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CHOOSING A FENCE FOR YOUR YARD P. 50 WHAT GUTTER SYSTEM IS BEST? P. 48

Home Builders & Remodelers Association of Cape Cod

WOMEN IN BUILDING

Spring / Summer 2017 capecodbuilders.org

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LETTER TO OUR READERS

OFFICERS President Matthew Anderson Anderson Framing & Remodeling 1st Vice President/Treasurer Peter Kimball AP Kimball Construction 2nd Vice President/ Secretary Trevor Meyer Meyer and Sons, Inc Immediate Past President Mike Duffany M. Duffany Builders Executive Officer Christine Duren BOARD OF DIRECTORS YEAR DENOTES TERM EXPIRATION Warren H. Brodie ‘18 Law Offices of Warren H. Brodie John Cotton ‘18 First Citizens’ Federal Credit Union Brian Harding ‘17 Andersen Windows Stephen Klug ‘17 Fine Building & Finish Benjamin LaMora ‘17 Lineal Construction Inc. Timothy Sawyer ‘17 BLFR Architects Inc. Tony Shepley ‘17 Shepley Wood Products Jack Stevenson ‘18 Mid-Cape Home Centers

PUBLISHER Christine Duren chris@capecodbuilders.org EDITOR Rachel Arroyo rarroyo@lhmediasolutions.com ART DIRECTOR Eric Brust-Akdemir ebrust@lhmediasolutions.com Produced by:

Building with Experience WELCOME TO OUR SPRING/SUMMER 2017 ISSUE OF AT HOME ON CAPE COD. In each magazine issue, we strive to bring you a variety of articles from our subject matter experts (our members) to help with your own remodel, renovation or new home build. For readers to get to know our members a little better, we’ve included articles that highlight their dedication and community involvement. In “Striking Gold with Waterfront Infrastructure” (pg. 42), we learn how the owners of Beacon Marine Construction got their start and in “The Art of Giving Back” (pg. 52), we see what happens when the business community and local students team up for a creative art project. Additionally, we asked one of our members, Rick Fenuccio, principal of Brown, Lindquist, Fenuccio & Raber Architects, to take a second look at a popular article he wrote for the spring/summer 2014 issue –“To Renovate or Build New: 10 Criteria to Consider.” In this issue, Fenuccio, explains why more homeowners are opting to remodel instead of build (pg. 20). We also include statistics on the issuance of building permits, which show a consistently strong upward trend, and we have included our first installment of “What Goes Into Building a Home” series, where we will explore the different stages of the building process from a behind-the-scenes perspective, showing what our members must achieve in order to start and finish a project. This issue we start with an inside look at the permitting process (pg 44). On page 28, we have a great article highlighting some of our female members—what they do and how they arrived at their positions of ownership and/or management in an industry that has been perceived as a man’s world. We don’t build only residential houses; from time to time, we are asked to build other structures, too. On page 24, we highlight several tree house projects. We’re sure you will enjoy this fun look at a different type of dwelling. Thank you for picking up our magazine. Remember you can visit our website at capecodbuilders.org and search for a member by name, location or business category. You can also call our office about a project you are looking to start, and we will refer you to the appropriate members in our organization to help you meet your building or remodeling goals. Sincerely,

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On the cover: Hyannisport House Photo by Greg Premru gregpremru.com E.J. Jaxtimer Builder, Inc. jaxtimer.com

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MATTHEW ANDERSON President, Home Builders & Remodelers Association of Cape Cod Owner, Anderson Framing & Remodeling


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HB&RACC TABLE OF CONTENTS

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State of the Building Industry: We spoke with our elected members of the Cape and Islands state legislature about the current and future state of the residential construction industry, and here is what they had to say.

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46 54

What Goes into Building a House?: Conquering the permitting process. The first installment of a six-part series.

Gutter Guidelines: What is the style, size and material that is right for you? Energy Saver 101: Everything you need to know about home cooling.

42 42 52

Striking Gold With Waterfront Infrastructure: Childhood friends band together to run Beacon Marine Construction. The Art of Giving Back: Cape Cod businesses team up with local high school students for a community art project.

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24 28 34

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Sky High: Adventure, nostalgia and unwavering fascination— such are the sentiments provoked by tree houses. Women in Building: A roundtable discussion with four professionals who are leading the way. Sharing Spaces: The do’s of designing guest accommodations.

SPRING SUMMER 2017 / AT HOME ON CAPE COD

48 48 50

On the Fence: How to select the best enclosure for your yard.

Signing on the Dotted Line: What you need to know before choosing an insurance policy for your home or rental.

