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With unmatched inner strength and efficiency, combined with the reliability and precision performance of the Yamaha engines, you’ll have an exceptional ride and efficient fuel consumption.

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innovation and excellence in the perfect sized package. A combination of finely engineered features designed with a timeless and elegant, yacht-like exterior. Her cabin finished with interior hardwoods, solid stock trim and modern fabrics comfort you for an intimate overnight in your private cove or harbor. Let the leader in sport fishing vessels take you to endless blue water canyons, Great Lakes, rugged shorelines and pristine Caribbean or Pacific Islands in search of your next fishing adventure.

BOSUN’S MARINE | www.bosuns.com Mashpee, MA | Tel 508-477-4626 or 508-477-6020 Peabody, MA | Tel 978-535-1700 STRIPER MARINA | www.stripermarina.com Barrington, RI | Tel 401-245-6121

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NEW ENGLAND BOATING

A SUNAPEE SAMPLER

TABLE OF CONTENTS

110

Mix up your boating this season with a visit to this idyllic New Hampshire lake.

70

ISLAND OASIS

Looking for a relaxing respite from Rhode Island’s busier ports? Give Jamestown a try!

DESTINATIONS 40

CANDLEWOOD POWER Connecticut’s largest lake has more than enough room for any kind of boating activity.

SPECIAL FEATURES

48

20

20 BOATING GEAR & GIFTS

Our pick of fun, clever and useful products for the nautical-minded.

UP THE CREEK

Bucolic Mattituck Creek on the North Fork of Long Island beckons boaters from the Connecticut side of the Sound.

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54

BOROUGHED TIME

Discover the many charms of scenic, protected Stonington Harbor.

154

30 SIMPLY SEA BASS

You won’t find a more family-friendly fish than the black sea bass.

CONTINUED

154 12 GREAT NEW ENGLAND DOCK & DINES

Pay a visit to these boater-friendly restaurants, tested by the NEBO TV crew.

WWW.NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

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NEW ENGLAND BOATING

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NEW ENGLAND BOATING

TABLE OF CONTENTS

62

THE WONDERS OF WICKFORD

This summer, plan a daytrip or weekend visit to this delightful Narragansett Bay destination.

78

HOLE IN ONE

Often bypassed by boaters, the village of Woods Hole offers good reason to stop and stay a while.

86

ALL’S WELL IN WELLFLEET

Sailors, anglers, cruisers and paddlers all feel welcome in this quintessential Cape Cod harbor.

98

ONE HISTORIC HARBOR

Steeped in maritime lore, Marblehead is the perfect spot to forge your own boating memories.

120

CRUISING THE KENNEBUNKS

Maine’s Kennebunk River represents a two-for-one deal, with lots to see and do on both shores—and beyond.

132

ROCKLAND ROCKS

Discover why this former down-and-dirty fishing port is considered the boating hub of Penobscot Bay.

144

ESCAPE TO THE ADIRONDACKS

Get ready to hitch up your trailer and head north to adventure in the Saranac Lakes region of New York.

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EDITORIAL

THE HELM

EDITORIAL & CONTENT DIRECTOR

Janice Randall Rohlf EDITOR

Warning: The contents of this magazine can result in an uncontrollable craving for golden fried fish, crispy French fries, succulent lobster rolls, creamy chowder, sweet whole-belly clams and other delectable items commonly offered at dock-and-dine establishments throughout New England. If you are at all susceptible to the aforementioned foods, do not, under any circumstances, turn to page 154. The rest of the magazine remains relatively safe. Indeed, it comes recommended to anyone who enjoys boating and is looking for great spots to visit by water this season. Once again, we’ve tried to include a variety of freshwater and saltwater destinations throughout the region, to please a wide range of boaters. Hopefully, we’ve succeeded.

Tom Richardson: New England Boating LMS EDITORS

Maria Allen: South Shore Living Rachel Arroyo: Home Remodeling Lisa Leigh Connors: Cape Cod Magazine, Chatham Magazine Jaci Conry: Custom Publications Rob Duca: New England Golf & Leisure Ann Luongo: Cape Cod Guide Danielle Raciti: Southern New England Weddings Colby Radomski: Falmouth Magazine, Hingham Magazine Janice Randall Rohlf: Southern New England Home Jennifer Sperry: Southern New England Living ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR

Ann Luongo

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Colby Radomski

............................................

This issue of New England Boating starts in Connecticut with features on Stonington Harbor and a jaunt across Long Island Sound to the wine-country village of Mattituck, New York. In Rhode Island, adventures in Jamestown and historic Wickford Harbor await, while across the border in Massachusetts are stops in Woods Hole, Marblehead and Wellfleet. In Maine, the lovely, lively Kennebunks and hip, happening Rockland Harbor beckon.

EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Christopher Lewis CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Eric Brust-Akdemir ART DIRECTOR

Sharon Bartholomew ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTORS

Alexandra Bondarek Jennifer Oppenheim

PRODUCTION MANAGER

On the freshwater front, we’ll cruise around Connecticut’s Candlewood Lake, time-travel to Lake Sunapee, New Hampshire, and even take a family road-trip to the legendary Saranac Lakes of Upstate New York’s Adirondacks region. What a ride!

Rachel Clayton

SENIOR DESIGNER

Kamie Richard DESIGNER

Kendra Sousa ............................................ DIRECTOR ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT

Other offerings include our Gear & Gift Guide of nautical-themed items for

Oceanna O’Donnell

the boat or home, and the aforementioned mouth-watering roundup of 12

ACCOUNT MANAGERS

dock-and-dine restaurants that will have you dashing for the nearest clam shack. So dig in and enjoy—but don’t say you weren’t warned!

Ailish Belair Jessica Peacock

ACCT MANAGER/EVENT & SALES COORDINATOR

Rebecca Banas

SOCIAL MEDIA SPECIALIST

Allie Herzog

VIDEO PRODUCTION

Jimmy Baggott

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Ray Carbone, Nancy Gabriel Cifune, Malerie Yolen-Cohen, Rob Duca, Michele Herrmann, Tom Schlichter, Ken Textor CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Tom Richardson Editor

Karen Bobotas, Tom Croke, Caryn B. Davis, Joe Devenney, Scott Goodwin, Joe Vallier, Andrea Zimmerman PUBLISHED BY

Lighthouse Media Solutions www.lhmediasolutions.com Single copy price $7.99/$8.99 Canada. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without the written permission of the publisher. Publisher disclaims all responsibility for omissions, errors, and unsolicited materials. Printed in USA.

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PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Russell A. Piersons rpiersons@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................

CHIEF OPERATIONS OFFICER (DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT)

David F. Jensen djensen@lhmediasolutions.com PRESIDENT (VIDEO-TV)

Gene Allen gallen@lhmediasolutions.com VICE PRESIDENT SALES & MARKETING

Steve Wyman swyman@lhmediasolutions.com VP NATIONAL ACCTS & ACCT MGMT

Mike Alleva malleva@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................ REGIONAL SALES MANAGERS

Ray Clark (Marine Specialist) rclark@lhmediasolutions.com Kathy Hitchcock khitchcock@lhmediasolutions.com David Honeywell dhoneywell@lhmediasolutions.com Maribeth Kane mkane@lhmediasolutions.com Erin McCluskey emccluskey@lhmediasolutions.com Janice Rogers jrogers@lhmediasolutions.com Erin Soderstrom esoderstrom@lhmediasolutions.com Kelly Sykes ksykes@lhmediasolutions.com Rhonda Walsh rwalsh@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................ REGIONAL DIGITAL SALES

Patty Wolf pwolf@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................

SENIOR WEB DEVELOPER

David Fontes dfontes@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................ SALES AD COORDINATOR (PUBLISHING, TV, WEB)

Hillary Portell hportell@lhmediasolutions.com DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & WEBSITE DEVELOPMENT

David Dauer ddauer@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................ CONTROLLER

Connie Walsh cwalsh@lhmediasolutions.com ASSISTANT CONTROLLER

Angela McPherson amcpherson@lhmediasolutions.com CUSTOMER SERVICE

Elaine Jepson ejepson@lhmediasolutions.com ASSISTANT TO CEO & OFFICE MANAGER

Kristin Gayle kgayle@lhmediasolutions.com

Mondays at 6:30 p.m. on NESN Cape Cod Office: 396 Main Street, Suite 15, Hyannis, MA 02601 508.534.9291 Boston Office: 850 Summer Street, Suite 207, Boston, MA 02127 508.534.9291 Rhode Island Office: P.O. Box 568, Portsmouth, RI 02871 401.396.9888

ON THE COVER:

Chris Craft - Launch 36. Photo by: Forest Johnson Photography

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EDITOR’S PICKS

GEAR & GIFTS

Rings a Bell

Piscine Plates

The Ship’s Bell Clock by Chelsea Clock is a distinctive, handcrafted timepiece that chimes

The Roman Table in Scituate is offering Vietri handcrafted

eight bells at 4, 8 and 12 o’clock to mark the end

ceramic tableware with a subtle piscine touch. The Lastra Fish

of a mariner’s four-hour watch. Behind its classic,

Design uses a simple fish pattern with rustic edges to create

hand-silvered dial is an 11-jewel movement with

a fresh and playful seaside table. Handmade in Tuscany of

364 precision brass parts, many plated with gold,

Italian stoneware, these beautifully crafted dishes are safe in

to ensure accuracy. Available in 4 ½-inch, 6-inch

the microwave, freezer and dishwasher.

and 8 ½-inch dial sizes with a five-year warranty.

$22 - $160 (781) 378-2015 THEROMANTABLE.COM

$2,475 - $4,075 (866) 538-5464 KINGJEWELERSINC.COM

Classy Brass Keep wine, beer and other beverages chilled in this unique ice bucket made from a vintage brass porthole fastened to a sturdy base of repurposed decking— salvaged from a racing yacht—coated with multiple layers of beeswax. You couldn’t ask for a cooler cooler!

$425 (508) 241-9675 ATLANTICWORKSHOP.COM

Tray Cool This 12” by 15” white wood tray from Pea Pear features a removable, two-sided, full-size cardstock print encased in glass. One side features a coastal chart, while the reverse shows word-art specific to that location. Custom chart orders available for an additional fee.

$35 (617) 791-4043 PEAPEAR.COM

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Slate It CleanSlate by Tina of Marshfield, Massachusetts, offers a variety of original coastal photos mounted on pieces of slate. Available images include New England lighthouses, boats, panoramic seacoast scenes and

One Stop in Hyannis. Two Islands. Nantucket Martha’s Vineyard

custom photos of your choosing. Slate mounts are available in many different shapes and sizes.

$30 - $70 (781) 307-5547 CLEANSLATETINA.COM

Voted BEST BOAT LINE since 2004

• High-Speed and Traditional Ferry departures • The Only Ferry Service from Nantucket to Martha's Vineyard • Free Wifi on High-Speed Ferries and Dockside • Traditional Ferry Day Trips where Kids Ride Free • Dockside Restaurants at Hy-Line Landing in Hyannis • Same Day Online Reservations

Hy-Line Landing • 230 Ocean Street • Hyannis hylinecruises.com • 800 492-8082 WWW.NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

NEBoating.indd 1

PM NEW 1/9/2015 ENGLAND4:41:27 BOATING

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EDITOR’S PICKS

GEAR & GIFTS

Tide & Time This handmade, handpainted clock from Georgetown Pottery of Georgetown, Maine, lets you know at a glance when it’s time to fish, clam or swim. Simple, elegant and accurate, it’s available in 12 different designs. Clock face measures 7” diameter.

$50 (866) 936-7687 GEORGETOWNPOTTERY.COM

On the Cuff Rhode Island jewelry designer Kendra Philips mixes nautical flare into much of her work, as exemplified by this gold and silver anchor cuff. Makes a great statement, or gift, for any boater.

$96 (781) 544-3800 OUTOFTHEBLUESCITUATE.COM

Wrist Watch Captain The amazing quatrix watch from Garmin can be loaded with routes, mark waypoints and track data, and lets you return to your starting location using the TracBack feature. When linked to a Garmin autopilot and chartplotter, quatix lets you steer, activate route navigation and more using configurable preset patterns. It also provides remote control of Garmin VIRB action cameras. The quatrix serves as an altimeter, barometer, three-axis compass and temperature sensor, and contains tide tables for more than 3,400 locations. Sailors will love the racecountdown timer, virtual starting line and tack assist.

$450 (800) 800-1020 BUY.GARMIN.COM 22

NEW ENGLAND BOATING

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Sail It Again Hobie’s new line of Tequila Sunrise bags are made from recycled sailcloth and feature the iconic Hobie Cat sail pattern and logo. The collection includes a Wine Bag, Duffle, Beach Tote, Sailor Sling and versatile Roll Bag. The water-resistant bags are handcrafted in the U.S. from sails gathered from around the world.

$39 - $199 (888) 462-4321 HOBIECAT.COM

Sailor’s Delight This Sailing Bracelet from On the Cape Apparel is the perfect gift for a nautical-minded friend or loved one. The bracelet, featuring a stainless steel shackle clasp, is handcrafted on Cape Cod and made of 550 paracord in assorted colors. Each bracelet comes with its own drawstring bag.

$14 ONTHECAPEAPPAREL.COM WWW.NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

NEW ENGLAND BOATING

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EDITOR’S PICKS

GEAR & GIFTS

High Def Down Low The new High Definition System (HDS) Gen3 fishfinder/chartplotter series from Lowrance is available in 7”, 9” and 12” units, all boasting super-fast processors and advanced fishfinding technologies, including StructureScan HD and DownScan Imaging, which create picture-like images of fish-holding structure. Meanwhile, CHIRP sonar provides outstanding target separation and noise rejection to better distinguish bait schools and individual fish. Multi-touch and keypad operation provide fast, fingertip access to all features, while the icondriven commands are easy to learn. Scrolling menus, cursor assist, snap-to setting markers and preview panes with quick-touch slider bars make operation similar to using a smartphone or tablet. Gen3 units come preloaded with Insight USA charts for coastal and inland waters, and are compatible with the Insight HD, Insight PRO, Insight Genesis, Insight TOPO, Navionics charts, C-MAP MAX-N+ and third-party mapping. Built-in wireless allows for direct mapping and software downloads, as well as connectivity to other devices.

$1,249 - $3,149 (800) 628-4487 LOWRANCE.COM

Fisherman’s Friend Saltwater Tackle Station bags from Flambeau will hold all the plugs and gear needed for a fun day of chasing fish. The larger 5005SW bag features a top zippered pocket, front quick-access mesh pockets, a large top storage compartment and four smaller side pockets. It comes with a large utility box and five Tuff Tainer boxes with Zerust protective dividers. The smaller 4005SW bag comes with a utility box and five Tuff Tainer boxes. Both bags have a molded-plastic bottom and oversized plastic zippers.

$109-$125 (608) 356-5551 NORDICGROUP.COM

Short Order The revolutionary 7 ½-foot PRO4x ShortStix fly rod from G. Loomis is designed to make 80-foot-plus casts with less effort than traditional nine-foot rods. Paired with the new generation of short-head fly lines, the PRO4x loads easily and offers exceptional casting distance, especially with big, bulky, air-resistant flies. In the Northeast, the rod is ideal for striped bass, bluefish, false albacore, bonito, mahi and small tuna. Models include an 8/9 weight for use with 300- to 350-grain fly lines; a 9/10 weight for 375- to 425-grain lines; a 10/11 weight for 425- to 475-grain lines; and an 11/12 weight for 475- to 525-grain lines. All four rods in the ShortStix series feature K-frame stripper guides to reduce tangles when shooting line. The two larger rods also feature integrated fighting grips.

$400 - $425 (800) 456-6647 GLOOMIS.COM

24

NEW ENGLAND BOATING

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EDITOR’S PICKS

GEAR & GIFTS

NEXT Big Thing Combining the comfort and convenience of a kayak with the stability and load-carrying capacity of a canoe, the Old Town NEXT is sure to be a hit among New England aquaholics. Available in several bold colors, the NEXT is made of rugged polyethylene that withstands

Wire-Free Radar Furuno’s 1st Watch is the first radar system in the world that can be viewed and controlled using wireless iOS devices, such as the Apple iPad and iPhone. Once the dome antenna is mounted and the vessel’s power applied, the radar communicates with mobile devices, eliminating the need for a separate hardwired display. The DRS4W system features a 4 kW radome antenna with selectable range scales from 1/8 nm to 24 nm. The

scratches, dings and other abuse. Measuring 13 feet and weighing 49 pounds, the NEXT is easy to lift and transport. On the water, its low freeboard and tumblehome design reduce windage and the amount of reach required when paddling. The NEXT also features an adjustable seat that allows the paddler to maintain trim when carrying kids, pets or gear, as well as adjustable, contoured foot braces with position indicators for a quick custom fit.

$999 (207) 827-3647 PADDLENEXT.COM

mobile app can be downloaded for free from the Apple AppStore, and allows up to two devices to be connected simultaneously. Once the app is loaded onto an iOS device and connected to the antenna’s WiFi, the radar can be operated through the device’s simple touch interface.

$1,695 (360) 834-9300 FURUNOUSA.COM

Pole Position Whaler of a Tale This exquisite hardcover, coffee-table book published by the Mystic Seaport and The Day newspaper chronicles the history of the Charles W. Morgan—America’s oldest surviving merchant vessel of a whaling fleet that numbered more than 2,700 vessels. First launched in 1841, the Morgan is now America’s oldest commercial ship still afloat. The book captures the ship’s

This elegant, hassle-free flag and burgee pole is made from solid 316 stainless steel with an anodized aluminum clamp that’s machined to fit most boat rails. The pole swivels smoothly 360 degrees to prevent the flag or burgee from fouling. Several sizes are available to fit flags up to 24” by 36”. Poles and clamps sold separately.

$45 - $95 (978) 346-1113 ORIGINALSWIVELER.COM

amazing journey through her 80-year whaling career, five-year restoration and 38th Voyage in 2014. A portion of the proceeds support Mystic Seaport.

$40 (888) 973-2767 STORE.PEDIMENT.COM

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FISHING

BLACK SEA BASS

When it comes to fast, fun, kid-friendly fishing, the obliging black sea bass has all the bases covered. TEXT & PHOTOGRAPHY BY TOM RICHARDSON

ALWAYS ASSUMED THAT MY KIDS would cut their saltwater fishing teeth on stripers and bluefish, normally considered the piscatorial mainstays along our stretch of the coast. However, over the last ten years or so, another species has quietly usurped the inshore throne in Southern New England, and its realm is advancing steadily northward. Before I knew it, black sea bass had become my family’s go-to fish. The region’s sea bass population has exploded in recent years, to the point where it’s almost impossible not to catch one. I’ve taken them while trolling two-foot tube lures and drifting live eels for stripers, and it’s common to find them sharing the sandy shoals with fluke. I’ve even had them crash the party to inhale a soft-plastic lure during the middle of a false albacore blitz, and have seen schools of sea bass churning the surface in pursuit of silversides like so many frenzied bluefish. Not only are black sea bass abundant and easy to catch, they also happen to be delicious. Their white, flaky meat is similar to cod and haddock, only more flavorful. The fillets can be baked, fried, grilled or made into chowder, although my own preference is to use them in fish tacos.

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Black sea bass are surprisingly striking.

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FISHING

BLACK SEA BASS

Prime Time In Buzzards Bay, where I do most of my fishing, black sea bass season begins in late May, with June being prime time. This is when the adult fish move deep inside the bay to spawn, and it’s the best time to catch a limit of big ones. Male sea bass, identifiable by the pronounced bump on their forehead, can weigh eight pounds or more, although the typical size is three

Above: Standard bucktail jigs tipped with small strips of squid will turn the trick with sea bass. Below: Male sea bass display pronounced forehead bumps during spawning season.

to four pounds—perfect for budding anglers using light tackle. They are unexpectedly gorgeous fish, sporting iridescent, electric-blue markings on their head and fins. Indeed, they look almost tropical. As mentioned, it’s possible to find sea bass pretty much anywhere in the spring, but I like to fish the 20- to 35foot depths in the middle of the bay. The key is to find a section of hard bottom, although it doesn’t necessarily have to include the type of large boulders and dramatic structure associated with tautog or stripers. Indeed, the areas I fish are fairly flat and unremarkable. In Narragansett Bay, local anglers find sea bass over small, isolated humps, rock piles and mussel beds in 15 to 30 feet of water, and off the south side of Cape Cod, the local shoals and rocky outcroppings can be simply covered with them in late spring.

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FISHING

BLACK SEA BASS

Sea Bass Tackle The tackle and rigs used for sea bass are about as basic as it gets. Virtually any light to medium rod-and-reel combo

Above: Sea bass can be taken on even the lightest gear. Right: Double hook-up are the norm when a sea bass “nest” is discovered.

will suffice (my daughters have taken some pretty hefty fish on a Barbie rod). I prefer a conventional or spinning reel spooled with 30-pound-test braided line. The nostretch braid lets me feel the lure tapping bottom and the strike of the fish. It’s also affected less by current. I tie a small barrel swivel on the end of the line then attach a

Catch Your Drift

three-foot, 50-pound-test fluorocarbon leader.

I prefer to drift for sea bass, allowing the wind and current to push me along until I uncover a

For lures, you can’t go wrong with a bucktail jig “sweetened” with a four-inch, triangular strip of fresh squid on the hook. I usually start with a two-ounce white or chartreuse bucktail and switch to a heavier jig if the wind and/or current make it hard to keep in touch with the

direction. This allows for the use of lighter gear and makes fishing much easier, especially for kids. Conversely, wind against the current makes for difficult fishing, especially if the two opposing forces keep the boat stationary. In this case, you can use your engine to cover ground. The key is to keep moving, but not too fast.

bottom. Use a loop knot to attach the jig to the leader, as it

Once you’ve arrived at your chosen spot, start your drift and free-spool your jig to the bottom. When

allows for a more natural action.

the lure hits bottom, engage the reel drag and hop the jig up and down using short, sharp lifts of the

Bucktails come in many shapes, but I’ve had good results with Spro jigs and Jackpot Digger jigs (see sidebar). Basic

34

pocket of fish. The ideal conditions for drifting include a light wind and current moving in the same

rod. Be ready to set the hook when you feel a fish inhale the lure, which usually happens as it’s freefalling to the bottom.

diamond jigs and white swim shads also work well, as do

Sea bass seem to gang up in small pods, which likely has something to do with the spawning

high-low bait rigs. Whether you fish lures or bait, bring jigs

process or a concentration of bait. When you hook a big one, there are usually more in the same

and sinkers in a variety of weights, in case you need to

spot, so mark it on your chart plotter. At that point you can either anchor or make repeated drifts

switch things up to match the conditions.

through the same area. If you fail to hook any fish on your first drift, move to a new spot.

