Page 1

OLD LYME, CT HARPSWELL, ME GLOUCESTER, MA GREENPORT, NY

+ 4 MORE

INSIDE:

LIGHTHOUSE TOUR

ON LONG ISLAND SOUND

BOATER-FRIENDLY BEACHES

IN RHODE ISLAND


Visit isit Your New England Pursuit Factory Authorized Dealer All Seasons Marine • www.allseasonsmarineworks.com Atlantic Outboard Inc. • www.atlanticoutboard.com Bosun’s Marine • www.bosuns.com Striper Marina • www.stripermarina.com Yarmouth Boat Yard • www.yarmouthboatyard.com


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FOR NEARLY 60 YEARS, Boston Whaler has led the industry with award-winning, innovative boats that deliver incredible performance, comfort and capability. The new Outrage models epitomize Whaler’s commitment to Core Confidence.

YOUR NEW ENGLAND BOSTON WHALER DEALERS BOWDEN MARINE SERVICES Bar Harbor, ME SHEP BROWN’S BOAT BASIN Meredith, NH NANTUCKET MARINE Nantucket, MA NAUSET MARINE Marion, MA Pocasset, MA Orleans, MA YORK HARBOR MARINE SERVICE York, ME SABA MARINE, LLC Colchester, VT

MARINEMAX Brookfield, CT New Milford, CT Norwalk, CT Westbrook, CT MARINEMAX RUSSO Boston, MA Danvers, MA Hingham, MA Newport, RI Wakefield, RI Warwick, RI PORT HARBOR MARINE South Portland, ME Kittery, ME Raymond, ME Rockport, ME Holden, ME

BOSTONWHALERNEWENGLAND.COM

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NEW ENGLAND BOATING

TABLE OF CONTENTS

A BOUNTY OF BEACONS

70

BEACH IT!

84

The fascinating legends and lore of Long Island Sound’s most notable lighthouses.

Set a course for these 10 boater-friendly beaches in Narragansett Bay.

50

DEPARTMENTS 28 THE HELM

The boating “stuff” we accumulate includes a treasure trove of memories.

162 DOCK & DINE: ARCHER’S ON THE PIER, ROCKLAND, ME 168 VIEW ASTERN

NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

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50

GREENPORT GETAWAY

Connecticut boaters have an easy run to this protected and welcoming port on the North Fork of Long Island.

36 BOATING GEAR & GIFTS

Our pick of fun, clever and useful items for the nautical-minded.

DESTINATIONS

60

60

QUIET TIME IN OLD LYME

Long a haven for artists and nature-lovers, Old Lyme is a rare find along the heavily traveled Connecticut coast.

100

PADANARAM RISING

Changes are afoot in this lovely little harbor on the shores of Buzzards Bay. CONTINUED NEW ENGLAND BOATING

15


NEW ENGLAND NEW ENGLAND BOATING BOATING

TABLE TABLEOF OFCONTENTS CONTENTS

138 HISTORY LESSONS 148

HARPSWELL’S HIDDEN GEMS

Spend some time poking around the waters surrounding this magical Maine destination.

Traditional wooden boatbuilding is only part of what students discover at Lowell’s Boat Shop.

106 112 120 18

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128

NATURALLY PAMET

Cape Cod’s Pamet Harbor makes a delightful daytrip for trailer-boaters and paddlers, as well as a peaceful respite for coastal cruisers.

DUXBURY DELIGHTS

Navigating the shallow waters of this beautiful bay can be tricky, but the rewards within are worth the effort.

DOWN TO THE SEA

The city of Gloucester is drawing more attention from boaters with a revitalized waterfront and expanded marine facilities.

YORK TIME

Take a journey into the past on a visit to this protected harbor and scenic river on Maine’s southern coast.

NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM


Embassy Cruising Guide

eBook now Available! CHOOSE YOUR FAVORITE – available in both print and eBook formats! PRINTED Embassy Cruising Guides offer full-color photography, charts and facility tables. Specifically designed for easy use, they feature a waterproof, plastic spiral and wrap-around covers. DIGITAL Embassy Cruising Guide provide convenient, on-the-go reading with interactive links. Available for immediate purchase on iBooks® and Google Play.™

NEtiW on! Edi

R View full-color NOAA chart segments in full-screen mode. Easily find facility locations.

Smartly plan your cruise using clear, concise, and up-to-date facility tables.

Harbor photos and local port-of-call knowledge provide valuable navigation advice.

Quickly visit advertiser websites by simply tapping on an ad.

Search for “Embassy Cruising Guide” on iBooks and on Google Play. Apple, the Apple logo, and iPad are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc. Google Play is a trademark of Google Inc.

Purchase print products at your local marine dealer or bookstore.

1-888-839-5551 www.maptech.com

Our product family also includes electronic navigation software, digital charts, waterproof chartbooks, waterproof charts, and waterproof inland lakes and waterways maps.


© 2017 Garmin Ltd. or its subsidiaries

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GPSMAP® 1242


NEW ENGLAND BOATING

THE HELM

EDITORIAL & CONTENT DIRECTOR

Janice Randall Rohlf

IT’S REMARKABLE, THE AMOUNT OF GEAR, GADGETS, TOOLS—and in many cases, actual boats—one accumulates over a lifetime of boating and fishing. In my case, the volume of “stuff” is considerable, even ridiculous. In the last 30 years, I have filled my shop with enough stuff to stock a West Marine store: tackle boxes containing every lure known to man and fish, several hundred feet of anchor line and three anchors, two sets of oars, a dozen lifejackets, shelves groaning under the weight of bearing grease, boat soap, wax, deck cleaner, fogging spray, lower-unit oil, great bins of rags, a daggerboard and rudder, a 25-horsepower outboard engine, an electric trolling motor, spare trailer lights, two ball hitches, several hundred dollars worth of miscellaneous marine hardware, a jumble of reels intended for rehabilitation and no less than five kayaks. And scattered among all that stuff is a boatload of memories, which is one reason I can’t seem to throw any of it away. (Funny how I don’t have that problem with old rakes and lawnmowers.) I look at the outboard and relive the trip my wife and I took around Cape Cod in a small skiff. I look at a kayak and see my family paddling down a coastal river. I spy the wooden daggerboard and see my son and I taking our first sail in his Sunfish. I notice the pink Barbie rod and see my daughter struggling to land her first sea bass. Similarly, New England Boating has a way of dredging up memories by showcasing many of the destinations and points of interest beloved by avid boaters. I’m willing to bet that a few of you know one of the boater-friendly beaches of Narragansett Bay, so beautifully photographed by Cate Brown on page 84. And I’ve no doubt that some of the Long Island Sound lighthouses highlighted by Caryn Davis in her feature on page 70 will sound a foghorn. And if you’ve ever ordered the lobster club at Archer’s on the Pier in Rockland, Maine, the story on page 164 will leave you salivating over the memory of this delicious (if messy) sandwich and the wonderful view. Of course, this issue remains true to form by highlighting many well-known harbors in New England. Among them are Greenport, New York; Old Lyme, Connecticut; Harpswell, Maine; Padanaram, Massachusetts; York, Maine; and Gloucester, Massachusetts. And if you want to learn more about that aforementioned small-boat trip around the Cape, check out the feature on Pamet Harbor on page 106. So read on, and relive some boating adventures or, even better, be inspired to make new ones this season. And if this magazine happens to find its way into your collection of boating stuff, we’ll be flattered indeed!

EDITOR

Tom Richardson: New England Boating, New England FIshing LMS EDITORS

Maria Allen: South Shore Living, Plymouth Magazine Rachel Arroyo: Home Remodeling Kelly Chase: Southern New England Living, Falmouth Magazine, Hingham Magazine Lisa Leigh Connors: Cape Cod Magazine, Chatham Magazine Rob Duca: New England Golf & Leisure Colby Radomski: Southern New England Weddings Janice Randall Rohlf: Southern New England Home ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Kelly Chase ............................................ CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Eric Brust-Akdemir ART DIRECTOR/SOUTH SHORE LIVING

Alexandra Bondarek ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTORS

Wendy Kipfmiller-O’Brien Jennifer Kothalanka PRODUCTION MANAGER

Rachel Clayton DESIGNERS

Kamie Richard Kendra Sousa ............................................ TV/VIDEO SENIOR WRITER/PRODUCER/HOST

Parker Kelley TV/VIDEO SENIOR EDITOR/VIDEOGRAPHER

Jimmy Baggott VIDEOGRAPHER/EDITOR

Barry Kneller ............................................ CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Gaelen P. Adam, Caryn B. Davis, Rob Duca, Ken Textor, Malerie Yolen-Cohen CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Benjamin Boynton, Cate Brown, Caryn B. Davis, Joe Devenney Published by

Lighthouse Media Solutions www.lhmediasolutions.com Single copy price $7.99/$8.99 Canada. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without the written

Tom Richardson Editor & Co-Host

28

NEW ENGLAND BOATING

permission of the publisher. Publisher disclaims all responsibility for omissions, errors, and unsolicited materials. Printed in USA.

NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM


PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Russell A. Piersons rpiersons@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................

CHIEF OPERATIONS OFFICER (DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT)

David F. Jensen djensen@lhmediasolutions.com PRESIDENT (VIDEO-TV)

Gene Allen gallen@lhmediasolutions.com VICE PRESIDENT SALES & MARKETING

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Mike Alleva malleva@lhmediasolutions.com VICE PRESIDENT ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT

Mark Skala mskala@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................ ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER AND BRAND MANAGER NEW ENGLAND BOATING

Anchor Media LLC 860-452-4628 ............................................

Anne Bousquet abousquet@lhmediasolutions.com Jane Cournan jcournan@lhmediasolutions.com David Honeywell dhoneywell@lhmediasolutions.com Janice Rogers jrogers@lhmediasolutions.com Erin Soderstrom esoderstrom@lhmediasolutions.com Suzanne Ryan sryan@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................ DIRECTOR ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT

Oceanna O’Donnell ACCOUNT MANAGERS

Sharon Bartholomew Ailish Belair Michelle Overby SALES AD COORDINATOR (PUBLISHING, TV, WEB)

Hillary Portell hportell@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................

SENIOR WEB DEVELOPER

David Fontes dfontes@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................ SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

Allie Herzog

DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER

Lannan O’Brien

............................................ CONTROLLER

Connie Walsh cwalsh@lhmediasolutions.com ASSISTANT CONTROLLER

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Laura Scheuer lscheuer@lhmediasolutions.com

Mondays at 6:30 p.m. on NESN

Sundays at 11:30 a.m. on CBS Boston Cape Cod Office: 508.534.9291 396 Main Street, Suite 15 Hyannis, MA 02601 Boston Office: 508.534.9291 7 Tide Street, Boston, MA 02210 Rhode Island Office: 401.396.9888 P.O. Box 568, Portsmouth, RI 02871 ON THE COVER:

Back Cove 32 on the Connecticut River. Photo by Tommy Costello.

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NEW ENGLAND BOATING

NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM


SOME PEOPLE THINK TUNA IS CHICKEN THAT COMES IN A CAN.


The power and reliability of the Verado 350 will take these people to an aisle they won’t find in any grocery store. Sorry, Charlie. Ahi’s on the menu tonight. Learn more at mercurymarine.com or visit your local dealer, today.

CONNECTICUT Branford River Marine Branford, CT 203-488-8921 branfordrivermarine.com Defender Industries Inc Waterford, CT 800-628-8225 defender.com Guilford Boat Yards Guilford, CT 203-453-5031 guilfordboatct.com Niantic Bay Mobile Marine Repair LLC Mystic, CT 60-848-2628 Oak Leaf Marina Inc Old Saybrook, CT 860-388-9817 oakleafmarina.com O’Haras Landing Salisbury, CT 860-824-7583 oharaslanding.com Spicers Marina LLC Noank, CT 860-536-4978 spicersmarina.com

McLellan Brothers Inc Everett, MA 617-389-5508 mclellanbrosinc.com

Royal River Boat Repair Inc Yarmouth, ME 207-846-9577 royalriverboat.com

Jamestown Distributors Bristol, RI 401-253-3840 jamestowndistributors.com

Merrimac Marine Supply Methuen, MA 978-682-7291 merrimacmarine.com

RPM Service Inc Naples , ME 207-693-3014 rpm-services.com

VERMONT

Obsession Boat Sales East Falmouth, MA 508-540-0877 obsessionboatsales.com

South Port Marine South Portland, ME 207-799-8191 southportmarine.com

Portside Marine Service Danvers, MA 978-777-5727 portsidemarine.us

TW Willard Inc Caribou, ME 207-493-4507

Rick’s Outboard Marine Inc Fairhaven, MA 508-992-4888 Riverfront Marine Sports Inc Salisbury, MA 978-462-7755 riverfrontmarine.com Slips Capeway Marine Inc Raynham, MA 508-822-6948 slipscapewaymarine.com

M A S S AC H U S E T T S

USA Marine Inc Worcester, MA 508-791-7116 usamarineinc.com

Action Marine & Water Sports Inc Holyoke, MA 413-534-8000 actionmarineholyoke.com

Wareham Boat Yard & Marina Inc West Wareham, MA 508-748-1472 wareham-boatyard-marina.com

Bill’s Outboard Motor Service Inc Hingham, MA 781-749-1303 billsoutboard.com

MAINE

Captain Bub’s Marine Inc Lakeville, MA 508-763-4000 captainbubsmarine.com Doug Russell Marine Worcester, MA 508-791-4917 dougrussell.com Essex Marina LLC Essex, MA 978-768-6833 essexmarinallc.com Grey Lady Marine Acquisition Company LLC Nantucket, MA 508-228-6525 greyladymarine.com Hank’s Marine Cherry Valley, MA 508-892-4788 hanksmarine.com

Branch Pond Marine Ellsworth, ME 207-667-2268 branchpondmarine.com Clark Marine Manchester, ME 207-622-7011 clarkmarinemaine.com Mid Maine Marine & RV Inc Oakland, ME 207-465-2146 midmainemarine.com Oquossoc Marine Inc Oquossoc, ME 207-864-5477 oquossocmarine.com Parker’s Boathouse George, ME 207-636-2722 parkersboathouse.com Port Harbor Marine Inc South Portland, ME 207-767-3254 portharbormarine.com

White Rock Outboard Inc Gorham, ME 207-892-9606 whiterockoutboard.com NEW HAMPSHIRE Dover Marine Dover, NH 603-742-5453 dovermarine.com Green’s Marine Inc Hooksett, NH 603-485-5131 greensmarine.net Monadnock Boat Store Rindge, NH 603-532-5911 Stoddard, NH 603-847-9300 monadnockboatstore.com Paugus Bay Marina Laconia, NH 603-524-1233 paugusbaymarina.com Ward’s Boat Shop Inc Center Ossipee, NH 603-539-4563 wardsboatshop.com Winnisquam Marine Belmont, NH 603-524-8380 winnisquammarine.com RHODE ISLAND Billington Cove Marinainc Wakefield, RI 401-783-1266 CL Marine Inc Warwick, RI 401-732-6764 clmarineri.com

Boat Headquarters Swanton, VT 802-868-4444 boatheadquarters.com Fairlee Marine Fairlee, VT 802-333-9745 fairleemarine.com Vermont Home & Marine Williston, VT 802-658-5427 vthomemarine.com Woodard Marine Inc Hydeville, VT 802-265-3690 woodardmarine.com N E W YO R K Canada Lake Store & Marine Caroga Lake, NY 518-835-6069 canadalakemarine.com Capital District Marina Cohoes, NY 518-237-3442 capitaldistrictmarina.com Chic’s Marina Inc Bolton Landing, NY 518-644-2170 chicsmarina.com CR’s Marine Service Inc Schenectady, NY 518-370-3596 crsmarine.com Day Brothers Boats Plattsburgh, NY 518-562-2628 daybrothersboats.com E-Z Marine & Storage Inc Brant Lake, NY 518-494-7381 ezmarineandstorage.com Point Breeze Marine Saratoga Springs, NY 518-587-3397 pointbreezemarina.com Snug Harbor Marina Inc Ticonderoga, NY 518-585-6685 snugharbormarinainc.com


NEW ENGLAND BOATING

GEAR & GIFTS

1. 1. BOARD FEAT

—————————————— DEEP Ocean Apparel’s new Board-to-Bar shorts are designed for rugged, comfortable fishing duties, yet are stylish enough to wear about town. Available in black or gray, the quick-drying shorts feature subtle red and blue tagging and roomy pockets. Made entirely of four-way stretch material, the shorts are anti-microbial and stain-resistant. $65 SHOPDEEP.COM

2. SOUPER MUG

—————————————— This big, enameled metal mug is the ideal receptacle for a hearty soup or drink. Featuring a playful lobster motif, a navy ruled band and chromed-metal rim, it’s available from the Mayflower Shop in Chatham, Massachusetts.

