffee in small batches and meticulously prepare each cup they serve, whether it is cold brewed, poured over or cold filtered. The Jaws blend pour over and coconutinfused Costa Rica cold brew pair well with a pastry or homemade soup. Snowy Owl is comfortable, with small tables, bar-style seating and one big round communal table. It’s a great place to meet friends, chill out with your laptop or even Cape Cod Coffee.

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channel your inner child with one of the adult coloring books. socoffee.co

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While L.A. Burdick Handmade Chocolates, with

L.A. Burdick Handmade Chocolates.

locations in Boston’s Back Bay and Cambridge, serves a great cup of coffee or tea, its most popular order is rich and creamy hot chocolate. And forget about the storebought kind: L.A. Burdick makes its drinking chocolate by steaming your choice of chocolate—dark, milk or white—with milk, a combination that is, in a word, delectable. At least once, opt for a spicy version (made with ancho, morita and New Mexico peppers): the spice is pronounced enough to awaken your taste buds but mild enough that the flavor can be enjoyed thoroughly. The Burdick Mocha, made with dark hot chocolate and espresso, is sinfully addictive. They sell their hot chocolate blends to go, but the atmosphere is inviting enough that you’ll want to stay. For an added bonus, the coffee shop is also an artisan candy store and sells chocolates from all over the world, homemade truffles, candies and luxurious pastries. It’s particularly famous for its chocolate mice, which have delicious fillings, toasted almond ears and colorful silk tails. burdickchocolate.com

Pavement Coffeehouse.

Each of the six Pavement Coffeehouse locations in Boston has a slightly different décor geared to its respective neighborhood, but they all share the same sleek, ultra-modern style with upholstered leather chairs, cool art and industrial accents like brick and wood. The company specializes in single-origin coffees and customer favorites include the Spanish latte and mocha latte. If you’re feeling adventurous, try a more exotic choice, such as a cup of cinnamon plum tea. Pavement is famous for its homemade bagels that can be eaten plain or turned into a variety of breakfast and lunch sandwiches. The food is flavorful and bold and wins rave reviews in its own right. NEL pavementcoffeehouse.com

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EAT & DRINK Here, listed alphabetically (because we don’t play favorites) are some more top crowd-pleasers from coffee shop aficionados throughout New England.

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NEW HAMPSHIRE

44 North Coffee 11 Church St., Deer Isle 44northcoffee.com

Breaking New Grounds 14 Market Square, Portsmouth bngcoffee.com

Bard Coffee 185 Middle St., Portland bardcoffee.com

Cafe Monte Alto 85 Main St., Plymouth montealto.com

Elements 265 Main St., Biddeford elementsbookscoffeebeer.com

Dirt Cowboy Café 7 South Main St., Hanover dirtcowboycafe.com

Lil’s 7 Wallingford Square, Kittery; lilscafe.com

Prime Roast Coffee Company 16 Main St., Keene primeroastcoffee.com

Tandem Coffee Roasters 122 Anderson St, Portland; tandemcoffee.com

The Local Moose Café 124 Queen City Ave., Manchester thelocalmoosecafe.com

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Carol’s Hungry Mind Café 24 Merchants Row, Middlebury; carolshungrymindcafe.com

Dom’s Coffee 20 West Main St., Avon domscoffee.com

Maglianero 47 Maple St., Burlington; maglianero.com

Koffee? 104 Audubon St., New Haven koffeenewhaven.com

Mocha Joe’s Café 82 Main St., Brattleboro; mochajoes.com

Lorca 125 Bedford St., Stamford lorcastamford.com

Muddy Waters 184 Main St., Burlington

So. G Coffee Roaster 882 Main St., South Glastonbury

Speeder & Earl’s 412 Pine Street; Burlington

Source 289 Fairfield Ave., Bridgeport sourcecoffeehouse.com

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BECOME A SUPER BARISTA AT HOME! ow you can create a Coffee Bar in your own kitchen, bathroom or office with Wolf's Coffee System. Stay comfy and warm at home while it prepares your perfect cup, every time. Fresh coffee beans can be stored and ground per cup with 13 settings from which to choose. Whether you are brewing coffee, espresso, macchiato, lattes or cappuccino, you can customize strength and water temperature. Your milk is stored in its own Wolf container, chilled just right in your fridge…when you insert it into your Wolf coffee system…let the frothing begin! Perfection, every time.

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Plus...no plumbing is necessary, meaning this beautiful life enhancement can be easily installed anywhere. This one-touch, automated coffee system incorporates the following performance features to ensure consistent, delicious beverages: SPEED: A fast initial system warm up leads to swift coffee drink production, providing the perfect cup in no time. Beverages are ready to enjoy in minutes. An internal clock allows the user to power on the machine at a set time so it is ready to go when you are. EASY CLEAN-UP: This unique coffee system eliminates messy clean up often associated with built-in coffee machines. With one touch of a button, a three-to-six-second steam cleaning process is employed after each milk drink is prepared. Additionally, milk never enters the system’s internal machinery, so no disassembly is required for clean up. SETTINGS: Tailor your coffee system to work with whole bean or ground coffee. Settings can also be customized to adjust water temperature, brew strength and liquid output. Personal preferences can be stored by using the system’s “My Coffee” setting. WATER RESERVOIR: Conveniently located, the system’s water reservoir can be easily accessed from the front without opening the unit. The reservoir holds a half-gallon of water. The system also contains a hot water dispenser for tea and other hot instant beverages. For those whose lives depend on the perfect cup of coffee (we understand!), this will be the single best appliance you'll ever buy!