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FISHING

BLACK SEA BASS

Holding Bottom As you drift along, you’ll need to let out more line to maintain contact with the bottom. Every so often, reel in, check your lure for weeds and send the jig back down. The goal is to keep the line as vertical as possible. If the wind is pushing the boat too fast to keep your jig on the bottom, you can use a drift sock or sea anchor to reduce speed. A fivegallon bucket tied to a ‘midships cleat will achieve the same purpose with smaller boats. As mentioned, anchoring can also be effective, especially if conditions make it difficult to drift-fish. Some anglers go the extra mile and chum the area with clams, crabs, mussels, mackerel or catfood, sent to the bottom in a chum pot, to draw sea bass to the boat. Naturally, sea bass aren’t the only fish you’ll catch on the bottom. One of the perks of this early-season fishery is that you’re guaranteed to hook other species, including large scup, fluke, bluefish and assorted bottom fish that will keep the kids curious, entertained and possibly well fed. As my family has discovered, there’s rarely a dull moment when sea bass It’s hard to find a more accommodating fish than sea bass.

fishing, and that typically makes for a fun day on the water. Give it a try, and maybe sea bass will become your new go-to fish.

DIG THOSE DIGGER JIGS! Jackpot Digger Jigs were created by Rhode Island charter captain Cathy Muli, an expert in the art of bottom fishing. While these jigs have attracted a major following among fluke fishermen, they also do a number on sea bass, as I happily discovered last season. The lure’s forward-weighted head design gives it a dramatic action and causes it to kick up puffs of sand and mud in a way that resembles a wounded bait or jetting squid. Further, its streamlined shape lets it descend quickly to the bottom in strong current. Jackpot Digger Jigs are available in four-, five-, six- and eight-ounce weights, in a wide range of colors, including glow-in-the-dark. I found the four-ounce size to be most effective on sea bass in 20 to 40 feet of water, but it may be too heavy for very light rods. White and chartreuse proved the top colors. As with other jigs, it helps to tip the lure with fresh squid. Prices range from $7.75 to $9.75 per jig. For more information, visit jackpotdiggerjigs.com or call (401) 596-4089.

— TOM RICHARDSON Jackpot Digger Jigs come in several sizes and styles.

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2013 Barracuda 9 $159,999

2014 Monteray 280 $99,000

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101,995

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CONNECTICUT DESTINATION

CANDLEWOOD LAKE

Roomy, stable pontoon boats are popular on Candlewood.

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NEW ENGLAND BOATING

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As the biggest lake in the state, Candlewood serves as the freshwater boating Mecca of Connecticut, yet it still offers lots of places to get away from it all. BY MICHELE HERRMANN PHOTO BY CARYN B. DAVIS

AVING BOATED ON CANDLEWOOD LAKE for some 15 years, Brookfield resident Ken Perry has witnessed an evolution in the local boating scene: The boats themselves have changed, and so have the activities. Along with newer, bigger and more colorful craft, Perry has noticed more families engaged in watersports instead of just lounging around. “People used to just cruise around and then drop anchor,” says Perry. “All of the sudden, it seemed that everyone had a tower on his boat and kids strapped to wakeboards.” Of course, there are still folks who prefer to kick back in a quiet cove, and that’s the great thing about Candlewood: It’s big enough to accommodate boaters with many different and divergent interests. Created in 1928 by the Connecticut Light and Power Company as a hydropower source, this manmade, 5,420-acre lake—the largest in the state—is bordered by the city of Danbury and the towns of Brookfield, New Fairfield, New Milford and Sherman. The name “Candlewood” comes from New Milford’s Candlewood Mountain, which in turn was named for the candlewood tree, whose sapling branches were sometimes used as candles by early settlers.

WWW.NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

NEW ENGLAND BOATING

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CONNECTICUT DESTINATION

CANDLEWOOD LAKE

Candlewood’s many protected coves are the scene of weekend raft-ups.

East is Most Most boaters tend to congregate in the lower eastern part of Candlewood. “There’s a bunch of little islands and coves here where people can beach their boats or drop anchor and have a good time,” explains Chris Perry of Candlewood East Marina. “This part of the lake attracts a mix of boaters, from fishermen and Jet Skiers to sailors and day-boating families.” For those interested in watersports, there are open areas that provide good venues for wakeboarding, waterskiing, wake surfing and tubing, including the waters off Hollywyle Park in New Fairfield. A small cove in the same area is a favorite spot to anchor and swim, according to Perry. Another popular hangout is Chicken Rock in Sherman, where boaters gather to socialize, climb the rocks and jump into the water.

Candlewood East is the largest marina on the lake, and features manicured grounds, plenty of slips, a service center and a well-stocked ship’s store.

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Lake for All Seasons Bruce Powers of Katonah, New York, some 30 minutes from Candlewood, sees the lake as a year-round retreat. What he likes most about Candlewood is its hidden nooks. “You don’t feel like you’re driving around in circles,” says Powers, who often takes his Cobalt bowrider to several spots in the course of a day, working his way from the marina all the way to Sherman and back down from Pine Island. Ken Perry, who runs a Nautique G23, uses his boat for a variety of activities, from watersports to simply hanging out at the islands. “You can always find something to do or some place to go that matches the mood you’re in that day,” he says. “It’s great to get up to the islands, spend time with neighbors and let the kids have a blast.”   And unlike other boating venues in New England, Candlewood doesn’t shut down after Labor Day. In the fall, pontoon-boaters and kayakers often enjoy foliage cruises, and Perry himself tries to stay on the water as long as he can, often extending his season into November.

Candlewood boasts some of the best bass fishing in the state.

A young boater jumps from Chicken Rock— a popular Candlewood gathering spot.

Launch Time Naturally, Candlewood is a major destination for trailer-boaters, but is restricted to boats under 26 feet unless approved by special permit. The two main ramp options are Lattins Cove in Danbury and Squantz Cove in New Fairfield. If you need gas, Pocono Point Marina in Danbury, Echo Bay Marina in Brookfield and Gerard’s Water’s Edge Marina in New Milford all have fuel docks. The Candlewood Lake Authority is charged with keeping boaters safe, and maintains a 45 mph speed limit during the day. The limit drops to 25 mph from a half hour after sunset to a half hour after sunrise. No-wake zones exist in Lattins Cove, from the southern end of the cove north 2,500 feet, and in Squantz Cove, from the causeway south 1,500 feet.   Any ledges and rocks are well marked, but boaters new to the lake need to pay attention to the buoys and give the hazards a five- to ten-foot berth. A detailed map and updated chart plotter help, of course. The former is published by “Fishing Hot Spots”, and shows Wake surfing has become popular on Candlewood. WWW.NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

everything a boater needs to know—except for places to eat. NEW ENGLAND BOATING

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CONNECTICUT DESTINATION

CANDLEWOOD LAKE

Meal Time Speaking of which, the only dock-and-dine option is Down the Hatch in Brookfield. It offers outdoor seating from April through October, and its menu features burgers, appetizers, sandwiches, wraps and salads. Of course, there are plenty of other dining options near the water. Many can be found on Candlewood Lake Road, including Mangia Mangia, an Italian

CANDLEWOOD LAKE AT A GLANCE BOATING RULES

Candlewood Lake is restricted to boats under 26 feet unless special authorization is granted by the state DEEP. Also, a speed limit of 45 mph is in effect during the day, and a state fishing license is required to fish the lake. Boats and trailers must be rinsed at haul-out to reduce the spread of invasive species. For more information call (860) 354-6928 or visit candlewoodlakeauthority.org.

MAP

FISHING HOT SPOTS (715) 365-5555; fishinghotspots.com Great source for a detailed map of Candlewood Lake, including boat-access points.

MARINAS

CANDLEWOOD EAST MARINA (203) 775-2253; candlewoodeast.com Full-service marina on the lower part of the lake offering sales, service, slips, storage and a well-stocked store. ECHO BAY MARINA (203) 775-7077; echobaymarina.com Service, sales, rentals and dockage.

BOAT RENTAL

ECHO BAY MARINA (203) 775-7077; echobaymarina.com Bowrider and pontoon boat rental.

WHERE TO EAT

DOWN THE HATCH (203) 775-6635; downthehatchrestaurant.com Candlewood’s only dock-and-dine option. Located on the eastern side of the lake. AL’S COOKOUT (203) 775-1900; alscookoutct.com Friendly, casual tavern and bar specializing in “American” cuisine, such as wings, corn dogs and fried ravioli. MANGIA MANGIA (203) 775-2191; mangiamangia.weebly.com Popular Italian restaurant serving pasta, pizza, calzones, sandwiches and more. WIDOW BROWN’S CAFÉ (203) 743-7021; widowbrowns.com Fun, festive bar and grill in Danbury.

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NEW ENGLAND BOATING

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THE MOST ENJOYABLE BOAT TRIPS ARE

WELL COORDINATED: 41°21.57’N x 71°57.92’W

PULL UP TO OUR DOCKS FOR A ONE-OF-A-KIND TRIP. Chart a course for a must-see maritime destination: Mystic Seaport. You can dock for the day or overnight — overnight docking rates even include Museum admission for everyone aboard your boat! To make your reservation call 860.572.5391 or visit us at www.mysticseaport.org/visitbyboat

SEA HISTORY ALIVE

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Embracing the traditional way of the bistro:

Relax, Eat, Drink, and leave feeling satisfied and recharged. Above: Boaters take a lake break at Down the Hatch in Brookfield. Left: Trailer-boaters can launch at Lattins Cove.

restaurant; Al’s Cookout, an American pub; and Nimer’s White Turkey Pantry, a deli. In Danbury you’ll find Widow Brown’s Café, a popular pub and restaurant. For newcomers, Powers encourages them to get a map and explore the whole lake before settling on one or two spots as their favorites. After all, Candlewood is huge, so you’ll need to put in some time getting to know it. But that’s a good thing. As Powers says, “Any time you’re on the water is a good time!”

WWW.NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

(508) 778-6500

410 Main Street, Hyannis, MA 02601

NakedOyster.com NEW ENGLAND BOATING

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Last year, over 12,000 boaters chose

BREWER

Experience it for yourself! Visit your nearest Brewer Yacht Yard, see us online at byy.com, or visit us at winter boat shows: Saltwater Fishing Show in Providence RI Feb 27-Mar 1


Come see why we’re more than

MARINAS

At Brewer, a great marina starts with well-maintained docks, safe lighting, beautiful landscaping, friendly attentive staff, and really clean showers and heads. Then we add pools, playgrounds, free Wi-Fi, grills, picnic areas, club houses and restaurants – just for fun! Customers also receive free transient dockage, fuel discounts and other offerings, making Brewer locations so much more than just a marina. You'll also find the best service work in the northeast at Brewer with more ABYC certified technicians and the highest standards in the industry. Large or small, our crew can handle all your service needs. Become a Brewer member.

Enjoy every moment on your boat!

Connecticut Branford Deep River Essex Essex Island Mystic Old Saybrook Stamford Stratford Westbrook

(203) 488-8329 (860) 526-5560 (860) 767-0001 (860) 767-2483 (860) 536-2293 (860) 388-3260 (203) 359-4500 (203) 377-4477 (860) 399-7906

Maine South Freeport Maryland Oxford Massachusetts N. Falmouth Plymouth Salem

(207) 865-3181 (410) 226-5101 (508) 564-6327 (508) 746-4500 (978) 740-9890

Visit your nearest Brewer location, or visit us online at byy.com. We’re open year ‘round! New York Glen Cove Greenport Mamaroneck Port Washington Stirling Harbor

(516) 671-5563 (631) 477-9594 (914) 698-0295 (516) 883-7800 (631) 477-0828

Rhode Island Barrington Greenwich Bay Portsmouth Warwick Wickford

(401) 246-1600 (401) 884-1810 (401) 683-3551 (401) 884-0544 (401) 884-7014

Visit your nearest Brewer location, or visit us online at byy.com. We’re open year ‘round!


NEW YORK DESTINATION

MATTITUCK

Beautiful, bucolic Mattituck Creek and village on the North Fork of Long Island beckons boaters from the Connecticut side of the Sound. BY TOM SCHLICHTER PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOE VALLIER

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NEW ENGLAND BOATING

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Above: Narrow Mattituck Creek can accommodate some surprisingly large boats. Right, top: Delicious dishes await the visiting boater at Pace’s Dockside at Strong’s Water Club. Right, bottom: Anglers can catch fluke, stripers and snapper blues right inside the creek.

ase into Mattituck Creek from the open waters of Long Island Sound and you get the feeling you’ve slipped through a wormhole to the past. This magical North Fork waterway is the gateway to a village that has worked hard to maintain its rural charm while building an agritourism base that seems to have universal appeal among locals, visiting boaters and landlubber tourists alike. For Connecticut boaters, Mattituck couldn’t be easier to reach. It’s just 15 nautical miles from Clinton and Westbrook—and Guilford, Saybrook and Branford aren’t too far away either. Trailer-boaters can launch at the Clinton town launch for daytrips or even weekend getaways, as overnight parking is allowed. Once you arrive at Mattituck Inlet, it’s no-wake through the channel, which has been dredged to a depth of roughly 11 feet through the first two turns. After that, you’ve got a mean low water depth of 6 1/2 feet to the head of the creek. Follow the markers closely, as it’s easy to become distracted by all the ospreys and beautiful salt marsh. WWW.NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

NEW ENGLAND BOATING

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NEW YORK DESTINATION

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Heart & Soul “This is such a great place for New England boaters to visit,” says Bridget Rymer of Strong’s Water Club & Marina, at the head of the creek. “The waters here are well protected, and beautiful Mattituck Creek lets you enjoy a slow cruise and get a taste of the local flavor. As for the village, it may be small, but it’s huge on character, and there’s plenty to see and do in the surrounding area.”                “I grew up here, went away to college, and came right back,” says Ethan Crook of the Village Cheese Shop on Love Lane, which serves as the heart of Mattituck Village. “I love this area because it continues to progress without giving up its beauty and charm. In the last few years, the tourism industry has exploded here, but that’s generally been a good thing. It has brought us excellent restaurants, wineries, unique gift shops, boutique agriculture, street fairs and farmers’ markets, but this town has never strayed from its roots, which is something everyone seems to appreciate.”          

Many local wineries in the Mattituck area offer tours and tastings.

Lovely Lane Holding onto its roots, however, doesn’t preclude some changes. From year-to-year the stores on Love Lane vary just enough to keep things interesting. A relatively new face is Ammirati’s, a delightful delicatessen that brothers Greg and Stephen Ammirati opened last July, fulfilling a lifelong dream to work just blocks from where they grew up. If you stop in, try the ahi wrap, but everything’s delicious.          

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PHOTO TOM SCHLICHTER

Across the street, Lombardi’s Love Lane Market is also relatively new. It carries a wide array of cured meats, Italian favorites, salads, locally produced foods and specialty pizzas. Then there’s Love Lane Toys, which opened this winter on the corner of Love Lane and Main Road. Owner Alex Dank found the village so inviting he figured a toy store would fit in perfectly—and it does. In addition to board games for rainy days, he stocks an array of beach toys, tubes, kites, pails, shovels and more. “Boaters are very much on my mind,” says Dank.                Visitors also have a choice of good restaurants from which to choose, including the Iron Skillet, Love Lane Kitchen, aMano and Pace’s Dockside Restaurant at Strong’s Water Club. Pace’s offers indoor and outdoor seating, as well as a fun Tiki bar. Boaters can arrange for dock space, a mooring or drop anchor in the federal anchorage nearby. Another dock-and-dine option is the Mill House Inn, halfway up the creek. It has a small dock for patrons.        

Above: All manner of delicacies can be found along Love Lane. Right: Expect to see lots of osprey on a cruise down Mattituck Creek.

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NEW ENGLAND BOATING

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NEW YORK DESTINATION

MATTITUCK

Fishing Options If you prefer to catch your own dinner, you’re in luck. Fluke and black sea bass can be taken at Roanoke Shoals, just west of Mattituck Inlet, while scup abound in the 12- to 30-foot depths a mile to the east. Head deeper and you can catch bluefish on diamond jigs throughout the summer. September sometimes sees the arrival of false abacore, and late fall can bring decent striper action as the bass migrate east along the beach. Of course, no visit to the North Fork of Long Island would be complete without a trip to one of the local wineries. Lenz and Pindar are highly rated. Also noteworthy is award-winning Macari Vineyards, which offers a tasting bar and dining area with views of the vineyard. Back in Mattituck Village, you can sample selections from Roanoke Vineyards at its tasting room and shop on Love Lane. You may want to plan a trip around the variety of fairs and farm events held in Mattituck throughout the season. In June, the Mattituck Lions Club Strawberry Festival draws more than 30,000 visitors—six times Mattituck’s resident population. Fall is pumpkin time, of course, and you’ll find roadside farm stands selling gourds and apples every other mile. Throw in an occasional small-town parade, the Mattituck Historical Society Antique and Yard Sale, weekend farmers’ markets, plus a local performing arts theater, and you’ll find plenty to sample on a visit to this small but thriving outpost in the heart of Long Island’s North Fork.

Top: Don’t be surprised if you hook an oyster toadfish—locally called a “hacklehead”—while fishing the creek. Above: Strong’s Water Club at the head of the creek features a festive Tiki bar.

MATTITUCK AT A GLANCE DOCKAGE, MOORINGS & SERVICE

STRONG’S WATER CLUB & MARINA (631) 298-4770; strongsmarine.com Fuel, slips, moorings, WiFi and service at the head of Mattituck Creek. Also has an onsite restaurant, Tiki bar and pool. MATTITUCK INLET MARINA (631) 298-4480; mimsboats.com Fuel, service, repair, TraveLift, pool and more midway along Mattituck Creek.

ANCHORAGE

A federal anchorage is located at the head of Mattituck Creek. It has six feet of water and excellent holding ground.

LAUNCH RAMPS

The nearest Connecticut launch ramp to Mattituck is the Clinton town launch. Cost is $20 to launch and park, and boaters can leave their rig overnight. On Mattituck Creek, an excellent public launch can be found on the west bank, near the inlet. No fee to launch and park.

WHERE TO EAT

PACE’S DOCKSIDE (631) 315-5252; strongsmarine.com Waterfront dining at Strong’s Water Club & Marina. Serves great steaks, seafood, shellfish, salads, sandwiches and more.

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THE IRON SKILLET (631) 298-1235; ironskilletmattituck.com Home-cooked meals served in an old, homey farmhouse. BYOB.

LOVE LANE SWEET SHOPPE (631) 298-2276; lovelanesweets.com Fine chocolates, candies and other delights.

AMMIRATI’S OF LOVE LANE (631) 298-7812; ammiratisoflovelane.com Excellent deli sandwiches, wraps, desserts, pastries and more in the heart of Love Lane.

LOMBARDI’S MARKET & CAFÉ (631) 737-8470; lombardismarket.com Gourmet market offering an exceptional selection of artisanal cheeses, spreads, oils, bread, pasta, pasta sauces, marmalades, chocolates, nuts and more.

LOVE LANE KITCHEN (631) 298-898; lovelanekitchen.com Upscale comfort food served in a café with indoor and outdoor seating. Also serves craft brews and wine. AMANO (631) 298-4800; amanorestaurant.com Specializes in wood-fired pizza, pasta, dishes made with local produce and local wine.

COOL SHOPS

LOVE LANE TOYS (631) 315-5200 Creative toys and gifts, including lots of boat and beach items. VILLAGE CHEESE SHOP (631) 298-8556; thevillagecheeseshop.com Mind-boggling array of cheeses from around the world.

THINGS TO SEE & DO

MACARI VINEYARD (631) 298-0100; macariwines.com Award-winning winery and vineyard. Tours and tastings available. LENZ WINERY (631) 734-6010; lenzwine.com Small winery founded in 1978. MATTITUCK AREA TOURS (631) 576-4787; thecasualride.com Let friendly and knowledgable Scott Hill of Casual Pointe Transportation serve as your personal tour guide to the Mattituck area. Casual Pointe offers sightseeing and winery tours, and can handle large groups.

WWW.NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM


CONNECTICUT DESTINATION

STONINGTON

The cozy coastal village of Stonington, Connecticut, manages to maintain its working-waterfront roots while offering ample delights for boaters of all types.

PHOTO ERIC BRUST-AKDEMIR

BY MALERIE YOLEN-COHEN PHOTOGRAPHY BY TOM RICHARDSON & ERIC BRUST-AKDEMIR

A gazebo on the waterfront offers a grand view of the harbor.

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PHOTO ERIC BRUST-AKDEMIR

Protected Stonington Harbor bustles with boat traffic in summer.

NOWN AS “THE BOROUGH,” the village of Stonington remains a place where fresh fish, lobster and scallops are unloaded within shouting distance of tidy summer homes. Recently named one of Yankee Magazine’s “Prettiest Coastal Towns,” the place is so authentically New England that it even landed a role as a Maine harbor in the movie Hope Springs. No stand-ins necessary though, as Stonington has its own personality and needs no introduction. As a village with its roots in the sea, Stonington is best viewed from the water. To the south, a long jetty juts westward, protecting the many recreational boats and fishing vessels that share the harbor. A large brick-and-stone building, once a factory, dominates the skyline. It serves as testimony to the town’s manufacturing history, during which everything from horseshoe nails to firearms to Coke bottles were produced here. Indeed, Stonington’s industries made it a popular target of British attacks during the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812, and the local militia successfully withstood bombardments by the Royal Navy in both conflicts.   Later, Stonington became renowned for pottery, which was produced in a bayside factory at the end of Water Street (then called “Shinbone Alley”), where William States established a pottery works in 1811. The imprints of “W. States” and “Swan & States” are well known among pottery aficionados, and fragments from the States factory still litter the inshore waters. WWW.NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

NEW ENGLAND BOATING

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STONINGTON PHOTO ERIC BRUST-AKDEMIR

CONNECTICUT DESTINATION

Downtown Stonington features numerous shops and restaurants.