2.

$18 (508) 945-0065; THEMAYFLOWERSHOP.COM

3. BRILLIANT BY DESIGN

—————————————— Lovers of classic boats will covet this large and weighty volume on one of the world’s most innovative and prolific naval architects. Herreshoff, American Masterpieces by Maynard Bray and Claas van der Linde is packed with information and lore on 36 classic designs created by the brilliant Nathanael Greene Herreshoff.

3.

Bray and van der Linde offer insightful commentary on Herreshoff’s design evolution in every facet, from lines to displacement to hardware, accompanied by full-color images of each vessel both in detail and under way, as well as unique color reproductions of Herreshoff’s own archival plans and drawings.

1.

$100 (212) 354-5500; WWNORTON.COM

4. WOODEN WONDERS

—————————————— Looking for a great gift for the boater in your life, or the perfect decoration for a beach or lake house? These beautiful and unique maps by Nautical Wood Maps are laser-cut from Baltic birch and engraved before being stained and hand-assembled in a wood frame. Choose from a collection of over 100 stock maps, as well as a collection of customizable maps. $158 - $1,295 (941) 388-7754; NAUTICALWOODMAPS.COM

4. 36

NEW ENGLAND BOATING

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5.

5. FLARE PLAY

6.

—————————————— The SOS Distress Light is the first and only LED visual distress signaling device that meets Coast Guard requirements as a substitute for pyrotechnic flares. Unlike traditional flares, the electronic Distress Light never expires, so you don’t have to worry about replacement and disposal. The floating unit can be handheld, tethered or hoisted aloft, and the three C-sized batteries deliver 60 hours of operation. $99.95 (410) 263-6700; WEEMS-PLATH.COM

6. DOME TEAM

—————————————— The new GMR Fantom 18 and 24 solid-state, pulse-compression radomes from Garmin offer MotionScope Doppler technology and 40 watts of power, the highest in the industry. Available in 18” or 24” footprints, they bring Garmin’s award-winning Fantom technology to smaller boats and at a lower price point. Doppler processing allows the Fantom to detect moving targets in real time, helping you avoid potential collisions, find flocks of birds and track weather. The radar’s MotionScope feature highlights moving targets on the display with an easy-to-see color. When the Echo Trails setting is activated, a fading trail helps identify the direction of the moving target and potential collision threats. The trails shown are corrected for the boat’s rotation when the radar is interfaced with an autopilot or heading sensor. Pulse-compression technology provides high resolution while maximizing energy to enhance target detection. Pulse expansion can then maximize target size to help differentiate real targets from noise. The Fantom 18 features a 5.2-degree beam width, while the Fantom 24 offers a narrower 3.7-degree beam that paints a precise, high-resolution image. Both radomes can detect objects from as close as 20 feet all the way out to 48 nautical miles, and the dual-range feature lets you see both close- and long-range simultaneously. Radar data for one or both ranges can be overlaid on a chart. $2,000 - $2,800 GARMIN.COM

7. FOUR STROKE OF GENIUS

—————————————— Yamaha’s next-gen F90 four-stroke outboard is lighter, quieter and quicker than its predecessor, and leads its class in torque and acceleration. The new F90 employs a single overhead camshaft to drive four valves per cylinder, thereby saving weight while increasing volumetric efficiency and creating more power. Weighing in at 353 pounds, the engine is 13 pounds lighter than its predecessor and displaces 1.8 liters versus 1.6 liters.

7.

The F90 is compatible with Yamaha’s Variable Trolling RPM switch for slow trolling, and can be rigged for use with Yamaha’s multifunction tiller handle. Charging has also been increased, with the F90 offering 35 amps of power over the previous 25 amps. PRICE: $10,405 (20” SHAFT) YAHAMAOUTBOARDS.COM

NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

NEW ENGLAND BOATING

37


NEW ENGLAND BOATING

GEAR & GIFTS

8.

8. PET PROJECT

—————————————— Nautically inspired and handmade in Marion, Massachusetts, the Island Time Pet Toys line includes beautiful and functional rope dog leashes, dog collars and toys constructed of cotton line and using time-tested splicing techniques. Each splice is carefully hand-sewn in place with waxed sail twine using a nautical whipping stitch, while hardware is high-quality bronze. Cat toys feature a traditional nautical monkey’s fist knot with a hidden bell and are artfully crafted of 100% cotton seine twine. $3.95-$80 (774) 766-0468; ISLANDTIMEPETS.COM

9. CLASSIC CLASP

—————————————— The Whydah Galley bracelet by Cape Clasp is made of triple-wrap rigging twine and features a red bronze or silver anchor clasp. The bracelet is adjustable to fit a variety of wrist sizes, and comes with a drawstring bag. Twine colors include navy, black, red/navy and red/yellow. RED BRONZE: $30 SILVER: $60 (401) 787-3656; CAPECLASP.COM

10. SEA SWEETS

—————————————— This clever—and delicious—assortment of handmade chocolates comprises favorite clambake items ranging from chocolate lobsters to corn on the cob. Seafood never tasted so sweet! Available from the Chatham Candy Manor. $14 (508) 945-0825; CANDYMANOR.COM

10. 9.

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11.

11. SNAP!

—————————————— The Snap Tool Multi-Key from Davis takes the standard deck-plate key to a new level by combining it with a button snapper (and unsnapper)—perfect for shrunken canvas or corroded snaps—and a zipper puller that makes it easy to pull sticky or corroded zippers, including those with missing pull tabs. The tool also has 5/16”, 3/8”, 7/16” and 1/2” hex wrench sockets, a scraper and a recessed blade for cutting line and cord. Rounding out the list of useful features is a slotted screwdriver, a Phillips head driver, a bottle opener and a lanyard hole. The Snap Tool Multi-Key fits most deck caps, and its shackle tool works on both galvanized and stainless shackle pins. $12.99 (510) 732-9229; DAVISNET.COM

NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

NEW ENGLAND BOATING

39


Find Your Nearest Yamaha New England Dealer Here — We’ve Got You Covered NEW HAMPSHIRE INDEPENDENT MARINE Moultonboro independentmarine.com (603) 476-5580 ROCKINGHAM BOAT REPAIR AND SALES Hampstead rockinghamboat.com (603) 329-5625 CONNECTICUT ALL SEASONS MARINE WORKS Westport allseasonsmarineworks.com (203) 838-9038 BOATS INCORPORATED Niantic boatsinc.com (860) 739-6251 ISLAND COVE MARINA, LLC Old Saybrook islandcovemarina.net 860-388-0029 J. CATALANO & SONS INC. Greenwich catalanoandsons.com (203) 531-9207 PINE ISLAND MARINE Groton pineislandmarina.com (860) 445-9729 TWIN HULL BOATS, LLC Bridgeport twinhullboats.com (203) 330-8964 RHODE ISLAND BREWER ST. BOAT WORKS Newport bsbw.com (401) 847-0321

OCEAN HOUSE MARINA Charlestown oceanhousemarina.com (401) 364-6040 SILVER SPRING MARINE Wakefield silverspringmarine.com (401)-783-0783 MASSACHUSETTS 3A MARINE Hingham 3amarine.com 781-749-3250 A & J BOAT CORPORATION Marion ajboatcorp.com (508) 748-2800 ALLEN HARBOR MARINE SERVICE Harwich Port allenharbor.com 508-430-6008 ATLANTIC BOATS INC. E. Wareham atlanticboats.net (508) 295-8005 BAERT MARINE Middleton baertmarine.com (800) 522-7712 BASS RIVER MARINA West Dennis bassrivermarina.com (508) 394-8341 BOSUN’S MARINE Mashpee Peabody bosuns.com (800) 522-7712

BURR BROTHERS BOATS, INC. Marion burrbros.com (508) 748-0541 CAPE ANN MARINE SALES & SERVICE Gloucester capeannmarine.com (978) 283-0806 CATAUMET BOATS INC. Cataumet cataumetboats.com (508) 563-7102 MACDOUGALLS’ CAPE COD MARINE SERVICE Falmouth macdougalls.com (508) 548-3146 MILLWAY MARINA Barnstable millwaymarina.com (508) 362-4904 NAUSET MARINE Orleans nausetmarine.com (508) 255-0777 OYSTER HARBORS MARINE Osterville oysterharborsmarine.com (508) 428-2017 OUTERMOST HARBOR MARINE Chatham outermostharbor.com (508) 945-2030 RIVERFRONT MARINE SPORTS, INC Salisbury riverfrontmarine.com (978) 462-7755

SCITUATE BOAT WORKS Scituate scituateboatworks.com (781) 545-0487 TERN HARBOR MARINA Weymouth ternharbormarina.com (781) 337-1964 MAINE BOWDEN MARINE SERVICE Bar Harbor bowdenmarine.com (207) 288-5247 HAMLIN’S MARINE Waterville hamlinsmarine.com (207) 872-5660 HODGDON YACHT SERVICES Southport hodgdonyachtservices.com (207) 633-2970 MOOSABEC MARINE Jonesport (207) 497-2196 NAVTRONICS York navtronics.com (207) 363-1150 YARMOUTH BOAT YARD/MOOSE LANDING MARINA Naples mooselandingmarina.com (207) 693-6264


NEW ENGLAND BOATING

GEAR & GIFTS

12. TUNED IN

—————————————— The WebWatch antenna is an all-in-one WiFi hot spot and high-def antenna that can keep your devices connected to the Internet from nearby hot spots or via cellular data. It also improves reception and offers more range than PC and mobile device wireless data connections.

12.

WebWatch provides Internet access for up to 32 users from a nearby WiFi hot spot or, with a dataonly AT&T SIM card, a cellular network, with speeds of up to 4G. It also supports T-Mobile and Cricket networks up to 3G speeds. The cutting-edge system shares the signal wirelessly throughout the boat or via an Ethernet cable. With the built-in HDTV antenna, you can enjoy local TV network programming with sharp, highdefinition picture quality. The antenna receives over-the-air digital signals, allowing uninterrupted connectivity when satellite connections fail. $850 - $900 (803) 227-1590; SHAKESPEARE-CE.COM

13. VISION QUEST

—————————————— The super-compact FLIR M100 and M200 marine thermal-imaging cameras bring night-vision technology to smaller boats. Both models feature a Boson high-performance thermal camera core with an integrated multi-core video processor that delivers superior image quality. When combined with a Raymarine Axiom MFD, ClearCruise intelligent thermal analytics will visually and audibly alert you when “non-water” objects such as other boats, obstacles, or navigation markers are identified.   The M100 offers adjustable tilt to compensate for the boat’s running angle, while the M200 has full pan and tilt for viewing 360 degrees in both vertical and horizontal planes. M100: $2,495 M200: $3,495 (800) 254-0630; FLIR.COM/MARINE

13.

14.

14. SOUND POLICY

—————————————— FUSION’s RV-FS402 Sound-Panel is a complete, shallow-mount, 200-watt, dual-speaker system designed for simple and versatile installation. Encapsulated in a single enclosure, the SoundPanel incorporates dual 4” speakers, tweeters and a passive radiator, all tuned for premium sound delivery. Available with black or white grills, as well as four mounting accessory brackets, the Sound-Panel fits any vessel and boasts an IP65 waterproof rating. $199 (623) 580-9000; FUSIONENTERTAINMENT.COM

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NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM


The New 2017 Sailfish 245DC The Latest Entry In the Versatile Sailfish Family of Dual Consoles!

Style, Seating, Storage -- The Sailfish 245DC is Compact and Complete! The Sailfish 245DC is the latest entry in our exciting dual console line-up. It boasts comfortable seating for up to 14 people, our high performance sixth generation VDS hull, highly ergonomic deck layout, and enough storage space to accommodate whatever your crew brings on board. The Sailfish 245DC is another “leader in its class” of dual consoles.

DEEP FULLY UPHOLSTERED BOW SEATING

RECLINING CAPTIAN’S CHAIR - FLIP UP ARMRESTS

SPACIOUS STEP DOWN HEAD

3 POSITION LOUNGE/STORAGE/COOLER

25 GAL. TRANSOM LIVEWELL

FOLD DOWN AFT SEAT / BOLSTER

The 245DC is extremely versatile, family friendly and yet respectful of Sailfish’s proud 30-year fishing heritage. It features a spacious well appointed step-down head, optional retractable ski-pole, in-floor and above deck storage, plenty of cup holders, and an optional galley with a sink, counters and a refrigerator. These features make the 245DC a fantastic, fun-on-the-water day boat. Deep bow seating, a three position, port-side passenger lounge, adjustable captains chair and fold-up seating surrounding the cockpit provides comfortable seating for all while allowing for maximum fishing space. Adding to its fishing credentials is a transom live well, in-floor and bow-seat fish boxes, and transom, gunwhale and hard top frame rod holders.

Visit your nearest Sailfish dealer and take a walk through the Sailfish 245DC and Discover the Difference - the Sailfish Difference. MarineMax - Norwalk, CT .......................................................... 203-831-6311 MarineMax - Westbrook, CT ...................................................... 860-339-5581 MarineMax / Russo - Boston, MA ......................................... 617-288-1000 MarineMax / Russo - Danvers, MA ...................................... 781-395-0050 MarineMax / Russo - Hingham, MA ..................................... 781-875-3619 MarineMax - Warwick, RI ........................................................... 401-886-7899 Port Harbor Marine - South Portland, ME ........................... 207-767-3254

www.sailfishboats.com


NEW ENGLAND BOATING

GEAR & GIFTS

16.

15.

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15. BACK IN BLACK

—————————————— NavPod’s PowerPod watertight electronics enclosures are now available in a black carbon finish to match today’s high-tech equipment. Designed to resist impact, vibration and moisture, PowerPods are crafted with a heavy-gauge, UV-stable, acrylic-capped ABS material. And like all NavPods, the Carbon Fiber PowerPods are manufactured with a double gasket system that keeps spray and salt away from electrical connections, helping to ensure the longevity of your marine electronics. The units are installed with nickel-chrome-plated stainless steel tamperproof screws that provide peace of mind when a vessel is left unattended. Available for 7”, 9” and 12” LCD displays from major marineelectronics manufacturers. $300 - $530 (541) 318-1272; NAVPOD.COM

16. FLY HIGH

—————————————— The Asquith graphite fly rod series from G. Loomis comprises a full range of 9´ models up to 12-weight, plus five spey models. The troutfocused four- through six-weight rods feature custom bamboo/aluminum reel seats, while heavier models are fitted with aluminum reel seats with Shimano’s CI4+ material inserts that reduce weight and increase durability. All Asquith rods feature Titanium SIC Sea Guide stripper guides and REC Recoil snake guides. $1,000 - $1,700 (877) 577-0600; GLOOMIS.COM

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17. LOUD & CLEAR

—————————————— The M93D handheld VHF radio from Icom features active noise-canceling, a dedicated built-in DSC receiver and an internal GPS, as well as a builtin compass and nav functions. A new flat-sheet keypad makes for a super-slim profile while providing a “positive click” feel during operation. Another nifty feature is Float ‘n Flash. Should the radio be dropped overboard, a flashing light will activate, even when the power is turned off. Meanwhile, the AquaQuake draining function uses low-frequency sound waves to clear water from the speaker grill for clearer audio in wet conditions. Additional features include a 2.3” full dot matrix, high-contrast display; IPX7 waterproof rating; 50-waypoint memories with alphanumeric names for Navigation, and a loud BTL 900 mW speaker. $350 (800) 872-4266; ICOMAMERICA.COM

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NEW YORK DESTINATION

GREENPORT

This village on Peconic Bay has quietly grown into a bona fide boating destination that welcomes vessels large and small. BY MALERIE YOLEN-COHEN PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARYN B. DAVIS

Stirling Harbor serves as a well-protected hideaway for boaters in the Greenport area.