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Boston’s Seaport Is Booming. In the past 10 years, this neighborhood that sat vacant for decades has seen the advent of high-rises sprouting on top of former parking lots, tony condos, business headquarters and posh new restaurants and hotels. The inventive new spaces and concepts inspired the area’s moniker, the Innovation District, but older businesses (some a century old) and historic sections maintain the old Boston charm. Spend the weekend in the Seaport and feel part of the pulse. All you need is a comfortable pair of walking shoes to enjoy contemporary art exhibits, high design, new bars and eateries and a few historical establishments, all in this one burgeoning quarter on Boston Harbor.

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The Harborwalk bordering the edge of the neighborhood creates a pathway between the buildings and the harbor. Strategically located benches allow visitors to watch boats, ferries and cruise ships entering and leaving the harbor and planes taking off and landing at Logan Airport across the way in East Boston. In the warmer months, the scene isn’t just for looks; boat tours take groups out to the Boston Harbor Islands for the day, where you can stroll around, explore old forts and have a picnic. Two Water Taxi Services (bostonharborcruises.com and roweswharfwatertransport.com) operate year-round, whisking visitors to the district from Logan Airport, as well as making other stops in the area. The Envoy Hotel (70 Sleeper Street; theenvoyhotel.com) built in 2015 has quickly become a popular venue for Lookout, their rooftop bar that overlooks Boston Harbor, the Fort Point Channel and buildings of the Financial District. The hotel’s 136 rooms and suites are furnished minimally with pops of color, and modern designs and floor-to-ceiling windows expose the city skyline. In the street- level Outlook Kitchen and Bar, chef Tatianna Pairot Rosana creates a menu using regional ingredients inspired by her French training, her Cuban heritage and her wife’s Korean heritage. For entertainment, local musicians provide live acoustic tunes for restaurant-goers. The Seaport Hotel (1 Seaport Lane; seaportboston.com) has all the standard amenities you’d expect and some surprises, including approximately one million bees on their

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roof kept by an on-staff beekeeper. The insects are one of many green initiatives in the hotel’s “Seaport Saves” program. Guest perks include allergy-friendly rooms, complimentary bicycles and if you arrive in a hybrid car you receive one night complimentary valet parking.

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Down the street, District Hall (75 Northern Avenue; districthallboston. org) is where ideas are nurtured in the Innovation District. The public space, built by Boston Global Investors, has workstations that are open to the public until 2 a.m. every day except Sunday, as well as conference rooms, classrooms and assembly space available for rent. There’s a college library vibe. Brew (75 Pier Four Boulevard; brewcafeboston. com) is the supplier of caffeine for the building, and the cafe also serves breakfast, lunch and snacks. The attached restaurant Gather (75 Pier Four Boulevard; gatherboston.com) buzzes with chatter and shared lunches during the workweek and also serves dinner and weekend brunch, where a favorite is chicken and waffles and fluffernutter French toast—Frosted Flake-crusted challah bread that’s coated with layers of marshmallow and peanut butter. Wander through the Seaport and you’ll find many bars and restaurants on the ground levels of the proliferating high-rises. By evening, an after-work crowd flocks to the industrial-designed spaces, many with large windows, hanging lights and warmly lit bars. For high-end Italian, you can’t go wrong at Strega Waterfront (1 Marina Park Drive; stregawaterfront.com) on Fan Pier with views of the harbor. The Greek restaurant Committee (50 Pier Four Boulevard; committeeboston.com) is a popular event and meet-up spot; a fitting use since the restaurant was founded on “meze,” a Mediterranean dining concept that means getting together and eating a little of everything. Or snag a seat at one of three bars at Babbo Pizzeria e Enoteca (11 Fan Pier Boulevard; babbopizzeria.com) for pizza, antipasti and cocktails, and try a slice from the wood-burning brick oven.

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Of course there is an abundance of seafood restaurants in this harborside neighborhood, including the oldest family-run eatery in Boston—the NoName Restaurant (15 1/2 Fish Pier Street East; nonamerestaurant.com). In the early 20th century, Yanni Contos served fresh seafood from a stand on the Fish Pier and opened a restaurant there in 1917. For over a century, the Contos family has been serving local catches in a no-fuss environment. “I’m right on the Fish Pier, you can’t get any fresher than here,” says manager Jimmy Klidaras. “Most of the fish we get fresh every day from the fishermen and these are guys I grew up with, I know them all.” Favorites include lobster, shrimp and scallop platter, sourced locally and prepared simply with spices, cooking wine and butter. The seafood chowder is very popular. “No potatoes, no bacon, no flour. Just haddock, cod, shrimp, clams, a little paprika, onion and some secret ingredients from the family recipe,” says Klidaras. “Everybody loves it.”

Further down the waterfront, the Yankee Lobster (300 Northern Avenue; yankeelobstercompany.com) family boasts five generations of men who made their living in the fishing industry. Today the operation run by Joseph Zanti and Dennis Kelly includes Commercial Lobster, the wholesale business, as well as Yankee Lobster, a sit-down restaurant and also a retail business that ships lobsters, steamers and clam chowder anywhere in the continental United States in less than 24 hours (a great gift for the homesick). The family business has been operating since before the Seaport began to rise around them, and they pride themselves on their laid-back ambience. “We are a hole-in-the-wall kind of place, it’s very low key and very casual, which we enjoy, especially being in the Seaport, where there are a lot of high-end restaurants,” says fifth-generation Frank Zanti, manager.

Legal Sea Foods (legalseafoods.com) has their headquarters in the Seaport as well as Legal Test Kitchen (225 Pier Four Boulevard; legalseafoods.com), which has a menu that differs from Legal’s standard offerings. “The Test Kitchen has a seafood-based concept but features multicultural cuisine,” says Ida Faber, vice president of marketing at Legal Sea Foods. “It’s open late, it’s a smaller footprint and a neighborhood restaurant.” Across the street, Legal Harborside’s (270 Northern Avenue; legalseafoods.com) three floors face the harbor and each has its own kitchen and menu. “The third floor is sushi bar, second floor is white tablecloth, celebratory dining and is open for dinner, and the first floor is the most casual dining and it’s open for lunch and dinner,” says Faber.