Right top: The nearby Barn Island boat launch is big and busy. Right bottom: The Barn Island Wildlife Management Area features sprawling marshes that invite exploration in kayaks, canoes and other small craft.

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PHOTO ERIC BRUST-AKDEMIR

Today, boaters appreciate Stonington’s deep, wide harbor, which is “well protected in anything short of a hurricane,” according to Dick Sattler, dockmaster at the Stonington Harbor Yacht Club and owner of the Orchard Street Inn bed-and-breakfast. Transients can anchor inside the west breakwater or grab a mooring through Dodson Boat Yard or the SHYC. Wherever you end up, the harbor is a perfect jumping-off point for trips to Fishers Island (2 nautical miles), Watch Hill (2.5 nm) and Block Island (14 nm), as well as some mighty fine fishing and paddling grounds.   If you can squeeze beneath the fixed railroad bridge at the head of the harbor, it’s worth exploring quiet Wequetequock and Lambert coves, where you’ll find a few small-boat marinas. One of them, Don’s Dock, has expanded its capacity from 80 to over 200 slips in the last few years, satisfying a regional thirst for ocean access in this pretty part of the world. 

PHOTO TOM RICHARDSON

Stop & Go

WWW.NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM


As for shoreside attractions, there’s plenty to see in Stonington. A walk south along Water Street leads to what’s arguably the most photographed spot in the Borough. Built in 1823, the Stonington Lighthouse is now a museum filled with interesting art and artifacts relating to local history. Climb the steel ladder to the lantern room and you’ll be treated to a 360-degree view of the harbor, Fishers Island Sound and Little Narragansett Bay. Back on ground level, use Water Street as your path to Stonington’s commercial district. Along the way, narrow lanes lead to the water—and various surprises. These include the town’s commercial fishing pier, home to deep-sea scallopers, draggers and lobster boats. You can even buy some of the freshly landed fish and shellfish at Stonington Seafood Harvesters, right at the dock.

PHOTO ERIC B. AKDEMIR

Lighthouse Lore

The lantern room of the Stonington Lighthouse, now a museum, affords panoramic views.

Another waterfront gem is the headquarters of New England Science and Sailing, which teaches sailing, marine science and adventure watersports to kids and adults. Next door to NESS is the former home of Skipper’s Dock, a longtime dock-and-dine institution that was sold in 2013 and is currently (as of last fall) in transition after a brief stint as Swooners Restaurant. The pier in front of the restaurant, offers transient dockage through the Inn at Stonington.

WWW.NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

NEW ENGLAND BOATING

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STONINGTON

PHOTO ERIC BRUST-AKDEMIR

CONNECTICUT DESTINATION

The Dog Watch Café at Dodson Boat Yard is a popular dock-and-dine restaurant.

PHOTO ERIC BRUST-AKDEMIR

NATURAL CHOICE Nature-lovers seeking solitude in kayaks, canoes and small boats will find much to appreciate about Stonington, which abuts the Barn Island Wildlife Management Area (BIWMA) on Little Narragansett Bay. At just over 1,000 acres, the BIWMA features miles of trails and meandering creeks to explore, as well as a large public launch ramp with lots of free parking. Once permitted for development as a golf course, the woods and marshes of the BIWMA are now the protected home of dozens of birds, mammals and fish. After launching at BIWMA, boaters can explore miles of protected shorelines and beaches, including those on Sandy Point, a spur of land that was once a part of nearby Napatree Point. Now an island, this hummock of sand and scrub is managed by the Stonington Community Center (thecomo.org), which sells seasonal passes or charges a nominal daily access fee to boaters. Note that large sections of Sandy Point are closed to protect nesting shorebirds during much of the season, so pay attention to the signage before venturing ashore.

— TOM RICHARDSON

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PHOTO TOM RICHARDSON

Eclectic Shops & Restaurants

Pottery from the past can be viewed at the Stonington Lighthouse Museum.

But don’t despair, as many of the Borough’s existing restaurants are just steps from the waterfront. Noah’s, Milagro, Yellow House and the Water Street Café are all notable eateries, but one of the most popular spots among boaters—the Dog Watch Café—can be found at Dodson Boat Yard. You can also visit great little shops like Yali, which specializes in organic Turkish-made towels; Zia’s, an off-price boutique, and Clad-In Clothing, which carries unique women’s apparel and shoes. Stonington is also home to three wineries—Stonington Vineyards, Saltwater Farm Vineyards and Jonathan Edwards—plus a self-styled “nano-brewery” called Beer’d. All offer tastings, of course, but we recommend purchasing a few bottles of Stonington Vineyards’ eminently drinkable Seaport White and some cheese to enjoy on your boat. After all, Stonington is even lovelier from the water than it is from land. CONTINUED


PHOTO TOM RICHARDSON

STONINGTON

PHOTO ERIC B. AKDEMIR

CONNECTICUT DESTINATION

Creative jewelry shines in a Stonington shop window.

STONINGTON AT A GLANCE Sandy Dubois Beach is a great spot for a swim.

HARBORMASTER (860) 303-5046

DOCKAGE, MOORINGS & SERVICE

DODSON BOAT YARD (860) 535-1507; dodsonboatyard.com Full-service yard and marina with transient slips and moorings, as well as gas and diesel, ice, laundry, pump-out and showers. Dodson also runs launch service in the harbor and features a popular onsite restaurant, the Dog Watch Café. STONINGTON MARINA (860) 599-4730; stoningtonmarina.com Small-boat marina on Wequetequock Cove. Offers dockage, service and repair, as well as kayak and SUP rentals. DON’S DOCK (860) 535-0077; dons-dock.com Seasonal and short-term dockage for smaller vessels on Lambert’s Cove, north of the fixed train bridge. Floating docks, launch ramp, showers, engine service and repair. STONINGTON HARBOR YACHT CLUB (860) 535-0112; shyc.us More than 240 feet of transient dock space. Discounted rates for members of reciprocating clubs. INN AT STONINGTON (860)535-2000; innatstonington.com Deep-water dockage on the harbor. CARDINAL COVE MARINA (860) 535-0060; cardinalcovemarina.com Small-boat marina on protected Cardinal Cove. Rents slips for boats 24 feet and under by the week, month or season. COVE LEDGE INN & MARINA (860) 599-4130; coveledgeinn.com Rooms, pool, 50-slip marina and kayak rental.

ANCHORAGE

Stonington’s main anchorage is on the west side of the harbor, west of G C “7.” Dinghies can be left at the town dock, and launch service is available through Dodson Boat Yard.

LAUNCH RAMP

Boaters and paddlers can launch at the Barn Island state ramp off Palmer Neck Road. This is a large and busy ramp (especially on weekends) with long tie-up floats and ample free parking.

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KAYAK RENTAL

STONINGTON MARINA (860) 599-4730; stoningtonmarina.com Kayak and SUP rental on protected Wequetequock Cove.

DEVON HOUSE ANTIQUES & GALLERY (860) 535-4452; devonhousestonington.com Beautiful art and home furnishings, including rustic tables and benches.

WHERE TO EAT

THINGS TO SEE & DO

NOAH’S (860) 535-3925 Casual fine dining on Water Street. MILAGRO (860) 535-8178 Authentic Latin food and great margaritas. WATER STREET CAFÉ (860) 535-2122; waterstcafe.com Intimate eatery well-known for its terrific Sunday brunch. ZACK’S BAR & GRILLE (860) 535-0301; zacksbarandgrillect.com Classic pub food as well as choice New York sirloin, local scallops and fisherman’s stew. YELLOW HOUSE COFFEE & TEA ROOM (860) 535-4986 Good spot for a quick bite or beverage on Water Street. DOG WATCH CAFÉ (860) 415-4510 Popular dock-and-dine restaurant and bar at Dodson Boat Yard.

COOL SHOPS

VELVET MILL (917) 915-6340; velvetmillequities.com Rambling, repurposed mill now home to a variety of artists studios and small businesses. ZIA’S JEWELRY & ACCESSORIES (860) 535-2298; ziasofstonington.com Lotions, candles, apparel, jewelry and more. CLAD IN (860) 415-4506; cladin.com Imaginative designer clothing, shoes and accessories. YALI’S (860) 884-5151; yalistonington.com Unique and beautiful bath and home textiles from Turkey.

OLD LIGHTHOUSE MUSEUM (860) 535-1440; stoningtonhistory.org Historic stone lighthouse built in 1823 and featuring exhibits of early Stonington life. Visitors can climb to the lantern room for panoramic views of the harbor and beyond. CAPT. NATHANIEL B. PALMER HOUSE (860) 535-8445; stoningtonhistoyr.org Built in 1852, this Victorian mansion serves as home to the Stonington Historical Society, and houses exhibits that chronicle the life and exploits of “Cap’n Nat,” one of the first explorers of Antarctica. Entry fee includes admission to the Lighthouse Museum. SALTWATER FARM VINEYARDS (860) 415-9072; saltwaterfarmvineyard.com Vineyard and winery on 100 acres bordered by spectacular salt marsh. STONINGTON VINEYARDS (860) 535-1222; stoningtonvineyards.com Turns out nice, cold-climate whites perfect for summer afternoons. JONATHAN EDWARDS WINERY (860) 535-0202; jedwardswinery.com Produces wines from Napa Valley grapes grown in North Stonington. BEER’D BREWING CO. (860) 857-1014; beerdbrewing.com Beers and ales crafted in very small batches. Growler refills. DODGE PADDOCK & BEAL PRESERVE Nature preserve a short walk from Stonington’s busy waterfront area, on the eastern side of Stonington Point. Features a walkway that meanders through salt marsh and offers splendid views of Watch Hill, Napatree and Sandy Point. DUBOIS BEACH (860) 535-2476 Protected, kid-friendly beach on Stonington Point. A small fee is charged for access.

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View of Mill Pond and Wickford Marina, as seen from NorthWick Boatyard.

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PHOTO TOM RICHARDSON

This charming and historic village makes an ideal daytrip or extended stay for boaters on lower Narragansett Bay.

ichard Smith knew a good thing when he saw it. In 1637, the intrepid settler from Massachusetts built a large house overlooking what is now Wickford’s Mill Cove, then known to the Narragansett Indians as “Cocumscussoc.” The structure, which was rebuilt in 1678 by Smith’s son after the original home was burned during King Phillips War, still stands on what remains one of the most idyllic spots in Rhode Island. Just as “Smith’s Castle” (so named because it was large and fortified) has endured, so does much of what makes Wickford such a special place to visit, especially by boat. These days, several restaurants, four marinas, a host of interesting shops and several summer events make it one of the top boating destinations on Narragansett Bay.

BY NANCY GABRIEL CIFUNE PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDREA ZIMMERMAN & TOM RICHARDSON

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PHOTO TOM RICHARDSON

PHOTO ANDREA ZIMMERMAN

RHODE ISLAND DESTINATION

WICKFORD

Wickford’s backwaters teem with birdlife, such as this great egret.

PHOTO TOM RICHARDSON

A local boater enters Wickford Harbor after clearing its twin breakwaters.

The Wickford Collection sells home and garden furnishings on the banks of Academy Cove.

One Hospitable Harbor Located just south of Quonset Point, Wickford is easy to reach from other Bay ports, as well as the open ocean, and offers one of the most protected harbors in the region. Shortly after clearing the two breakwaters guarding Wickford Harbor, you have the choice of entering either Wickford Cove to port or Mill Cove to starboard. Both coves provide easy access to Wickford Village. Daytrippers have it pretty good here, as the town dock at the head of Wickford Cove allows a two-hour tie-up at no charge—not something you find in every boating destination these days. If you wish to stay longer, the town also maintains a handful of free transient moorings behind the southern breakwater that are available on first-come, first-served basis. However, they are not exactly convenient to the waterfront.   If you’re willing to pay for that convenience, Wickford’s marinas stand ready to accommodate. At the head of Wickford Cove is the venerable Wickford Shipyard, offering over 100 slips, a fuel dock, showers, laundry, service, a pool and storage. A bit deeper into the harbor is the full-service Brewer Wickford Cove Marina. It has space for transient boaters, but reservations are recommended. The marina features laundry, showers, fuel, ice, WiFi and other amenities, and can also service your boat.   PHOTO ANDREA ZIMMERMAN

Boaters who find Wickford Cove too busy can always opt to stay on Mill Cove. Here, the NorthWick Boatyard (formerly Johnson’s Boat Yard), welcomes visitors with more than 85 slips, moorings and a ramp. You can also tie up for a few hours or a week at Wickford Marina, which can accommodate boats up to 100 feet. If you need fuel or haul-out, Pleasant Street Wharf has you covered. Docking in Mill Cove also allows for spectacular views of the Quonset Air Show in June and the South County Hot Air Balloon Festival in July.

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Captain Jim White hefts a 30-pound striper taken near Wickford.

Village Delights Once ashore, you’ll find an array of shops in charming Wickford Village. These range from the Narragansett Bay Olive Oil Company to Green Ink, which carries unique designer clothing. Architecture aficionados will appreciate the wellpreserved 18th and 19th century buildings built during Wickford’s seemingly unlikely past as a shipping port, so a walking tour is definitely in order. And if you’re traveling in July, you won’t want to miss New England’s longest running art festival, with more than

WICKFORD GOOD FISHING

200 artists showcasing their work in every

Wickford’s location in the southern part of Narragansett Bay gives local anglers a lot of options, both inshore

medium imaginable.

and off. Striped bass are the most popular targets, and can be caught right inside Mill Cove and Fishing Cove beginning in May. These early-season fish can be taken on soft-plastics and flies along channel edges, marsh

Feeling hungry? Stop by the Beach Rose

banks and structure points, including the breakwaters, through June. Outside the harbor, fishing with live and

Café, which serves up breakfast items,

chunked menhaden is the ticket to scoring with trophy bass, some up to 40 pounds. Good spots to find the big,

delicious sandwiches and drinks on

oily baits in recent years have been the Providence River and Ohio Ledge, but the schools can sometimes be

Wickford Cove. Right across the street is the more upscale and romantic Tavern By the Sea, which features a Mediterraneaninspired menu and ambience. Indoor and outdoor seating are available.

found closer to Wickford in spots like Greenwich Bay and off Warwick Point. Slow-troll or drift these baits along rocky shorelines and near the bottom of channels and holes. Other available inshore species include black sea bass, fluke and scup. Like striped bass, the bottom fishing for these species is best inside the bay in spring and early summer. To hook up, find a hard-bottom area in 10 to 30 feet of water and drift some squid strips on a weighted three-way rig or leadhead jig.

PHOTO TOM RICHARDSON

Fluke fanatics have numerous spots nearby, including the edges of Potters Cove, the Newport Bridge and the deep trench off Austin Hollow on Beavertail Point. Squid and fluke belly strips are the preferred baits for the flatties, and be sure to bring a net because there are some big ones here! When summer arrives, Wickford anglers have the option of fishing the cooler, deeper ocean waters, such as those off Beavertail, Castle Hill and Point Judith, as well as Block Island. For striped bass, drifting eels, live menhaden or chunks in the above spots is the way to go when things get steamy. Meanwhile, bottom fishermen can head for one of the many rocky “humps” in Rhode Island Sound to tangle with sea bass, scup and bluefish through the summer. Standard leadhead jigs, diamond jigs and three-way rigs fished on the bottom will produce in these spots. Keep in mind that a saltwater license is needed to fish Rhode Island waters, although the state offers reciprocity with Massachusetts and Connecticut license holders. To order a Rhode Island license, go to ri.gov/DEM/saltwater/.

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PHOTO TOM RICHARDSON

RHODE ISLAND DESTINATION

WICKFORD AT A GLANCE HARBORMASTER

(401) 633-5323

DOCKAGE, MOORINGS & SERVICE

TOWN OF WICKFORD (401) 633-5323; nkpolice.org/harbor Wickford maintains several free transient moorings behind the southern breakwater. Dinghies can be left at the town dock, or you can hail the Wickford Harbor Launch on VHF Channel 68. The Wickford town dock offers free tie-up for up to two hours. BREWER WICKFORD COVE MARINA (401) 884-7014; byy.com/RIMarinas/Wickford Full-service marina with transient slips and moorings. Also offers storage, laundry, showers, picnic areas, free WiFi, fuel, pump-out, repair and a 70-ton Travelift.

The Kayak Centre can get you into SUP yoga. PHOTO ANDREA ZIMMERMAN

Delectable fried scallop rolls at the Beach Rose Café.

Kayaks, SUPs & Seabees During your stay, consider taking a kayak or paddleboard lesson, or renting, at the Kayak Centre, known for its top-notch instructors and equipment. Mill Cove, Mill Creek and Fishing Cove in particular are scenic and protected paddling spots, and you can beach your ‘yak or SUP on Cornelius Island for a swim or picnic. Keep an eye out for the island’s famous swimming squirrels! If you travel with bikes, pedal down Post Road to nearby Davisville and the Seabee Museum, which pays tribute to the men and women who served as Navy Seabees from 1942 to 1994. The Quonset hut was developed at this very spot, and you’ll see plenty of them at the museum. Military buffs can continue their tour at the Quonset Air Museum at Quonset Point, a former Naval Air station through the early 1970s and now home to a large collection of military planes and helicopters.

WICKFORD MARINA (401) 294-8160; wickfordmarina.com Full-service marina on Mill Cove. Accommodates seasonal and transient boats up to 100 feet. Offers showers, laundry, Jacuzzi, cooking facilities, patio and enclosed tent, kayak rental and winter storage.

Colonial history, kayaking or fishing, sailing or powerboating, Wickford stands ready to accommodate all comers. Pay it a visit this season

WHERE TO EAT

TAVERN BY THE SEA (401) 294-5771; tavernbytheseari.com Mediterranean-inspired restaurant serving lunch and dinner on a scenic canal on the harbor. Menu includes seafood, gourmet burgers and sandwiches, salads and pasta, along with a full bar. BEACH ROSE CAFÉ (401) 295-2800; beachrosecafe.com Waterfront dining for breakfast and lunch inside and on their dog-friendly deck. Also features Friday night dinners made with locally grown products. Menu includes organic coffee, breakfast favorites, salads, sandwiches, paninis and burgers. WICKFORD DINER (401) 295-5477; quahog.com Historic diner open for breakfast and lunch daily. Features quahog dishes, sandwiches and salads.

WICKFORD SHIPYARD (401) 294-3361; wickfordshipyard.com Fuel, showers, laundry, pump-out, ice, pool, full marine services and repair. Transient slips and moorings available.

THE PLACE (401) 294-0800 Family-fare restaurant serving pizza, grinders, and salads. Great for take-out.

NORTHWICK BOATYARD (401) 932-3613; northwickboatyard.com On Mill Cove. Offers 60 slips and 20 moorings, a launch ramp, dockside parking, restrooms and changing rooms, outdoor showers, patio and grill area.

COOL SHOPS

PLEASANT STREET WHARF (401) 294-2791; pswri.com Storage, hauling, fuel, mooring services and seasonal dock rental.

GREEN INK (401) 294-626; greeninkboutique.com Unique clothing, shoes and accessories, featuring Eileen Fisher, Pacificotton, Very Vineyard, Aid Thru Trades, Dansko and more.

WICKFORD HARBOR LAUNCH SERVICE (401) 294-0021; wickfordharborlaunch.com Mooring shuttle service from Quonset Point to Rome Point; day rates and seasonal subscriptions available. Will even deliver Sunday brunch to your boat.

NARRAGANSETT BAY OLIVE OIL COMPANY (401) 295-2500; nboliveoil.com Flavor-infused olive oils and vinegars, gourmet foods and body-care products.

LULABELLS (401) 667-7676; lulabellsgifts.com Gifts, Beatriz Ball tableware, jewelry, Fraas scarves, Sloane Ranger bags and hand-blown glass.

WICKFORD YACHT CLUB (401) 294-9010; wickfordyc.org Five moorings available for visitors on a first-come, firstserved basis. Restrooms, showers, patio and trash services also available.

GOLD LADY JEWELERS (401) 294-4695; goldladyjewelers.com Selection of fine gifts and collectibles, including estate jewelry, diamonds, pearls and watches.

MILL CREEK MARINE (401) 294-3700; millcreekmarine.com Boat sales, service and winter storage. Can accommodate boats up to 38 feet.

SEABEE MUSEUM & MEMORIAL PARK (401) 294-7233; seabeesmuseum.com Home of the Quonset hut and WW II naval pontoons, the museum commemorates the Seabees, a military unit dedicated to building infrastructure required during wartime.

LAUNCH RAMPS

PLEASANT STREET MUNICIPAL RAMP At end of Pleasant Street next to Pleasant Street Wharf. Gravel and dirt ramp with few on-street parking spaces available. Best for cartop launching of skiffs and kayaks. WILSON PARK Concrete-slab ramp on Intrepid Drive with adjacent float. Free parking, but limited access at low tide.

BOAT & KAYAK RENTAL So whether your interest lies in military history or

WICKFORD BOAT RENTALS (401) 295-0050; wickfordboatrentals.com Full- and half-day charters and harbor cruises; extended-term rentals. Sailboats, powerboats and fishing boats available.

THE KAYAK CENTRE (401) 295-4400; kayakcentre.com Rentals, sales, guided tours and lessons for adults and children. Carries kayaks, stand-up paddleboards and equipment.

THINGS TO SEE & DO

QUONSET AIR MUSEUM (401) 294-9540; quonsetairmuseum.com Traces Rhode Island’s aviation history through displays and restoration of 28 aircraft dating from 1944 to 1983, housed in an original Naval Air Station hangar built in 1945. SMITH’S CASTLE (401) 294-3521; smithscastle.org Colonial-era house and gardens on Mill Cove. Open for tours May through October. The home features a library, furniture and artifacts from the 1700s. HISTORIC HOMES WALKING TOUR historicwickford.org Self-guided and docent-led walking tours of nearly 20 historic 1700s and 1800s buildings in downtown Wickford.

and see it for yourself.

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RHODE ISLAND DESTINATION

JAMESTOWN

Often overshadowed by its more celebrated neighbor across the way, Jamestown provides a relaxing respite from the hustle and bustle of Rhode Island’s busier ports.

View of the East Passage and the Claiborne Pell Newport Bridge from Jamestown Harbor.