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38 56 62 64

Why Homeowners Are Choosing to Remodel Instead of Build: Richard Fenuccio of Brown Lindquist Fenuccio & Raber Architects weighs in on the trend. Marketplace: Innovative products for the home. Homebuilders’ Resource Directory Ad Index Chris’ Corner


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INDUSTRY NEWS

Elected members of the Cape and Islands state legislature share their views on the local residential construction industry.

T

his spring we spoke with some of our elected members of the Cape and Islands state legislature to learn more about how

they see the residential construction industry on the Cape –its role in the local economy, the challenges businesses face, its future and how we can help make a difference. This issue we feature interviews from Senators Vinny deMacedo and Julian Cyr, and Representatives Will Crocker, Sarah Peake and Randy Hunt. Next issue we’ll speak with Representatives Timothy Whelan, David Vieira and Dylan Fernandes.

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INDUSTRY NEWS

People love to visit the Cape and many move here. It is a privilege to live here.

are those very people who most likely built their home or who protect their neighborhood, teach their children and grandchildren or care for them when they are sick.

Representative William L. Crocker, Jr. Republican Second Barnstable District WHAT ROLE DO YOU THINK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION PLAYS IN THE CAPE’S ECONOMY AND FUTURE? It’s huge, a huge role and not just housing but in the ripple effect it produces through purchasing products and creating jobs. Much of our Cape’s economy depends on the trades, whether that is new housing construction, remodeling or landscaping.

WHAT DO YOU BELIEVE ARE THE TOP TWO TOUGHEST CHALLENGES FACING THE RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY ON CAPE COD? We have such a lack of housing that is affordable on the Cape. Wages do not correspond with the cost of housing or rent, making it impossible for working individuals and families to afford a home. Towns need to figure out how to open up restrictions on zoning to allow for higher density, lower cost housing,[as well as find] ways to provide opportunities for developers to create housing without imposing restrictive regulations and fees. Many people equate “affordable housing” with problem tenants or homeowners. There is an old false perception that integrating affordable housing into a community will lower property values by bringing crime to the neighborhood and [that] the designs of affordable housing will not be in keeping with the charm of Cape Cod. One of the challenges is how to shift those notions from a negative to a positive. How do we convince people that the vast majority of people who are struggling to find affordable housing

If you don’t mind, I would like to add a third challenge and that is a lack of a qualified, trained workforce. Yes, we have to do a better job of supporting trades education through apprenticeships, etc. However, a big challenge is the rampant growing substance abuse and dependency of our young people. I am addressing this issue through my seat on the Joint Committee on Tourism, Arts and Cultural Development. Small business owners can’t survive without qualified, reliable employees, and they are vital to the future of the Cape’s economy. Every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, when I’m driving north over the bridge to the State House, I see a continuous stream of people driving onto the Cape…to work! We need to address jobs and workforce development, [create] housing that is affordable and attract and keep workers here on the Cape.

HOW HAVE YOU ADDRESSED THESE ISSUES? WHAT LEGISLATION HAVE YOU SUPPORTED THAT ADDRESSES THESE ISSUES?  AND WHAT HAS BEEN THE RESULT? As a freshmen representative I am constantly learning, and the more I learn, the more I understand that there is no easy answer. No one piece of legislation will solve the housing affordability issue. Being a lifelong Cape Codder, and through my role as a town councilor, I deeply know and understand the obstacles in resolving the issue. I am working with my fellow Cape and Islands legislators to look at legislation such as zoning reform and starter home [programs], while making sure we do not legislate the building code. That should be left up to the experts to make sure we have an up-to-date code that ensures safety, quality, efficiency without adding unnecessary time and costs to the builder and the consumer.

WHAT CURRENT LEGISLATION THAT AFFECTS CONSTRUCTION AND HOUSING DO YOU SPONSOR AND/OR SUPPORT? People love to visit the Cape and many move here. It is a privilege to live here. One of the reasons we are such a high tourism destination, aside from our natural resources, is the thriving cultural scene. I sit on the Joint Committee on Tourism, Arts and Cultural Development, and know how important the arts and tourism are to the Cape. I will continue to support legislation and ideas that continue to nurture our strongest assets.

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INDUSTRY NEWS WHAT IS YOUR HOPE AND VISION FOR CONSTRUCTION AND HOUSING ON CAPE COD? My hope is that we use commonsense approaches to begin to resolve housing issues. All we have to do is look at what’s happening and has happened for years. Boomers are retiring here! Many older citizens don’t need or want the big house anymore, so let’s flip it. Let’s allow homeowners to create an accessory dwelling unit to live in, and rent the main house to a year-round family. This creates an affordable housing unit for working individuals and families, and creates a revenue stream for the retiree to supplement their fixed income and allows them to stay in their “new” home longer and live well.