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ITINERARY Before the Seaport was buzzing with development and business, many found themselves in the neighborhood events happening at the two second largest event centers in the city—Seaport World Trade Center (200 Seaport Boulevard; seaportboston.com) and the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center (415 Summer Street; bostonconventioncenter.com). Popular events include the Boston Wine Expo (wine-expos.com), the Boston Flower and Garden Show (bostonflowershow.com) as well as the New England Boat Show (newenglandboatshow.com). Another old standby attracting out-of-towners is the Blue Hills Bank Pavillon (290 Northern Avenue; bostonpavilion.net), an outdoor amphitheater on the water that can hold up to 5,000. Beneath the white tent musicians such as Bonnie Raitt, Bob Dylan, Aretha Franklin and Lynyrd Skynyrd play into the summer night.

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Leave the brewery and walk through the Fort Point neighborhood. Once a land of manufacturing and warehousing, Boston Wharf Company created an enclave of brick sidewalks and buildings. When the industry died down in the 20th century, artists moved into the lofts and former warehouses, laying the foundation for what is today one of New England’s largest artist communities. The Innovation and Design Building (21 Drydock Avenue; idbldg.com) has a similar history; the 1.4 million-square-foot building provides spaces for a variety of creative industries, including the Boston Design Center (1 Design Center Place; bostondesign.com), where numerous home design showrooms display over 1,000 domestic and international product lines for customers. The eight-story building was originally built in 1918 and was used by the South Boston Army Base for warehousing and storage. Today the building has a new purpose and serves as the offices for architectural, communication and design firms, retail offices, and tech start-ups. The public is welcome. A neighbor to the Design Center, 7 Tide (7 Tide Street; seventide.com) is the newest design-forward destination if you’re in the market for high-end Wolf and Sub-Zero appliances, Kohler products or highly customizable Marvin windows and doors. To learn more about 7 Tide, see page 126.

FRANCOISE GROSSEN'S 20-FOOT-LONG FIBER SCULPTURE, "INCHWORM," AT THE INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART

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At the edge of the Seaport is Harpoon Brewery (306 Northern Avenue; harpoonbrewery.com), which has daily hour-long tours. But you can also grab a seat at one of the long wooden tables inside the Beer Hall. Opt for a single pint or try a few drafts with a flight of six-ounce tastings. The brewery hosts festivals throughout the year. For more craft beer, Trillium Brewing Company (369 Congress Street; trilliumbrewing.com) is a 15-minute walk away in the Fort Point neighborhood. Husband and wife JC and Esther Tetreault founded the brewery in 2013 and have been serving the Greater Boston area farmhouse-style ales since. They opened a new tasting facility in Canton in 2015, but many of their beers reflect the company’s roots in the historic Boston neighborhood, including one of their most popular, Fort Point Pale Ale.

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T R IL LIU M B R E W IN G C O M PA N Y THE FALLON COMPANY

THIS PAGE: BILYANA DIMITROVA: FACING PAGE: SPACECRAFTING PHOTOGRAPHY

Art brings life to old venues, but in the case of the Institute of Contemporary Art (25 Harbor Shore Drive; icaboston.org), a new venue brought more possibilities for a growing contemporary arts community. The building is a work of art itself, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro Architects. The geometric structure has alternating transparent and translucent glass panels, which create a bright, open space and frame a number of remarkable harbor views. Colette Randall, director of marketing and communications for the ICA, explains that the views afforded by the architecture were intentional “to cause people to think about how art can shape and inform our perspectives.” In the summer months, the ICA has weekly outdoor programming including free music on Thursdays in collaboration with Berklee College of Music and dance parties on the first Friday of the month. This year’s featured exhibitions include “Nari Ward: Sunsplashed,” the largest survey of the artist’s work, which examines migration, citizenship and African American history. Also, Steve McQueen’s “Ashes,” a momentous video installation by the award-winning British artist, will make its debut at the ICA in February and run through July 9.

RENDERING OF TWENTY TWO LIBERTY, THE FALLON COMPANY'S LUXURY CONDOMINIUM BUILDING

If you fall in love with the Seaport and want to take up residence here, you’re in luck. The Fallon Company’s Fan Pier luxury condominiums at Twenty Two Liberty and 50 Liberty Drive, are both phenomenal venues to experience and enjoy Boston Harbor as a dynamic place to live, work, dine and socialize. NEL

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Life-size brainstorming. Architects and designers love meeting with clients at 7 Tide, where they can project designs on a 16' x 9' wall to give a full-scale impression of how their new kitchen will feel.

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SEVEN TIDE YO U R S . BY D ES I G N .

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ITINERARY YOUR HOME IS A VITAL PART OF YOUR LIFE. Embarking on a major remodeling project or building a custom home takes inspiration, imagination and time to consider all of the pieces that come together to create the space you envision. It’s been difficult to imagine how the important details will look and feel in your home, until now. 7 Tide, Boston’s newest design destination, has recently opened at 7 Tide Street in Boston Seaport, the city’s trendiest area. Here discerning homeowners have the unique opportunity to gather key information and find jaw-dropping inspiration before beginning an extensive design project. In various spaces at 7 Tide, you can actually experience your appliance technology, custom windows, doors, kitchen design details and more, before you commit to a concept or purchase. 7 Tide is the perfect place to start dreaming about your new space, where you can explore in three dimensions and with all five senses. In this unprecedented brand experience center, you not only see the options, you will use them, compare them and feel them in real settings that help you make those exciting, yet often daunting, decisions with pleasure and delight. 7 Tide is designed as a sanctuary, offering you the opportunity to drink in the possibilities and imagine yourself living in them.