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ERHAPS THE COOLEST THING ABOUT JAMESTOWN is that it’s an island. Or three. Settled in the late 1600s and named for England’s Prince James, the town comprises the nine-by-one-mile Conanicut Island and the much smaller Dutch and Gould islands, the last having served as a military fort and torpedo station during both World Wars. Today, Jamestown is a great place to watch the seasonal parade of boats heading to and from Newport, as well as the numerous local regattas—all while avoiding the general hubbub of that busy harbor to the east. “If you’re passing through on a boat, Jamestown is a little easier to deal with than Newport,” agrees resident writer and boater Will Tuthill. “It’s less frenetic, yet you can still get to Newport quite easily. The other nice thing is that whether you choose to keep your boat at Conanicut Marine on the east side or Dutch Harbor on the west side, you can basically walk to the grocery store.” Tuthill highly recommends the island’s farm-stand produce and fresh fish in summer, and gives a shout-out to Jamestown Mercantile for locally grown and locally sourced, organic prepared foods. “And [Jamestown’s] definitely a great spot for daytime boating activities,” he adds. “Come here on a hot day, drop the hook, swim around or kayak alongside the rocks.”

BY NANCY GABRIEL CIFUNE PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANDREA ZIMMERMAN

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Dockage Decisions The majority of boating amenities are found on the island’s east side. Conanicut Marine Services is Jamestown’s largest full-service marina, and is steps away from most of the local shops and restaurants. Moorings and slips are available on a seasonal or transient basis, and the marina maintains a complete on-site repair facility. It’s all located next to the ferry dock and the town pier, which offers dinghy tie-up and touch-and-go dockage. Visitors can grab a bite to eat at the nearby East Ferry Deli or a homemade ice cream at Spinnakers, or head into the village center for more dining options. Another transient-friendly marina is Clark Boat Yard, a bit farther south near Fort Wetherill. This intimate, family-owned and -operated yard offers moorings with launch service, showers, WiFi, repair, service, a launch ramp and more. Also nearby is the Jamestown Boat Yard, which has transient moorings and dockage, launch service, a private beach, repairs, hauling and dinghy storage. Both yards are within reasonable biking distance of the town center, and a short jaunt to Newport Harbor.

Conanicut Marine stands ready to accommodate transients. The historic Jamestown Windmill can be visited in summer.

Dutch Treat If you truly want to get away from the Newport scene, look to Conanicut’s western shore, home of Dutch Harbor Boat Yard, a tranquil facility with moorings, launch service and a great view of scenic Dutch Island Light and the West Passage. It seems a long way from everywhere, but a mile-long walk or bike ride down Narragansett Avenue brings you to Jamestown’s village center. “Dutch Harbor is such a quick ride to open water,” points out Joe McGrady, owner of Dutch Harbor Boat Yard. “Boaters here can easily cruise to Block Island, Cape Cod or the Vineyard. It’s a fantastic spot from which to reach a lot of places, plus it’s secluded and quiet. At night, you aren’t bothered by the bright lights or busyness of Newport. People really enjoy that they can get a good night’s sleep here. It’s just a great place.”

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Beavertail Lighthouse, at the southern tip of Conanicut Island, houses a museum and an aquarium.

Parks Aplenty As for Jamestown’s shore-based attractions and diversions, there are many, starting with the aforementioned Fort Wetherill State Park. The park has a small marina and a small-boat and kayak launch area, or you can rent a Jet Ski or paddleboard from Adventure Watersports and see Jamestown from a whole different perspective. The park also offers biking and hiking trails, as well as amazing views of Fort Adams, Newport and the East Passage. At the southernmost tip of Jamestown is Beavertail State Park, home to Beavertail Light, one of Jamestown’s five lighthouses and open to the public. The property features a small museum and an aquarium that showcases local sea life. Meanwhile, Beavertail Point affords aweinspiring views of the Atlantic that draw photographers and artists alike. It’s also a popular spot to dive, fish and scout for tide-pool critters.   On the island’s western shore is the Fort Getty Recreational Area, which features a launch ramp suitable for larger boats and plenty of trailer parking. The park is also a campground with seasonal RV sites, tent sites, restrooms, charcoal pits and more. A farmers’ market on Mondays sells locally grown products through August.

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RHODE ISLAND DESTINATION

Diving is popular at Fort Wetherill State Park.

JAMESTOWN

Sightseeing Sojourn Photo Amory Ross/Team Alvimedica, Volvo Ocean Race

FRONT ROW SEAT Jamestown boaters can enjoy a prime vantage point for viewing the much-heralded Volvo Ocean Race when the big boats arrive in Rhode Island from May 5 through May 9 after finishing the Brazil-to-Newport leg. A host of activities are planned through May 17, including a Race Village in Newport, where visitors can

After a day of exploring the island’s various parks, head back to the village for a little refreshment and entertainment. A summer concert series in Memorial Square provides the soundtrack to accompany lovely views of the Newport-Pell Bridge and the East Passage. Or enjoy a cold one at the Narragansett Café, known for its variety of blues and jazz bands. For more local flavor, stop by Jamestown Designs, which carries a variety of items produced by area artists and craftspeople. The Jamestown Fire Department Museum, also downtown, maintains a collection of antique fire-fighting equipment, both horse-drawn and motor-powered, including 1845 and 1857 pumper trucks. Afterward, stroll down the street and pick up some coffee and a sweet treat at Slice of Heaven Bakery.

view the boats and team compounds and watch a professional sail loft and boatyard at work. Also scheduled are interactive marine education exhibits, live music and an international food festival. As part of the event, Sail Newport will host free sailing tours of Newport Harbor for all ages. Experienced skippers and lifejackets will be provided for all excursions aboard Sail Newport’s J22 sailboats. On May 15 and 16, spectators can watch the Pro-Am and In-Port Races, during which the Volvo boats compete off Fort Adams. The festivities wrap up on May 17, when the mammoth ocean racers leave Newport Harbor, position themselves along the start line and begin the transatlantic leg to Lisbon, Portugal. For the latest info on the Volvo Ocean Race and how you can monitor the race online, visit volvooceanrace.com.

— TOM RICHARDSON Beavertail Point is a famous fishing spot. The views are pretty sweet too.

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Farms & Ferries

You can find most anything at Grapes and Gourmet.

Local shops such as Jamestown Designs carry unique crafts.

There are more interesting things to see in the northern part of the island. A short drive or bike ride from the village center up North Road leads to Jamestown’s 200-year-old windmill, open for visits on weekends in summer. Nearby is Watson Farm, a quintessential New England farm that began in the late 1700s and continued through five generations. The property remains a working proposition, raising Heritage Red Devon cattle and sheep and providing local beef to area restaurants. The business is now run by tenant farmers Don and Heather Minto, and you can visit the grounds seasonally to enjoy magnificent views of Dutch Harbor. The Mintos come by their profession honestly. Farming dominated Conanicut Island in the 1600s and 1700s. As more colonists arrived from England, ferry service to Newport was established in 1675. For more than 200 years the ferry served as an important part of the local economy and culture, bringing freight, passengers—and changes—to Jamestown. An exhibit of ferry memorabilia can be found at the Jamestown Historical Society, including handwritten meeting minutes from the late 1800s and old photographs. While completion of the Newport-Pell Bridge in 1969 effectively ended the heyday of the Jamestown ferry, it continues to shuttle passengers on lighthouse tours and trips to and from Newport. It’s much better than driving over the bridge, but boaters already know that! CONTINUED

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Right: Spinnakers Café at East Ferry Wharf. Far right: Biking at Beavertail Point.

JAMESTOWN AT A GLANCE HARBORMASTER

(401) 423-7249; jamestownri.net

DOCKAGE, MOORINGS & SERVICE

CONANICUT MARINE SERVICES (401) 423-1556; conanicutmarina.com Full-service marina with more than 200 seasonal and transient moorings, fuel, repair and storage. Stocks mechanical parts and outdoor gear, plus marine accessories and gifts. DUTCH HARBOR BOAT YARD (401) 423-0630; dutchharborboatyard.com Full-service yard offering launch service, showers, WiFi, laundry and on-site café. Transient moorings available; reservations recommended. JAMESTOWN BOAT YARD (401) 423-0600; jby.com Transient moorings, launch service and a private beach. Reservations recommended for moorings, required for dockage. Also provides repairs and upgrades, hauling and dinghy storage. CLARK BOAT YARD & MARINE WORKS (401) 423-3625; clarkboatyardandmarineworks.com Full-service boat yard near Fort Wetherill with seasonal and transient moorings for boats up to 65 feet. Launch service, pump-out, showers, WiFi, parking, picnic area, storage, repair and maintenance.

ADVENTURE WATERSPORTS (401) 849-4820; newportriwatersports.com Small-boat, kayak, stand-up paddleboard and Jet Ski rentals. Also offers fishing and yacht charters.

WHERE TO EAT

PLANTATION AT THE BAY (401) 560-0060; plantationatthebay.com Elegant dinners and Sunday brunch, with seafood, vegetarian and beef dishes, desserts and a top-shelf bar in a historic mid-1800s inn with water views. JAMESTOWN FISH (401) 423-3474; jamestownfishri.com European-inspired cuisine featuring locally harvested seafood and an extensive wine list, with seating on the patio, in the dining room or in the Bridge Bar.

CLANCY DESIGNS (401) 423-1697; clancydesigns.com Hand-blown glass gifts, handmade tile mosaics, and sculptural glass pieces for the home. FAIR TRADE WINDS (401) 560-0564; fairtradewinds.net Handmade gifts, jewelry, clothing, kitchenware and home décor, all with a socially conscious mission to support artisans around the world to help them and their communities become self-sustaining. PURPLE DOOR BEAD SHOP (401) 423-1231 Handmade jewelry, plus findings and loose beads in ceramic, glass, plastic, metal and semi-precious stone. Some heirloom and estate jewelry as well. DIDI SUYDAM JEWELRY & FINE ART (401) 575-1214; didisuydam.com Metal sculpture, contemporary images and jewelry.

THINGS TO SEE & DO

NARRAGANSETT CAFÉ (401) 423-2150; narragansettcafe.com Great village spot for a cold brew, pub grub and live music.

WATSON FARM (401) 423-0005; jamestowncommunityfarm.com Historic, 265-acre farm established in 1796, with heritage-breed farm animals. Visitors are welcome on the property for nature walks and views of Dutch Harbor.

CONANICUT YACHT CLUB (401) 423-1424; conanicutyachtclub.org Allows use of guest moorings and facilities to members of reciprocal clubs.

EAST FERRY DELI (401) 423-1592; eastferrydeli.com Sandwiches, salads, bakery items, soups and coffee with a view of the Newport Bridge and East Passage.

JAMESTOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT MEMORIAL MUSEUM (401) 423-0062; jamestownfd.com/museum Antique firefighting equipment, with both horse-drawn and motorized fire engines on display.

ANCHORAGES

SLICE OF HEAVEN BAKERY (401) 423-9866; sliceofheavenri.com Baked goods, gourmet sandwiches, espresso drinks and smoothies served indoors or outdoors.

JAMESTOWN GOLF (401) 423-9930; jamestowngolf.com Public play is welcome at this nine-hole course just minutes from the downtown area and Conanicut and Dutch Harbor marinas.

SPINNAKERS CAFÉ (401) 423-3077; spinnakerscafe.com Casual waterfront restaurant serving seafood, burgers, sandwiches and homemade ice cream.

BEAVERTAIL LIGHTHOUSE MUSEUM (401) 423-3270; beavertaillight.org Lighthouse museum displays, with the tower open for climbing once a month, May through October. Also features an aquarium.

COOL SHOPS

SYDNEY L. WRIGHT MUSEUM (401) 423-7280; jamestownri.com Located at the Jamestown Philomenian Library, the museum contains Native American artifacts found in Jamestown in the 1960s, some dating back 3,000 years.

Boaters can anchor on the east side of Jamestown outside the designated mooring fields and ferry lanes. An especially idyllic anchorage is Mackerel Cove, which boasts a wonderful beach and good protection in everything but a southeast wind. Other good spots to drop the hook include Potter Cove and Dutch Harbor.

LAUNCH RAMPS

FORT GETTY RECREATIONAL AREA (401) 423-7211; jamestownri.net Off Beavertail Road. Daily parking fee. Launch ramp, RV services, campsites, showers and a fishing area. FORT WETHERILL STATE PARK & MARINA (401) 423-1771; riparks.com At the southeast end of Ocean Street, off Walcott Avenue (Rte. 138), with parking available. Reservations accepted at the park’s 42-slip marina for small boats. Ramp is best suited to skiffs, PWCs and kayaks. EAST/WEST FERRY DOCKS jamestownri.gov Limited trailer parking at East Ferry. Best for skiffs and kayaks.

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JAMESTOWN OUTDOORS (401) 924-2885; jamestownoutdoors.com Rentals of bikes, kayaks and stand-up paddleboards. Will deliver to anywhere on Conanicut Island. Paddleboard lessons also offered.

NEW ENGLAND BOATING

JAMESTOWN DESIGNS (401) 423-0344; jamestowndesigns.com Jewelry, gifts and fine art—including paintings, prints, ceramics and sculpture—by local artists, plus custom framing services. GRAPES & GOURMET (401) 423-0070; grapesandgourmet.com Wine and spirits, deli, artisan cheeses and cigars. Offers wine and cheese tastings on Friday evenings, and beer and cheese tastings on Monday evenings.

JAMESTOWN HISTORICAL SOCIETY (401) 423-0784; jamestownhistoricalsociety.org Summer exhibits on the history of Jamestown, plus temporary exhibits at the library and a local school. JHS also maintains the Jamestown Windmill and the Quaker Meeting House and has a collection of ferry memorabilia on site.

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MASSACHUSETTS DESTINATION

WOODS HOLE

Sailboats swing on their moorings in protected Eel Pond.

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Many boaters zip past Woods Hole on their way to and from other destinations, but this cozy Cape Cod village offers numerous reasons to stop and stay a while. or the majority of folks, Woods Hole is a mere way station, a place to kill an hour or two while waiting for the ferry to Martha’s Vineyard. That’s too bad, as this charming village—part of the town of Falmouth—is worth getting to know more intimately, and boaters are well positioned to do just that once they find their way ashore. Settled by Europeans in 1659, Woods Hole’s maritime past dates back to the early 1800s, when the village served as a whaling station. Between 1815 and 1860, at least nine whalers tied up at Bar Neck Wharf, now part of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Back then, Water Street was lined with shops—cooperages, bakeries, candleworks—dedicated to the whaling industry and the fitting out of ships.   While whaling ports were certainly no perfumeries, Woods Hole entered an even more malodorous era in 1859, when a group of businessmen formed the Pacific Guano Company and built a huge factory that processed fertilizer on what is now Penzance Point. It is said that the noxious vapors carried by a westerly wind were so powerful they would cause the tide to run in the opposite direction.

BY TOM RICHARDSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY TOM CROKE WWW.NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

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Nosbka Light marks the eastern entrance to Woods Hole passage.

WOODS HOLE

Modern Times Today, Woods Hole is decidedly more aromatic, especially if you happen to stand downwind of its many restaurants, most of which specialize in seafood. Among them is the venerable Captain Kidd’s on Eel Pond. The adjoining marina offers short-term dockage to boating patrons, along with free water and sunset views. Another waterfront institution is the Landfall, which has live entertainment and a festive bar scene overlooking the busy harbor. Two newer and highly rated kids on the block are the Quicks Hole Tavern and Quicks Hole Tacqueria, which serve lunch, dinner and brunch, including creative tacos and all sorts of sandwiches. They also offer a wide selection of wines, beers and cocktails. And if you’re looking to cool off with some ice cream and other frozen treats, head for Jimmy’s, right around the corner from the ferry terminal.

Woods Hole has served as an oceanresearch center since the late 1800s.

Science Center Of course, there’s more to explore in Woods Hole than its eateries. There are plenty of shops in and around the village center, but the main attraction is the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. WHOI was founded in 1930 in what was already an established scientific research community, thanks in large part to Spencer Baird, the first commissioner of the U.S. Commission of Fish and Fisheries, who created a government headquarters in Woods Hole in 1871. Over the past 85 years, WHOI researchers have been at the forefront of ocean studies and exploration, and the institution maintains a fleet of research vessels at its docks on Woods Hole Harbor. Just down the street from WHOI is the small but no less interesting Woods Hole Science Aquarium. This kid-friendly spot has over 140 species of local marine critters on display, including some in touch tanks. You can even get a “behind the scenes” look at how the tanks are maintained.   Yet another local waypoint worth visiting is the Woods Hole Historical Museum, home to all kinds of interesting exhibits and artifacts relating to the village’s past. The intimate museum also maintains a collection of well-preserved small wooden boats and other nautical items from the past.

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Local artists display their work near the harbor.

Getting Ashore Ah, but how does a boater gain access to this eclectic enclave of shops, restaurants and institutions? Admittedly, Woods Hole can be a tricky and intimidating place to visit by boat, given its swift currents, gauntlet of reefs and amount of boat traffic, which includes the New Bedford fast ferry and the frequent comings and goings of the hulking Vineyard ferries, not to mention the mosquito fleet of local skiff fishermen buzzing about.

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If you’ve never navigated Woods Hole before, it can be quite an experience. Indeed, one is often left to marvel at the courage of early mariners who did it under sail power alone. “I always advise sailors to make sure they have adequate auxiliary power and to travel at slack tide or with the tide,” says Falmouth harbormaster Greg Fraser. “The current can run so fast here that some boats can’t make headway. Most people get in trouble on the incoming tide, as they make the turn between Broadway and the Straits. If they don’t have enough power they get pushed onto Red Ledge.” For tasty lobster tacos, grab an outdoor seat at Quicks Hole Tacqueria.

FISHING HOLE Woods Hole makes an ideal jumping-off spot to some of the most productive and diverse fishing grounds in the Northeast, including Buzzards Bay, the Elizabeth Islands, the South Cape area and Martha’s Vineyard. The action begins in late April, when tautog gather on the shallow wrecks, rock piles and other structure. For about a month, these tough and tasty fish can be taken on green crabs and clam baits fished on the bottom. Striped bass arrive between mid- and late May, taking up station in the nearby rips of Middle Ground or off Nobska Light, where they can be caught on all manner of lures, including topwaters and flies when the fish are chasing squid on the surface. Casting poppers, soft-plastics, live eels and large flies along the rocks of nearby Naushon Island is another great way to score, with early morning being most productive. Be careful as you get in close to shore, however, as some large boulders lurk just below the surface. Black sea bass are prolific in this area, and can be taken all season long. Hard-bottom areas in Buzzards Bay will hold fish up to six pounds through June, but you’ll also find them in Vineyard Sound, including over the same shoals that hold fluke. To hook up, simply hop a two- to four-ounce bucktail jig tipped with a small piece of squid over the bottom. Bluefish crash the party in late May and hang around all summer in the numerous rips of Nantucket and Vineyard sounds. The choppers will take the same lures used for striped bass, and the topwater action can be explosive. Trolling slightly ahead of and parallel to the rip line with swimming plugs or parachute jigs can produce when the fish are holding deep. Another local favorite is scup, an ideal target for youngsters. By mid-July, the bottom from nearby Timmy Point to Great Ledge is literally paved with these saltwater panfish. Anchor just about anywhere, lower a hook baited with a worm or squid strip to the bottom, and watch your rod double over. Come late August, keep an eye out for fast-moving pods of false albacore and bonito. You can often encounter these speedy tunoids among the moorings in Great Harbor, as well as outside Hadley Harbor and off the northeast tip of Nonamesset Island. Many anglers score on small, metal lures such as Kastmasters and Deadly Dicks, but a small, weightless white Slug-Go or Zoom Fluke can’t be beat.

— TOM RICHARDSON

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Left, top: A former candleworks is now part of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Left, bottom: Unique houseboats occupy moorings in Great Harbor.

Eel Pond Secrets Once safely inside protected Great Harbor, small boats can be tied up for short periods at the public pier adjacent to the launch ramp at the end of Albatross Street. The other option is to head for Eel Pond. The narrow entrance to the pond can be tricky to spot, but you’ll find it just west of the Landfall Restaurant. The drawbridge over the inlet opens every half-hour in summer, and you can tie up alongside the bulkhead while you wait. Inside Eel Pond, you can try to arrange for a slip at Woods Hole Marine or Pinky’s Marina. Skiffs and dinghies can also be left at the town docks on the western side of the pond at the end of MBL Street while you go ashore for a few hours. Anchoring is not allowed inside Eel Pond. If you have a larger vessel, check in with the folks at Woods Hole Marine to see if they have a mooring available inside Eel Pond or in Great Harbor. You can also anchor in Great Harbor, as long as you do not impede traffic in the fairway channel. Contact the harbormaster to be on the safe side. No matter how you find your way into Woods Hole, it’s worth the effort. From science to seafood, there’s much to discover about this overlooked village brimming with Cape Cod charm.

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WOODS HOLE

Local marine critters inhabit the Woods Hole Science Aquarium.

Beautiful sailboats pass through Woods Hole every day in season.

WOODS HOLE AT A GLANCE

The Eel Pond drawbridge opens every half hour in summer.

HARBORMASTER (508) 457-2550

DOCKAGE, MOORINGS & SERVICE

WOODS HOLE MARINE (508) 540-2402, woodsholemarine.com Transient slips and guest moorings inside Eel Pond and Great Harbor. Slip services include shore power, ice, showers, repair and trash removal. PINKY’S MARINA (508) 540-2310 Transient slips to 45 feet, as well as showers, shore power and ice. WOODS HOLE YACHT CLUB (508) 548-9205; woodsholeyachtclub.org Transient moorings sometimes available. R&R MARINE (508) 548-6976 Marine supplies, bait and tackle, charter trips and nautical gifts.

FUEL

Gas and diesel are available in Falmouth Inner Harbor, two miles east of Woods Hole.

ANCHORAGES

Anchoring is possible in Great Harbor, northwest of the National Marine Fisheries Service wharf, although boaters should check with the harbormaster first and make sure they are not impeding fairway traffic. Anchoring is not allowed in Little Harbor or Eel Pond. Another option is Hadley Harbor, tucked between Uncatena Island and Nonamesset Island, on the Elizabeth Islands side of Woods Hole passage.

LAUNCH RAMPS

A concrete launch ramp is located next to the Woods Hole Science Aquarium, although street parking is limited at best. A better bet is the large state ramp in Falmouth Inner Harbor or the ramp in West Falmouth Harbor.