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ISTORICALLY, THE NORTH FORK of Long Island has been sleepy and rural, lacking the dazzle of the celebrity-rich South Fork Hamptons. But that’s changing quickly, as evidenced by the village of Greenport, which overlooks beautiful and protected Peconic Bay. Some nine miles west of Orient Point Light, Greenport is served by five marinas and makes an attractive daytrip or weekend destination for boaters, especially those launching from Connecticut. Greenport’s two main streets are chock full of great eateries, adorable boutiques and small but enriching museums. However, the best news for boaters is the creation of a lovely waterfront park, complete with a public marina for transients and a historic carousel.

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NEW YORK DESTINATION

GREENPORT

PEACEFUL PECONIC “Bug Light”—the affectionate name for Orient Long Beach Bar Lighthouse—marks the entrance to Peconic Bay. The bay stretches 20 miles from Riverhead to Shelter Island, at its easternmost point, and remains one of the most idyllic boating spots in the world. Channels are deep and wide, and even the small inlets and coves have enough water at low tide to accommodate larger vessels. Enveloping the bay are the long, protective arms of Long Island’s North and South Forks. Boasting rich soil and the longest growing season on the Northeast seaboard, thanks to moderate coastal temperatures and climate patterns, the North Fork is a farmer’s dream. Indeed, the area is best known for its agriculture, most notably the growing of grapes for wine making. Numerous independent wineries have sprouted in the last few decades, and most offer tours and tastings. Wine has brought tourists, who have attracted restaurateurs and merchants, and viola: the North Fork, ascending.

MANY MARINAS From Bug Light you can easily spy the Orient Yacht Club, which occupies a building that was once used to store and offload potatoes grown on nearby farms. Opposite the eastern tip of Shelter Island, you can pull into charming Gull Pond—a favorite paddling spot and the site of Greenport’s only boat launch—and Stirling Basin, where Brewer Greenport Marina, Brewer Stirling Harbor Marina and Townsend Manor Marina are located. All three are within walking distance of downtown Greenport. Directly on the harbor, opposite Shelter Island, are two more marinas: the transient-only Mitchell Park municipal marina and Claudio’s. The former is newly festooned with a contemporary enclosure for its antique carousel, a funky camera obscura building and a broad lawn used for concerts and community events. If you’re here for the day or staying overnight, it puts you within steps of the local shops and restaurants.

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Mitchell Park & Marina accommodates large yachts during the busy summer season.

The Arden Scott Maritime Monument.

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GREENPORT

Preston’s chandlery has all your boating needs covered.

SHIPBUILDING PAST And museums. Anyone interested in local maritime history will want to visit the East End Seaport Museum, which contains the original Fresnel lens from Little Gull Light and scads of information on the history of Long Beach Bar Light. Other exhibits focus on Greenport’s shipbuilding past. Local builders not only turned out gorgeous yachts and fishing vessels, but also landing craft and mine sweepers during World War II. On the second floor, another exhibit pays homage to Claudio’s Restaurant, which was opened in 1870 by a Portuguese sailor and is on the National Register of Historic Places. Berthed behind the museum is Fire Fighter, a 1931-built New York City fireboat that was recalled to service on 9-11. It’s now in the process of being restored, and serves as a floating museum. Adjacent to Fire Fighter is the venerable Peconic Star II, a 150-person charter fishing vessel also used by the East End Seaport Museum for its Bug Light cruises and tours. On the other side of Mitchell Park, Claudio’s Marina is part of the aforementioned seafood restaurant, which encompasses an upscale restaurant and the more laidback Claudio’s Clam Bar on the wharf. The next pier over is Preston’s Dock, attached to the historic Preston’s Marine Supply, which dates back to 1880 and sells everything from T-shirts to rigging materials to kayaks.

Long Beach Bar Lighthouse (a.k.a. Bug Light).

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NEW YORK DESTINATION

GREENPORT

Christian Baiz welomes visitors to the Old Field vineyards and winery.

SOLAR-POWERED TOURS Preston’s is also where you’ll find the electric-powered vessel, Glory. Co-owned by Captain David Berson (former skipper of the schooner Harvey Gamage out of New York City) and Andrew Rosen, the 1990-built, 30-foot reproduction of an Elco launch is the only electric-powered vessel on Long Island designed for passenger service. Berson and first mate Max, a champion bichon frise, give daily tours of the harbor and Peconic Bay in season. As someone who has sailed the world over, Berson considers Peconic Bay one of the most exquisite—though lesser-known—cruising grounds on the planet, seemingly custom made for recreational boaters. “It’s nicely protected, with a sandy bottom and prevailing winds from the southwest,” he points out. On his tours, Berson takes visitors along the working waterfront and talks about the history of the area and its inhabitants.

Paddleboarders make wakes on Gull Pond during a community paddle.

“Greenport has 2,100 year-round residents. It’s a hard-working, working-class community,” he says proudly. Although that, of course, is changing, a fact not lost on the witty Berson, whose business banner reads: “Artisanal, Locally Sourced, Bay-to-Boat, Hand-Crafted, Free-Range, Seasonal Tours Aboard Glory with Vine-Ripened, Barrel-Aged Captain.”

SOUTHOLD SOJOURN: PORT OF EGYPT MARINA

Port of Egypt Marina is a delightful option for Southold boaters.

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If you want to understand the essence—and future—of Long Island’s North Fork, look no further than Peter “Sep” Sepenoski, whose hands are in the dirt one day and at the helm of a Grady-White the next. Sep and his wife, Katie, are steeped in the local farming and boating communities as owners of Sep’s Farm in East Marion and Port of Egypt Marina in Southold, some three miles west of Greenport. Port of Egypt is the oldest operating Grady-White dealer in the country, and the marina offers fuel, full-service repair, a high-end restaurant, an upscale hotel and 150 slips, with 10 reserved for transients. Port of Egypt offers boaters a relaxed atmosphere and the opportunity to stay on land at the on-site Heron Harbor Suites. The marina and hotel are within easy biking distance of Greenport, a ride that takes you through bucolic salt marshes and rolling farmland. — Malerie Yolen-Cohen

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NEW YORK DESTINATION

Fresnel lens at the East End Seaport Museum.

GREENPORT

UNIQUE BOUTIQUES Proof of Greenport’s gentrification is plain to see on a walk down Main and Front Streets, which are lined by high-end, upcycled, country-cool homegoods stores like the Weathered Barn, Mercantile and dozens of other unique boutiques. Stand in line for a meal at the Frisky Oyster, Noah’s or the shuck-your-own Little Creek Oyster shack and you’ll most likely notice a certain well-heeled clientele from NYC, many of them in town to purchase wine from one of the 50 area wineries, or perhaps to buy property while it’s still cheaper than in the Hamptons.

Noah’s Restaurant focuses on fresh, local ingredients.

Once the weather cools and the majority of tourists leave, however, resident North Forkers revel in the area’s quiet beauty. And there’s still plenty to do, as winery tasting rooms, local shops and some inns remain open deep into the fall. It’s another good reason to keep your boat in the water longer this year!

Preston’s carries all things nautical.

GREENPORT AT A GLANCE HARBORMASTER (631) 477-2200

DOCKAGE, MOORINGS & SERVICE On Greenport Harbor MITCHELL PARK & MARINA (631) 477-2200; villageofgreenport.org Town-managed, transient-only marina with deep-water dockage for large vessels. Open mid-May to Labor Day. Offers showers, WiFi, water, power and pump-out. CLAUDIO’S MARINA (631) 398-4359; claudios.com Deep-water slips with power, WiFi and showers on the Greenport waterfront.

On Stirling Harbor BREWER STIRLING HARBOR MARINA (631) 477-0828; byy.com Slips for vessels up to 90 feet, pool, showers, restaurant, laundry, fuel, fitness center, marine supplies and free shuttle to town. BREWER YACHT YARD AT GREENPORT (631) 477-9594; byy.com Full-service boatyard and marina with 200 slips, showers, laundry, ice, supplies, on-site restaurant, pool and transport to town.

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TOWNSEND MANOR MARINA (631) 477-2000; townsendinn.com Resort facility with high-end accommodations for boats up to 60 feet.

LAUNCH RAMP

Gull Pond Beach (Norman E. Klipp Park) Two-lane ramp with tie-up float and parking near Gull Pond Inlet.

KAYAK RENTAL

EAGLES NECK PADDLING CO. (631) 765-3502; eaglesneck.com Kayak and paddleboard rentals, along with guided tours of Peconic Bay.

WHERE TO EAT

CLAUDIO’S (631) 477-0627; claudios.com A Greenport institution overlooking the harbor. Specializes in seafood. NOAH’S (631) 477-6720; chefnoahs.com New American cuisine with an emphasis on inventive small plates made with locally sourced ingredients. THE FRISK Y OYSTER (631) 477-4265; thefriskyoyster.com Upscale American bistro cuisine served in a fun “hipster” atmosphere.

LUCHARITO’S (631) 477-6666; lucharitos.com Authentic Baja-style Mexican cuisine. BRIX & RYE (631) 477-6985; brixandrye.com Old-timey cocktails and New York-style pizza served in a “speakeasy” setting. STIRLING SAKE (631) 477-6782; stirlingsake.com Wide variety of artisanal sake and authentic Japanese food. ALDO’S (631) 477-6300; aldos.com Block Island boaters will be familiar with Aldo, whose Greenport bakery specializes in fine roasted coffee and pastries.

COOL SHOPS

THE WEATHERED BARN (631) 477-6811 theweatheredbarngreenport.com Locally crafted jewelry, home and gift items. MERCANTILE NORTH FORK (862) 333-9036 Home furnishings and housewares with an urban farmhouse flare.

THINGS TO SEE & DO

EAST END SEAPORT MUSEUM (631) 477-2100; eastendseaport.org Small but intriguing maritime and community history museum. TOURS ABOARD GLORY (631) 477-2515; greenportlaunch.com Enjoy informative tours aboard Long Island’s first and only electric-powered launch. FIRE FIGHTER FIREBOAT MUSEUM (631) 333-2230; americasfireboat.com Historic NYC fireboat and floating museum. PECONIC STAR II (631) 875-2631; peconicstarboats.com Sport fishing charters and lighthouse tours in and around Peconic Bay. MITCHELL PARK CAROUSEL (631) 477-2200 Historic merry-go-round open daily in season. $2 per ride. THE OLD FIELD VINEYARDS (631) 765-0004; theoldfield.com Tour the winery and sample fine wine at this vineyard and winery in Southold.

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CONNECTICUT DESTINATION

OLD LYME

Long a haven for artists, nature-lovers and boaters seeking peace and tranquility, Old Lyme is a rare find along the heavily traveled Connecticut coast.

BY MALERIE YOLEN-COHEN PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARYN B. DAVIS

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Vast marshes dotted with osprey nesting stands cover Old Lyme’s Great Island.

HHHH. YOU’RE APPROACHING OLD LYME, passing Saybrook Light on Long Island Sound, making your way past the breakwater, throttling back to obey the no-wake zone. Steering east, you skirt salt marshes that sweep like the Kansas prairie. Amid the waving reeds, birds chatter and squawk. They are the loudest things in this tranquil place. Morning mist rising from the river creates the hazy tableau of an impressionist painting: a blurred, muted landscape in the very place considered the birthplace of American Impressionism. It was here, in the late 1890s, that widow Florence Griswold opened her home to American artists fresh from studying in France, forming the country’s first European-style artists colony—an “American Giverny.” Today, the creative-minded and those who appreciate their work still find their way to this exquisite section of coastal Connecticut midway between New York and Boston.

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OLD LYME

Blackhall Marina is popular among fishermen.

NATURAL CHOICE With a year-round population of nearly 8,000, the 27 square miles of Old Lyme comprise a triangle of land where Long Island Sound meets the Connecticut River. Rivers and tidal creeks wind through the surrounding marshland, providing a home for many species of birds and fish. It’s an ephemeral place where nature plays havoc with sandbars and islands, carving random compositions with each storm. What is one day a deep-water channel is a beach the next. It’s the main reason Old Lyme never became a commercial port, and also why the town has long been appreciated by sportsmen, artists and nature-lovers.

A young boy and his best friend relax on their boat at the Old Lyme Dock Company.

All three types gather along the wooden boardwalk that skirts the river near the Amtrak railroad bridge. Constructed by the state’s Department of Energy & Environmental Protection, the quarter-mile platform starts at the DEEP Marine Division Headquarters parking lot, passes below the bridge and ends at a salt marsh teeming with birds. Visit the place on a late afternoon and you’ll see why so many folks are drawn to this fantastic, peaceful spot.

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LOVELY LIEUTENANT Of course, an even better way to experience the wild side of Old Lyme is in your own boat or kayak. Depending on your draft, you can hook east into the winding Lieutenant River, where egrets, herons, osprey, cormorants, terns and other birds vanish and reappear amid the towering reeds. It’s no surprise that Roger Tory Peterson, our modern-day Audubon, lived in Old Lyme. After the ornithologist’s death in 1996, Great Island—the huge chunk of marsh at the mouth of the Connecticut River—was renamed the Roger Tory Peterson Wildlife Area. The Lieutenant stretches several miles north, and connects with the Duck River via a small side channel just south of the fixed railroad bridge. The Duck, as well as the Back River, are extremely shallow and, like the Lieutenant, suitable only for skiffs and kayaks. If you choose to explore the marshes, it’s best to go on the upper half of the tide, and bring a handheld GPS so you don’t get lost in the maze of creeks.

The small but friendly Old Lyme Dock Company marina is located between the bridges.

Kayakers explore the marsh-lined Lieutenant River.

SPOTS TO DOCK Back on the Connecticut, heading north, the first marina you’ll come to is the 25-slip Old Lyme Dock Company, between the railroad bridge and Interstate 95, about three miles from the Sound. There are no indications, from the road at least, that this is anything other than private property, save for a towering Shell sign. Surprisingly, this unassuming little marina (owned by car dealership mogul Herb Chambers) offers the cheapest fuel on the river, which draws a lot of boaters from the Old Saybrook side. Just north of the I-95 bridge is the full-service Old Lyme Marina, with 25 slips and 65 moorings in a beautiful anchorage behind Calves Island. It’s a bit closer to town and the place that put Old Lyme on the map: the Florence Griswold Museum, now a multiacre complex encompassing Griswold’s Georgian-style main house, a modernist gallery, a barnlike studio, the seasonal Café Flo, and acres of gardens and plantings set on the Lieutenant River.

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LYME LIGHT LIVING

The Old Lyme Marina is an option for transient boaters.

In 1899, to keep from loosing her home after the death of her husband, 50-year-old Florence Griswold began renting rooms to artists drawn to the brilliance and clarity of light in Old Lyme (or “Lyme Light,” as it was called). Childe Hassam, Henry Ward Ranger and dozens more moved in, creating America’s first Impressionist art colony and paying Griswold back by creating murals on her paneling, cupboards and doors. Visitors can see those preserved paintings during a marvelous house tour then ogle a changing art collection in the space-aged Krieble Gallery. It’s easy to spend the better part of a day here, especially if you come on Sundays in season when, wearing supplied smock and straw hat, you’re dispatched with painter’s palate and blank canvas to the marshy banks of the river to create en plein air, just as the Impressionists did.

Sandy Soundview Beach is a great spot to anchor and take a dip in the Sound.

Florence Griswold’s boarders spurred a quiet revolution in Old Lyme. The artists needed a place to exhibit their work, so in 1921, members of the newly established Lyme Art Association opened a gallery next door. Still standing, this weathered New England structure is a marvel of soaring sunlit rooms. These days, members of the Association— both artists and supporters—ensure that the organization’s shows and programs continue to evolve. Down the street, around 200 students from all over the world attend the Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts, which was founded in 1976 in the basement of the gallery.

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CONNECTICUT DESTINATION

OLD LYME The Chocolate Shell sells tempting treats.