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Built in 1943, as The Riggers and Sail Loft Building, this 38,000-square-foot building was purchased in 2014, and has been totally reimagined and renovated as 7 Tide. Inside you’ll find Clarke, New England’s Official Sub-Zero & Wolf Showroom and Test Kitchen, in their most technologically advanced showroom yet. You’ll find the very latest from Sub-Zero, Wolf and ASKO appliances, in stunning kitchens to inspire design excellence. In every corner there is a “wow moment,” with design details and unique materials that will get your creative juices flowing.

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PHOTO: GLENN PERRY

In addition to their signature Appliance Test Drives, Clarke now offers two exciting additions to the award-winning Sub-Zero and Wolf experience. First, architects and designers are invited to present floor plans, renderings, elevations and photos of their projects to clients on a 16’ x 9’ media wall at 7 Tide. Here in the comfortable Media Lounge, homeowners can discuss their projects, and then explore appliance options in full-size kitchens only steps away. Clarke’s Small Plates program allows visitors to taste a delicious example of what they can create with Sub-Zero and Wolf appliances. Try a bite or two of Strawberry Rhubarb French Toast, Bacon-Wrapped Chicken, or perhaps Crispy Artichokes with Truffle Aioli. Your small bite will depend on the time of day you visit and the season of the year. Small Plates are available not only in Boston, but also in Clarke showrooms in Milford, MA and South Norwalk, CT. Clarke wants you to see, hear, touch, smell and taste what your new kitchen can become. Adjacent to Clarke’s Showroom and Test Kitchen, visitors encounter the country’s first brand experience center for Marvin Windows and Doors. In another incredible high-tech, high-touch experience, homeowners are introduced to a whole new way to think about windows and doors. Sit in a living room and see how a 30” window might look on your wall. Imagine something grander? Instantly you can experience a 5-foot bay window. Once you choose a design direction, you may try Marvin’s smart table to actually see how different finishes and hardware can change the look of your windows or doors. In fact, Marvin’s beautiful products surround the entire building, offering a stunning example of how to connect your interior and exterior environments. N E W E N G L A N D L I V I N G. T V

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While not open to the public, Reflex Lighting is on the second floor, offering their commercial lighting expertise to architects and designers throughout the region. As the building continues to transform, Clarke’s showroom will expand and other premier brands will be revealed. Since these spaces are dedicated to inspiration and information gathering, homeowners will never be asked to purchase anything. Instead, they will receive details on products that delighted them and contacts for authorized dealers near their project. As one recent visitor commented, “It’s not a sales experience at all. It’s relaxing and inspiring. I loved planning my home this way.” NEL

To visit CLARKE’S SUB-ZERO & WOLF Showroom and Test Kitchen, visit ClarkeLiving.com for showroom hours and online appointments or call 800-842-5275. To make an appointment with MARVIN AT 7 TIDE call 617-315-4850 or email appointment@marvin7Tide.com

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Shipbuilding is alive and well in this historic city on Maine’s

ravel north along the Kennebec River

Kennebec River, but it’s only one

and you’ll come to a place where the

reason to plan a visit by boat.

past, present and even future collide. As you round Doubling Point and enter Long Reach, the rolling grounds of the Maine Maritime Museum spread before you, marked by six towering, flag-topped masts representing the 329-foot schooner Wyoming, the largest wooden sailing vessel ever built in the United States. Just beyond that is the Bath Iron Works, where the most advanced Navy warship—a 600-foot destroyer resembling a giant Civil War ironclad—was recently launched. Farther on, a skeletal, iron railroad bridge built in 1927 spans the river just downstream from its hulking 21st-century neighbor—the steeland-concrete, four-lane Sagadahoc highway bridge. During summer, both are busy. And so is the city of Bath, one of the most interesting and underrated boating destinations in Maine.

BY KEN TEXTOR PHOTOGRAPHY BY TOM RICHARDSON

Doubling Point Light welcomes boaters as they enter Long Reach, the gateway to Bath.

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DOCK & WALK Named the “City of Ships” for its long history as a shipbuilding center, modern-day Bath has a lot to recommend it to visiting boaters, including a public float with 200 feet of free dockage for waterborne daytrippers. Step ashore and you’ll find yourself amid a thriving downtown filled with shops, galleries and restaurants. Brick sidewalks run the length of Front Street, Bath’s primary retail district. As they have for more than 100 years, strollers check out the shop windows, kibitz with friends and strangers, relax on benches under shade trees and walk the family dog.

The Virginia—replica of the first ship built in Maine— takes shape in downtown Bath.

Pedestrians rule; all others must yield. “Everything you could want is right here,” says Mike Fear, owner of Now You’re Cooking, a retail wine and cookware outlet on Front Street. “Certainly, all the old sea captains’ homes on Washington Street are an attraction, but so is the variety of shopping here … and the museum … and the river. It just goes on and on.”

Boaters can spend days exploring the many tidal rivers around Bath.

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City Hall, one of Bath’s many interesting buildings.

MUST-SEE MUSEUM That duality of old versus new occurs throughout the city. If you want to immerse yourself fully in Bath’s shipbuilding past, set a course for the Maine Maritime Museum, which offers overnight transient moorings and limited dock space for day visitors on the doorstep of one of the state’s premiere attractions. The museum’s 20-acre campus occupies the former site of 19th century shipyards, and features a series of fascinating exhibits on how massive wooden sailing vessels were constructed from trees harvested from Maine’s interior. It also maintains a large collection of beautifully restored wooden boats, kayaks and canoes, as well as an on-site boatbuilding workshop. In short, plan on spending a full day here. Shipbuilding techniques of an even older era can be witnessed closer to downtown Bath, where a full-scale, wooden replica of the Virginia—the first English ship built in North America—is taking shape in a former train depot at the foot of Commercial Street. The original Virginia was a 50-foot wooden pinnace built in 1607 and 1608 by the Popham Colony, a failed English settlement at the mouth of the Kennebec. The replica is being fashioned using mostly hand tools by a group of volunteer shipwrights and students, and will one day be used for educational purposes. Visitors are welcome to stop by for a firsthand look at how “Maine’s First Ship” was likely built. In stark contrast to the past on display at the Maritime Museum and the Virginia shop is the state-of-the-art shipbuilding facility of Bath Iron Works, a General Dynamics company that the locals refer to only by its initials. But even the waterfront-dominating BIW has deep roots in the city, going back to 1826 as the Bath Iron Foundry. Bristling Captain Ed Rice gives tours of the Kennebec aboard his stable pontoon boat.