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WHERE TO EAT

CAPTAIN KIDD (508) 548-8563; thecaptainkidd.com Venerable, low-key restaurant on Eel Pond. Limited dockage for boating patrons. QUICKS HOLE TAVERN (508) 495-0048; quicksholewickedfresh.com Creative sandwiches, salads and entrees, along with a wide selection of wines, beer and cocktails.

COOL SHOPS

UNDER THE SUN (508) 540-3603; underthesunwoodshole.com Fine jewelry and crafts made by local artists. WOODS HOLE HANDWORKS (508) 540-5291; woodsholehandworks.com Artists’ cooperative gallery featuring jewelry, stained glass, paintings, photographs and more.

THINGS TO SEE & DO

QUICKS HOLE TACQUERIA (508) 495-0792; quicksholewickedfresh.com Baja California surfer hangout meets New England clam shack. Can you say lobster tacos? Open seasonally.

WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION (508) 289-2252; whoi.edu World-renowned marine science facility. Offers walking tours from its information office at 93 Water Street.

SHUCKER’S RAW BAR (508) 540-3850; woodshole.com/shuckers Casual Eel Pond dock-and-dine. Serves seafood, chicken and steak dishes.

WOODS HOLE SCIENCE AQUARIUM (508) 495-2001; aquarium.nefsc.noaa.gov Over 140 species of local marine life can be viewed—and sometimes touched—at this small but interesting aquarium at the end of Water Street.

THE LANDFALL (508) 548-1758; woodshole.com/landfall Large, popular restaurant overlooking the harbor. Lively bar scene and live music. FISHMONGER CAFÉ (508) 540-5376; fishmongercafe.com Village mainstay next to the Eel Pond inlet and specializing in fresh seafood with a Mediterranean flair. Serves breakfast, lunch and dinner, including vegetarian dishes.

PROVISIONS

WOOD HOLE MARKET (508) 540-4792 Small but well-stocked market on Water Street.

WOODS HOLE HISTORICAL MUSEUM (508) 548-7270; woodsholemuseum.org Intimate museum containing exhibits and information on the village’s rich history. Also maintains a small collection of old wooden boats and other marine-related artifacts. SHINING SEA BIKEWAY Beautiful bike path stretching over 10 miles from Woods Hole to North Falmouth. Much of the path runs along the shores of Buzzards Bay. MARINE BIOLOGICAL LABORATORY (508) 548-3705; mbl.edu Drop by the MBL visitor’s center on Water Street to learn about the lab’s research in the field of marine biology.

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MASSACHUSETTS DESTINATION

WELLFLEET

Wellfleet’s protected harbor makes an inviting daytrip or overnight destination for sailors, paddlers and powerboaters.

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For true Cape Cod ambience in a friendly, laidback setting, plot a course for the all-welcoming town of Wellfleet. BY ROB DUCA PHOTOGRAPHY BY TOM CROKE

EW CAPE COD TOWNS BOAST A MORE ATTRACTIVE HARBOR than Wellfleet, sheltered as it is from Cape Cod Bay by the long arm of Great Island. Adding to its charms are world-class fishing, spectacular natural surroundings, great paddling waters and a host of shops and restaurants within easy walking distance of the waterfront. For daytrippers and transient boaters, the only game in town as far as slips and moorings are concerned is the town-managed marina at the head of the harbor. Not to worry, as Wellfleet extends a warm welcome to visiting mariners. The marina features 200 slips, 12 of them reserved for transient boats up to 45 feet. Transient moorings are available for boats up to 55 feet, and dinghies are available free of charge if you need one. The marina also offers electric and water, pump-out and a fuel dock.   Trailer-boaters can take advantage of the state launch facility, also at the town marina. Rebuilt in 2008, it features floats and ample parking. Most trailerable boats can be launched here, save for during the hour on either side of low tide. There is a $10 daily fee to launch and park.

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Watch the Tides If there’s one drawback to visiting Wellfleet by boat, it’s the harbor’s shallow water and shifting channels. In other words, you’d better know the tides and keep an eye on your chart and the channel markers when coming or going. “As long as they dredge the harbor, there isn’t a problem,” says longtime boater and fisherman Jeff Smith, who ran a charter-fishing business on the Outer Cape for more than a decade. “If you have a very large or deep-draft boat, you might be restricted for about an hour at low tide.”   Speaking of low tide, many Wellfleet visitors are curious about the scores of black, plastic cages littering the local mud flats. These are oyster grow-out bags, and they support a booming shellfish industry that helps keep Wellfleet a legitimate working harbor. Each October, the town pays tribute to these important bivalves during its annual Oysterfest event.

The harbor is the perfect place for messing about in a small sailboat.

A Beach of One’s Own For paddlers and those with shallow-draft boats, there are additional opportunities for fun and adventure. These folks can beach their craft on the backside of Great Island, part of the Cape Cod National Seashore, after which they can explore the island (once the site of a colonial-era tavern) or make their way to the pristine beach fronting Cape Cod Bay. Be aware of the dropping tide when making such a visit, or you may end up spending more time on dry land than you planned. The expansive marshes surrounding the mouth of the Herring River behind Great Island are also ideal for kayaking and paddleboarding, and are a great spot to collect horseshoe crab shells and observe shorebirds and waterfowl. Just be sure to plan your trip on either side of greenhead fly season, which typically runs from late June through July.   More great paddling is available up inside Duck Creek and south of the harbor around Lieutenant Island. When visiting the latter spot, keep your eyes peeled for diamondback terrapins, as the surrounding tidal creeks and flats are home to the northernmost population of these rare, elusive and endangered estuarine turtles.   If you wish to learn more about the Outer Cape’s natural wonders, visit the Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary, which showcases the local beaches, woodlands, salt marshes and ponds in a 1,100-acre setting. Visitors can take a bird walk led by a naturalist or a guided tour of the Cape Cod National Seashore. A kayaker paddles below a bridge spanning a Wellfleet tide marsh.

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Make Constitution Marina Your Boston Harbor Destination

Constitution Marina on Boston Harbor is the destination of choice for visiting boaters from across New England and around the world. We are located on the Freedom Trail just a 5 minute walk from North Station and the Boston Garden, close to lots of great restaurants, water transportation, all major highways, Logan Airport and all the terrific things Boston offers. So spend some time with us this season. We are confident that you will be glad you did.

CONSTITUTION MARINA 28 Constitution Road

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Boston, MA 02129

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617-241-9640

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e-mail: cm@bosport.com

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WELLFLEET

Town Time Natural attractions aside, many boaters love Wellfleet for its village scene. Within minutes of tying up at the marina for a $10-per-hour fee, you can be enjoying lunch at the Bookstore Restaurant or savoring fried clams from a rooftop deck while listening to live music at the Pearl. Both establishments are steps from Wellfleet’s pier and marina. From there, a 15-minute walk brings you to the center of town. Art galleries, clothing stores and ice cream shops beckon all the way to Main Street, where more unique and diverse establishments await. Once in the center of town, you might check out the Lighthouse for breakfast or Winslow’s Tavern for an upscale dinner.

A lucky lobsterman hauls in the catch of a lifetime from the roof of Mac’s Shack.

Wellfleet is a spectacular natural destination.

Home of Hopper If you’re in the market for original art, you’ve come to the right place, as Wellfleet has been home to a thriving artists community since the early 20th century. This is where celebrated American painter Edward Hopper created some of his most famous works, including “Cape Cod Sunset,” “Corn Hill” and “Seven A.M.” His painting “October on Cape Cod” sold at auction two years ago for $9.6 million. Two-hour tours of the houses Hopper painted in Wellfleet and neighboring Truro begin at the harbor parking lot. They are held twice daily in the summer and feature 30 Hopper sites.

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WELLFLEET PHOTO TOM RICHARDSON

Fresh fruit, vegetables and seafood are available at Hatch’s Fish and Produce.

Big bass can be taken off Wellfleet from May to October.

WELLFLEET’S FISHING SCENE Wellfleet makes an ideal jumping-off spot for fishing forays in Cape Cod Bay for striped bass, bluefish and even tuna. While schoolie stripers and the occasional bigger bass can be taken right inside the harbor, most trophy-hunters head for nearby Billingsgate Shoal. This perennial fish-producer is plied by numerous charter boats throughout the season, so it can be a crowded place at times. Tip: If the fleet is trolling wire line, you’d best follow suit, or find another spot to fish. The fish move around the shoal depending on time of year and the location of bait, so you may have to experiment to find the pay-off zone. However, the main thing is to keep your baits and lures near the bottom, where the biggest fish typically hold.

Cape Cod’s musical arts are well represented, too. The Wellfleet Preservation Hall on Main Street has a full schedule of events throughout the season. Live jazz and folk music, along with independent documentary films, are presented in this renovated former church. The WPH also holds Zumba and yoga classes, if you’re so inclined. For first-rate theater, stop by the Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater and its Julie Harris Stage, a mile or so from the center of Wellfleet. This impressive theater is renowned for its year-round productions of classic and modern plays, opera, film screenings and children’s performances. More live theater and screenings of avant-garde films can be enjoyed at the intimate Harbor Stage, just steps from the waterfront.

If your boat has a shallow draft, don’t be afraid to scout out areas close to the beach, as schools of surprisingly large bass and bluefish often patrol the sand flats off Wellfleet. These fish can be hard to catch, but a well-placed soft-plastic bait, stickbait or sand eel fly can sometimes turn the trick. Other local hot spots include the waters off Provincetown. The area between Race Point and Wood End has produced world-class action with big bass in the last few seasons, especially in the late spring and early summer, when the fish are feeding on mackerel, herring and sand eels. At this time, big fish can be taken on fly and light spinning gear, but bring some diamond jigs and butterfly jigs if the bass are holding deep. The bluefin tuna grounds are also nearby, but action with these extraordinary fish has been unpredictable. Perennial hot spots include Fishing Ledge, Wood End, the Race and the southwest corner of Stellwagen Bank. If the fish are showing on top and chasing bait, you can throw poppers and jigs at them, but make sure your gear is in tiptop shape, as these fish have an uncanny knack for finding the weak link. Remember that you’ll need a saltwater license to fish off Wellfleet. You can order one online at ma. wildlifelicense.com. If you want to fish with a local pro, contact Captain Bobby Rice of Reel Deal Charters, (508) 487-3767; fishreeldeal.com.

— TOM RICHARDSON Mac’s Seafood on the pier serves delicious fried fare and lobster in the rough.

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MASSACHUSETTS DESTINATION

WELLFLEET

But Wellfleet’s entertainment options extend to less highbrow fare. Although it’s not close to the harbor, the Wellfleet Drive-In is one of the last of its kind in the country and a local summer institution dating back to 1957. It’ll make you feel as though you’ve been transported back in time, when life was less complicated. A drive-in theater will do that. Then again, so will just about everything in Wellfleet.

There’s no shortage of interesting shops in Wellfleet.

WELLFLEET AT A GLANCE HARBORMASTER

(508) 349-0320; wellfleetma.org

DOCKAGE & MOORINGS

WELLFLEET TOWN MARINA (508) 349-0320; wellfleetma.org The only option for transient dockage and moorings. Services include electric and water, pump-out, gas and diesel. Short-term tie-up is available for $10 per hour. Reservations are recommended, especially in summer.

ANCHORAGE

A large anchorage with good holding ground is located west of GC “11,” north of Smalley Bar and east of Great Island, in 7 to 20 feet of water. Before anchoring, consider the 10-foot tidal range.

LAUNCH RAMP

The public boat launch on Wellfleet Harbor features floats and plenty of parking for trailers. Most boats can be launched here except for the hour on either side of low tide. $10 daily fee.

BOAT & KAYAK RENTAL

WELLFLEET MARINE CORP. (508) 349-6417; wellfleetmarine.com Sailboat and powerboat rental at the town marina. Full- and half-day rates available.

PROVISIONS

BOATHOUSE FISH MARKET (508) 349-7377 Fresh local seafood at the town marina. Also sells chilled appetizers, boiled lobsters, clambakes and heat-and-serve meals. HATCH’S FISH & PRODUCE (508) 349-2810; hatchsfishmarket.com Great spot for local seafood, fruits and vegetables.

COOL SHOPS

FRYING PAN GALLERY (508) 349-0011; fryingpangallery.com Inspired gallery across from the town pier. Carries funky, original, nautical-themed art produced by creative local minds.

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WELLFLEET MARINE PIER STORE (508) 349-6417; wellfleetmarine.com Tackle, bait, souvenirs, clothing and books, right on the harbor. BANK SQUARE (703) 628-2787 Four unique gift, art and clothing stores, a mile from the harbor. FRANCES FRANCIS (508) 255-3876; francesfrancisdesigns.com Personally designed, handmade contemporary women’s clothing. LEFT BANK GALLERY (508) 349-9451; leftbankgallery.com Interesting gifts and home items, including beautiful jewelry, artwork and furnishings.

WHERE TO EAT

MAC’S ON THE PIER (508) 349-0404; macsseafood.com A Wellfleet institution on the harbor. Serves decadent fried seafood, lobster rolls, chowder and steamers, plus vegetarian entrées and burritos. WELLFLEET PEARL (508) 349-2999; wellfleetpearl.com Good food, drinks, live music and awesome views of Wellfleet Harbor from its upper deck. WICKED OYSTER (508) 349-3455; thewickedo.com Great place to chat up the locals and watch a game while dining on some of the freshest seafood Cape Cod can dish up. MAC’S SHACK (508) 349-6333; macsseafood.com Excellent sushi, local oysters and creative dishes such as crackercrusted bluefish, grilled oysters with absinthe, and halibut in saffron lobster broth. THE BOOKSTORE & RESTAURANT (508) 349-3154; wellfleetoyster.com Good food, a short walk from the waterfront.

Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary.

PB BOULANGERIE & BISTRO (508) 349-1600; pbboulangeriebistro.com French bakery and bistro off Route 6.

THINGS TO SEE & DO

GREAT ISLAND TRAIL Visiting boaters can kayak, take a taxi or bike to the Great Island Trail, which leads past sprawling salt marsh and provides access to remote beaches along Great Island. The trail entrance is a couple of miles down Chequesset Neck Road from Mayo Beach. WELLFLEET DRIVE-IN (508) 349-7176; wellfleetcinemas.com Old-timey drive-in movie theater and mini-golf course. WELLFLEET PRESERVATION HALL (508) 349-1800; wellfleetpreservationhall.org Hosts live jazz and folk performances, along with independent documentary films, in a renovated former church. WELLFLEET BAY WILDLIFE SANCTUARY (508) 349-2615; massaudubon.org Follow extensive trails through salt marsh habitat, barrier beaches and pine woodlands, each attracting a wide array of wildlife. Also features an award-winning “green” nature center with numerous exhibits and aquariums. WELLFLEET HARBOR ACTORS THEATER (508) 349-9428; what.org Great theater, dance, opera, music and film.

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MASSACHUSETTS DESTINATION

MARBLEHEAD

Steeped in maritime history, scenic Marblehead Harbor offers plenty to please the present-day boater.

HE PAST COMES ALIVE in Marblehead, where at any moment you half expect a wooden schooner to ghost out of the summer fog, pick its way through the ledges and islands and drop anchor in the harbor. Indeed, they sometimes do. Marblehead, which celebrated its 365th anniversary last year, is deeply rooted in American history—and the ocean. The downtown area features hundreds of homes and buildings that predate the Revolutionary War, when its citizens helped fight British troops (George Washington twice visited Marblehead to thank its residents for their service). During the War of 1812, the USS Constitution sought shelter from two British gunships in the shadow of Fort Sewall—now a public park—which guarded the harbor entrance from its strategic position atop Gale’s Head. In the peaceful times that followed, Marblehead served as a fishing port, as the nearby waters teemed with cod, flounder, mackerel, herring and other sought-after species. By 1837, the local fleet consisted of 98 vessel. However, on September 19, 1846, a gale caught the Marblehead boats by surprise as they were fishing the Grand Banks, sinking at least 11 vessels and killing 65 men. It was the beginning of the end of commercial fishing in Marblehead. Yachting came next. The site of famous schooner races and the first America’s Cup competitions, Marblehead is widely considered the birthplace of recreational sailing in America. The legacy endures, as the harbor is home to

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PHOTO SCOTT GOODWIN

no less than five venerable yacht clubs and more than 1,200 boats, including many classic wooden vessels.


Boats of every size and description share Marblehead’s storied harbor.

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MARBLEHEAD

Summer is a busy time on Marblehead Harbor, which is home to five yacht clubs, but no marinas.

PHOTO ERIC B. AKDEMIR

MASSACHUSETTS DESTINATION

Marblehead Rocks While Marblehead remains as inviting as ever to boaters, thanks in no small part to its deep and well-protected harbor, visitors should exercise caution. After all, the same waters that provided protection for “Old Ironsides” also pose certain navigational challenges. Salem Sound is riddled with rocks and ledges, so it’s essential to pay close attention to the channel markers, as well as your charts and electronics. Fog and heavy boating traffic in summer only increase the demand for situational awareness. “A lot of people get caught up on Coney Ledge, which lies between Coney Island and Cat Island,” cautions Terry Tauro, manager of the town harbormaster’s office. Tauro notes that the large water tank in the town center and the distinctive rooftop of Abbot Hall serve as convenient landmarks when entering the harbor. On the way in you’ll pass Marblehead Neck Lighthouse, part of Chandler Hovey State Park. The nearly four-acre park is well worth a visit, as it features pavilions, beaches, picnic tables, restrooms and dazzling ocean and harbor views. Marblehead Neck Lighthouse guards the harbor entrance.

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PHOTO ERIC B. AKDEMIR

PHOTO ERIC B. AKDEMIR

Beautiful homes surround Marblehead’s well-protected harbor.

Local Facilities Despite its rich boating history, Marblehead lacks a full-service marina (the nearest is in neighboring Salem). Limited transient dockage and moorings are available at the town-owned Tucker’s Wharf, just steps from Marblehead’s historic district. Reservations can be made through the harbormaster’s office, and services include laundry, pump-out, power and water. Daytrippers are allowed a 30-minute tie-up at the public landings, including those at Commercial and State streets.

PHOTO SCOTT GOODWIN

Dinghies can also be left at these landings free of charge. If you can’t find accommodations at Tucker’s Wharf, you can usually arrange a mooring through Mid-Harbor Marine or one of the three yacht clubs—Eastern, Corinthian and Boston— that jointly maintain several guest moorings, available on a first-come, first-served basis, near the harbor entrance. The Marblehead Trading Company offers fuel, ice, repair and storage, while the Forepeak on Front Street carries a wide assortment of marine and boating supplies. If you’re interested in trailering a small boat or kayak to Marblehead, you’ll find a launch ramp on Lady’s Cove, at the very head of the harbor off Ocean Avenue. There’s plenty of parking, but no tie-up float, and the surrounding mud flats prevent launching and hauling at low tide. The best bet for larger boats and all-tide access is the launch at Winter Island in nearby Salem. Top: Local boaters enjoy a summer outing. Above: Historic Fort Sewall offers fantastic views. WWW.NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

NEW ENGLAND BOATING

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PHOTO ERIC B. AKDEMIR

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MARBLEHEAD

Sights & Delights Whether by land or sea, no matter how you get to Marblehead, the town’s plethora of land-based attractions and activities are sure to delight. Abbot Hall, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is a popular tourist attraction, and also serves as the Town Hall. Among the hall’s many historical artifacts are its tower clock, which first began ticking in 1877, and the famous Willard painting “The Spirit of ‘76.” The Jeremiah Lee Mansion is another point of interest. Built in

Fishing for stripers off Half Tide Rocks.

1768, when Lee was the wealthiest merchant and ship owner in Massachusetts, the magnificent home stands as a tribute to colonial America’s strong ties to England and its independent commercial success. Many of the mansion’s original decorative elements have been preserved, including rare 18th century hand-painted wallpapers—the only such wall treatments surviving in place. Just around the corner is the King Hooper Mansion, home of the Marblehead Arts Association. The building contains five galleries of exhibitions by association members and guests. Artwork is also for sale. Not far from Fort Sewall is Old Burial Hill, one of the most picturesque graveyards in New England and offering magnificent views of the harbor. Established in 1638 on the site of Marblehead’s first meetinghouse, it’s the final resting place of an estimated 600 Revolutionary War soldiers. Some of its

PHOTO SCOTT GOODWIN

PHOTO ERIC B. AKDEMIR

headstones date to the 17th century.

Above: A gilded codfish adorns a house on Harbor Avenue. Right: Downtown Marblehead is alive with colors and character.

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Making the Most of Life on the Water Located three nautical miles to the open ocean and within easy reach of metropolitan Boston, Hingham Shipyard Marinas is the ultimate boater’s destination. Make the most of New England’s boating season at this family-run Boston area marina!

• • • • • • • •

500+ Slips 100 Moorings Secured Gates State-of-the-Art Concrete Slips 40-Ton Travel Lift Dock Hands Pump Out Launch service

• • • • • • • •

Make sure to visit us during the 7th Annual South Shore In-Water Boat Show! April 25-26, 2015

Electric & Water 30, 50,100, 200 amps Gas/Diesel Dock Showers & Restrooms Laundry WiFi Ice Marina Gift Shop ValvTect Gas/Diesel

HINGHAM SHIPYARD MARINAS 24 Shipyard Drive, Hingham, MA 02043 T: 781-749-2222 F: 781 740-0700 VHF9 Info@hinghamshipyardmarinas.com www.hinghamshipyardmarinas.com


PHOTO ERIC B. AKDEMIR

MASSACHUSETTS DESTINATION

MARBLEHEAD

Boaters idle through the harbor near the Corinthian Yacht Club.

The Landing Restaurant off ers indoor and outdoor seating, along with a lively bar scene.

Eats & Treats If you find yourself getting hungry after soaking up the local arts and history scene, check out two of Marblehead’s popular dining spots: the Barnacle and the Landing, both on Front Street overlooking the harbor. The casual Barnacle specializes in seafood and features an outside deck. The Landing, next to State Street Wharf, has an extensive menu of local seafood, with an adjoining pub that’s the perfect spot for a light snack or cold beverage. While you relax and soak up the ambience of this classic New England harbor, keep an eye on the ocean beyond Marblehead Neck. You don’t want

PHOTO SCOTT GOODWIN

to miss out when a wooden sailing ship suddenly

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materializes on its return to port. It’s the magic of Marblehead at work again! CONTINUED

NEW ENGLAND BOATING

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MARBLEHEAD

PHOTO SCOTT GOODWIN

MASSACHUSETTS DESTINATION

Devereux Beach is a good spot for a chilly swim or picnic.