HOW CAN HBRACC SUPPORT AND WORK WITH YOU TO GROW THE RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY ON THE CAPE? Your members need to lobby legislators. It will make a difference to spend time with lawmakers. We are not developers, builders, remodelers, tradespeople – so we need to hear from them and learn from them.

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INDUSTRY NEWS

I hope we can find a way to create housing that is affordable for people who live and work here.

one piece of it. Of course the challenge of it is that there is a housing crisis on the Cape. We have a peninsula that is filled with dwellings, they’re just not lived in.

OUR MEMBERS BUILD WHAT THEY ARE ALLOWED TO BUILD. THEY’D LOVE TO DESIGN AND BUILD HIGHER DENSITY CLUSTER HOUSING. I think it can be done in good, clever and aesthetically appropriate ways.

Representative Sarah K. Peake Democrat Fourth Barnstable District

WHAT IS YOUR HOPE AND VISION FOR CONSTRUCTION AND HOUSING ON THE CAPE?

Yes, I do. It is a big economic driver. Recently, I took a tour of Cape Cod Technical High School because I work closely with Bob Sanborn, the superintendent there. Those kids are learning so much [carpentry, plumbing, electrical]. They are learning trades where there’s work for them when they walk out the door and they are good-paying jobs.

I hope we can find a way to create housing that is affordable for people who live and work here. For the kids we were talking about who are going to graduate from Cape Cod Tech, even if they walk out the door with a good mid- to high-five-figure salary, it’s challenging. So we are working on some interesting and creative ideas. Secretary Jay Ash was on the Cape a month ago at the Cape Cod Chamber of Commerce and what was talked about was housing for the workforce, summer seasonal housing and yearround housing, as we say, “housing that is affordable, not affordable housing.” The next day in Provincetown we talked about the H2B visa workforce, but also housing, housing, housing. And also [the need] to make sure that Boston isn’t giving priority to large, same site developments; we need help with scattered site because that is how we are going to do it down our way. Then we had a very interesting conversation about the reuse of the North Truro Air Force base. There is an opportunity to make that happen now, given the change in the administration in the White House, and soon-to-be change in the administration of the Cape Cod National Seashore, with the superintendent retiring. And that is land that used to be housing. Nobody has a thought of reusing those houses. It’s an asbestos-removal, get-oil-tanks-out-of-the-ground kind of a project. We are not talking about virgin forests that are going to be cut down.

HOW DO YOU BALANCE KEEPING THE GROWTH IN CONSTRUCTION WITH THE GROWTH IN DEVELOPMENT AND LAND MANAGEMENT?

WHAT CAN WE DO TO SUPPORT YOU AND OUR LEGISLATORS, AND WHAT IS THE BEST WAY FOR US TO WORK TOGETHER TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE?

I think there is the fear of [zoning reform] change. There are changes that most states adopted years ago—cluster developments as a right, so you can still maintain open space, bike paths, sidewalks and pathways, and have as much development on a parcel of land as allowed. So I think that’s

I think regular communication with us works. Scheduling meetings works. I think if there is legislation that is either troubling or important in a positive way, a quick email to highlight [it] for us is very, very important.

WHAT ROLE DO YOU THINK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION PLAYS IN THE CAPE’S ECONOMY AND ITS FUTURE? I think it’s a huge part of the economy. I know in my district home renovation and restoration is tremendously huge for commercial properties as well as residential properties. And that keeps people working at any number of levels, whether it is the bookkeeper who does the billing or the person who owns the company, which in some cases they’re swinging a hammer as well as running the company.

SO YOU SEE IT AS A REAL ECONOMIC DRIVER?

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INDUSTRY NEWS

My hope is that we do well with pushing more business that is in a different sphere than tourism on the Cape.

WHAT ARE THE TOP TWO TOUGHEST CHALLENGES FACING RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY THAT CAN BE ADDRESSED AT THE STATE HOUSE?

Representative Randy Hunt Republican Fifth Barnstable District WHAT ROLE DO YOU THINK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION PLAYS IN THE CAPE’S ECONOMY AND ITS FUTURE? I see residential real estate being in multiple parts these days. One of the things that is really encouraging is a lot of planning boards are taking a closer look at secondary uses and secondary apartments and legitimizing that and taking away regulation that has prevented us as residents from doing that. An accessory dwelling to your primary residence could be one way to keep someone from having to leave that property. And only allowing relatives to use those makes it difficult. You either can’t do it or you drive that business underground, which has been bad for us. So, I think remodelers and builders could see a whole lot of business come out of that.