with cranes and featuring a huge submersible dry dock, BIW is the city’s largest employer and a major contractor for the U.S. military. Since 9/11, the waters near the facility have been off-limits, with an armed patrol boat standing ready to shoo off wayward boaters who wander inside the orange-buoyed no-go zone.

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DOWNTOWN DELIGHTS After getting your fill of shipbuilding, you may be ready to explore Bath’s downtown scene. Loaded with antiques shops, restaurants and specialty stores (you can get your dog a lifejacket or an ID bracelet here), this is where most visitors end up. Maine’s premier department store, Reny’s, is perhaps the most-visited local outlet, being well known for its cut-rate prices on name-brand clothing, nonperishable foods, over-the-counter drugs, beauty aids, lawn chairs and you-name-its. Galleries, bookstores, jewelry shops, cafés and boutiques also vie for the attention of tourists and serious shoppers. Late on a windless morning, however, you will likely notice the smells of some of the city’s most popular eateries, not the least of which is Beale Street Barbecue, on Water Street, where the Memphis-style fare has been tempting

Modern shipbuilding on display at Bath Iron Works.

diners for more than 20 years. Meanwhile, the high-end crowd tends to gravitate to Solo Bistro, where French and fusion cuisine draw foodies from miles around. Many

STRIPERS & SHORTCUTS

other dining options, including Thai, seafood and a terrific

One way to work off all the tempting libations and victuals of

ice cream shop called Dot’s, can be found within steps

downtown Bath is to get back out on the Kennebec River and try

of the waterfront—but you don’t have to stray even that

your hand at striper fishing. Striped bass can be found anywhere

far for a cold beverage or bite to eat. The Kennebec River

between the river mouth and Swan Island, eight miles north of Bath,

Tavern and Marina offers free dockage, as well as a large

but the deep area directly in front of BIW offers some of the most

deck for enjoying the view. You can also arrange to keep

dependable action. Some biologists now consider a portion of the

your boat here overnight if you decide that Bath deserves

Kennebec’s striper population to be non-migratory, meaning that

more thorough exploration.

some fish spend the winter in the river’s “holes”, some of which are more than 100 feet deep.

If you happen to visit on a Saturday, you’ll find no end of delicacies at the Bath Farmers’ Market, held along

Other natural delights await the observant river cruiser. A leisurely

Commercial Street in Waterfront Park. The quality and

trip either up- or downriver will usually yield a bald eagle sighting

variety of goods on display are impressive, and area

or two, along with seals, leaping sturgeon, osprey and a variety of

boaters often make the trip just to stock up on local goods.

wading birds. Of course, there’s nothing like having a local expert

If you miss the Farmers’ Market, Brackett’s on lower

aboard, and Capt. Ed Rice of River Run Tours is happy to oblige.

Front Street has a pretty extensive array of meats, wines,

His stable, 25-foot pontoon boat makes the perfect stage for his

vegetables, local beers and the like, all at competitive

informative nature and history tours, and can also be chartered for

prices (meaning not adjusted for tourist season).

custom adventures on the Kennebec and its tributaries.

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BATH AT A GLANCE HARBORMASTER

(207) 443-5563

DOCKAGE, MOORINGS & SERVICE

BATH CITY DOCKS (207) 443-5563 Long public float with free short-term dockage for visitors who want to go ashore for a few hours. Contact the harbormaster to see about possible overnight stays. KENNEBEC TAVERN & MARINA (207) 442-9636; kennebectavern.com Transient slips and moorings near downtown Bath. Also features a gas dock and an onsite restaurant. MAINE MARITIME MUSEUM (207) 443-1316; bathmaine.com Limited moorings and dockage for transients and daytrippers, so call ahead. Cabs and trolley service can get you to downtown, or you can take a dinghy to the city docks.

LAUNCH RAMPS

Bath has two free launch ramps with parking, one north of the city and one south. Both have courtesy floats and toilets. The former is off Bowery Street, next to the sewage-treatment plant, while the latter is just south of the Maine Maritime Museum.

BOAT & KAYAK RENTAL

SEA SPRAY KAYAKING (207) 443-3646; seaspraykayaking.com Kayak and paddleboard sales, rentals and tours in West Bath. Can arrange overnight, fishing and multiday paddling tours in the Mid-Coast region.

A restored fog bell tower marks the bend at Doubling Point, just south of Bath.

Speaking of which, Bath’s inland connections to a variety of neighboring harbors make it a perfect base when foul weather or fog hinder ocean travel. The most popular “inside route” destination is Boothbay Harbor, accessible via the Sasanoa River—a trip that’s described in great detail in most cruising guides. But there is also Wiscasset, Five Islands, Bowdoinham, Richmond, Hallowell and even Augusta, all of which can be reached from Bath using channels that are well marked and plenty deep enough for all but the largest megayachts. Nooks and crannies for gunkhole enthusiasts number in the dozens. So regardless of whether you’re headed to Bath for its past, present or future, the nation’s “Cradle of Shipbuilding” is bound to keep you gainfully occupied for days, maybe even weeks. Follow the Kennebec north on the first of the flood and be prepared for a 12-mile trip and a destination like no other you’ve experienced before, or will again. NEL

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GETTING AROUND

BATH TROLLEY COMPANY (207) 443-9741; cityofbath.com/trolley Runs daily in summer with stops at the Maine Maritime Museum and various downtown sites.