MARBLEHEAD AT A GLANCE HARBORMASTER

(781) 631-2386

DOCKAGE, MOORINGS & SERVICE

TUCKER’S WHARF (781) 631-2386 Short-term and overnight dockage and moorings available through the town-managed Tucker’s Wharf. Services include power, water, showers, laundry and pump-out. Reservations can be made beginning March 1. Thirty-minute tie-up is allowed at the Commercial Street and State Street landings. MID-HARBOR MARINE (781) 631-0611; VHF 69; midharborlaunch.com Guest and seasonal moorings. Fee includes launch service to Village Street Landing on Salem Harbor (3/4-mile walk to downtown Marblehead). MARBLEHEAD TRADING COMPANY (781) 639-0029; marbleheadtrading.com Service, fuel, ice, repair, rigging, storage and more. THE FOREPEAK (781) 631-7184; marbleheadtrading.com Wide assortment of marine supplies, including hardware.

LAUNCH RAMPS

The Riverhead Beach public launch at the head of Lady’s Cove off Ocean Avenue is only usable (for most boats) during two hours on either side of high tide. Kayakers and cartoppers may have less of an issue. There is no dock or float, and the water depth is below three feet for the first 50 to 75 yards into the cove. The ramp fee can be paid at the attendant’s building in the lot across the street. Trailer-boaters who want to access the Salem Sound area are best off launching at Winter Island in Salem.

PROVISIONS

CROSBY’S MARKETPLACE (781) 631-1741; crosbysmarkets.com Well-stocked market within walking distance of the waterfront. Features a deli and bakery, and sells groceries, wine and beer.

WHERE TO EAT

THE BARNACLE (781) 631-4236 Popular eatery and pub with outside deck. Specializes in sandwiches, salads, chowder and seafood.

NEW ENGLAND BOATING

SHIPSHAPE (781) 631-7477; shipshapemarblehead.com Uncommon nautical-themed items created by local artists and craftsmen.

THINGS TO DO & SEE

THE LANDING (781) 631-1878; thelandingrestaurant.com Large seafood restaurant and pub next to State Street Landing.

OLD TOWN HOUSE (781) 631-1069; marblehead.org Built in 1727, this preserved house in the center of town is often referred to as “Marblehead’s Cradle of Liberty” for the many pre-Revolutionary War meetings held there.

THE MUFFIN SHOP (781) 631-8223; officialmuffinshop.com Award-winning restaurant serving delicious breakfast dishes.

JEREMIAH LEE MANSION (781) 631-1069; marbleheadmuseum.org Magnificent colonial Georgian home built in 1768. Tours available.

THE DRIFTWOOD (781) 631-1145 Local breakfast and lunch favorite.

OLD BURIAL HILL Colonial-era cemetery near Fort Sewall.

COOL SHOPS

ABBOT HALL (781) 631-0528; marblehead.org Museum and Town Hall containing interesting artifacts relating to Marblehead’s history. Open year-round.

MARBLEHEAD OUTFITTERS (781) 631-4660; marbleheadoutfitters.com Cool marine clothing and accessories.

MARBLEHEAD HISTORICAL SOCIETY (781) 631-1768 Guided tours of Marblehead’s historic sites, held on weekends during the summer.

BUS STOP (781) 639-0637; busstopclothing.com Fun, funky and affordable hats, jewelry, scarves and bags.

MUD PUDDLE TOYS (781) 631-0814; mudpuddletoys.com Unique selection of classic and educational toys, arts-andcrafts, wooden construction toys, books and more. JAMBU JEWELRY (781) 639-9600 Elegant designer jewelry featuring sterling silver, gold and semi-precious stones.

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Visitors can learn about Marblehead’s history at Abbot Hall.

MARBLEHEAD ARTS ASSOCIATION (781) 631-2608; marbleheadarts.org Exhibits and art for sale by local artists at the King Hooper Mansion. DEVEREUX BEACH Sandy beach with a playground, restaurant and good swimming (if you like cold water).

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NEW HAMPSHIRE DESTINATION

LAKE SUNAPEE

Let this idyllic New Hampshire lake transport you to a quieter age of boating.

T APPROXIMATELY EIGHT MILES LONG and 2 1/2 miles wide, with a maximum depth of 140 feet, Sunapee is a big lake— the fifth largest in New Hampshire—that somehow manages to feel small and intimate. Spend some time drifting its protected coves, swimming in its super-clear water or fishing along its sylvan shores, and you’ll remember why you bought a boat. Sunapee awakens basic boating instincts. Perhaps it’s the number of classic wooden vessels one sees or the replica steamboat Kearsarge that plies the lake. Then again, it could just be that Sunapee is simply quieter, more laidback, than other New England lakes. BY RAY CARBONE PHOTOGRAPHY BY KAREN BOBOTAS

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Take the leap this summer and trailer your boat to Sunapee.


NEW HAMPSHIRE DESTINATION

LAKE SUNAPEE

VIew of the lake from its northernmost point.

Clean & Clear It’s also extraordinarily clean, with underwater visibility extending 30 feet or more. The Lake Sunapee Protective Association has been vigilant about maintaining the lake’s purity for over 100 years, and has helped keep Sunapee virtually milfoil-free—a pretty astounding feat. In other words, Sunapee is nearly as pristine as it was in the late 1800s, when the railroad first began bringing hot and tired city residents from Boston, New York and other urban centers. After arriving, these so-called “rusticators” boarded steamboats that ferried them to lakeside hotels and boarding establishments. Automobile travel doomed the steamboat era, but Sunapee’s reputation as a tourist destination endured. Hotels morphed into inns, bed-and-breakfasts and seasonal homes where extended families gathered in summer. By the 1950s, most of the area was developed, and recreational boating was firmly embedded in the lake’s culture.

A couple unwinds on a Sunapee shore.

The public boat launch on Sunapee Harbor can be a busy place.

Lake Limits

Pontoon boats are a great way to enjoy the lake.

There is a good mix of boats on the lake, but most are small, given the limited access. “The average size of a boat here is about 18 or 20 feet,” says Bo Muller, who has operated Muller Boatworks in Sunapee for the last 40 years. “There are no size restrictions, but there are launch limits. You can’t really get anything in that’s much over 30 feet.” As for speed limits, there aren’t any outside of the posted no-wake zones, but not many folks care about going fast. “We occasionally get someone from Winnipesaukee who really wants to open it up,” says Muller. “But they soon realize that it only takes two or three passes to see the whole lake. It’s really not that big.”

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NEW HAMPSHIRE DESTINATION

LAKE SUNAPEE Getting on the Water A handful of public and privately maintained launch sites provide public access, although most are only suitable for small boats, canoes and kayaks. The largest and busiest launch facility is the Sunapee Harbor town landing, in the Getting ready to cool off at the swimming beach in Georges Mills.

heart of the village. Boaters who use this ramp must deal with summer congestion in town, as well as limited trailer parking on weekends. Additionally, the parking lot is a good distance from the ramp. The Sunapee Harbor website contains a detailed map of the area and helpful launching tips. Another public launch can be found at Mount Sunapee State Park Beach, in the southern part of the lake. This ramp can only be used by small craft, and launch times are limited. Contact the park headquarters for hours of operation and current fee structure. If you don’t want to trailer your own boat to Sunapee, you can always rent one at Sargents Marina, which has two locations: one on Sunapee Harbor and another in Georges Mills, in the northwest corner of the lake. Sargents rents a variety of powerboats, including pontoons and bowriders, as well as kayaks, canoes and stand-up paddleboards. It also carries watersports gear, such as tubes, skis and wakeboards.

A pair of anglers heads out for some fishing at the Sunapee Harbor landing.

Fab Fishing Once you get on the water, there’s a lot to keep you busy, especially if you’ve brought a rod and reel. “There are big lake trout and salmon, and the smallmouth bass fishing is really good,” says Rick Green, whose family has owned Burkehaven BoatWorks for four generations. The first two species prefer the lake’s colder, deeper zones in summer, and are usually taken on spoons trolled on downrigger gear or wire line. You’ll need to fish close to the bottom for trout, but the salmon typically hold 15 to 30 feet below the surface, right along the thermocline. Bass, on the other hand, can be found around shallow rocks, weed beds, docks, channel edges and ledges throughout the season. They’ll hit a variety of lures, including soft-plastics, poppers, spinnerbaits and jigs, as well as live baits such as shiners and helgramites. Before you wet a line for any of the above species, make sure you have a New Hampshire fishing license. The folks at the Tackle Shack in Newbury can get you outfitted and point the way to some good fishing spots. As mentioned, Sunapee’s clear water lends itself to snorkeling and diving, and there are several wrecks to check out, including that of the steamboat Weetamoo. If you’re interested, LaPorte Skindiving on A young girl and her dog enjoy Sunapee’s pristine waters.

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Route 103 in Newbury offers dive equipment sales and lessons. WWW.NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM


NEW HAMPSHIRE DESTINATION

LAKE SUNAPEE

Wooden Boat Central You’ll see a lot of wooden boats on Lake Sunapee, a tradition that began in the 1920s. “I would say there are well over 100 wooden boats on the lake,” says Bo Muller, who specializes in repairing and restoring classic boats. “There are even times when you’ll see more wooden boats than fiberglass. On Sunday evenings, there’ll be a good dozen or so putt-putting around.” Muller points out that the number of existing boathouses, many dating back to the early days of boating, makes this possible. “It’s really the only good way to protect a wooden boat,” he says. The boathouses themselves are a major part of the Sunapee shorescape, and range from the simple to ornate.

Sargents Marina in Georges Mills rents powerboats and kayaks.

Sunapee’s wide-open sections are ideal for watersports.

Sail, Ski & Paddle Sunapee’s sailing tradition also remains strong. The Lake Sunapee Yacht Club hosts 23 Starboats, making it one of the largest inland fleets of these Olympicclass vessels in the country. Meanwhile, the Lake Sunapee Cruising Fleet races every Wednesday evening and alternate Sunday afternoons during summer. If watersports are your thing, Sunapee is a great place for tubing, skiing and wakeboarding, as the open stretches are virtually hazard-free. The broad northcentral part of the lake is a popular area for the above activities. Of course, kayakers, canoeists and paddleboarders also have a ball on Sunapee. Many gravitate to Burkehaven Harbor, where the rocks discourage larger vessels and the small islands offer protection from the wind. Visiting boaters should note that most of the shoreline and all of the islands on Sunapee are privately owned. However, you can go ashore in a few spots, such as the John Hay National Wildlife Refuge, where you’ll find hiking trails and beautiful gardens, as well as the Lincoln and Allison Gordon Wildlife Management Area, in the northwestern part of the lake.

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The town beach in Sunapee Harbor is adjacent to the MV Kearsarge, which offers sightseeing tours.

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NEW HAMPSHIRE DESTINATION

LAKE SUNAPEE

Harbor Stop Lake Sunapee has only one major town: Sunapee Harbor, on the lake’s midwestern shore. It’s a small and charming village with several shops, restaurants and waterfront activities. Free concerts are held in the local park during summer, and boaters can tie up at the town docks, adjacent to the Anchorage Restaurant, for up to three hours while they explore the village or grab a bite to eat. But Sunapee Harbor isn’t the only game in town. In Newbury, at the very southern end of the lake, you can dock for up to two hours at the public landing and walk across the street for food and drinks at Bubba’s Bar and Grill, a casual family eatery. Nearby is the Newbury Harbor Gazebo, which hosts the occasional concert. It’s not Weirs Beach, but for Sunapee fans it’ll do just fine. After all, the lake’s main attractions aren’t on shore. Take it from Bo Muller: “If somebody comes to Sunapee, they should plan to be on the water.” That’s about as simple as it gets.

LAKE SUNAPEE AT A GLANCE BOATING REGULATIONS

License: New Hampshire requires a boating-safety certificate to operate a powerboat with an engine of 25 horsepower or more. The certificate requires passing a boating-safety exam, or proof of equivalent certification in another state. For information, call (888) 254-2125. Age Limit: Unless accompanied by an adult, no one under 16 may operate a boat or outboard motor in excess of 25 horsepower. Persons under 16 may not operate a personal watercraft under any conditions. To protect loons, state law prohibits the use of lead sinkers and jigs in all fresh waters. The ban prohibits the use of lead sinkers weighing one ounce or less and lead jigs less than one inch long along their longest axis.

MARINAS & SERVICE

BURKEHAVEN BOATWORKS (603) 763-8717; burkehavenboatworks.com The only full-service marina on Lake Sunapee. Offers service and repair. Slips are rented on a seasonal basis. SARGENTS MARINA (603) 762-0111 (Sunapee Harbor) (603) 763-5036 (Georges Mills); sargentsmarina.net Maintains two boat and watersports rental facilities on the lake. Rentals include runabouts, pontoons, kayaks, canoes and stand-up paddleboards. Also rents skis, kneeboards, wakeboards, tubes and fishing equipment. Gas available. MULLER BOATWORKS (603) 863-8146 Specializes in restoration and repair of classic wooden boats. OSBORNE MARINE (603) 763-0152; osbornemarine.com Boat sales, service and dockage. Slips are rented on a seasonal basis. BOB’S BEACON MARINA (603) 763-4484; bobsbeaconmarina.com Boat sales and service. BROWN’S AUTO & MARINE (603) 863-3322; brownsautoandmarine.com Boat sales and service.

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The Wild Goose Country Store carries food, gifts and more.

BOAT, KAYAK & PADDLEBOARD RENTAL

KAYAK COUNTRY (603) 381-8685; kayakcountry.com Mobile outfitter offering rentals of kayaks and stand-up paddleboards. SARGENT’S MARINA (see above) OSBORNE MARINE (see above)

LAUNCH RAMPS

SUNAPEE HARBOR TOWN LAUNCH sunapeeharbor.com Free, town-operated launch site with courtesy float. Expect long lines in summer. Off-site trailer parking. MOUNT SUNAPEE STATE PARK BEACH Small-boat access only. Limited operating hours. $10 fee for motorized vessels; no charge for non-motorized. BURKEHAVEN MARINA (see above) Shallow, private ramp for small boats only. Boulder hazard 10 feet from shore. NEWBURY STATION BOAT CLUB (603) 763-7400 Privately owned ramp off Route 103 in Newbury. Car-top launching is available at Herrick Cove, New London; Soo-Nipi Park, New London, and Newbury Harbor Beach, Newbury.

WHERE TO EAT

APPLESEED RESTAURANT (603) 938-2100; appleseedrestaurant.com Long-established restaurant offering “country dining at country prices.” Named “Best Sunday Brunch” by New Hampshire magazine. Located in Bradford, near the southern part of the lake. THE ANCHORAGE (603) 763-3334; theanchorageatsunapeeharbor.com The only waterfront dining spot on Sunapee Harbor, this family eatery has a varied menu and a fun, casual atmosphere. Open seasonally. BUBBA’S BAR & GRILLE (603) 763-3290 Popular “family-style” restaurant in Newbury Harbor serving lunch and dinner. Dockage available across the street at the Newbury town landing docks.

COOL SHOPS

MARZELLI’S SWEET SHOP & CAFÉ (603) 763-0072; themarzellideli.com Delicious baked goods, homemade gelato, sweets and prepared meals, in Sunapee Harbor. QUACK SHACK (603) 763-3084 Ice cream and other treats in Sunapee Harbor. WILD GOOSE COUNTRY STORE (603) 763-5516 Souvenirs, toys, collectibles, gifts, hand-crafted pottery, frames, jewelry, maple candy and penny candy. Also sells coffee and freshbaked bread.

THINGS TO SEE & DO

MOUNT SUNAPEE STATE PARK (603) 763-5561; nhstateparks.org Family campground, picnic area, hiking trails, beach and boat rentals, on the western shore of Sunapee. MV MOUNT SUNAPEE II & MV KEARSARGE (603) 938-6465; sunapeecruises.com Scenic cruises, narrated tours and dinner cruises. Both vessels depart from Sunapee Harbor. JOHN HAY NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE & FELLS HISTORIC ESTATE AND GARDENS thefells.org Hiking trails and nature preserve on the eastern side of the lake. The Fells Estate comprises a classic early-1900s Colonial Revival home and gardens available for tours. MOUNT SUNAPEE SKI RESORT (603) 763-3500; mountsunapee.com Summer activities include zip-line tours, aerial challenge courts, Segway tours, a gravity jump, a climbing wall and an 18-hole disc golf course. Also hosts the Annual League of NH Craftsmen’s Fair, a nine-day event held each August that showcases the work of local artisans.

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MAINE DESTINATION

KENNEBUNKS

Maine’s Kennebunk River offers boaters a two-for-one deal, with plenty to see and do on both shores.

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Chicks Marina welcomes transients on the Kennebunkport side of the river.

istantly within the orbit of the Greater Boston area, Kennebunkport maintains a personality all its own. Just a quick stroll around the town’s bustling commercial center, Dock Square, confirms you’re not in just any old ordinary Maine coastal berg. Shoppers range from all-American, shorts-and-knit-shirt types to North African families attired in burnooses. Moreover, amid every American accent imaginable, it’s just as common to hear languages ranging from Canadian French and Mexican Spanish to German, Bulgarian and Chinese.     “Oh, it’s been like that for a long time now,” says Lillian Fox, general manager of Chicks Marina, the go-to facility for most transient boaters who visit the Kennebunk River. “People from all over the world have heard about the town, and want to see it for themselves.”

BY KEN TEXTOR PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOE DEVENNEY

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NEW ENGLAND BOATING

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Anglers head out to try their luck.

Bush Garden Indeed, Kennebunkport’s international notoriety dates from the late 1980s, when then-President George Bush, Sr. spent his summers at the family’s seaside home not far from downtown. Photos of “H.W.” fishing for striped bass and bluefish just outside the mouth of the Kennebunk River were beamed worldwide—especially when the media made the President’s poor angling luck the object of ongoing ridicule. The former President and his family still turn up in town every summer, and stripers remain the target of many local fishermen, regardless of political affiliation. And although the fishing can be good at times, most visitors to the Kennebunkport area come here for the extensive shopping, dining and all-around Maine coastal experience.

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Kennebunkport, on the east side of the river, is home to most of the area’s shops, restaurants and marinas.

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MAINE DESTINATION

Cruising boats of every description call on the Kennbunks each season.

KENNEBUNKS

Summer Show For a town of only 3,500 year-round residents, the array of diversions is truly remarkable, hence the summer population of nearly four times the official census. Curiously, the original attraction at both Kennebunkport, on the east side of the river, and the separate town of Kennebunk, on the west side, were the local beaches. They still are. In fact, if you happen to be in the area for the July Fourth fireworks, the fine, white-sand beaches—most of them west of the river mouth—are the best spot for catching the impressive show. Kayaks at Goose Rocks Beach.

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MAINE DESTINATION

KENNEBUNKS PHOTO TOM RICHARDSON

Clam Up, Brew Down Back in town, though, Dock Square is where most of the crowds congregate. The shopping tends to be upscale, with only a smattering of “T-shirt” shops that seem to dominate other popular Maine ports. Exotic and fashionable apparel boutiques battle it out with numerous jewelry and antiques shops for prime locations in Dock Square. But if you see a long line of people queued up just west of the Square, there’s little doubt where it leads. Stripers highlight the inshore fishing in and around the Kennebunk River.

FISHING THE KENNEBUNKS While George H. W. Bush did little to promote the fishing in Kennebunkport thanks to his well-documented lack of success in the 1980s, the action with striped bass can be quite dependable. According to Captain Ben Welch of Striker Charters, based at the Boathouse Waterfront Hotel, schoolie bass arrive in June and can be caught inside the river through September. “When fishing the river, trying slow-trolling a half-ounce tube lure with a seaworm on the hook,” he advises, adding that he fishes his tubes on straight braided line with a three-foot, 20-pound-test mono leader. “Channel edges and deep holes often hold the most fish. Also, I like to troll with the current, to get the lure near the bottom.” Light-tackle and fly fishermen can also score with schoolies in the Kennebunk. “First light is your best bet for taking stripers on soft-plastics and flies,” says Welch. “Fish your lures near the jetty rocks and any kind of structure in the river, including drop-offs. I’ve even seen guys catch fish around the lobster pots and mooring balls. Try to mimic the little sand eels that are prevalent during the summer.” For larger fish, live and chunked mackerel are the ticket to success. Welch usually finds good numbers of macks schooled up between the green daymarker and the bell buoy, about a mile outside the inlet. Once he marks a school of bait on his depthsounder, he sends over a chum bag and starts jigging with a Sabiki rig. If he doesn’t find any macks within 10 minutes, he tries a new spot.

A fish painting and signs decorate the entryway of a shop on Ocean Avenue.

The tiny take-out place known as the Clam Shack has been operating near the Taintown Bridge over the Kennebunk River since the 1960s, possibly longer. Even before President Bush made it internationally famous for the

After making bait, he’ll head for any number of structure spots along the coast. “Any rocky structure in the bay

luscious fried clams on which he doted, this

can produce,” he says. “The trick is to cast your bait as close to the rocks as possible. If you’re not seeing

open-air eatery attracted big crowds

bottom, you’re probably in the wrong spot.”

enthusiastic about all of its seafood offerings—especially the lobster rolls. Most

Welch also fishes chunks of mackerel on circle hooks around the same rocky areas. Indeed, he says that he caught more big fish on chunks than live mackerel last season. In this situation he will anchor and fish the chunks a few feet above bottom on a bobber rig.

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benches or lobster crates, watching the crowds and traffic go back and forth across the busy bridge, which is unofficially named “Taintown”

If you want to learn how to fish the Kennebunkport area from a local pro, give Welch a shout. He can be reached at (207) 590-9093; strikercharters.com.

grab their orders and sit on nearby wooden

— TOM RICHARDSON

because residents of the ’Port side of the river tease their cross-river brethren by alleging, “It t’ain’t really the town!”