SHOPPING & DINING If all this art immersion entices you to drop a few grand on a classic painting or sculpture, the Cooley Gallery and EF Watermelon have you covered. Both are on Lyme Street, where you’ll also find two fine inns: the Bee & Thistle, home to the excellent Chestnut Grille, and the Old Lyme Inn, which has been making waves since 2013 when it opened a jazz club called The Side Door. Down the street, the much-lauded Old Lyme Ice Cream Shoppe stands ready to satisfy your sweet tooth, while homegrown music and homemade food can be enjoyed at the relatively new Nightingale’s Acoustic Café. From the Historic District, as you walk back to the Old Lyme Marina on Halls Road (Route 1), be sure to stop by Bowerbird, a gift emporium so famous and expansive that people come from out of state to pick up everything from home goods to jewelry to pet items to baby gifts. Nearby, enjoy lunch at the family-owned Morning Glory Café, on the Lieutenant River, where you can sit on the deck and take in the quiet beauty and magical light that first attracted American artists over a century ago.

Studio 80 scupture grounds.

An aplaca munches at the Ashlawn Farm Farmer’s Market.

OLD LYME AT A GLANCE HARBORMASTER (860) 434-1605

DOCKAGE, MOORINGS & SERVICE

OLD LYME DOCK CO. (860) 434-2267; oldlymedock.com Small marina between the railroad bridge and Interstate 95 offering transient slips, discount fuel and restrooms with showers. OLD LYME MARINA (860) 434-1272; oldlymemarina.com Full-service marina with 25 slips, 65 moorings and repair. Best bet for large vessels. BLACK HALL OUTFITTERS (860) 434-9680; blackhalloutfitters.com Smaller boats can access this marina that’s popular among anglers. It features transient slips with power, a full tackle shop and kayak/ SUP rentals.

LAUNCH RAMPS

Old Lyme features three boat launches. Boats up to 25 feet can be launched at the end of Smith Neck Road on the Back River, and from the Four Mile River Landing on the Four Mile River, although parking is limited at both spots. For carry-ins only, the ramp at Ferry Road and Route 156 puts you right on the Lieutenant River. Larger vessels are best off launching at the large, free state facility in Old Saybrook, below the I-95 bridge.

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KAYAK & SUP RENTAL

BLACK HALL OUTFITTERS (860) 434-9680; blackhalloutfitters.com This shop and marina on the Black Hall River rents and sells kayaks and paddleboards, and offers lessons, yoga classes and guided tours of the local waters.

WHERE TO EAT

CHESTNUT GRILLE (800) 622-4946; beeandthistleinn.com Romantic restaurant at the Bee & Thistle Inn, known for its creative American cuisine with a focus on locally sourced ingredients. MORNING GLORY CAFÉ (860) 434-0480 morningglorycafeoldlyme.com Enjoy flavorful, homemade food overlooking the scenic Lieutenant River. CAFÉ FLO (860) 434-5542 Seasonal outdoor café at the Florence Griswold Museum, serving soups, sandwiches and lighter fare with great views of the Lieutenant River. NIGHTINGALE’S ACOUSTIC CAFÉ (860) 434-1961 The place for homegrown music, as well as fine coffee, tea, sandwiches and baked goods.

COOL SHOPS

COOLEY GALLERY (860) 434-8807 the-cooley-gallery.myshopofy.com Pick up an original painting, sculpture or piece of pottery at this fine-art gallery in the historic district. EF WATERMELON (860) 434-1640; efwatermelon.com Amazing and unique fine jewelry, mineral art, essence bottles, internal gemstone art and other handcrafted wonders. BOWERBIRD (860) 434-3562; thebowerbird.com Eclectic shop carrying an array of jewelry, books, gourmet foods, toys and creative home décor items. OLD LYME ICE CREAM SHOPPE (860) 434-6942 Cool off with an exotic-flavored ice cream at this local favorite.

THINGS TO SEE & DO

FLORENCE GRISWOLD MUSEUM (860) 434-5542 florencegriswoldmuseum.org Peruse art and nature—and learn to paint like an Impressionist—in the very place made famous by those artistic pioneers.

Live music at Nightingale’s Acoustic Café. THE SIDE DOOR JAZZ CLUB (860) 434-2600; thesidedoorjazz.com New York City-caliber jazz and nightlife meets the quiet Connecticut shore at this sleek club at the Old Lyme Inn. LYME ART ASSOCIATION (860) 434-7802; lymeartassociation.org Features art exhibitions and studio classes in galleries designed by the founders of the Old Lyme Art Colony. LYME ACADEMY COLLEGE OF FINE ART (860) 434-5232; lymeacademy.edu See fabulous creations by students and faculty in a bright gallery. BIRDWATCHING Avian life can be observed from many places in Old Lyme. These include the platform at the end of Smith Neck Road, the boardwalk that begins at the DEEP facility on Ferry Road, and inside the tidal creeks on a quiet paddle along the Connecticut River Estuary Canoe & Kayak Trail.

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CONNECTICUT LIGHTHOUSES

Learn about the fascinating history of Long Island Sound’s notable lighthouses on a fast ferry tour out of New London—or visit them on your own! TEXT & PHOTOGRAPHY BY CARYN B. DAVIS

OATERS LOVE LIGHTHOUSES—for obvious reasons. Our affinity for the iconic beacons goes well beyond their original role as critical aids to navigation. There’s a romance to the sturdy structures, which range from squat, conical towers to ornate fortresses resembling Victorian mansions. Further, we like to imagine the lives of those who occupied these lonely sentinels, working long, odd hours to keep mariners safe from harm. In recent years, lighthouses have largely been rendered obsolete, yet our fascination with them endures, particularly here in New England—the lighthouse capital of the country, if not the world. On Long Island Sound, numerous lights of varying description and style lie within a relatively short distance of one another. A great way to see and learn about some of them is aboard the Cross Sound Ferry’s Sea Jet, based in New London. The ferry service offers two different lighthouse cruises, both narrated by experts who shed light on the rich and complex history, architecture and folklore of the subject at hand.

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The “Classic Cruise” showcases nine lighthouses in Long Island Sound and Gardiners Bay, including Latimer Reef Light, the oldest cast-iron lighthouse still in service, and the Italianate-inspired Little Gull Island Lighthouse. You’ll also learn about “Ernie,” the lightkeeper’s ghost said to inhabit New London’s Ledge Light, and the many paranormal investigations conducted at Race Rock Light, another stop on the Classic Cruise. The “Lights & Sights Cruise” makes stops at eight lighthouses, but also pauses to appreciate some of the lavish homes and hotels dotting the coast, such as Simmons Castle on Fishers Island, whose guests once included George Harrison, Robert Redford and Ali MacGraw. In Watch Hill, you’ll catch a glimpse of the 11,000-square-foot mansion belonging to pop star Taylor Swift, as well as the neighboring Ocean House, a triplefive-star resort. All cruises take approximately two hours and run from April through November. They depart at 12:30 p.m. from the Cross Sound Ferry docks at 2 Ferry Street in New London. Reservations are recommended; call (860) 444-4620 or visit longislandferry.com.

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DATE BUILT: 1760 MATERIALS: brownstone, brick interior HISTORY: The original New London Harbor Light helped guide colonial privateers seeking shelter inside the Thames River during the American Revolution. LIGHT LORE: The oldest lighthouse in Connecticut.

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DATE BUILT: 1909 MATERIALS: granite, brick HISTORY: Known simply as “Ledge Light,” this architecturally unique, three-story lighthouse at the mouth of the Thames River was built at a cost of $115,000. LIGHT LORE: The lighthouse is reportedly haunted by the ghost of an early keeper named “Ernie.”

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DATE BUILT: 1849 MATERIALS: brick, wood HISTORY: This handsome lighthouse and keeper’s house in Fishers Island Sound was built on an island originally owned by John Winthrop, son of the governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. The Winthrop family later sold the island to the federal government for $600. During Prohibition, the keeper of North Dumpling Light was accused of signaling to liquor smugglers. LIGHT LORE: The island and lighthouse are currently owned by Dean Kamen, inventor of the Segway Human Transporter.

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DATE BUILT: 1868 MATERIAL: granite HISTORY: This light in Noank was built to guide mariners into the Mystic River. Land for the light station was purchased from shipbuilder Roswell Avery Morgan, a descendant of an early settler of the area. The light resembles similar structures on Sheffield Island and Block Island. LIGHT LORE: Among Morgan Point’s first keepers was Eliza Daboll, a widow and mother of six, who reportedly kept the 25-foot granite tower and its stone house “in great neatness.” Her daughter was known to sing loudly during storms to keep her courage up.

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WATCH HILL LIGHT DATE BUILT: 1808 MATERIALS: granite, brick interior HISTORY: First built as a watchtower to warn local residents of naval and pirate attacks, Watch Hill Light assumed its maritime safety role when the current structure was built in 1808. It warns mariners of the dangerous reef that runs between Fishers Island and Watch Hill. LIGHT LORE: Fortyfive shipwrecks were recorded off Watch Hill in the first 27 years after the light was built.

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DATE BUILT: 1878 MATERIAL: granite HISTORY: Built on a reef where currents can run up to five knots and conflicting seas are the norm, Race Rock’s foundation alone took seven years to build and required the transport of 10,000 tons of granite. The light was built by Captain T.A. Scott, who also constructed New London Ledge Light. LIGHT LORE: Race Rock Light is thought to be haunted, and was featured in an episode of “Ghost Hunters.”

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CONNECTICUT LIGHTHOUSES

LATIMER REEF LIGHT DATE BUILT: 1884 MATERIAL: iron, brick HISTORY: An iron “spark plug” light located about a mile north of the eastern point of Fishers Island, Latimer Reef Light was originally outfitted with a fifth-order Fresnel lens. LIGHT LORE: The light and the reef it marks are named for a patriot spy named James Latemore, who was captured on the location and subsequently hanged there.

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CONNECTICUT LIGHTHOUSES

DATE BUILT: 1869 MATERIAL: Granite HISTORY: Located seven miles northeast of Long Island’s Orient Point, the 81-foottall conical light replaced a smaller structure built in 1806. The island was once home to a three-story keeper’s home that resembled New London Ledge Light, and which was destroyed by fire in 1944. LIGHT LORE: A former assistant lightkeeper, John Collins, owned a pet opossum named “Jacob.”

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RHODE ISLAND DESTINATION

BEACHES

The beach on Patience Island is just one of many beaches available to boaters.

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This summer, set a course for these 10 boater-friendly beaches in Narragansett Bay. BY TOM RICHARDSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY CATE BROWN

arragansett Bay is a boater’s playground, filled with quiet coves and lovely towns that are perfect for daytripping. And when it comes to beaches, the bay’s got a bunch, many of them accessible by boat. Here’s the lowdown on some lovely strands on which to wile away a summer day.

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BEACHES

Mackerel Cove is a well-protected anchorage .

JAMESTOWN:

This narrow, finger-like cove on the southern end of Conanicut Island makes a great anchorage, and the coarse-sand beach at its head is a popular spot for beachgoing families. Boaters can drop the hook before rowing or paddling to shore. And don’t forget your snorkeling gear, as the cove’s clear waters are ideal for underwater exploration!

The cove can be crowded on sunny days.

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Paddlers enjoy the cove’s placid waters.

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Calm waters make Potter’s Cove a kid-friendly beach.

JAMESTOWN:

This somewhat rocky beach can be found on Conanicut Island’s eastern shore, just north of the bridge and tucked in behind Taylor Point. It offers easy access and is well protected from the prevailing summer southwesterlies. Bring a rod, because the deeper edges of the cove and the rocks off Taylor Point offer excellent fishing for fluke, bluefish and striped bass.

The southern end of Potter’s Cove is a great spot to drop the hook and swim ashore.

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BEACHES

Town Beach boasts soft sand and calm waters.

NORTH KINGSTOWN:

A portion of this lovely beach just south of Wickford Cove and Poplar Point is roped off for swimming, but you can beach a skiff or dinghy at the northern end. The wonderfully sandy, shallow-sloping beach is perfect for small kids.

Be mindful of swimmers at North Kingston’s Town Beach. A life guard monitors the action at Town Beach.

NORTH KINGSTOWN:

This awesome little spot at the mouth of Tibbets Creek is ideal for a family daytrip. There is sand on either side of the creek mouth, but the best spot to beach a small boat is along the shore a few hundred feet south of the point, where the water is deeper.

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Town Beach is a good place to watch the fireworks off North Kingston.

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BEACHES

PRUDENCE ISLAND

The beach in front of Jenny’s Creek is a favorite mid-bay stop for families.

This long barrier beach extending west of the Jenny’s Creek inlet on the south-facing shore of Prudence Island can only be reached by boat (unless you live on Prudence). Note that summer southwesterlies can make the water a bit rough in the afternoon, but it’s no problem in northerly breezes. Kids can have a blast exploring the winding, shallow tidal creek that runs behind the beach.

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The long beach skirting the eastern edge of Patience Island is only accessible by boat.

The channel that cuts between Patience and Prudence Islands features a grey-sand beach along the western edge that makes a terrific anchorage, especially in westerly winds. The beach is extremely popular among boaters, given its centralized location, and offers a steeply sloping bottom that allows anchoring close to shore.

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You don’t need a large boat to enjoy the bay’s many coves and beaches.

PRUDENCE ISLAND:

Potter’s Cove on the eastern shore of Prudence provides access to calm, warm bay waters.

The sand-rimmed peninsula of Gull Point, which forms a sheltering arm around Potter’s Cove, on the eastern side of Prudence Island, bustles with boating families and sometimes raucous raft-ups on hot summer days, and offers a calm anchorage in all winds. It makes a great daytrip destination for boaters launching out of Bristol and Warren.

Bay beaches hold many wonders for the naturally curious.

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Stay clear of the swimmming area when anchoring off Goddard Neck.

EAST GREENWICH:

You can anchor in deep water off the long swimming beach that runs along the northern edge of Goddard Sate Park and wade, swim or paddle ashore. This beach is well protected from southerly winds, and affords access to the park’s walking trails, picnic areas and carousel. If you’re feeling hungry, several dock-and-dine eateries await in nearby Greenwich Cove.

Boaters can stretch their sea legs on one of Goddard’s walking trails.

Greenwich Bay offers opportunities for fishing, crabbing and tubing.

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BEACHES

Third Beach is protected from southerly winds by Sachuest Point.

For many boaters, Third Beach ranks first in terms of sand quality.

NEWPORT:

If you’re looking for fine sand and calm water, this is your beach! Located at the mouth of the Sakonnet River (technically part of Narragansett Bay), Third Beach is protected by Sachuest Point from southwesterly breezes. It’s a great spot for paddleboarding, sunbathing and swimming, and you can stretch your legs in the Sachuest Point Wildlife Refuge or on a short stroll to Second Beach.

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Sandy Point Beach is an idyllic spot on the Sakonnet.

BEACHES

PORTSMOUTH:

This beach comes by its name honestly.

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This lesser-known spot on the Sakonnet River, halfway along Aquidneck Island, is worth a mention. The beach sits on a knuckle of land facing east. The south side is rocky, while the north side features soft sand and is a good place to anchor.

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MASSACHUSETTS DESTINATION

PADANARAM

Mist rises from the waters of Padanaram Harbor on a crisp fall morning.

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This snug little harbor on Buzzards Bay is fast becoming a favorite stopover among coastal cruisers, and also makes an excellent daytrip or fishing destination. BY GAELEN P. ADAM PHOTOGRAPHY BY TOM RICHARDSON

espite its well-protected harbor and prime location at the crossroads of the northsouth cruising routes, Padanaram has remained largely underappreciated by visiting boaters. However, that is rapidly changing, partly because this oddly named little village—part of the town of South Dartmouth—on the western shore of Buzzards Bay is undergoing something of a renaissance. After years of domination by real estate offices and shuttered storefronts, the village has recently seen the opening of two new restaurants, a sandwich shop and several boutique stores. A new market and ATM now provide amenities for cruisers that have long been missing. And there may be more to come, as the development of a welcome center for visiting boaters, complete with showers, short-term tie-up and a new harbormaster’s headquarters, appears to be in the works. NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

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PADANARAM

South Wharf Yacht Yard and Marina welcomes transients and features on on-site restaurant.