PROVISIONS

BATH FARMERS’ MARKET bathfarmersmarket.com Fresh, local produce, cheeses, meats, jams, jellies, breads, flowers and crafts at the city’s Waterfront Park. Open Saturdays, May through October. BRACKETT’S MARKET (207) 443-2012; brackettsmarket.com Large grocery store with a deli and bakery near the waterfront.

WHERE TO EAT

KENNEBEC TAVERN (207) 442-9636; kennebectavern.com Large dock-and-dine restaurant and bar on the river with indoor and outdoor seating. BEALE STREET BBQ (207) 442-9514; mainebbq.com Mouth-watering Memphis-style barbecue and other tasty southern fare. BRYNE’S IRISH PUB (207) 443-6776; byrnesirishpub.com Lively gathering spot in the heart of downtown Bath. ADMIRAL STEAK HOUSE (207) 443-2555; admiralsteak.com The place to go if you’re seeking steaks and chops.

JR MAXWELL & CO. (207) 443-2014; jrmaxwells.com Seafood and more on Front Street. SOLO BISTRO (207) 443-3373; solobistro.com Upscale French and fusion cuisine. MAE’S RESTAURANT & BAKERY (207) 442-8577; maescafeandbakery.com Breakfast and lunch menu with gluten-free pastries, breads and more. CABIN RESTAURANT (207) 443-6224; cabinpizza.com Cozy family-style restaurant specializing in handtossed pizza. BEST THAI RESTAURANT (207) 443-8655; bestthairestaurant.com Authentic Thai cuisine on Elm Street.

COOL SHOPS

NOW YOU’RE COOKING (207) 443-1402; acooksemporium.com A cook’s playground filled with utensils, kitchenware, appliances, cookbooks and more. RENY’S (207) 443-6251; renys.com “Real Maine” department store carrying a wide array of quality discount clothing, tools, toys and just about anything else you can imagine. MARKINGS GALLERY (207) 443-1499; markingsgallery.com Carries an eclectic mix of works by Maine artists in metal, clay, fiber, paper, glass, paint, stone and wood. OPEN DOOR BOOKS (207) 443-8689; opendoorbooks.us Large inventory of hard-to-find, out-of-print, used and rare books.

THINGS TO SEE & DO

MAINE MARITIME MUSEUM (207) 443-1316; bathmaine.com Maine’s maritime heritage and culture is celebrated and preserved at this sprawling museum south of downtown Bath. The museum features a collection of classic boats and artifacts relating to Maine’s maritime past, and also offers educational programs, exhibitions and a unique historic shipyard. Dockage is available, as well as boat tours of the Kennebec. CHOCOLATE CHURCH ARTS CENTER (207) 442-8455; chocolatechurcharts.org Named for its brown exterior, this striking Gothic Revival church in downtown Bath was built in 1847. RIVER RUN TOURS (207) 504-BOAT; riverruntours.com Capt. Ed Rice runs intimate, customized scenic, history and nature tours on the Kennebec and surrounding waters aboard a 25-foot pontoon boat. GREAT GADZOOKS FISHING CHARTERS (207) 720-0857; greatgadzooks.com Striped bass fishing charters with Capt. Johann Brouwer on the Kennebec.

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GREAT Main Streets OF

NEW ENGLAND Six states, six lively downtown areas just waiting to welcome you with open arms. By Kelly Chase

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Burlington, Vermont In 1980, four blocks of historic Church Street were blocked off to cars, creating a pedestrian paradise, or as locals call it, Burlington’s “front porch.” In this brick-paved section, there’s plenty of people-watching with street performers and musicians scheduled throughout the year. “We like to always have something happening that draws people to Marketplace and music is a draw,” says Becky Cassidy, who is in charge of media relations and fundraising for the Church Street Marketplace District Commission. In the winter, artists create light installations that brighten the area in the darker days of the year. Right on Church Street, the gallery inside Frog Hollow (85 Church Street; froghollow.org) exhibits fine and contemporary art and crafts made by Vermonters. The organization became the first state craft center in the nation in 1975, and today not only promotes local art but also teaches the next generation of makers. Unlike downtowns that have needed to make way for larger retailers, 70 percent of the businesses on Church Street are locally owned and operated, including Lake Champlain Chocolates (65 Church Street; lakechamplainchocolates.com), which creates all-natural, handmade treats like the Legendary Dark chocolate truffles and organic bars of coconut and raspberry, and the Vermont Flannel Company (28 Church Street; vermontflannel.com) for all your winter comfort needs. Agriculture is one of the state’s top industries and many local restaurants are on board with supporting the future of the state’s farmland. Hen of the Woods’ (55 Cherry Street; henofthewood.com) James Beard-nominated chef Eric Warnstedt makes everything in-house using local, seasonal ingredients and because these vary, a new menu is printed daily. Farmhouse Tap and Grill (160 Bank Street; farmhousetg.com) is a farm-to-table gastropub, which has menu items such as the Vermont Heritage Grazers Pork Burger with cheddar, a sunny-side-up farm egg and house kimchi. In the warmer months, the outdoor beer garden is a popular spot to sample all 24 craft beers on draught. The town is the birthplace of Ben and Jerry’s (36 Church Street; benjerry.com), but as the day winds down, grab a creemee (tip: do not say soft-serve) at Burlington Bay Market and Cafe (125 Battery Street; burlingtonbaycafe.com) and watch the sun set over Lake Champlain. Keep an eye out for Champ, the monster said to live beneath the waters.