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MAINE DESTINATION

KENNEBUNKS

Kennebunk Debunked In truth, however, there is much to be seen, appreciated and consumed on the Kennebunk side of the river. Indeed, one of Maine’s oldest craft brewers, the Shipyard Brewing Company, got its start here in 1992, about a block west of the bridge where you’ll find Federal Jack’s Brew Pub—an offshoot of the original brewery. Known locally as just plain “Jack’s,” it occupies the site of one of numerous shipyards that were the commercial reason for settling the Kennebunk area in the 18th century. Like many early shipyard towns in Maine, successful settlement depended on a long, watery highway to forests that provided the lumber out of which 150-foot barques, brigs and schooners were built. The Kennebunk River did just that, running some four to five miles through somnolent salt marshes to the interior woodlands. Today, that inland waterway makes for a delightful and scenic kayak or dinghy trip. Even better, the river stays nicely dredged to about six feet of depth in the main channel. Its high priority among national waterways makes it easy to reach any one of the four marinas that squeeze into the tightly packed available spaces along the estuary’s edges. Obviously, it’s wise to plan well ahead of time, especially in summer, to be assured of a slip or mooring.

Top: Arundel Yacht Club members and their guests enjoy a fine view of the river and its parade of boats. Above: Marina slips are at a premium in summer, so call ahead.

Of course, you can also visit by car—but that’s not nearly as fun! CONTINUED

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Whimsical stairs lead to one of Kennebunkport’s many shops.

Visiting megayachts often anchor outside the river.

KENNEBUNKS AT A GLANCE HARBORMASTER (207) 967-5040

DOCKAGE, MOORINGS & SERVICE

TOWN OF KENNBUNKPORT (207) 967-5040 The town maintains two guest moorings, which can be reserved for two nights running. Call ahead. CHICKS MARINA (207) 967-2782; chicksmarina.com Popular, full-service marina offering fuel, repair and transient slips for boats up to 150 feet. KENNEBUNKPORT MARINA (207) 967-3411; kennebunkportmarina.com Full-service marina with fuel, repair, transient slips and boat and kayak rental. YACHTSMAN LODGE & MARINA (207) 967-2511; yachtsmanlodge.com Luxury resort and marina near town. PERFORMANCE MARINE (207) 967-5550; performancemarine.com Transient slips for boats up to 100 feet, fuel dock, storage and outboard service on the Kennebunk side of river. NONANTUM RESORT (888) 205-1555; nonantumresort.com Transient slips and dinghy dock for guests, as well as sailing and fishing charters, kayak rental and more.

ANCHORAGE

Anchoring in the Kennebunk River can be a tricky proposition, as you’ll have to set two anchors to prevent your boat from swinging through the fleet as the current changes direction with the tides. Set one anchor upstream, one downstream, and check the soundings carefully.

LAUNCH RAMPS

There is no public launch ramp on the lower Kennebunk. Both Chicks and the Kennebunkport Marina have ramps and a parking area that boaters can use for a fee.

BOAT & KAYAK RENTAL

KAYAK EXCURSIONS (888) 925-7496; southernmainekayaks.com Kayak rental and guided tours. Will deliver.

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NONANTUM RESORT (888) 205-1555; nonantumresort.com Kayak, paddleboard and bike rental. COASTAL MAINE KAYAK & BIKE (207) 967-6065; coastalmainekayak.com Kayak and bike rental and sales. KENNEBUNKPORT MARINA (207) 967-3411; kennebunkportmarina.com Rents skiffs, canoes and kayaks.

WHERE TO EAT

THE CLAM SHACK (207) 967-2560; theclamshack.net Follow the lines to this humble shack at the Taintown Bridge, which serves what many consider the very best fried clams in Maine. Lobster rolls also a specialty. DAVID’S KPT (207) 967-8225; boathouseme.com This restaurant at the Boathouse Waterfront Hotel sports a “luxury yacht” feel and features outdoor dining, two vibrant bars and Kennebunkport’s only raw bar. The chef relies on native Maine ingredients prepared with a creative flair. EDGEWATER INN (207) 967-3315 Tasty, elegant—and filling—breakfast dishes in an equally elegant setting. KENNEBUNKPORT INN (800) 248-2621; kennebunkportinn.com Upscale dining at an upscale inn. FEDERAL JACK’S PUB & RESTAURANT (207) 967-4322; federaljacks.com Celebrated brewpub and birthplace of the Shipyard Brewing Co. Offers fresh-brewed beer and ale, plus affordable meals. ALISSON’S RESTAURANT & PUB (207) 967-4841; allisons.com Solid Maine fare and (possibly) respite from the crowds. OCEAN (855) 346-5700; capearundelinn.com In the Cape Arundel Inn, Ocean offers spectacular ocean views combined with inspired fine cuisine.

COOL SHOPS

ABACUS (207) 967-0111; abacusgallery.com Dock Square shop full of interesting crafts and jewelry, including New England-inspired wall hangings, nautical jewelry, seascape art prints, pottery, notecards and more. ABODE (207) 317-2121; abodekennebunk.com Eclectic and imaginitive array of home décor and gift items ranging from candlesticks to rugs. COMPLIMENTS GALLERY (800) 248-2269; complimentsgallery.com Wide range of original home décor items, jewelry, hand-painted furniture, beautiful light fixtures and more. FLAMING GOURMET (207) 967-8825; flaminggourmet.com One of the largest inventories of hot sauces in New England. SEA GLASS JEWELRY STUDIO (207) 967-1982; seaglassjewelrystudio.net Pairing genuine sea glass with natural freshwater pearls, precious gemstones and sterling silver, this shop and gallery offers an array of unique, natural works of wearable art.

THINGS TO SEE & DO

INTOWN TROLLEY TOURS (207) 967-3686; intowntrolley.com Hour-long tours of the Kennebunkport area. Trolleys depart from Dock Square. KENNEBUNKPORT HISTORICAL SOCIETY (207) 967-2751; kporthistory.org Historic or architectural walking tours, guided or self-guided, at the Nott House on Maine Street. SAINT ANTHONY’S MONASTERY Boaters can visit the grounds and gardens of the chapel of St. Anthony Monastery and Shrine, home of Lithuanian Franciscan monks who welcome visitors by water. Tip: go at high tide! KENNEBUNK COASTAL TOURS (207) 831-3663; kennebunkportcoastaltours.com Daily river, coastal, lighthouse and sunset cruises aboard a 26foot Downeast cruiser.

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Discover why this former down-and-dirty fishing port is considered the boating hub of Penobscot Bay.

Boaters have reason to celebrate the recent transformation of Rockland. Inset: Today, yachts don’t seem out of place in this classic Maine harbor.

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HE OLD “UGLY DUCKLING” STORY comes to mind when sailing inbound past the impressive and much-loved breakwater protecting Rockland Harbor. But instead of turning into a mere swan, this Penobscot Bay city now soars well beyond an improved look and sensibility. Heck, even the rich and famous have discovered it. “The most surprising development lately is the number of really big boats that are visiting,” says harbormaster Ed Glaser. And exactly how big are these pleasure boats? “Oh, 150 feet or more. They usually just anchor because we don’t have a mooring big enough for them.”

BY KEN TEXTOR PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOE DEVENNEY

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A City Transformed The ten-year veteran of Rockland’s waterfront is a little cagey when asked exactly who these high rollers are. “We like to respect people’s privacy,” he says simply, noting most Rocklanders tend to leave even the biggest celebrities to themselves. Still, with boats that range from mega motoryachts to diminutive daysailers, visitors to Penobscot Bay’s acknowledged hub of boating make the trip for pretty much the same reasons. One is easy navigation in and out of the harbor, which boasts plenty of room for even the biggest flotilla, plus good protection from storms. Another is the array of shoreside attractions, including festivals, shops, galleries and museums. And then there’s the food.

A sailboat passes in front of Rockland’s Breakwater Lighthouse.

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An angler jigs for mackerel near the Rockland breakwater.

Foodie Fantasy Wandering gourmands now flock to what was once a down-and-dirty fishing port, complete with the traditional sights and smells that come with processing the bounty of the sea. But that’s all in the rearview mirror. Today, the scents wafting along Main Street range from scrumptious to darn near irresistible. Harbormaster Glaser is again diplomatic when it comes to recommending one particular restaurant. “There are just too many” to pin down to one, he says. During our own investigations, my wife and I tried one of the top-rated, high-end eateries, Café Miranda, and found its award-winning menu as advertised. Even better, there are coffee bars and diners of all levels of expense and atmosphere throughout the town. And for those who prefer to cook onboard, a short walk from the harbormaster’s office on a Thursday morning puts you in the middle of an extensive farmers’ market, where you can pick up local produce, meats, bread and fish for the galley.

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Fresh bread on display at the Atlantic Baking Co. on Main Street.

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Art About Town If you’re on a diet, Rockland also offers plenty to see and do within reasonable walking distance of the public landing or one of the four marinas huddled around centrally located Crockett Point. Art aficionados will be drawn to the Farnsworth Museum on Main Street, where works by the Wyeth family (N.C., Andrew and James) seem to dominate the collection, although there are plenty of other sea-oriented masters, from Winslow Homer to Edward Hopper. This concentration of fine artistry has spawned a plethora of galleries, antiques shops and related businesses along Main Street or just off it, many featuring contemporary Maine artists who may be “on the way up.” Many visiting sailors eventually wind up at the Maine Lighthouse Museum, which is a short walk just north of the public landing. Keep your sunglasses handy when visiting, as there is an abundance of bright, shiny, polished brass among the displays. The guided tours are also pretty informative, and admission is only $5.

The Breakwater Lighthouse remains a working aid to navigation.

A downtown mural celebrates Penobscot Bay’s resident seals, seabirds and shellfish.

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A stroll along the nearly mile-long breakwater protecting Rockland Harbor is a good way to work up an appetite.

For anyone interested in early-American autos, motorcycles and aircraft, the Owls Head Transportation Museum is well out of town, but worth the effort to visit. With one of the best collections of pre-World War II vehicles and “flying machines” in the nation, be prepared to spend a long day gazing at ancient Harleys, a Steffy motorcycle or perhaps a Prescott or Stanley “motor carriage.” If you’re lucky, your visit may coincide with a fly-in, bike-in or some other gathering of hundreds of golden-oldies from all over the country. Ironically, there is no public transportation to the Transportation Museum from downtown Rockland, but the local cabbies know the way and are happy to oblige.

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Sunrise from Sandy Beach on Ocean Street.

Lobster & Blues Those fly-ins, bike-ins and whatnot have to compete with a long line of festivals for which Rockland has become justifiably famous. Perhaps the best known is the annual tribute to the Pine Tree State’s most celebrated resident: Homarus americanus. For nearly 70 years, the Maine Lobster Festival has served these popular crustaceans to throngs of visitors, recently topping more than 20,000 pounds of Mr. Redcoat to satisfy the four-day appetites on hand. Usually held during the first week in August, the event draws even hardcore foodies, who show up to sample unusual lobster concoctions, which reportedly have included lobster ice cream. Rockland offers another alternative for waistline-watchers when the North Atlantic Blues Festival takes over the town in mid-July. This four-day event attracts thousands of music lovers, who descend on the area for an al fresco event that now includes a popular pub crawl well into the night. The local clubs, bars and restaurants sport every imaginable version of blues style, making one pause and marvel at just how far a backwater fishing town has come from its bluecollar roots. Want more? Well, back on the waterfront there are all manner of schooners sailing out of Rockland these days on day trips, evening cruises or weeklong adventures all over Penobscot Bay. In fact, Rockland now lays claim to the title “Schooner City,” an accolade that miffs a few other Penobscot ports that also advertise the passenger boats in significant numbers. Thus it’s easy to see how a small brick-and-mortar city has evolved pretty nicely into a destination that welcomes boats big and small. Rockland has always had its eyes on the sea. Low tide at the Pearl Restaurant.

It’s just that, at least in recent decades, the casual visitor has become the focus of attention.

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A retired navigation buoy in Harbor Park on Public Landing Road.

ROCKLAND AT A GLANCE HARBORMASTER

(207) 594-0312; rocklandharbor.info

DOCKAGE, MOORINGS & SERVICE

ROCKLAND PUBLIC LANDING (207) 594-0312; rocklandharbor.info Open May 15 to October 15. Diesel and gas, moorings, pump-out, showers and laundry. Dockage is free for up to two hours, then $5 an hour. Overnight dockage available. JOURNEY’S END MARINA (207) 594-4444; journeysendmarina.com Full-service marina with transient slips and moorings, a ship’s store and more. KNIGHT MARINE SERVICE (207) 594-4068; knightmarineservice.com Full-service facility with transient slips and moorings. TRIDENT YACHT BASIN (207) 236-8100; yachtingsolutions.com Deep-water facility with transient slips, gas and diesel, pumpout, airport shuttle and onsite restaurants. ROCKLAND LANDINGS MARINA & RESTAURANT (207) 594-4899; rocklandlandingsmarina.com Marina with transient slips and moorings, gas and diesel. Also home to a popular restaurant. OCEAN PURSUITS (207) 596-7357; oceanpursuits.com Full-service boatyard with transient moorings. Specializes in carpentry, rigging, electrical and more.

ANCHORAGES

A good deep-water anchorage, especially in easterly winds, can be found in the northeast part of the harbor, behind the breakwater. The southwest corner of the harbor also offers a protected place to anchor in winds from the west or south. A third anchorage close to town is located near the public landing. Lastly, a nifty (albeit tight) little anchorage is Deep Cove, just west of Owls Head.

SCHOONER BAY LIMO & TAXI (207) 594-5000; schoonerbaytaxi.com SIDE COUNTRY SPORTS BIKE RENTALS (207) 596-1004; sidecountrysports.com

WHERE TO EAT

CAFÉ MIRANDA (207) 594-2034; cafemiranda.com Cozy, bistro-style restaurant that recently won a best farm-to-table award. ROCKLAND CAFÉ (207) 596-7556; rocklandcafe.com Family restaurant on Main Street. Serves breakfast, lunch and dinner, with lobster and other seafood a specialty. RUSTICA CUCINA ITALIANA (207) 594-0015; rusticamaine.com Italian-Mediterranean fine dining near the water. THE PEARL (207) 594-9889; thepearlrockland.com Waterfront restaurant specializing in seafood. THE LANDINGS RESTAURANT (207) 596-6563; thelandingsrestaurant.com Lobster, steak, pasta and poultry near the waterfront. ATLANTIC BAKING COMPANY (207) 596-0505; atlanticbakingco.com Fresh-baked bread and pastries on Main Street.

COOL SHOPS

HAMILTON MARINE (207) 594-8181; hamiltonmarine.com Venerable marine retailer on Park Drive.

LAUNCH RAMPS

ROCKLAND MARKETPLACE (207) 596-9972; rocklandmarketplace.com Dizzying array of antiques, home furnishings and more from over 50 dealers.

KAYAK LESSONS & TOURS

GOOD TERN NATURAL FOODS (207) 594-8822; goodtern.com Large selection of natural foods on Main Street.

A hard-surface ramp with parking is available just south of town off Mechanic Street. Fee required.

BREAKWATER KAYAK (207) 596-6895; breakwaterkayak.com Sea kayak lessons and tours; based at the Boat Barn of the Landings Restaurant near the public landing.

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PLANET TOY (207) 596-5976; planetmarketplace.com Fun games, toys and more for the whole family.

There’s no shortage of eateries in downtown Rockland. JESS’S MARKET (207) 596-6068; jessmarket.com Fresh lobster and other seafood on South Main Street.

THINGS TO SEE & DO

MAINE LIGHTHOUSE MUSEUM (207) 594-0311; mainelighthousemuseum.com Home to the largest collection of lighthouse lenses and U.S. Coast Guard artifacts in the country. FARNSWORTH ART MUSEUM & WYETH CENTER (207) 596-6457; farnstworthmuseum.org More than 6,000 works of original American art, mostly devoted to coastal Maine; located in five buildings in the heart of downtown Rockland. STRAND THEATRE (207) 594-0070; rocklandstrand.com Restored 1923 theater offering first-run movies, live performances, concerts, lectures and more. OWLS HEAD TRANSPORTATION MUSEUM (207) 594-4418; owlshead.org Remarkable collection of planes, motorcycles and airplanes of a bygone era. A bit far from the water, but you can get there by cab or bike. WINDJAMMER CRUISES (888) 692-7245; sailmainecoast.com Over a dozen schooners make their home in Rockland. For more information on the fleet and cruise schedules, check in with the Maine Windjammer Association. ROCKLAND LOBSTER FESTIVAL (800) LOB-CLAW; mainelobsterfestival.com Held every August in Harbor Park, this annual crustacean celebration includes a parade, coronation of the Sea Goddess, steamed lobster, concerts and maritime displays. NORTH ATLANTIC BLUES FESTIVAL (207) 236-7660; northatlanticbluesfestival.com Big-name bands and musicians from around the country draw thousands to Rockland for this mid-August event at Harbor Park.

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Hitch up your trailer, throw a kayak on your roof and hit the road to adventure in the famed, family-friendly Saranac Lakes region of northeastern New York. BY STEVE WYMAN PHTOGRAPHY BY TRISH WICKWIRE

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HEN I WAS A KID, THE MAGIC WORD “ADIRONDACK” was enough to conjure up images of remote, trout-filled lakes surrounded by dark, impenetrable woods sheltering moose, bear and, yes, even panthers. After all, this was the legendary stamping ground of the Mohawk Indians, FrenchCanadian trappers and buckskin-clad frontiersmen. This was wilderness! I had good reason for such imaginings. In the mid-1800s, novelist James Fenimore Cooper and painters Winslow Homer and William James Stillman did much to romanticize the region’s wild and scenic landscape—a paradise for sportsmen and those seeking respite from suffocating urban life. Happily, it still is. Given the Adirondacks’ long association with outdoors adventure, I couldn’t wait to visit the area with my wife, Dyan, and our two kids, Emma and Ben. So last August we hitched up our 1970’s-vintage Sears Alumacraft to our Honda Odyssey and set off down the Mass Pike toward the New York border. As we pulled out of the driveway in our heavily loaded family truckster, I couldn’t help thinking of the movie “Family Vacation”—and we all know how that trip went down. Fortunately, our drive to Upstate New York was uneventful, and we made the trek from southeastern Massachusetts in 4 ½ hours. Our adventure began with a short stay on Lake George, where I fondly remembered spending summer vacations as a child. However, the place had changed quite a bit, and now sported a honky-tonk, tourist-town vibe and considerable development along the shoreline. It was a far cry from the summer lake escape I remembered from my youth.

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Rockin’ the Raquette After a couple of nights, a bunch of laps around the go-kart track and a round of miniature golf, we decided to move on to remote Tupper Lake, where we had access to a three-generations-old cabin on the pristine Raquette River, which flows for 146 miles from Raquette Lake to Akwesasne on the St. Lawrence River. A paddler’s paradise, the Raquette was once part of the “Highway of the Adirondacks,” a watery route of connecting rivers and streams that allowed fur traders to travel hundreds of miles by canoe. This was more like it! With a boathouse of SUPs, canoes and kayaks at our disposal, we spent our first full day on the Raquette paddling, swimming and catching smallmouth bass as we floated to Tupper Lake. Nicknamed the “Crossroads of the Adirondacks,” Tupper’s sylvan shores and fish-filled waters have attracted generations of hunters and anglers dating back to the 1800s. Today, the lake and its eponymous village comprise a must-visit destination for outdoors enthusiasts of all kinds. One of its major attractions is the Wild Center, where visitors can check out

PHOTO DYAN WYMAN

river otters, local fish, raptors and many kinds of educational exhibits and presentations related to the natural wonders of the Adirondacks. After two days of relaxing on the Raquette, we were ready to hit the road again. Like modern-day adventurers, we rolled out a map of the region and started plotting possible destinations, with an eye toward Lake Placid to the east. However, after traveling just 20 miles we happened upon a gorgeous, handcarved wooden sign for an intriguing place called the Ampersand Bay Resort and Boat Club. Why not? The author paddles down the Raquette River, followed by his children, Emma and Ben.

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Saranac boaters have discovered that pontoon boats are ideal for accessing shallow coves and beaches.

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As we pulled in, we were greeted warmly by resort manager Mary Gach, who gave us an impromptu tour of the property, which sits on the northwest shore of Lower Saranac Lake. We never left.

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The Saranacs feature public picnic and camping areas.

Sampling the Saranacs If boating and fishing in the Adirondacks is on your bucket list, there is no better starting point than Lower Saranac. Boats up to 30 feet can access the lake via the Lower Lock from Lake Flower, or by launching at Ampersand Bay or the Second Pond boat launch on Route 3. You can also rent one of the well-maintained aluminum fishing or pontoon boats at Ampersand Bay Resort. A lakeside cottage at Ampersand Bay.

AMPERSAND BAY RESORT & BOAT CLUB Nestled on the shores of Lower Saranac, Ampersand Bay Resort and Boat Club affords families a unique Adirondacks experience. Occupying 28 acres of rolling lawn, beach and forest, the resort features well-appointed accommodations ranging from rustic, hand-hewn cedar log cabins to beautiful lake-view cottages to upscale lakefront “Heron” suites. All have full kitchens and baths,

Lower Saranac is one of the most scenic and beloved bodies of water in the Adirondacks, with countless tree-fringed islands to explore and a world-class smallmouth bass fishery. The lake also boasts a 62-site “boat-access-only” island campground, making it doubly attractive to boaters and paddlers. With Ampersand as our base camp, we got to enjoy the best of both worlds. We took full advantage of the resort’s canoes and kayaks, and my kids could not get enough of the stand-up paddleboards and paddleboats. As for Dad, I was in heaven bouncing plastic worms off the bottom for smallmouths. Occasionally, I would get serious and take the Alumacraft for an early-morning offensive of catching pike and smallies, or a covert evening foray to drag Jitterbugs and Hula Poppers across lily pads for explosive hits from largemouth bass and the occasional pickerel.

outdoor grills, two or three bedrooms, WiFi and ample space for

Lake Monsters

relaxing. Guests who bring their own boats are provided a slip for the duration of their stay at the resort’s full-service marina. Another option is to rent one of Ampersand’s aluminum fishing boats or pontoon boats. Canoes, kayaks, paddleboats and stand-up paddleboards are available at no charge to all Ampersand guests. In addition, the marina sells live bait, ethanol-free gasoline, ice, snacks, drinks, firewood and supplies in a well-stocked chandlery. For more information on Ampersand Bay Resort and Boat Club, call (518) 891-3001 or visit ampersandbay.com.