COLONIAL ROOTS Originally known as “Ponogansett,” the village was founded when William Bradford and 33 other members of the Plymouth Colony purchased land along the Apponagansett River from the Wampanoags in 1652. After the first settlement was destroyed in 1675 during King Philips War, Padanaram recovered to become a shipbuilding center then prospered as a minor whaling port through the mid-1800s. In response to trade embargoes imposed during the War of 1812, the village also developed a large salt works at Ricketsons Point. Its current name is thought to have originated with Laban Thatcher, who moved from Harwich around 1805 and founded a successful shipyard on the Apponagansett. According to the Proceedings of the Fall Meeting of the Old Dartmouth Historical Society in 1903, “The first mention of Padanaram occurred in a deed given by [Thatcher] in 1828, and it is supposed that the circumstances of his life corresponding with the Bible story of Laban who lived in Padanaram prompted him to give the place that name.”

HAVEN ON THE BAY For those with a keel, the approach to the harbor, particularly from the east, appears more challenging than it is. There are plenty of rocks and ledges, to be sure, but all are well marked. Follow the channel markers, pay attention to your chart and you should be fine. The harbor itself is protected by a stone breakwater, and is home to several marine facilities. Chief among them is South Wharf Yacht Yard and Marina, which offers transient dockage for boats up to 100 feet and 12 feet of depth. The full-service yard also offers repair, service, haul-out, private showers, laundry, bike and kayak rentals and WiFi, plus an onsite restaurant called the Sail Loft.

Padanaram offers fast access to Buzzards Bay and its dependable southwest winds.

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If you’d prefer a mooring, the Town of Dartmouth has installed six transient moorings on the north side of the causeway swing bridge that are free for up to a three-night stay. They can be reserved through the harbormaster’s office (see sidebar). Town officials are also working to enhance the short-term dinghy tie-up on the north side of the pump-out dock, immediately adjacent to the northeast corner of the bridge. NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM


BRIDGE GAME

A private home and yacht in Padanaram.

Boaters must negotiate the swing bridge to access the Apponagansett River.

Speaking of the bridge, it opens on the half-hour from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. and from 8:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., May through October, and every hour from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Bridge openings can also be requested by hailing the bridge tender on VHF 13 or calling (508) 910-7107. The bridge has a vertical clearance of eight feet MHW when closed, so smaller boats may be able to sneak through at high tide. Moorings are also available through the venerable Davis & Tripp boatyard and the New Bedford Yacht Club, which offers use of its facilities, including launch service, showers and clubhouse, for $55 per night. The club’s fuel dock is the only place to get gas and diesel inside the harbor, and also sells water and ice.

FUN AT THE PARK

The popular state launch facility in Padanaram features a two-lane ramp and tie-up floats.

On the north side of the drawbridge, trailer-boaters will find a newly refurbished, two-lane launch ramp at Apponagansett Park, which also has a playground and a beach. The park hosts concerts on Wednesday nights throughout the summer and is home to the family-favorite Gulf Hill Dairy Ice Cream Bucket, where you can grab a lobster roll, burger and, of course, all kinds of frozen treats. Across the street from the park, trails lead through the coastal woodlands and salt marsh of the Knowles Reserve—a terrific spot for a stroll and nature-watching. Paddlers will find that the Apponagansett River is a wonderful place to explore in a kayak, canoe or stand-up paddleboard. Just west of Apponagansett Park, a lovely tidal creek meanders through scenic salt marsh containing osprey, heron, egrets and other birds. And a quarter-mile due north of the drawbridge, Little Island (locally known as “Monkey Island”) is ideal for a picnic or swim. In summer, the water is delightfully warm.

THE HUNT CONNECTION Visitors to Padanaram who have an interest in nautical history should take note of what looks like a small, white shed perched atop the brick building just north of the New Bedford Yacht Club. The incongruous structure is the former studio of legendary naval architect, C. Raymond Hunt. Hailed as a genius and innovator, Hunt created many classic designs, among them the lovely Concordia yawl, the unsinkable Boston Whaler, the Surfhunter 33, the 12 Meter Easterner and the 5.5 Meter Minotaur. But perhaps his biggest contribution to recreational boating was the development of the modern planing deep-vee powerboat hull, made famous by the Bertram 31, which debuted in 1960. Hunt designed boats large and small, including a series of unmanned 12-foot, deep-vee “drone” skiffs built for the military. The skiffs never saw use, but the hulls of these speedy, seaworthy boats can still be seen in parts of southern New England. — Tom Richardson

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Left: C. Raymond Hunt. Above: The legendary 31-foot deep-vee Moppie.

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PADANARAM

PHOTO PARKER KELLEY

MASSACHUSETTS DESTINATION

DINING DELIGHTS While Padanaram may not offer the type of dining options you’ll find in major cruising destinations like Newport or Camden, you won’t go hungry. Options include the aforementioned Sail Loft at South Wharf Marina, Little Moss, the Black Bass Grille and a terrific new sandwich shop called Chumley’s. In addition, there’s local favorite Dockside Ice Cream, where you can order hot dogs, burgers, fries, frappes and the like. If you’re looking to restock the galley, the Farm and Coast Market offers a wide selection of local foods and wine, along with premade sandwiches, bakery goods, coffee and much more.

Salt on Elm offers body treatments, nail and skin care.

PADANARAM AT A GLANCE HARBORMASTER (508) 999-0759 dartmouthharbormaster.com

In term of shops, the village has several worth checking out. Flora, 321 Elm, Folia, Refried Tees, the Village Merchant and several other businesses carry unique clothing, household items and gifts. And don’t miss the Woodhouse Shop, a Padanaram institution for knickknacks and penny candy since . . . well, forever. The Norton Gallery highlights high-end artwork, while the Karyne & Company Day Spa and Salt Spa offer massage therapy, body treatments, and nail and skin care. For a unique workout, book a session with Padanaram Standup Paddleboard Yoga, which holds classes every Wednesday during the summer.

TOWN OF DARTMOUTH (508) 999-0759 dartmouthharbormaster.com Transient moorings are available free of charge for up to three nights through the harbormaster; reservations accepted.

In the market for a new catboat? Aficionados of these classic workhorse sailboats may want to drop by Marshall Marine, just north of the drawbridge. Owner Geoff Marshall continues his family’s tradition of building fiberglass versions of the classic New England shoal-draft craft, and offers several different models for sale, from the 15-foot Sandpiper to the Marshall 22.

SOUTH WHARF YACHT YARD & MARINA (508) 990-1011; southwharf.com Full-service boatyard and marina offering transient dockage, haul-out, repair, showers, WiFi and onsite restaurant. Twelve feet MLW.

FLORA Hip women’s clothing, home décor items, creative jewelry and more.

DAVIS & TRIPP (508) 993-9232; davistripp.com Transient moorings, repair, service and a small marine store.

321 ELM (508) 992-0519; 321elm.com Gifts, toys, casual clothing, penny candy, housewares and other fun stuff.

NEW BEDFORD YACHT CLUB (508) 997-0762; nbyc.com Offers public use of its facilities, including moorings, launch service, showers and clubhouse, for $55 per night. The club also has a fuel dock with water and ice.

REFRIED TEES (508) 962-8055; refriedtees.com Colorful, casual fashions, many sporting a nautical theme.

If you happen visit at the end of July, catch the Padanaram summer festival, featuring live music, vendor booths and sidewalk sales. And sailboat-racing aficionados won’t want to miss the 45th edition of the Buzzards Bay Regatta, which will be hosted by the New Bedford Yacht Club this August. While those of us who live here would rather keep it a secret, Padanaram offers too much not to let cruisers now about this destination, which rivals the Vineyard or Nantucket for charm, but without the crowds—at least so far. Editor’s Note: The causeway between Padanaram Village and Apponagansett Park is currently closed for repairs until 2019. However, the swing bridge still opens for boats, as usual.

DOCKAGE, MOORINGS & SERVICE

CONCORDIA BOATYARD (508) 999-1381; concordiaboats.com Transient moorings, repair and service. DOYLE SAILS BUZZARDS BAY (508) 992-6322; doylesails.com Sail repair.

ANCHORAGES

Boaters who wish to anchor may find a spot tucked inside the north end of the breakwater protecting the inner harbor, as well as plenty of room along the Nonquit shoreline in some 10 feet of water.

LAUNCH RAMP

A recently refurbished two-lane launch ramp with plenty of parking can be found at Apponagansett Park, on the north side of the bridge off Gulf Road. Daily fee is $5 to launch and park.

WHERE TO EAT

Sample South Coast comfort food at the Sail Loft.

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LITTLE MOSS (508) 994-1162; littlemoss.com Intimate, casual restaurant featuring locally sourced seafood and produce. Menu changes based on seasonal availability.

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SAIL LOFT (774) 328-9871; thesailloftdartmouth.com Serves mouth-watering “South Coast comfort food” in a fun atmosphere with outdoor seating and a small Tiki bar near the harbor. Free dockage at South Wharf Yacht Yard and Marina.

CHUMLEY’S (774) 425-4378; chumleysdartmouth.com Creative sandwiches, wraps, salads, burgers, hot dogs and more. BLACK BASS GRILLE (508) 999-6975; blackbassma.com Near the water just north of the bridge. Specializes in surf-and-turf dishes.

COOL SHOPS

VILLAGE MERCHANT (508) 496-9653 Unique antiques in a funky store presided over by a charming pug named Dozer. WOODHOUSE SHOP (508) 993-5014 A Padanaram original, this throwback store is a favorite among kids for its selection of toys, candy, doll and dollhouse accessories and more.

THINGS TO SEE & DO

APPONAGANSETT PARK Public park with playground and beach. Hosts concerts on Wednesday nights throughout the summer. PADANARAM STANDUP PADDLEBOARD YOGA (508) 676-5511 Stay cool—and fit—at one of these unique classes, held Wednesdays during the summer. K AYAKING WITH OSPREY SEA K AYAK ADVENTURES (508) 636-0300; ospreyseakayak.com This Westport-based outfitter can arrange kayak and SUP tours of Apponagansett Bay and nearby waters.

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MASSACHUSETTS DESTINATION

PAMET HARBOR

An excellent jumping-off spot for trailer-boaters and paddlers, as well as a peaceful stopover for shallow-draft coastal cruisers, Pamet Harbor never fails to charm.

TEXT & PHOTOGRAPHY TOM RICHARDSON OWE PAMET HARBOR A DEBT of gratitude. Back in 2000, my future wife and I were circumnavigating Cape Cod in a small boat (don’t ask) when we encountered strong southwest winds on the crossing from Provincetown to the Cape Cod Canal. What started out as a choppy ride soon turned into a white-knuckle fight to keep from swamping in the building seas. As I cast a nervous eye toward shore, wondering if we might have to surf our way to safety, I spied a jetty in the distance. Suddenly I remembered—Pamet Harbor! I vaguely recalled visiting the place on a fishing charter some years earlier, but wasn’t sure what else it offered. Nevertheless, any port in a storm, right? Slowly, carefully, we beat our way across the white-capped seas and slid throtugh the inlet, where I beached the skiff at the base of the jetty and literally kissed the ground. As the adrenalin rush of our near miss faded, we began to take stock of our surroundings, and soon realized that we had stumbled upon a beautiful little harbor filled with interesting boats of all sorts, a nice launch ramp and meandering tidal creeks teeming with birdlife—proof that sometimes the best boating destinations turn out to be the ones you don’t plan on visiting.

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The inlet to Pamet Harbor is narrow and shallow—and a good place to fish.

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PAMET HARBOR

Low tide leaves boats high and dry at the mouth of the Pamet River.

PEACEFUL RETREAT

Since that fateful day, I have returned to Pamet several times on other fishing trips and once to explore its backwaters in a kayak, and am always pleased to see that the harbor has maintained its low-key charm and natural beauty. It’s a good place to escape the tourist traps, noisy restaurants, busy beaches and traffic congestion of a Cape Cod summer. For trailer-boaters, the harbor offers an excellent launch ramp with ample parking, not to mention ready access to many popular fishing spots, including Stellwagen Bank, the Race, Peaked Hill Bar, Billingsgate Shoal and the Brewster Flats. And paddlers will find a peaceful, protected spot that allows close-range observation of marsh and shore birds going about their business. Indeed, avid birders flock to Pamet, intent on getting up close and personal with the area’s avian wildlife, which includes ruddy turnstones, plovers, terns, great blue herons, egrets, green herons, night herons, sandpipers, osprey, hawks, sparrows, kingfishers and more.

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Big stripers are available just outside the harbor.

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CAPE COD OUTPOST

Behind it all is a fascinating history. Like many Cape Cod waterways, the harbor has been extensively and intentionally altered over the centuries. Indeed, the Pamet River’s original inlet was located a half-mile north, at the base of Corn Hill, where the Pilgrims and the Mayflower crew famously helped themselves to a stash of maize belonging to the Nausets. From the late 1700s until the Civil War, the harbor was home to a vibrant shipbuilding and fishing industry, as well as a salt works, all despite its notoriously shallow inlet. When rail service came to the lower Cape in 1873, a trestle and depot were built on the harbor, along with a high berm that divided the marsh. Not that there was much need for a station. For a century after the Civil War, the harbor was all but deserted, mainly due to severe silting of the river mouth and the decline of shipbuilding on Cape Cod (although a small boatyard continued to operate at Pamet through the 1950s).

The Pamet harbormasters keep a close eye on activity around the launch ramp.

BIRDS OF PAMET HARBOR

Semipalmated Plover

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Common Terns

Great Blue Heron

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PAMET HARBOR

CHANGING CHANNELS

In 1918, the present inlet was carved through the dunes in an attempt to straighten the course of the river, increase current flow and ultimately prevent silting. However, within five years the harbor was again unnavigable to all but shallow-draft vessels. To solve the problem, a pair of stone jetties was constructed in the 1950s. This helped mitigate the silting problem—at least for a time. Major dredging occurred in the 1960s, again in 1996, and most recently in 2008. At present, the harbor channel has a reported mean low water depth of three feet from the launch ramp to the bay. Small to midsized boats usually have no problem launching here, although the channel gets pretty dicey in spots due to continued shoaling. In other words, it’s best to time your launching and hauling around the upper stages of the tide, just to be safe.

The harbor is home to all manner of powerboats.

The ramp and large parking lot make Pamet especially popular among fishermen, as it affords quick access to Cape Cod Bay, Stellwagen and the backside of Cape Cod. On the other hand, many visitors never venture beyond the jetties. Kayakers and nature-lovers can spend the day exploring the harbor’s tidal creeks and the Pamet River itself, which very nearly bisects the upper arm of the Cape as it flows from its source behind Ballston Beach. Note that the river becomes exceedingly shallow at low tide, so it’s best to launch a trip upriver on the incoming tide and return on the ebb. High tide or low, big boat or small: no matter how you choose to enjoy the harbor or what your reasons for visiting, Pamet never fails to impress—especially if you’re looking for a good place to ride out a storm.

PAMET HARBOR AT A GLANCE HARBORMASTER (508) 349-2555

MOORINGS

There are no marinas or marine services on Pamet Harbor. The harbormaster’s office maintains three transient moorings inside the harbor, as well as a complementary dinghy with oars. Moorings rent for $20 a day and can be reserved.

LAUNCH INFO

The Pamet launch ramp can accommodate large boats.

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The Pamet launch ramp is a double-lane, concrete-slab ramp that can accommodate even large boats on the upper stages of the tide (not so much at low water). It also features a decent amount of parking and a tie-up float. Fees are $10 per day for use of the ramp and parking; $5 per day if launching a dinghy or kayak at the beach adjacent to the harbormaster’s office. There are 38 spaces for trailers and another 28 for vehicles alone, but the lot fills up fast on summer weekends. Ice is available at the harbormaster’s office, which is open mid-April to mid-October, 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. If you launch before the office opens, be sure to pay the ramp fee before leaving.

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MASSACHUSETTS DESTINATION

DUXBURY BAY

Navigating the shallow waters of this beautiful bay on the South Shore of Massachusetts can be tricky, but the rewards within are worth the effort.

View of Snug Harbor at dawn, as seen from the town landing.

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TEXT & PHOTOGRAPHY BY TOM RICHARDSON

HE SHALLOW, PROTECTED WATERS of Duxbury Bay—a broad, fertile estuary fed by several rivers—serve as an aquatic playground for boaters of all types. However, newcomers would be wise to study a chart before entering this maze of channels, guzzles and flats. According to Duxbury’s Acting Harbormaster, Jake Emerson, the best advice for enjoying a visit is simple. “Stay in the channel. We lose 66 percent of the water here at low tide, so it gets very shallow. If you don’t know the bay, follow the markers closely, as you don’t want to spend the day waiting for high tide or a towing service to arrive. If you’re unsure of the best route or need some advice, just give us a call.”