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Camden, Maine Whatever season you decide to explore this midcoast town, you’ll be swept away by its natural beauty and enjoy fine local food. Camden is one of only two places on the East Coast where the mountains meet the sea. Arrive by boat to the harbor and see how tree-covered Camden Hills State Park rises above town. The view from the top of these mountains looks over island-studded Penobscot Bay. But you’ll probably be traveling by car, and if you’re coming from the south, you’ll arrive in downtown Camden via Elm Street, where you’ll pass Long Grain (31 Elm Street; longgraincamden. com), a cherished Thai-inspired restaurant, where there’s usually a crowd, but the curries and stir fries make it worth waiting for a table. In Camden, there are shops to pop into year-round. Swans Island Company (2 Bayview Street; swansislandcompany.com) has an exceptional collection of wool blankets, scarves and hats handwoven by Maine artisans. Just off Main Street, the Goose River Exchange (23 Bay View Street; gooseriverexchange.com) offers a curated a collection of vintage books, posters and photography. Nearby Francine Bistro (55 Chestnut Street; francinebistro.com) is a romantic sight as it glows from the street with twinkling lights. James Beard-nominated chef Brian Hill creates French cuisine using seasonal ingredients (share the poutine—fries, gravy, cheese and no regrets). The Drouthy Bear (50 Elm Street; drouthybear.com) is a cozy, naturally lit pub with wood stoves that make it an ideal pit stop on a winter afternoon. If you’re craving a craft cocktail, try 40 Paper (40 Washington Street; 40paper.com), which has a modern bar and drinks like Viva Negroni made with mezcal, Campari, and Cocchi Torino Sweet Vermouth. The kitchen cranks out traditional Italian plates. Up the way, a Relais & Chateaux experience awaits at the Camden Harbour Inn (83 Bay View Street; camdenharbourinn.com); the inn’s restaurant, Natalie’s, has a rotating tasting menu for a dinner to remember. In the winter, the town has the Camden Snow Bowl (20 Barnestown Road; camdensnowbowl. com) and the U.S. National Toboggan Championships, in the fall there’s Camden International Film Festival (pointsnorthinstitute.org), and in summer there are sunsets on schooners and camping in Camden Hills.

PHOTO BY ERIN LIT TLE

PHOTO BY DOUGLAS MOT T

PHOTO BY JOE CORRADO

TRAVEL

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Hingham, Massachusetts

PHOTO BY ERIN LIT TLE

This scenic suburb south of Boston can be reached by boat from Boston’s waterfront or commuter rail from South Station. By highway, Derby Street Shoppes, an outdoor mall with high-end franchise stores and restaurants, is just off Route 3, but to reach the historic heart of town follow Route 228 as it winds past antique ship captains’ homes and impressively manicured lots and farmhouses before arriving where North, South and Main streets intersect. The Snug (116 North Street; snugpub.com) is a local pub that’s authentically Irish; on weekend nights it’s packed and on Sundays local musicians drop in for a traditional Irish session. Just down the street, Tosca (14 North Street; toscahingham.com) is a special-occasion spot with fine Italian dishes and a warmly lit, brick-walled atmosphere inside the circa 1910 Granary Marketplace. Across the street, Stars on Hingham Harbor (2 Otis Street; starshingham.com) typically has a wait for weekend brunch, but offers casual American cuisine throughout the day, and the newly renovated bar attracts a crowd at night for live music and an extensive microbrew selection. For morning brews, stop into Brewed Awakenings (19 Main Street; 781-741-5331) in the heart of downtown, or if you prefer a water view, Redeye Roasters (3 Otis Street; redeyeroasters.com) is right on the harbor. Hingham has an active downtown association composed of business owners and residents who are making an effort to attract more people to the area through events such as a Fourth of July parade, ArtsWalk in the fall and Christmas in the Square. For 15 years, South Street Gallery (149 South Street; southstreetgallery.com) has been displaying the work of New England plein-air artists, hosting gallery openings, artist lectures and also offering framing and appraisal services. Nona’s Homemade Ice Cream (19 Main Street; nonasicecream.com), another longtime downtown staple, is known for their creamy flavors inspired by local landmarks such as Hingham Harbor Sludge and Heath Bare Cove Crunch. Carolann’s (31-35 Main Street; carolannsonline.com) has been selling girl’s clothing in downtown since 1985 and has since expanded to include items for women, boys and men. Housed in an 1852 building, the Loring Hall Theater (65 Main Street; 781-749-1307) has been a local theater since 1936. Closer to the harbor, yellow, red and blue colonial homes proudly remind visitors of Hingham’s historic roots. Even Eleanor Roosevelt was taken by this coastal town’s charm, dubbing it ‘the most beautiful Main Street in America.’ Come see for yourself.