—STEVE WYMAN

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Our last day at Ampersand found my son Ben toting an aerated bait bucket full of minnows, which were given to us by Eric, a young Ampersand caretaker and dockmaster who had befriended my family from day one. Eric had also given Ben some local intel that included a crude chart scrawled on a piece of cardboard. With this “treasure map” in hand, we motored out of the cove, steered clear of a well-marked rocky shoal and ended up between two fishy-looking outcroppings at the mouth of a marshy creek. What unfolded over the next few hours can only be described as an epic fishing experience. As a bald eagle eyed us from a nearby branch, we fed one pike minnow after another to huge smallmouth bass and enormous yellow perch. We also landed several toothy northern pike, the first of which was so large that it caused my son to reconsider swimming in a lake that harbored such monsters!

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Above: You don’t always need a giant fish to get young anglers smiling. Right: An appropriate piece of furniture for taking in the local scenery.

Village Life

The Saranacs feature world-class fishing for bass, pike and more.

FISHING THE SARANACS There was a good reason ESPN’s Outdoor Games based its bass fishing tournament on Saranac Lake for three years running: The action is world class. Mike Wallace of Blueline Sports in Saranac Village [(518) 891-4680; bluelinesportsllc.com] knows all about it. His well-stocked bait and tackle shop carries equipment for targeting all of the lake’s sport fish, which include smallmouth and largemouth bass, walleye, lake trout, salmon, brown trout, perch and sunfish. The lake is also home to some monster northern pike. To target them, Wallace suggests trolling a red ¾-ounce Daredvl or Mepps Spinner, size 4 or 5. Red or white patterns, with silver blades and white bucktails, are productive. A third option for northerns is Rapala’s XR 10 X-Rap in olive green and gold-and-black. For bass, Wallace recommends Gary Yamamoto five-inch plastic worms, rigged Texas- or “wacky”-style. Top colors include green/pumpkin and black. Let the worm settle to the bottom around structure in 5 to 15 feet of water then twitch it slowly to draw a strike. For salmon and lake trout, Wallace suggests using flutter spoons and a leadcore-line setup, as these species prefer the Saranacs’ deeper, colder zones. “Lakers” from the Saranacs can outweigh even the biggest northern pike, and the best place to bag such a trophy is Upper Saranac.

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Lower Saranac also happens to be close to Saranac Lake Village, rated by National Geographic as one of America’s “Top Adventure Towns.” With just over 5,000 residents, Saranac Lake is the largest village in Adirondack State Park, and is home to a hospital, an airport, a theater, restaurants, galleries and shops. It makes a great rainy-day option or side trip if you want a break from the sun. If you’re curious about the area’s rich history, stop by the headquarters of Historic Saranac Lake, a not-for-profit preservation group that also maintains a local museum. Visitors are invited to take a Saranac Lake walking tour and experience the area’s celebrated park system, created by the Olmsted Brothers in the 1800s and now owned by the Village Improvement Society, a volunteer group that has cared for the park since 1910. But there’s more to explore by boat beyond the lovely confines of Lower Saranac. In the southeastern corner of the lake, boaters can enter the well-marked, 2 ¼-mile channel—actually a section of the Saranac River—that links Lower and Middle Saranac. To pass from one lake to another, you must negotiate the manually operated Upper Lock with the help of a friendly lock tender. It should be noted that Middle Saranac is a broad and exposed body of water that can get pretty choppy at times. On hot summer afternoons it pays to monitor the weather and keep an eye out for approaching storms, especially if you’re traveling by canoe or kayak. WWW.NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM


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You don’t need to leave the dock to enjoy the beauty and bounty of the Saranacs.

Boating the Big Lake While it’s not possible to access Upper Saranac by boat from either of its sister lakes, this spectacular body of water has unique charms of its own. Upper Saranac is the largest of the Saranac chain and the sixth largest lake in the Adirondacks. To accommodate boaters, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation maintains a large launch facility at the northern end of the lake and a carry-in site called “Indian Carry” at its southern end.

PADDLING PARADISE Paddling opportunities abound in the Saranac area, and St. Regis Canoe Outfitters is a good place to get started. St. Regis offers guided canoe and kayak trips, and its

Upper Saranac is known as the centerpiece of the Saranac Lakes Wild Forest and is considered by many boaters to be the best boating and fishing lake in the Adirondacks. It boasts 37 miles of breathtaking shoreline, nearly half of which is publicly held and protected from development. It also features 20 primitive campsites available on a first-come, first-served basis. While cruising around, you might be fortunate enough to spy a vintage Hacker-Craft or Chris Craft, as the big lake is home to several beautifully maintained, antique wooden boats.

knowledgeable staff can point the way to a variety of do-it-yourself adventures.

Speaking of history, Upper Saranac is bordered by several luxury hotels and resorts that occupy the sites of former “great camps” established in the 19th Century. These rural retreats attracted wealthy families such as the Rockefellers, Astors, Guggenheims and Vanderbilts, who considered a trip to lavish lodges a form of “roughing it.”

St. Regis Outfitters’ Saranac River and Floodwood Pond locations provide direct access to

As for the Wyman family, we’re happy with just about any sort of accommodations that let us visit this beautiful part of the world. Will we be back? You bet! As I was relieved to discover, the Adirondacks still stand for outdoors adventure and unspoiled natural beauty, and hopefully my kids will also dream of big pike, dark forests and lonely loon calls when they hear the magic word.

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A popular four- to five-hour trip is the paddle from Middle Saranac Lake through the upper lock system to Lower Saranac. This trip can also be extended to a terrific overnight adventure by making a reservation at one of the island campsites available through Saranac Lake Islands Campground. Reservations can be made via reserveamerica.com. There are countless places to picnic, swim and relax along the way, including Middle Saranac Beach and Bluff Island, both on Lower Saranac. Some breathtaking views of the lake and the McKensie Mountain Range can be enjoyed from the latter site.

Fish Creek and Upper Saranac Lake. You can also file your paddling plan online at canoeoutfitters.com.

— TOM RICHARDSON

Paddlers of all ages and skill levels can spend days exploring the hundreds of lakes, rivers and ponds in the Adirondacks.

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PHOTO JOE VALLIER

NEW ENGLAND BOATING

Seared ahi with soba noodles at Finz of Salem, MA. Tom and Parker, hard at work.

Seeking sustenance on the water? Add the following NEBOtested restaurants to your 2015 itinerary!

RODUCING A BOATING TV SHOW does have its perks, and one of the biggest is food. We’ve visited a lot of dock-anddine restaurants and sampled an untold number of lobster rolls, fried clams and seafood platters during our two seasons of filming New England Boating TV. Our only complaint? Having to choose 12 of our favorites for this article—and the extra offseason gym time. Seafood served with a smile at the Summer Shanty on Cape Cod.

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Waterfront Restaurant, Camden, ME.

WATERFRONT RESTAURANT, CAMDEN, ME For tasty fare served with a side of famous Camden Harbor scenery, head for the Waterfront Restaurant on Bayview Street. The New England Boating crew dined here for lunch in 2013, and can vouch for its quality menu, fabulous views and super-friendly staff. The spacious deck affords a nice view of the harbor and the fleet of beautiful boats for which Camden in famous. The food is plenty good, too. We sampled the fish-and-chips, portabella-and-red pepper salad, thick and creamy chowder and the lobster roll. Oh, and we can’t forget the Maine mussels steamed in white wine, garlic, Spanish onions and scallions—a house specialty. Everything was delicious, and the french fries—served piping hot and golden brown—rated close to perfection. The Waterfront also has an indoor dining area and a lively evening bar scene. Boaters can sometimes find dock space in front of the restaurant, but will most likely need to leave their dinghy at the town dock or use the harbor launch service. Either way, it’s worth the effort.

Waterfront Restaurant (207) 236-3747 waterfrontcamden.com

BY TOM RICHARDSON & PARKER KELLEY PHOTOGRAPHY BY TOM RICHARDSON

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KENNEBEC RIVER TAVERN, BATH, ME If you haven’t been to Bath, you’re missing out on a very welcoming and overlooked boating spot with much to see and do—as we discovered during our inaugural season in 2013. After getting our fill of the river’s amazing scenery and historic sites, thanks to local tour-boat captain Ed Rice, we docked at the Kennebec River Tavern, just steps from downtown Bath. The Tavern offers casual indoor and outdoor dining overlooking the river, and boaters can usually find space to tie up along the adjoining marina docks, or arrange for a mooring. The restaurant serves lobster, sandwiches, fish, steaks, burgers and more, and has a wide assortment of cold beverages on tap, plus a full bar, but the water views and convenient dockage really set it apart. If you’re lucky, you may even spy a bald eagle flying along the river while you enjoy a cold beverage and Boiled lobster at the Kennebeck Tavern.

a lobster roll.

Kennebec River Tavern (207) 442-9636 kennebectavern.com WWW.NEWENGLANDBOATING.COM

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Lobster club at Frye’s Leap Café.

Al fresco dining at Diamond’s Edge.

FRYE’S LEAP CAFE, SEBAGO LAKE, ME

DIAMOND’S EDGE, PORTLAND, ME Getting to Great Diamond Island, just two miles from Portland Harbor, is half the fun of dining at Diamond’s Edge. The island, once home to a military fort and training ground built in the late 1800s, now welcomes visiting boaters. The upscale Diamond’s Edge restaurant occupies a former munitions warehouse that was part of Fort McKinley, built during the Spanish-American War. There’s indoor seating and a cool bar, but nothing beats a table on the porch or in the shady grove overlooking lovely Diamond Cove. Menu items include oysters, gourmet burgers, salads, seared scallops and grilled tuna—all of it delicious. Dockage and moorings are available at the Diamond Cove Marina on a first-come, first-served basis. Call ahead.

Diamond’s Edge (207) 766-5694 diamondsedgerestaurantandmarina.com

We visited Frye’s Leap Café while filming the Sebago Lake episode last summer, and can see why it’s an institution among local boaters. Dockage is available along the floats next to the ferry landing, space permitting (try to arrive after 1:00 p.m. to avoid the lunch crowd). The café has outdoor seating and serves a wide variety of tasty lunch and dinner items, including fried clams, buildyour-own burgers and creative wraps, but we highly recommend the lobster club sandwich, homemade pizza and lobster mac-and-cheese. The fries and desserts are outstanding as well, and on weekends the café serves a special breakfast buffet. Frye’s Leap also features a small bar stocked with an outstanding selection of microbrews, and serves mixed drinks.

TOWN DOCKS, MEREDITH, NH We’ll never forget our visit to this lively, kid-friendly restaurant and bar on Lake Winnipesaukee, where we filmed an impromptu interview with local children’s book author Andy Opel, and where Parker enjoyed a massive brain-freeze colada served in a watermelon. The laidback restaurant can accommodate one or two boats along its small dock, but there’s additional short-term dockage at the municipal pier, just a few steps away. You can also anchor just offshore and swim or wade to shore. The Town Docks has indoor seating, but most folks choose to hang out on the sandy “beach” and eat at the picnic tables. The restaurant serves lobster dinners, tasty salads, fried seafood platters, burgers, hot dogs, sandwiches and the like. For dessert, try the homemade ice cream. Town Docks on Lake Winnipesaukee.

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Frye’s Leap Café (207) 655-4256 fryesleap.com

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DOCK & DINE

Finz (978) 744-8485 hipfinz.com

FINZ, SALEM, MA When we called on Salem Harbor in 2013, we were treated to a fantastic dock-and-dine experience at Finz Seafood and Grill, courtesy of owner George Carey. The affable Carey launched Finz in 2001 at its current location on Pickering Wharf, in the heart of the Salem waterfront, and has kept the place fresh and popular over the years. The dining focus is squarely on seafood, although Finz also serves delicious meat, chicken and vegetarian dishes. The atmosphere is upscale yet not too fancy, with tasteful artwork and big windows affording views of the water. Outside tables are also available, or you can dine at the bar. We sampled an amazing variety of dishes, including fried oysters, fish tacos, burgers, raw oysters, scallops, hamburgers and the crispy haddock burritos—all were delicious. Finz also makes great cocktails and has an extensive wine list. If arriving by boat, make your way into the channel behind Derby Wharf to Pickering Wharf Marina. Head down the South River channel and look for an open space along the floating docks in front of Finz. You can also contact Pickering Wharf Marina ahead of time to see about tie-up space, or Fried oyster basket at Finz.

get a mooring in the harbor and catch a ride to the wharf via the Salem Water Taxi.

WATERCLUB, QUINCY, MA We kicked off our second season of NEBO with an episode on Quincy, Massachusetts, just south of Boston. Among the many segments was dining at the WaterClub overlooking the docks at Marina Bay and affording incredible views of the Boston skyline. The restaurant serves all manner of sandwiches, burgers and the like, as well as a wide selection of mixed drinks. The bartender even went so far as to concoct a special cocktail in our honor—called the “NEBO,” of course! As its name implies, the WaterClub is a loud and lively place, especially on summer evenings. It features an indoor and outdoor nightclub with dancing and live entertainment. Large-screen TVs on the patio bar make this a great place to catch the game, or an episode of

NEBO cocktail and a lobster roll at the WaterClub.

New England Boating—which is why we also held our season-premier party here.

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WaterClub (617) 328-6500 waterclubmarinabay.com

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Lobster roll plate at the Summer Shanty on the Bass River.

DOCK & DINE

SUMMER SHANTY WEST DENNIS, MA Among our favorite Cape Cod dining stops in 2013 was the Summer Shanty at the Bass River Marina in West Dennis. The Shanty offers free dockage, space permitting, and both indoor and outdoor seating on the patio and the covered porch, which overlooks the river. You can also relax with a cocktail or appetizer in the Adirondack chairs arranged on the front lawn—a popular sunset hangout. Plus there’s live entertainment on weekends. The food is excellent, too. We enjoyed the lobster rolls, fish and chips, burgers, tuna salad and quahog stuffies. The salads are large and fresh. Note that the restaurant is located north of the Route 28 fixed bridge, which has clearance of 15 feet MHW.

Summer Shanty (508) 394-0400 summershanty.com

DEWOLF TAVERN, BRISTOL, RI If you watched the Bristol, Rhode Island, episode of NEBO, you’ll no doubt recall Parker’s interview with head chef and owner Sai Viswanath, who was born in India and received his culinary training there before traveling the world and eventually moving to the U.S. Although the Tavern is not an Indian restaurant per se, this imprint is subtly present in most of its dishes. Viswanath even installed a traditional tandoor oven, which he uses to make delicious pizzas and other items. The restaurant features a raw bar and serves nice salads with locally grown greens. Specialities include filet mignon served with herb butter and silky mashed potatoes, and tandoor-roasted native lobster. Viswanath also makes a spectacular tandoor marinated swordfish served with apple and cranberry curried couscous, red bell pepper and toasted sunflower seed sauce. The DeWolf Tavern occupies a former rum distillery at Thames Street Landing on Bristol Harbor.

DeWolf Tavern (401) 254-2005 dewolftavern.com 160

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The outdoor patio is the perfect place to savor the breeze, watch boats during the day or enjoy the evening sunset. Boaters can tie up at the nearby Thames Street Landing floats for up to three hours, at no charge.

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Belle’s Café at the Newport Shipyard.

BELLE’S CAFE, NEWPORT, RI Many boaters find themselves overwhelmed by Newport, given the crowded harbor and abundance of huge yachts. With every inch of dock space seemingly occupied by acres of gleaming fiberglass, they don’t know what to do about grabbing a simple bite to eat. Fortunately, there’s a solution at the Newport Shipyard, where we found a delightful breakfast and lunch nook called Belle’s Café. Boaters can pull up next to Belle’s to enjoy a variety of delicious sandwiches, salads, coffee and other drinks. The chefs make some mean paninis and creative wraps, as well as tasty side dishes. Diners can eat inside or outdoors under the covered tables overlooking the beautiful boats.

Belle’s Café (401) 846-6000 newportshipyard.com Grilled panini.

Captain Scott’s Lobster Dock (860) 439-1741 captscotts.com

CAPTAIN SCOTT’S LOBSTER DOCK, NEW LONDON, CT Tom can’t remember a time when he craved fried clams more than while waiting in line at Captain Scott’s Lobster Dock after our tour of New London’s Ledge Lighthouse. Perhaps that’s because the restaurant’s namesake, Captain Thomas A. Scott, built the iconic lighthouse at the mouth of the Thames River, as well as Race Rock Light. The family-owned eatery, which has been around nearly 20 years, is located inside Shaw’s Cove, just south of the New London Custom House Pier. To access the cove, boaters need to hail the railroad bridge tender, but the wait is generally short. Once inside, you can usually find an open slip along the dock in front of the restaurant. Just look for the clock signs indicating when the slip owners are due back, and try to time your visit around the peak lunch hour, when long lines can be the norm. Scott’s specializes in fried seafood and lobster, of course, and they do a great job of it. We ordered a variety of items, including whole-belly clams, lobster rolls, chowder, clam fritters, corn and cole slaw, and found all of it delicious. The fried food isn’t overly greasy and the lobster rolls are heavy on the meat, light on the mayo. Scott’s also serve steamers, salads, scallops, grilled chicken, hamburgers, hot dogs and

Fried fish platter at Capt. Scott’s on Shaw’s Cove, New London.

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more, plus ice cream.

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Pan-fried sea bass with mango at Edd’s Place.

EDD’S PLACE, WESTBROOK, CT When it comes to dock-and-dines, it doesn’t get more authentic than Edd’s—a Westbrook institution. In all honesty, dockage here is limited to skiffs, dinghies and other shallow-draft vessels that can access the skinny water of the Menunketeset River, but many local boaters simply walk here from the various marinas in Westbrook. The small restaurant features outdoor picnic tables overlooking the river, as well as a covered section in case of inclement weather. Edd’s offers a variety of tasty fare, but what impressed us most was the fact that they will prepare the fish you bring them, any way you like. We arrived with some sea bass and fluke, caught earlier in the day as part of our fishing segment with Captain Phil Wetmore, and Edd himself fried and sautéed the fillets to perfection. The meal was served with fresh salad and french fries.

Edd’s Place (860) 399-9498

Of course, you can also order clams, lobster, burgers and other items, but we say “BYOF” (Bring Your Own Fish)!

T.

HARBOR LIGHTS, NORWALK, CT Norwalk really surprised us with the sheer amount of fun boating activities available within a few miles of the harbor. We were also impressed by Harbor Lights Restaurant in East Norwalk. So, apparently, was the New York Times restaurant critic, who gave it a glowing review shortly after its opening. Located on the site of a former penny arcade overlooking the water, the upscale Harbor Lights is owned by Chris Gavrelitis, a native of Greece, who worked closely with his head chef to offer a variety of Mediterranean-inspired dishes, including grilled octopus, lobster Santorini, braised lamb shank and grilled sea bass. There’s a long dock in front of the restaurant where boaters can tie up for lunch or dinner, and the dining room affords fantastic sunset views.

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Harbor Lights (203) 866-3364 harborlightsrestaurant-ct.com

Harbor Lights of East Norwalk.

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ADVERTISERS INDEX Atlantic Boats ....................................................................... 21 Atlantic Outboard ................................................................. 61 Baert Marine ....................................................................... 157 Bass Pro Shops ........................................................ 38-39, 153 Bass River Marina ................................................................. 83 Bassett Boat & Yacht Sales ................................................. 161 Boats Inc. ............................................................................ 163 Boston Harbor Hotel .............................................................. 7 Boston Whaler .................................................................18-19 Boston Yacht Sales ............................................................... 35 Bosun’s Marine .....................................IFC, 10, 13, 15, 17, 123 Bowden Marine ..............................................................18-19 Brewer Yacht Yards ..........................................................46-47 Burr Brothers Boats .............................................................. 91 Cape Cod Car Storage ........................................................ 151 Cape Yachts ........................................................................... 37 Cataumet Boats ................................................................... 93 Cobia Cape Cod .................................................................... 95 Constitution Marina ............................................................. 89 Chris Craft Boats ............................................................... 123 Crosby Yacht Yard ................................................................. 85 Dowling & O’Neil Insurance Agency ....................................... 6 Eastern Boats ...................................................................... 137 Eastern Yacht Sales ............................................................ 149 Everglades Boats ................................................................ 149 Evinrude Marine Engines ................................................... 147 Fay’s Boatyard .................................................................... 115 Fireside Inn and Suites ....................................................... 141 G&S Marine ........................................................................... 75 GMC Trucks ..........................................................................8-9 Grady-White Boats ............................................................ 127 Hingham Shipyard Marinas ............................................... 103 Hinkley Yachts ........................................................................ 1 Hobie Cat ........................................................................... 113 Hunt Yachts ........................................................................... 27 Hyannis Marina ................................................................28-29 Hy-Line Cruises ..................................................................... 21 Irwin Marine ....................................................... 28-29, 77, 119 Jeanneau Yachts ................................................................... 59 Jupiter Marine .................................................................... 137 KAM Appliances ...................................................................... 5 Kingman Yacht Center .......................................................... 23 Lakeport Landing Marina ................................................... 123 Louis Marine ......................................................................... 57 MacDougalls’ Cape Cod Marine Service .............................. 81 Maptech ............................................................................... 53 Marina Bay Boston Harbor ................................................. 107 MarineMax ...................................... 18-19, 28-29, 77, 108-109 Meridian Yachts .................................................................... 77 Mile’s Marine ......................................................................... 16 Mystic Seaport ...................................................................... 45 Naked Oyster ........................................................................ 45 Nauset Marine ..................................................................18-19 Northland Boat Shop ......................................................18-19 Ocean House Marina ............................................................ 67 Oyster Harbors ................................................................96-97 Petzold’s Marine ................................................................. 167 Pursuit Boats .......................................................................2-3 Regulator Marine .................................................................. 25 Rockingham Boat Repair & Sales ...................................... 117 Rossiter Boats ..................................................................... 139 Russo Marine .......18-19, 28-29, 77, 108-109, 125, Back Cover Saba Marine ....................................................................28-29 Sea Ray Boats ..................................................................28-29 Seaway Boats ..................................................................... 129 Shep Brown’s Boat Basin .......................................... 18-19, 23 Shipyard Brewing Company ............................................... IBC South Port Marine .............................................................. 149 South Shore Dry Dock Marine ............................................ 105 Sterling Associates ............................................................. 131 Striper Marina ....................................................................... 73 Tern Harbor Marina ............................................................ 159 Tiara Yachts ........................................................................... 33 Tracy Volkswagen ................................................................. 4 Wilde Yacht Sales ................................................................ 165 Yamaha Outboards New England ...................................68-69 York Harbor Marine Service .............................................18-19

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New England Boating - Spring / Summer 2015  
New England Boating - Spring / Summer 2015