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DECENT DEPTH

Helping matters is that the main channel leading into Snug Harbor, home of the town landing and several waterfront shops and restaurants, received some much-needed dredging last season, and now offers a controlling depth of eight feet. Visiting boaters who want to poke around the waterfront can offload passengers at the town landing, which has a 30-minute tie-up limit. Longer stays, including overnights, can sometimes be arranged through the harbormasters if a guest mooring is available. Anchoring is also possible in certain areas, such as the deeper edges of the large flat shown on charts as the “Cowyard.” Dinghies can be left at the town landing, and launch service is available via VHF 9 and 10.

The Duxbury Bay Maritime School offers a variety of sailing, rowing, paddling and ecology programs for kids and adults.

Blakeman’s at Duxbury Beach Park is a local institution.

Gulls pick off stranded bait at low tide on the Cowyard flat.

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From the landing it’s a short walk to a couple of restaurants and shops. French Memories is a popular spot for coffee, tasty pastries, sandwiches, soups and more. Next door is the Snug Harbor Fish Market, where you can order delicious take-out seafood, including stuffies, chowder, fish and clam platters, grilled swordfish, lobster dinners and more. If you’re looking to work up an appetite, the hot new restaurant in town is The Oysterman, some two miles inland off St. George Street. The creative surf-and-turf menu, wide selection of craft brews, generous cocktails and raw bar stocked with local shellfish are worth the effort to get there, and you can cap off your meal with a Danish-style ice cream at local favorite Farfars, just across the street. Littlenecks are plentiful on the fertile mud flats of the Back River.

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DUXBURY BAY

The DBMS Accessail Program’s modified O’Day sailboats allow people with disabilities to enjoy the bay.

BEAUTY ABOUNDS

Of course, Duxbury Bay’s beautiful and bountiful waters are the real draw for most boaters. “The resources here are astounding,” says local fishing and hunting guide Dave Bitters, who left a job in advertising so he could spend more time on the bay. “We’ve got lobster, we’ve got four or five different types of shellfish, there’s half a dozen fish species to catch, plus we have ducks in season. It’s just an amazing resource.” Bitters and others who appreciate the bay’s abundance of life point to its role as a critical nursery for many types of baitfish and other prey that fuel the marine food web. It’s also an ideal environment for budding boaters to learn the ropes, and many do just that at the Duxbury Bay Maritime School, which offers public access to the local waters through its wide range of sailing, rowing, powerboating and marine ecology programs. On any given day throughout the summer, the school’s considerable fleet of watercraft can be seen plying the bay. “It absolutely amazes me how accommodating the bay can be,” says DBMS Executive Director Chuck Leonard. “For the most part, mornings have light to no wind, allowing for flat waters for teaching rowing, while the afternoon breezes are perfect for sailing. The bay as a whole is great for our ecology classes, especially at low tide, when neither rowing nor sailing lessons are desirable. And the nearby rivers and marshes provide opportunities for exploring in paddleboards and kayaks. What a great environment for teaching the community how to enjoy Duxbury Bay!”

Bayside Marine is home to the only fuel dock in Duxbury.

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DUXBURY BAY

HARBORMASTER

(718) 934-2866; duxburyharbormaster.org

DOCKAGE, MOORINGS & SERVICE

DUXBURY TOWN LANDING (718) 934-2866; duxburyharbormaster.org The town offers limited overnight moorings for transients at a rate of $30 per night, based on availability. BAYSIDE MARINE (781) 934-0561; baysidemarine.com Full-service marina offering launch service, a marine store, rack storage, haul-out, engine and hull repair, gas dock and restrooms.

The town launch ramp is no place for large boats at low tide.

LOW-TIDE PLAYGROUND

As Leonard and harbormaster Emerson point out, low tide limits navigational options in Duxbury Bay, but opens up other recreational opportunities. Indeed, plenty of folks intentionally beach themselves on one of the sprawling flats, such as Browns Bank or the aforementioned Cowyard, where they can have a huge stretch of sand all to themselves—at least until the rising tide chases them off. In some areas, such as the mud-bottomed Back River north of the Powder Point Bridge, one can easily dig up a bushel of littlenecks (with a permit, of course). In all cases, be sure to keep an eye on the tide to avoid being cut off from your boat by the rising water. Obviously, shallow-draft vessels offer the best mode of transportation for exploring the bay’s flats and backwaters, although those in larger craft can anchor along the channel edges and wade or swim ashore in certain spots. Kayakers and paddleboarders are uniquely positioned to enjoy the bay’s shallow margins, rivers and tidal creeks. However, check the weather forecast prior to setting out, and know your limitations. The bay has a lot of fetch, and a strong wind can kick up steep chop, particularly when it blows against the tide. Of course, there are many places to hide from the wind or take a break. Just inside the meandering Back River, paddlers can beach their craft and refuel on burgers, fried clams, fish-and-chips, ice cream and more at Blakeman’s, just behind the barrier beach at Duxbury Beach Park. Another good rest stop is the small, family-friendly Ellison Beach, at the foot of Ship Yard Lane, which features a float moored a short distance offshore. The adjacent salt marsh invites exploration, but then again, so does pretty much any part of this beautiful body of water just 35 miles south of Boston.

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LONG POINT MARINE (781) 934-5302; longpointmarine.com Small boatyard on the Bluefish River offering haul-out, storage, canvas shop, engine work and hull repair. DUXBURY YACHT CLUB (781) 934-5815; duxburyyachtclub.org Offers reciprocal privileges to members of affiliated clubs.

ANCHORAGES

A small but deep and well-protected anchorage called the “Potato Hole” can be found off the north end of Clarks Island. Depth is around 18 feet MLW. If it’s calm, you can also drop the hook in the area known as the “Cowyard,” northeast of buoy RN “2.”

LAUNCH RAMPS

Powder Point Bridge: Paddlers can launch from the small beach on the west end of the Powder Point Bridge. The lot here fills quickly in summer, so get there early. Duxbury Beach Park: This site affords access to a swimming beach on the ocean side and kayak/ SUP access to the Back River, although you’ll need to launch and haul your craft on the upper stages of the tide. Open 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Parking is $15 per day.

BOAT & KAYAK RENTAL

DUXBURY BAY MARITIME SCHOOL (781) 934-7555; dbms.org Offers boating courses and ecology classes for residents and non-residents, as well as rentals of small sailboats to members.

COOL SHOPS

SNUG HARBOR GALLERY (781) 452-7643 Small gallery near the water featuring beautiful local photography, paintings, home décor items and more. PETIT PEONY peitipeony.com Children’s clothing store in Snug Harbor featuring colorful, nautical-themed items.

WHERE TO EAT

THE OYSTERMAN (781) 934-2900; theoystermanduxbury.com Creative surf-and-turf, great cocktails, wide selection of craft brews and an oyster bar stocked with local shellfish.

Launch facilities directly on Duxbury Bay are limited, especially for non-residents. The best option is the large public launch on nearby Plymouth Harbor. This facility offers ample parking and access to the local waters on all but the lowest tides. Fee is $5 per day.

BLAKEMAN’S (781) 837-3112; duxburybeachpark.com Venerable “beach shack” eatery at Duxbury Beach Park. Serves standard fried and grilled fare, including lobsters, steamers, chowder, burgers, fish-and-chips and more.

Duxbury Town Landing: This ramp at the town landing launches directly into Snug Harbor. However, parking is very limited, especially in summer, and deep-draft boats will have trouble launching and hauling on the lower stages of the tide.

FRENCH MEMORIES (781) 934-9020 Great spot for coffee, espresso and pastries in Snug Harbor. Also serves tasty breakfast and lunch items. Eat in or get it to go.

Howland’s Landing: Small boats and kayaks can be launched at this ramp, just west of the Myles Standish monument. There is limited parking along the street.

SNUG HARBOR FISH COMPANY (781) 934-8167; snugharborfishcompany.com Fresh seafood market in Snug Harbor that also offers a delicious take-out lunch and dinner menu. Enjoy your meal on tables outside the market.

THINGS TO SEE & DO

DUXBURY BAY MARITIME SCHOOL (781) 934-7555; dbms.org Offers a variety of ecology and boating programs for kids and adults. The school also hosts an annual Opening of the Bay festival each Memorial Day weekend, with bands, children’s activities, boat tours and vendor booths. FISHING WITH BAYMEN GUIDE SERVICE (781) 934-2838; baymencharters.com Pursue striped bass and bluefish on light tackle and fly gear with veteran guide and waterman Captain Dave Bitters.

The local harbormasters stand ready to assist visiting boaters.

DUXBURY BEACH PARK (781) 837-3112 Accessible via the wooden Powder Point Bridge, this public beach features a bathhouse and a popular restaurant. Parking is $15 per day. Open 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.

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MASSACHUSETTS DESTINATION

GLOUCESTER

Downtown Gloucester as viewed from Stage Fort Park.

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Famous as a fishing port, the city of Gloucester plans to draw more attention from boaters with a revitalized waterfront and expanded marine facilities. BY ROB DUCA PHOTOGRAPHY BY BENJAMIN BOYNTON

HERE ARE FEW PORTS SALTIER THAN GLOUCESTER, a city famous for fishing. From cod and herring to tuna and swordfish, all manner of North Atlantic finfish have been landed and processed in this busy harbor on Cape Ann since English settlers arrived in 1623. Although the fishing industry did not truly flourish here until the mid-1800s (inland logging and farming were the chief pursuits of early Gloucesterites), the image of the rugged “Gloucester Fisherman”— forever clad in his sou’wester hat, black boots and yellow oilskins— eventually became the romanticized and enduring symbol of Gloucester. Thanks in large part to Gorton’s, the company founded in Gloucester more than 150 years ago and credited with developing frozen seafood products, the image is known throughout the world. NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

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A speedboat makes it way through the Blynman Canal and Annisquam River.

NEW DIRECTIONS While Gloucester’s pride in its fishing heritage runs deep, a steady decline in cod stocks coupled with strict fishing regulations and an aging workforce has produced a steep decline in the commercial goundfishing fleet, which shrank by almost 20 percent between 2003 and 2008. In response, the city has made an effort to attract more recreational boaters by renovating its working-class waterfront with an educational HarborWalk, several dock-anddine options, museums, unique boutiques, a fivestar hotel and, perhaps most important, expanded marine facilities that make it easier for visiting boaters to tie up and experience the revitalized downtown area. “We are putting in a new marina to provide temporary tie-up for transient boaters that will be available by Memorial Day [2017],” says Tom Ciarametaro, Gloucester’s harbormaster. “We’re also hoping to create a municipal marina for transient boaters, but there are some challenges due to DPA [designated port area] regulations. It’s a work in progress, but right now we offer 35 municipal moorings for transients, as well as launch service.” Transient moorings can be found in both the outer and inner harbors, including 15 in Southeast Harbor, five off Stage Head in Western Harbor, and nine in the Inner Harbor. For those who wish to anchor, the best anchorage in the outer harbor is Southeast Harbor, which features a soft mud and clay bottom with depths of 23 to 30 feet. Western Harbor is a good option in westerly or northerly winds. A 26-passenger launch delivers boaters to the three primary public landings, all within minutes of downtown, or to the waterfront establishment of their choice.

The iconic Fisherman’s Memorial honors Gloucester’s commercial fishermen.

The Cape Ann’s Marina Resort welcomes transients with a host of amenities.

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A tuna boat in Harbor Cove.

SLIP IN Boaters who prefer a slip can contact one of Gloucester’s local marinas. One of the newest and largest in town is the Cape Ann’s Marina Resort, which caters to transients and offers a host of amenities, including a fuel dock, pool, restaurant and bar. The marina, as well as nearby Gloucester Marina, is situated on the protected Annisquam River, which connects to Western Harbor via the Blynman Canal, and essentially places Gloucester on an island. The Annisquam-Blynman route also serves as a shortcut between Gloucester Harbor and Ipswich Bay for cruisers who use Gloucester as a stopover on their way north or south. Eastern Point Lighthouse.

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Toodeloos on Main Street is hit with kids.

Menage carries artsy home decor items and gifts.

Downtown Gloucester abounds with eclectic shops.

DOWNTOWN DELIGHTS Once docked or moored, boaters are minutes from a bustling waterfront and downtown filled with hip restaurants, historic buildings, art galleries and shops. Exotic waterfront homes built in the 19th century have been transformed into museums and popular historic attractions, such as Beauport, Hammond Castle and the Sargent House. The HarborWalk—a series of informative granite signposts—guides visitors along a free walking tour of Gloucester’s waterfront and downtown district, including public art exhibits, gardens, scenic views and special events.

Exotic oils at Cape Ann Olive Oil Company.

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If you’re feeling hungry, the downtown area offers myriad options, for boaters and landlubbers alike. One of the harbor’s most popular dockand-dine spots is the Mile Marker One restaurant, at the aforementioned Cape Ann’s Marina Resort. Bands perform on the so-called “bridge deck,” and the bar specialty is a mean Pain Killer cocktail. Captain Carlo’s, on the working waterfront, is owned by Gloucester natives and has a sparkling reputation for fresh seafood. The quirky Latitude 43 is the place to go for sushi lovers and live music, while Passports offers classic seasonal seafood dishes sourced daily straight from the Atlantic. NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM


MASSACHUSETTS DESTINATION

GLOUCESTER

The Fisherman’s Wife Memorial stands watch over the harbor.

HISTORY ABOUNDS Visitors who want to learn more about Gloucester from the water can explore the entire harbor aboard the local water shuttle, while two wooden schooners, the Ardelle and Lannon, offer daytrip sails and tours. A replica 19th century “Pinky” schooner built in nearby Essex, the 45-ton Ardelle is a reminder of Gloucester’s shipbuilding past. “A major part of the city’s heritage is that it produced 3,000 schooners for the fishing fleet in the 1800s,” points out Ken Riehl, CEO of the Cape Ann Chamber of Commerce. In 1605, explorer Samuel de Champlain christened Gloucester, “the beautiful harbor,” and its natural splendor continues to attract both land- and waterborne visitors centuries later. Today, Gloucester is an amalgamation of working waterfront and vibrant tourist destination, and for transient boaters, the welcome sign is very much on display.

GLOUCESTER AT A GLANCE HARBORMASTER (978) 282-3013

DOCKAGE, MOORINGS & SERVICE

CAPE ANN’S MARINA RESORT (978) 283-2116; capeannmarina.com Deep-water transient slips, moorings and dockage for boats up to 100 feet. Also offers a fuel dock, onsite restaurant, pool, laundry, showers, ice, bait, WiFi, repair and more. GLOUCESTER MARINA (978) 283-2828 Marina on the Annisquam River offering transient slips, gas and repair. Fifteen feet MLW. ENOS MARINE & PIER 7 MARINA (978) 281-1935 Transient slips and moorings for boats up to 120 feet, ice, cable, power, water and service. On the inner harbor.

ANCHORAGES

Good holding ground in 20 to 30 feet of water can be found in Southeast and Western Harbors, just outside the inner harbor.

LAUNCH RAMP

A free public launch facility with ample parking can be found adjacent to Gloucester High School, opposite the Cape Ann’s Marina, on the Annisquam River. This is a two-lane ramp, and features a float.

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WHERE TO EAT

MILE MARKER ONE (978) 283-2116; capeannmarina.com Dock-and-dine restaurant and bar at the Cape Ann’s Resort Marina. LATITUDE 43 (978) 281-0223; latfortythree.com Seafood and sushi with great harbor views. THE RUDDER (978) 283-7967; rudderrestaurant.com Dock-and-dine restaurant on Smith Cove. Specializes in creative seafood dishes in a fun, festive atmosphere. DUCK WORTH’S BISTROT (978) 282-4426; duckworthsbistrot.com French-inspired, small-plate portions. SEAPORT GRILLE (978) 282-9799 seaportgrillegloucester.com Wide menu of surf-and-turf dishes, plus pizza, burgers and signature drinks. CAPE ANN BREWING CO. (978) 282-7399; capeannbrewing.com Family-owned brewery/eatery serving craft ales and pub fare. Also offers tours, concerts and a waterfront deck. THE STUDIO (978) 879-4896; studio-restaurant.com Enjoy sushi, shellfish, tapas and live music on the waterfront deck of this casual dock-anddine restaurant on Smith Cove.