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COURTESY OF CONNECTICUT OFFICE OF TOURISM

Greenwich, Connecticut

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Less than an hour from New York City and situated in one of the wealthiest counties in the United States, Greenwich boasts a shopping mecca of high design and luxury fashion. Start at the top of the tilted avenue and come across big names in retail such as Saks Fifth Avenue (205 Greenwich Avenue; saksfifthavenue.com/greenwich), Tory Burch (255 Greenwich Avenue; toryburch.com), Lilly Pulitzer (92 Greenwich Avenue; lillypulitzer.com) and Ralph Lauren (265 Greenwich Avenue; ralphlauren.com). Richard’s (359 Greenwich Avenue; richards.mitchellstores. com) keeps fashion profiles of their clients, so employees know exactly what clothing they have, what they like and what items to alert them about when they come in. Also, the Restoration Hardware (310 Greenwich Avenue; restorationhardware. com) is the only one in the area with a baby section, which draws many new parents. At Christmastime, a line of people snakes down the sidewalk at Hoagland’s (175 Greenwich Avenue; hoaglands.com), which has been on the strip since 1937, and is a popular place for engaged couples to register for fine china and later on to buy high-end baby gifts. With all that shopping you’ll need to refuel, and there are plenty of fine dining options at the top and bottom of the avenue. Elm Street Oyster House (11 West Elm Street; elmstreetoysterhouse.com) has been serving fresh seafood dishes for over 20 years. Sidle up to the marble bar for a plate of fresh oysters— there are six varieties daily. With wooden farm tables, beams and chandeliers, you’ll feel like you’re inside a barn at the Back 40 Kitchen (107 Greenwich Avenue; back40kitchen.com), and you should since the restaurant has its own working farm, where they harvest many of the menu’s ingredients. Dishes range from grass-fed beef with turnip puree, king oyster mushrooms and baby carrots to curried chickpeas over wild rice, winter roots and cranberry. Near the bottom of the avenue is celebrity chef Geoffrey Zakarian’s Greenwich version of The National (376 Greenwich Avenue; thenational-ct.com), which differs from his Manhattan concept with a focus on hardwood grilling and craft cocktails and has more of a family atmosphere. Typically crowded on weekends for lunch is Méli-Mélo (362 Greenwich Avenue; melimelogreenwich.com). French for “hodgepodge,” the name fits since the eatery has a large selection of sweet and savory crêpes, sorbets and ice creams, as well as healthier soups, salads and sandwiches. In June, the town hosts the Greenwich International Film Festival (greenwichfilm.org), which attracts film stars and movie lovers to the area. Even with the absence of high-rises, you will feel part of the pulse of big city life spending a day popping in and out of stores on this thoroughfare.

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF DISCOVER NEWPORT

Newport, Rhode Island Thames Street, running parallel to the harbor, is the city’s oldest street. The narrow one-way is lined with historic colonials housing local shops and restaurants. “The architecture for much of Thames Street hasn’t changed much—it maintains its small-town New England charm,” says Andrea McHugh, marketing and communications manager at Discover Newport (discovernewport.org). “When you look at historic photos, you can see the same framework; businesses have changed, but the infrastructure hasn’t.” The upper and lower sections of the street have a collection of shops and restaurants that embrace this nautical village’s roots. At Lemon & Line’s (421 Thames Street; lemonandline.com) flagship store bracelets are made out of maritime materials; the Newport is the original square knot design of braided rope with a sterling silver clasp. Style Newport (306 Thames Street; stylenewport.com) creates custom-made jewelry using nautical signal flags and next door, Shore Soap Company (302 Thames Street; shoresoapco. com) makes soaps and lotions inspired by the sea—such as Catching Waves made with coconut oils and sea salt and Mermaid Kisses Lotion with shea butter and sea buckthorn extract. Savor the seaside bounty at a more than reasonable price at Benjamin's Raw Bar (254 Thames Street; 401-846-8757), which has specials that include $1 oysters and $.75 clams. At Bouchard Restaurant (505 Thames Street; bouchardnewport.com) chef and co-owner Alfred Bouchard offers refined French dishes using local ingredients including the re-stuffed roasted lobster and scallops with truffle, gruyère cheese and lobster sauce. In 2014, Bouchard and his wife Sarah opened the Revolving Door (509 Thames Street; revolvingdoorri.com) where they invite chefs from around the world to create a new menu for two to four weeks at a time. Want more history? Have a drink at a bar that was the gathering place for colonists, the White Horse Tavern (26 Marlborough Street; whitehorsenewport.com). Opened in 1673, it’s the oldest tavern in the United States. Closer to the water, Newport’s wharves are dotted with more restaurants and shops. On Bannister’s Wharf, sit in an Adirondack chair outside the Coffee Grinder (33 Bannister's Wharf; coffeegrindernewport.com) and admire the harbor while sipping an authentic Italian espresso. On the way, you’ll pass the Clarke Cooke House (24 Bannister's Wharf; 781-849-2900), where proper dress is required for an intimate dining experience in the SkyBar with harbor views.

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Littleton, New Hampshire    It should come as no surprise that the hometown of Eleanor H. Porter, author of “Pollyanna,” is bursting with color, positivity and art. In the months without snow, Littleton’s Main Street has five pianos that are scrolled with “Be Glad, make music” set up along Main Street.” In Harmony Park chimes are set up for playing, while in an alleyway colorful umbrellas suspended in midair look as if they’ve been swept up by a breeze. “Our town is deliberately artsy, deliberately inviting and deliberately collaborative,” says interim executive director of the Littleton Area Chamber of Commerce Jessica Bunker. Main Street has, almost exclusively, locally owned businesses. Chutters (43 Main Street; chutters.com) candy shop boasts the longest candy counter in the world (112 feet). Fill a bag choosing from over 500 types of candy, and don’t miss out on the homemade fudge with over 50 flavors, like raspberry cheesecake and moose tracks. Nest of Littleton (97 Main Street; nestoflittleton.com) sells home décor and women’s accessories, and on the lower level is Gallery at the Best, where work by 25 local jewelry makers, photographers and potters is on display. Open seven days a week from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m., Littleton Diner (145 Main Street; littletondiner.com) has been a local gathering place since 1930. Pancakes made with flour from the Littleton Grist Mill are served all day. Gold House Pizza (87 Main Street; goldhousepizza.com) has been known to cause nostalgia for their veggie grinder and turkey sub, and sauces and cheeses are made in-house. Schilling Beer Company (18 Mill Street; schillingbeer. com) brews small batches of European-inspired beers, so there could be new varieties each time you visit. The brewery occupies three levels of a converted 18th-century gristmill on the Ammonoosuc River, and if you get hungry they make Neopolitan pizzas in a wood-fired oven. Littleton has recently seen more young people moving to the area. “A lot of young folks are looking for balance in their lives—they want to have the ability to try and start their own business, have access to outdoor recreation and also a safe place for their families—we happen to have that magic mix,” says Bunker. NEL

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