COOL SHOPS

DRESS CODE (978) 281-2888 Consignment boutique carrying a plethora of fun things, from vintage clothing and shoes to home décor items. THE CAVE (978) 283-0896; thecavegloucester.com Wide selection of fine cheeses and bread, as well as salted caramel, wine and chocolate. HOLY COW ICE CREAM CAFÉ (978) 281-0313; holycowicecreamcafe.com Sample ice cream tacos, ice cream cannolis, giant ice cream Oreo sandwiches and more at this palace of frozen delights on Pleasant Street. MYSTERY TRAIN RECORDS (978) 281-8911; mysterytrainrecords.com Rare and collectible recordings, including LPs, 12- and 10-inch singles, 45’s, 78’s, 8-track tapes and CDs.

THINGS TO SEE & DO

SCHOONER ARDELLE (978) 290-7168; schoonerardelle.com Tour the waters off Cape Ann aboard a wooden Pinky schooner built in Essex. MARITIME GLOUCESTER (978) 281-0470; maritimegloucester.org Explore Gloucester’s long relationship with the sea via interactive, hands-on exhibits, touch tanks, aquariums, fishing gear displays, a giant lobster trap and more.

GLOUCESTER HARBORWALK gloucester.harborwalk.org Follow this self-guided walking trail defined by 42 granite story posts installed as a permanent exhibit. Each marker highlights an aspect of Gloucester’s history as a seaport, its rich culture and people, and its evolution toward a modern, sustainable fishing industry. CAPE ANN MUSEUM (978) 283-0455; capeannmuseum.org Intimate museum featuring maritime and fine-art collections, along with exhibits and artifacts relating to the history and culture of Cape Ann. GLOUCESTER SCHOONER FESTIVAL gloucesterschoonerfestival.net Held Labor Day weekend, this event is a gathering of glorious schooners from all parts of New England. A highlight is the Parade of Sail, during which participating schooners make their way through the harbor and out past the breakwater, before ending at the Mayor’s Race starting area off Eastern Point. SARGENT HOUSE MUSEUM (978) 281-2432; sargenthouse.org Visit this Georgian-style house built in 1782 and learn about the early history of Gloucester from its beginnings as a farming and lumbering outpost to its evolution into the country’s premier seaport. Also features a collection of original works by portrait painter John Singer Sargent, a descendant of the Sargent family.

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MAINE DESTINATION

YORK

Sunset on the York River.

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Take a journey into the past on a visit to this protected harbor and scenic river on Maine’s southern coast. ROMOTERS LIKE TO CALL YORK “THE GATEWAY TO MAINE,” and that’s a pretty apt description. But for those arriving by boat, York Harbor also represents a trip from present-day Maine to the coast’s distant past, both literally and figuratively. You start to see it on the approach from seaward, headed for one of the best shelters in the state. “We get a lot of sailboats here,” says York Harbormaster Dave Hutchinson, who has seen his share of vessels during his many years on the York River. “We’re the only deep, safe harbor between Cape Ann and Portland with enough rental moorings for sailboats.” Indeed, entering the harbor at the pace of a sailboat is the best way begin the “journey into the past” that York offers. At first, you may feel as if you’ve never left Cape Cod and similar environs farther south. That’s because from East Point to the turn at Stage Neck, every stretch of beach is jammed with sunbathers and every inch of shoreline is chock-a-block full of cottages, mansions, hotels and parked cars.

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TIME TRAVELING

But as the channel narrows and you leave Stage Neck to starboard, something wonderful happens. In the inner harbor, flashy new shore abodes are replaced by elderly clapboard homes and pleasantly weathered piers. Old dominates and new diminishes. Even better, when you pick up one of the seven town-managed rental moorings in the swirling waters of the river (don’t try to anchor), Hutchinson or one of his assistants will greet you with a map of York Harbor, and you’ll see that all of “Old York” is well within walking distance. First settled in the 1620s, York has preserved many buildings from its busy past, including a wharf and warehouse run by Revolutionary War kingpin John Hancock. Farther upriver is the Elizabeth Perkins House Museum, once the home of rough-and-tumble ferrymen and sea captains, but later transformed into a 19th-century summer manse for a well-to-do family. The grounds are spectacular, and open to the public.

A boating family makes its way past Stage Neck.

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An angler takes in the view of Nubble Light at sunrise from Long Sands Beach.

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RIVER & WOODS

In fact, there are nearly a dozen properties scattered about town that have been preserved by various historical groups, and visitors could easily consume several days checking them out. For the saltwater-minded, however, sticking to the river is the best option. Note that traveling by dinghy, skiff or kayak is the best way to explore the upstream reaches of the York, as it allows easy passage below the various bridges. Just beyond the Route 103 bridge (15 feet vertical clearance), the river seems to split, with a cheerfully undersized footbridge spanning the mouth of Barrells Millpond to starboard. This miniature suspension bridge is known locally as the “Wiggly Bridge,” which means it’s a bit temperamental underfoot, but otherwise perfectly safe. Best of all, it leads to Steadman Woods, a parcel of land that separates the river from Barrells Cove and which contains some of the most popular walking paths on Maine’s southwest coast.

Low tide reveals the causeway leading to Steadman Woods.

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YORK

STRIPERS BELOW

The bridge and woods are well known to all, but saltwater visitors often look for what is not well known, or even readily seen. Fishermen will be interested to learn that the York River is an ideal spot for reeling in that dream striper, especially on the incoming tide. From June until late September, anglers troll the entire upper river for bass, often overlooking the second best fish in town: flounder. In fact, some of the bridges are ideal places to soak a seaworm for these tasty bottom fish.  A sign for Shearwater Charters touts the fishing options off York.

Alternatively, the flood tide can carry you deeper into York’s past, especially if you start early. Beyond Sewall’s Bridge (Route 1), there’s a golf course to starboard and just beyond that the remnants of York’s ancient brickyards. As in many early Maine towns, all that thick, heavy clay soil was looked upon as an opportunity to make bricks for export. Cities such as New Haven, Bridgeport, Baltimore and Philadelphia imported bricks from the likes of York throughout the 18th and early 19th centuries. Today, pieces of those bricks, as well as remnants of the loading piers, can still be seen along the shoreline.

Stripers and winter flounder are available to anglers inside the river.

The remains of another early York industry—shipbuilding— can be spied along the southern slopes of the Cider Hill area to starboard, just beyond the Route 1 and I-95 bridges. The decaying pilings of piers to which newly launched schooners, brigs and barques were once tied are still visible at low tide. The old shipbuilding ways are now occupied by subdivisions on Cider Hill, but it’s easy to visualize what once was.

PADDLERS MAY PAY

The Town of York is considering imposing a fee on paddlecraft use on the river, due to apparent congestion of the harbor in recent years. Further, the launching of paddlecraft such as kayaks and SUPs may be restricted to Town Dock Number 2 by the harbormaster’s office and farther upriver at Rice’s Bridge and Scotland Bridge. Check with the harbormaster before launching.

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Paddleboarders and kayakers may face restrictions to access the York River.

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YORK AT A GLANCE HARBORMASTER (207) 363-0433

DOCKAGE, MOORINGS & SERVICE

TOWN OF YORK (207) 363-0433; yorkmaine.org Transient moorings are available through the harbormaster’s office for $30 per night on a first-come, first-served basis. Maximum vessel length is 50 feet, and the controlling depth is nine feet. The town is currently seeking federal funds for dredging.

YORK HARBOR MARINE SERVICE (207) 363-3602; yorkharbormarine.com Full-service boatyard and marina offering transient slips and moorings, a fuel dock and boat rentals. Max LOA 35 feet. Six feet MLW.

Long Sands General Store near York Beach.

LAUNCH RAMPS

There are no public launch ramps for trailerable boats on the York River. However, there are several put-in spots for kayaks and other carry-in craft. The nearest large-craft launch facility is in Wells Harbor. This recently rebuilt ramp offers all-tide access and parking.

ANCHORAGE

An excellent little anchorage (except in northeast winds) can be found in 7 to 10 feet of water east of Rocks Nose, off Western Point at the mouth of the harbor. In calm conditions, boaters can also drop the hook off the beach north of Fort Point. Anchoring inside the river is discouraged.

WHERE TO EAT

DOCKSIDE (207) 363-2722; dockside-restaurant.com Dock-and-dine restaurant at Dockside Marina, opposite Stage Neck. Max LOA 35 feet.

A curious dog enjoys the water at the town wharf off Harris Island Road.

SHEARWATER (800) 340-1130; stageneck.com Upscale dining at the Stage Neck Inn. YORK RIVER LANDING (207) 351-8430; theyorkriverlanding.com Steaks, seafood and a great selection of craft brews with views of the York River.

THINGS TO SEE & DO

SEA K AYAKING WITH HARBOR ADVENTURES (207) 363-8466; harboradventures@aol.com Offers a variety of guided tours of the local waters, including custom excursions, full-moon paddles and “lobster luncheons.” Lessons available. FISHING WITH G COVE CHARTERS (207) 752-3420; gcovecharters.com Sport fishing for stripers, bluefish, haddock, shark, tuna and more. ELIZABETH PERKINS HOUSE MUSEUM (207) 363-4974; oldyork.org Historic manor and grounds bordering the York River.

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SALT MARSH EXPLORATION

Beyond Scotland Bridge, the last of the river’s overpasses, you may feel as if you’re in the York of 300 years ago. Houses along the shore vanish as you make your way into the upper river’s salt marshes. Small wonder that the waterway is currently being considered for federal “wild and scenic” designation, which would afford certain restrictions to preserve its pristine character. Looking carefully amid the marsh grass, you may spy weathered fence posts placed by early colonists, who looked upon the marshes as ready-made grazing fields. In late summer, the salt marsh hay was cut and shipped south as another early York export for gardeners along the East Coast. Riding the tide even farther inland, it’s just you, the egrets, herons, kingfishers, perhaps an osprey or eagle, and, just to remind you of modern times, a strong likelihood of kayakers. The soothing and nearly pristine scenery serves as yet another gateway to Maine and its motto: “The way life should be.”

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MAINE DESTINATION

HARPSWELL

A boater could spend an entire summer poking around the waters surrounding this magical Maine destination. Many do just that. BY KEN TEXTOR PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOE DEVENNEY

IG, DIVERSE AND SPREAD OUT, Harpswell isn’t really a single port. It’s at least a half dozen distinctly different destinations rolled into one, with miles of shoreline ranging from rugged granite to sandy beach, densely populated to nearly empty, easily navigable to seriously challenging. And gunkholes? They’re all over the place! “We’ve got 216 miles of shoreline here,” says Harpswell Harbormaster Jim Hayes. “So when you come here, you’ll probably find what you’re looking for. It might take a while, but you’ll find it.”

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Sunset over Merriconeag Sound, as seen from Orrs Island.


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COAST WITH THE MOST Indeed, with three bays, two sounds, a sizable estuary and no less than five harbors to choose from, Harpswell’s potential for a visiting boat and crew seems unlimited. Even a trailer-boat enthusiast has scads of access options, as there are no less than ten launch ramps scattered amid the three peninsulas and major islands comprising the town. Perhaps the best known of Harpswell’s “grips on the sea” is what locals call “The Neck.” This westernmost peninsula terminates conveniently at Potts Harbor, which is the most-visited of the town’s various official ports. Many boaters make this their only stop in Harpswell, and that’s a mistake. Yes, there are two excellent restaurants and a full-service marina in the northwest corner of the harbor, as well as quiet gunkholes and the impressive “reversing falls” at the entrance to Basin Cove. But even Harbormaster Hayes notes that nearby Mackerel Cove, on Bailey Island, is also worth a visit, given its distinctive “village within a village” atmosphere. Like Potts Harbor, it’s located at the end of another stretch of land that juts well out to sea, convenient to the common east-west cruising route across outer Casco Bay. Unlike Potts, however, the recreational focus here is squarely on sport fishing, a tradition that has endured for nearly 80 years.

Elijah Kellogg Congregational Church in Harpswell Center.

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A weathered fishing shack on scenic Mackerel Cove.

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A 500-pound bluefin tuna comes ashore at Cundys Harbor Wharf.

FISHING FIRST The Bailey Island Fishing Tournament, established in 1938 and run by the Casco Bay Tuna Club, is the oldest continually running fishing tournament on the East Coast. Formerly based in Mackerel Cove, participants now have their catch weighed and processed just a short distance up Merriconeag Sound, at Cook’s Lobster & Ale House. Even if you miss the tournament (the last week in July), the cove on which Cook’s is located makes a worthy side trip. Here, the world’s only “cribstone” bridge spans Wills Gut, which separates Bailey Island from its northern neighbor, Orrs Island. Built almost entirely of granite slabs that are formed, Lego-like, into “cribs” of support, the bridge is now a National Historic Landmark, not to mention a nifty piece of engineering.

Lobsterman’s statue at Land’s End on Bailey Island.

SEEKING SECLUSION If the cove is too crowded for an overnight stay (as it often is), you can always drop the hook across the sound in Harpswell Harbor. This large bight also offers a rough sand beach that shows on the chart as a hooked arm at Stover’s Point. This is town-owned land, so you may see a sunbather or two enjoying the shore and salt marsh just behind the spit of sand. If you seek even more seclusion, continue northeastward into Harpswell Sound, where the shoreline features fewer side-byside bungalows and more unbroken forest with occasional homes here and there. In addition to the obvious gunkholes, the tide begins to accelerate here, especially in Ewin Narrows, where a bridge with 30 feet of clearance limits taller boats from enjoying the Harpswell Cove area. The tidal currents around Princes Point are downright intimidating, and often require more than just casual attention to the helm.

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MAINE DESTINATION

HARPSWELL

RIVER RETREATS The truly daring will follow the flood tide east beyond Princes Point and into Long Reach, where you may feel as if you’re on the edge of wilderness—even though Maine’s biggest city, Portland, is little more than 20 miles away. Indeed, if your boat is short enough (under 10 feet), you can continue northward through Gurnet Strait and end up in the New Meadows River. Here begins yet another aspect of this multifaceted town, with options both northward and southward— and peppered with gunkhole options along the way. Cundys Harbor is where most mariners on the New Meadows eventually drop in. Although it can be a bit rolly in almost any weather, Cundys is home to an oldfashioned, on-the-wharf fishing village, highlighted by Watson’s General Store. Opened more than 160 years ago, Watson’s is a place to get anything you might need for your commercial or recreational fishing boat. But more than that, it’s a hangout on foggy or stormy days, a place where local fishermen swap stories (both true and gilded) while they wait for the weather to improve. 

Mackerel Cove on Bailey Island.

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MAINE DESTINATION

HARPSWELL Sunrise at Potts Point in South Harpswell.

HEAVENLY HOLBROOK HARBOR The catch of those same fishermen often finds its way to nearby Holbrook’s Lobster Grille & Snack Bar, which locals saved from sure demise in 2009, rebuilding the pier and upgrading the landing area for commercial fishermen and hungry visitors. The fish tacos are particularly outstanding. Continuing south and between the New Meadows River and back toward Bailey Island, the entirety of Quahog Bay and a slice of eastern Casco Bay await exploration—again with numerous anchorages and islands ripe for closer scrutiny. And if that’s not enough temptation, head back west and north of Potts Harbor and into Middle Bay, which is yet another Harpswellian nugget of nautical nirvana. The quiet coves, warm waters (swimmably warm!) and seclusion are worth the effort. And since all that Harpswell has to offer is impossible to cover here, you may want to check out the websites for the Harpswell Maine Business Association (harpswellmaine.org), Harpswell Heritage Land Trust (hhltmaine.org) and Things to Do, Harpswell (harpswell.maine.gov). Or better yet—just go!

Kayak instruction at Orrs Island.

HARPSWELL AT A GLANCE HARBORMASTER (207) 833-5771

DOCKAGE, MOORINGS & SERVICE

DOLPHIN MARINA (207) 833-5343; dolphinmarinaandrestaurant.com Potts Harbor marina offering transient slips, moorings, launch ramp, gas and diesel, showers, pump-out, storage and onsite restaurant. Fifteen feet MLW dockside. GREAT ISLAND BOAT YARD (207) 729-1639 Transient slips and moorings, gas and diesel, haul-out, launch ramp, repair, showers and pump-out. Eight feet MLW dockside. PAUL’S MARINA (207) 729-3067 Transient moorings, gas, restrooms, pumpout. Five feet MLW dockside. COOK’S LOBSTER HOUSE (207) 833-6641; cookslobster.com Transient slips.

ANCHORAGES

There are loads of protected places to drop the hook in and around Harpswell. A few good spots include Harpswell Harbor (west of Stover’s Point in 18 feet of water); Potts Harbor (central portion of the harbor in 22 to 33 feet of water); Mackerel Cove (47 to 52 feet of water), and Cundys Harbor (southern end in 20 feet of water).

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LAUNCH RAMPS

Harpswell has some 10 public launch spots, although not all are suitable for larger craft or offer low-tide access. Additionally, some marinas have launch ramps and allow parking for a fee. The best public bets are Lookout Point Town Ramp on Harpswell Neck (all-tide, limited parking) and Bethel Point Town Ramp (all-tide, limited parking). Among the other options are: Potts Point Landing, Graveyard Point Landing, Stover Cove Landing, Wharf Road Landing, Hildreth Road Landing, Mackerel Cove Town Ramp, Buttermilk Cove Landing and Holbrook Street Landing.

KAYAK RENTAL

H2OUTFITTERS (207) 833-5257; H2outfitters.com Sea kayak and paddleboard rentals, lessons, tours and more. Headquartered on Orrs Island.

WHERE EAT

DOLPHIN RESTAURANT (207) 833-6000 dolphinmarinaandrestaurant.com Potts Harbor dock-and-dine favorite. Offers lobster, local fish and shellfish, hand-cut steaks and more, all served with great views of Casco Bay. MORSE’S CRIBSTONE GRILL (207) 833-7775; morsescribstonegrill.com Cozy restaurant with indoor and outdoor seating near the famous Cribstone Bridge on Bailey Island. Good food and water views.

COOK’S LOBSTER & ALE HOUSE (207) 833–2818; cookslobster.com Boiled lobster dinners, chowder, steamers, mussels and other Maine classics are the draw at this seafood mainstay on Bailey Island. HOLBROOK’S LOBSTER GRILLE & SNACK BAR (207) 729-9050 Cundys Harbor dock-and-dine specializing in seafood, burgers, fried fare and more. GIANT STAIRS SEAFOOD GRILLE (207) 833-5000 Popular breakfast stop, but also serves lunch and dinner; also known for homemade pies and other desserts.

COOL SHOPS

ASH COVE POTTERY (207) 833-6004; ashcovepottery.com Beautiful handmade pots, bowls, mugs, dishes and more. C. PERIWINKLE CO. (207) 833-8040 Gift shop and gallery featuring local art and crafts, seashore wreaths and baskets, gourmet foods, baby gifts, jewelry, women’s accessories, cards and more. THISTLES & THINGS (207) 833-2329; thistlesandthingsgifts.com Handcrafted Scottish items, including Thistle Crieff pottery, Luckenbooth China, ceramics, Celtic jewelry, kilt accessories, music books and gift items.

THINGS TO SEE & DO

SEA K AYAKING WITH H2OUTFITTERS (207) 833-5257; H2outfitters.com Take a sea kayaking lesson or tour of the beautiful waters around Harpswell with this respected outfitter. EAGLE ISLAND STATE PARK Boaters can visit this small but beautiful state park southwest of Potts Harbor. Passengers can be dropped off at the pier float on the west side of the island while a park ranger directs you to a mooring. Anchoring is also possible. You can either dinghy to the pier or get a lift with the ranger. If arriving by kayak, you can land on the small beach on the north end of the island. CLIFF TRAIL Winding, rugged, 2.3-mile path that includes a shore walk along a tidal creek and spectacular views from 150-foot cliffs overlooking Long Reach. GIANT STAIRS TRAIL This popular walking trail follows the rocky coastline and offers sweeping views of eastern Casco Bay.

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LOWELL’S BOAT SHOP

Traditional wooden boatbuilding is only part of what students discover at this historic boat shop on the Merrimack River. BY KATE YEOMANS PHOTOGRAPHY BY ERIC KULIN

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Classic wooden boats in various states of repair and construction occupy Amesbury’s Lowell’s Boat Shop. NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

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LOWELL’S BOAT SHOP

o enter Lowell’s Boat Shop, housed in a crooked, red building overlooking a horseshoe bend in the Merrimack River, is to step straight into living history. Curled wood shavings litter the floo . Sunlight angles through a long row of windows, creating golden beams in the sawdust-infused air. Wood-handled chisels, planers and clamps of all sizes line the stained workbenches. Numbers, calculations and notes written in large cursive letters are scrawled in odd places among the rafters and walls. The sound of tapping, sanding, sawing, conversation and footfalls fill the ooms. And always, always, always, there’s a boat or two, or three, or more perched upon the floor in various states of build, repair or restoration.  

A meticulously restored rowboat rests against a workbench on the shop’s upper level.

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THE DORY STORY Founded in Amesbury, Massachusetts, in 1793 by Simeon Lowell, this is the oldest continuously operating boat shop in the United States. It’s also the birthplace of the fishing do y, which served as the workhorse vessel of the New England fishing fleet in the late 19th cent y and early 20th century. At one time, Lowell’s Boat Shop was just one of many businesses contributing to an industry that turned out more than 250,000 fishing dories ver two centuries. Today, it’s the only one left. As the fishing fleet volved, Lowell’s began building boats for recreational and civic use, counting many youth camps, rowing clubs and even the U.S. Lifesaving Service among its customers. The shop was passed down through seven generations of the Lowell family until the 1980s. In 2006, it was purchased by the non-profit Lowell’s Maritime Foundation, and today the boat shop is a designated National Landmark and Working Museum, celebrating its third century of wooden boatbuilding.

Students are taught to use traditional hand tools, such as this plane.

MASTER CRAFTSMAN Graham McKay, master boatbuilder and Lowell’s Executive Director, discovered the shop as a neighborhood kid who was curious about what was happening inside. He caught the boatbuilding bug right away, and had the simultaneous good fortune of apprenticing with mentors who saw his spark and nurtured it to flam . In this same way, McKay has now created a more formal teen apprenticeship program. This year, eight apprentices in grades 8 through 12 are spending two to three afternoons per week, October through May, working at the shop. Currently, they are building two dories for the Gloucester schooner Adventure, two kit boats for upcoming boat shows, skiffs for a local school, a 32-foot, multi-oar vessel for the Gloucester Gig Rowers and a production boat from 1935 using patterns found in the loft. In addition, Lowell’s hosts students once a week from private schools, and partners with local schools and organizations to introduce kids to rowing. Many of the shop’s summer programs are staffed by the apprentices.

An iron anvil is used to shape metal parts.

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LOWELL’S BOAT SHOP

Lowell’s is the oldest continuously operating boat shop in the United States.

LEARNING THE TRADE “I’ve always wanted to learn woodworking, and Lowell’s provided that for me—and so much more,” said Daniel Bennett, a senior at Newburyport High School. “But the main thing I learned was how to be a leader by watching Graham and the other boatbuilders. That has been so meaningful to me. Most of the work is done by the apprentices, but they would sometimes let us take charge of actual construction. As we became more confident in our skills we could be left on our own. I learned that being a leader means enabling others to do the tasks they need to do.”

Lowell’s offers hands-on apprenticeships to teens interested in traditional boatbuilding techniques.

“The shop’s impact on our students is amazing and significant like no other experience our students have,” added Aisha Naimey of the BRIDGE School in Sanford, Maine. Five students visit the boat shop once a week, and are now building their third boat. “They are challenged in a way that they have never been challenged. Graham is so delicate, but assertive. He pushes them to do things they didn’t know they could do. It’s been an absolutely phenomenal experience for our students.”

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BUILDING BOATS & LEADERS Will Johnson, a senior at The Governor’s Academy in Byfield Massachusetts, has apprenticed at the shop since his freshman year. He grew up near the water south of Boston, and developed an early appreciation for boats and marine life, but had no prior boatbuilding experience. He learned about the Lowell’s apprenticeship program during a holiday open house. “I jumped into it right away,” he said. McKay’s approach to teaching is pragmatic and sensible. Step one: Learn every tool in the boat shop. Step two: Learn how to use every tool safely. Step three: Learn how to use every tool that can be used to build a boat. During his first ear, Johnson and his fellow apprentices built a 27-foot surf dory, now used in Lowell’s youth programs. This experience inspired him to spend the following two summers and one winter building his own boat, a 16-foot Long Point Skiff, a task he figu es took about 700 hours. He named her Persistence. “Graham, Jeff and Ian—all of the boatbuilders at the shop—are an absolute inspiration to me,” Johnson said, adding that his apprenticeship has taught him life lessons that extend well beyond the workbench.

Lumber that will later become boats is stored in the loft.

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LOWELL’S BOAT SHOP

LIFE LESSONS LEARNED “Graham taught me that boatbuilding is about fixing our mistakes. I think that also goes for life in general. I’ve become so much more independent. I used to ask for help all the time, but now I first try to solve the problem myself.” Now a member of the Lowell’s Boat Shop board of directors, Johnson is working to find ays to extend the apprenticeship experience to his peers. “All my friends think this is the coolest thing in the world,” he said, “and they want to build a boat, too. However, they get so busy with after-school sports. I had to take the winter off from a sport to do this, and I really love it.”

Views of the Merrimack provide inspiration.

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Embracing the traditional way of the bistro:

Relax, Eat, Drink, and leave feeling satisfied and recharged.

Exectutive director Graham McKay has held a lifelong fascination with wooden boats and boatbuilding.

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(508) 778-6500

410 Main Street, Hyannis, MA 02601

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LOWELL’S BOAT SHOP

After he graduates from high school this spring, Johnson plans to study engineering and marine science in college … so long as he can still be close to the shop. “I’ll always be at Lowell’s,” he said, “for the rest of my life!” McKay is pleased by the passion he sees in Johnson and his other apprentices, and only wishes he had more teens in the shop learning these timeless skills.

The shop’s lower level also serves as a small museum.

“It’s difficult to et the word out that the opportunity exists here for high school apprentices,” McKay said. “We would love to be overwhelmed by applicants, but we aren’t, probably because they just don’t know about us. We’re a hidden gem. A lot of wooden boat shops are fairly closed off to public access, but at Lowell’s, the knowledge is here, the history is here, and it’s all available just by walking in the door.”

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S P E C I A L

A D V E R T I S I N G

S E C T I O N

Boaters welcome at TGC at Sacconnesset efine your perfect day on Cape Cod. If you have the good fortune to own a boat, it could be full sails beneath a cloudless sky; frantically chasing albies, blues or stripers too numerous to count; or a leisurely cruise to Martha’s Vineyard. If your passion is golf, a perfect day might include a quick nine holes or a full 18 on a course that can be, by choice of tee box, challenging or relatively stress-free. But if you choose to be the master of both boating and golf, you will need a golf club that patiently awaits your landfall, offering unfettered access whenever your busy schedule allows. One golf club has found a way to strike the perfect balance to attract boaters to their club. TGC at Sacconnesset of Falmouth is located minutes from the Bourne Bridge (which makes it a convenient drive for a “daycation”) and a short drive (no pun intended) from several public and private marina facilities offering slips and moorings on a seasonal or overnight basis. Morning rounds are particularly fast-paced, and there are many open groups that welcome new players. Membership at TGC at Sacconnesset is limited, ensuring easy access to the Rees Jones-designed layout and the time to enjoy both passions on the same day.

BY CHARLIE FIELD, JR.

“Morning rounds are particularly fast-paced, enabling members to enjoy both passions.” NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

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S P E C I A L

“Playing 18 holes of golf at the club and then jumping into my boat to bring friends and family over to Nancy’s at Oak Bluffs is my perfect summer day!” - TGC at Sacconnesset Member

A D V E R T I S I N G

S E C T I O N

TGC at Sacconnesset is member-owned, golf-only, and promotes a purposefully relaxed atmosphere. A round at the club is a true walk with nature. There is no residential development to distract from the pure golf experience. Local conservation restrictions preserve the tract in perpetuity and give the course the distinction of forever being the last new course to be built from raw land on Cape Cod. Overhead, redtailed hawks fly slow circles, occasionally intercepting the breezes that come off Buzzards Bay, gliding at high speed in pursuit of prey. The clubhouse has an understated, intimate appeal that is elevated by the personal attention offered to members and guests alike by a motivated and well-trained staff (including the Cape’s best caddie program). The Sacconnesset Grille draws inspiration from local seafood, putting tasty twists on traditional Cape Cod dishes and sourcing much of its produce from nearby farms and growers. To accommodate the “drop by for a bite” crowd, meals are purposefully served throughout the day: al fresco on the expansive patio overlooking the 18th green, or in the clubhouse pub and full-service dining room. It is not unusual to overhear conversations about early-morning rounds followed by on-the-water excursions in pursuit of stripers and blues. Set your course for TGC at Sacconesset—it waits patiently for you to make landfall on Cape Cod. For more information, visit tgcgolf.com or call (508) 457-7200.

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DOCK-AND-DINE DOCK-AND-DINE

What does it take to beat celebrity chef Bobby Flay at his own game? Find out at this Rockland Harbor gem! TEXT & PHOTOGRAPHY BY TOM RICHARDSON

Archer’s on the Pier commands a sweeping view of Rockland Harbor.

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OR LYNN ARCHER, THE AFFABLE OWNER AND HEAD CHEF of Archer’s on the Pier in Rockland, Maine, it’s all about fresh and local. “I was doing sea-to-table and farm-to-table before it became a ‘thing’,” she laughs, explaining that her father, husband and three sons are all lobstermen. “When I was growing up [in Thomaston, Maine], we ate what was available according to the season. We had chickens and cows, grew our own produce, always had fresh fish, crabs and lobster. I brought that philosophy to my restaurants by focusing on local ingredients.” Archer’s, which opened in 2011, occupies the former site of a waterfront bar on this once-exclusively working harbor. “When the property became available, I knew I had to acquire it. The setting is so spectacular,” says Archer, who also owns the Brass Compass in downtown Rockland. Spectacular indeed! The restaurant commands a sweeping view of Rockland Harbor and its eclectic waterfront. The huge wraparound deck is the perfect place to enjoy a meal or drink while watching the lobster boats and yachts come and go. Boasting a hearty laugh and no-nonsense Down East demeanor, Archer has become something of a local celebrity, and she’s a natural on camera. She has appeared on “Throwdown with Bobby Flay”— where her lobster club sandwich won the day—and has a monthly cooking segment on the Portlandbased lifestyle show, “207.” And now Archer can add “New England Boating TV” to her portfolio, as she and her restaurant were recently featured in NEBO’s Rockland episode.

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DOCK-AND-DINE

During that show, the crew feasted on the exquisite (if somewhat messy) lobster reuben sandwich and the now-famous “King of Clubs,” both bursting with lobster meat. However, Archer’s most popular menu item by far is the fish tacos, featuring Maine-caught haddock, cole slaw and Mexican rice. Other top dinner entrées include the tenderloin with butter-poached lobster, the hand-cut Delmonico ribeye, the broiled Italian haddock, and prime rib, the last served for $15 on Wednesday nights. “If you want the prime rib, you’d better get here early. We always sell out,” warns Archer, who is also famous for her desserts, which include a decadent chocolate peanut buttercup cake (yes, we tried it, and it is pretty awesome).

Chef and owner Lynn Archer poses with NEBO TV co-hosts Tom and Parker.

Visiting boaters can tie up at the Yachting Solutions marina, at the end of the pier, for $20, but Archer’s is also a short stroll from the Rockland public landing, where dockage is free for up to two hours. Besides, you’ll be glad for the walk back to your boat after dining at Archer’s, so you can work off a few of those calories!

Bobby Flay & Lynn Archer

ARCHER’S ON THE PIER

58 Ocean St., Rockland, ME (207) 594-2435; archersonthepier.com

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The famous “King of Clubs” suffers no lack of lobster!

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VIEW ASTERN

The person who goes farthest is generally the one who is willing to do and dare. The sure-thing boat never gets far from shore. — Dale Carnegie

PHOTO ERIC BRUST-AKDEMIR

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New England Boating Spring-Summer 2017  
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