ABOUT THREE-QUARTERS OF THE PERMITS THAT ARE ISSUED ON THE CAPE ARE FOR REMODELING, WHETHER IT IS A PORCH OR A DECK OR A FULL-BLOWN ADDITION OR A WHOLE HOUSE REMODEL. Yeah. It’s huge. We want to have more economy here that is not 100 percent tied to tourism, which is always going to be our primary calling card. No question about that. But, if you are going to have other industries come in and have the support that these industries bring with it, you are going to need workforce housing. When people start showing up with $70,000 to $125,000 a year jobs for Cape Cod, that will create the demand that will drive the construction of new properties as well as accessory dwellings.

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I definitely think zoning and the inconsistent building regulations are the top two things that are problematic for us. It creates a lot of problems when there is head-butting going on from the standpoint of building regulations; you can build a house here and 150 yards over in the next town you can’t build that house. And somebody wants to know why it costs $20,000 extra to build in a town under stretch code versus another. It’s difficult to manage. I think having a consistent code throughout would be helpful for us.

WHAT OTHER LEGISLATION HAVE YOU BEEN INVOLVED WITH, OR SUPPORTED IN THE PAST, OR ARE INTERESTED IN THAT AFFECTS HOUSING AND BUILDING? I’ve co-sponsored a number of efforts with [Representative] Dave Vieira, who has put forward some bills related to consistency of code regulations. So, I support that. This isn’t my big area of expertise, but I am a pretty smart guy who can latch onto things when people explain them in plain language. And that’s kind of the way the legislature works. We have 200 people and everyone has their thing. I think most people know a lot about a few things and then some about a lot of things. I think that applies to all of us.

YOU ARE ON THE BOARD OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND UTILITIES? Yes. Telecommunications, Utilities and Energy Joint Committee. I’ve served on that since I started in 2011, and I am still on that committee. Therein lies some interesting areas to deal with, such as on the utilities side [and] all the struggles I hear from builders who are trying to get their utilities installed on a timely basis or who have been told ‘not until we get this pipeline built to provide more gas to Dennis and further out.’

WHAT IS YOUR HOPE AND VISION FOR CONSTRUCTION AND HOUSING ON CAPE COD? My hope is that we do well with pushing more business that is in a different sphere than tourism on the Cape. We need diversification. It is such a wonderful place to live. It’s hard to believe that, say, a cadre of young engineers wouldn’t want to wake up on a Saturday and throw their kayak on the roof of their car and kayak through all of the marshes.


It seems like that would be highly attractive to a younger audience, yet we lose the younger crowd because they are pursuing better paying jobs off Cape. The vision, the dream and the hope is that we are able to bring jobs that will keep our younger people, and then that would result in demand for housing and would drive your industry just where you want it to go.

WHAT CAN WE DO TO SUPPORT YOU AND OUR LEGISLATORS UP HERE AT THE STATE HOUSE, AND WHAT IS THE BEST WAY FOR US TO WORK TOGETHER TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE? For an association, feet on the ground are important. It’s one idea to hire a lobbyist firm and have them run around and tell us why we should be voting for a bill, which is fine. It totally has its place. But it is very different, for me, when a few people who are constituents of mine walk into the office and, maybe with a lobbyist or some sort of interest group that has a connection to my district, explain why the changes would make a whole lot of sense for what they do and how it would improve the lot not only of the people who live in my district but across the board, and across the state. That type of activity is fantastic. I love to see that. So the lobbying days are good, and it really is most effective if you have one or two people who visit the legislator who are constituents.

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INDUSTRY NEWS

We need to return to our roots. At the heart of nearly every town on Cape Cod, Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket is a historic, relatively dense, walkable village center.

Senator Julian Cyr Democrat Cape & Islands WHAT ROLE DO YOU THINK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION PLAYS IN THE CAPE’S ECONOMY AND FUTURE? Residential construction is part of the backbone of our region’s economy. Residential construction has and continues to provide some of the best paying jobs for Cape and Islands families. Living on Cape Cod, Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket grows harder with each passing year because of the a lack of affordable housing. It is imperative that all of us in the region partner to develop commonsense solutions that further both production of desperately needed housing and the quality employment that comes with residential construction. With little land left to be developed, a multitude of housing options—multi-family housing, single-family homes on smaller lots, accessory dwelling units and step-down housing—must be allowed to be built to keep Cape and Islands communities vibrant and our workforce strong. The good news is that actively working to retain the next generation of Cape and Islanders also means looking out for the interests of the people that help build our homes and communities.

WHAT DO YOU BELIEVE ARE THE TOP TWO TOUGHEST CHALLENGES FACING THE RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY ON CAPE COD? Two of the most difficult challenges facing the industry are (1) outdated and overly restrictive zoning laws and (2) a lack of housing that is affordable for workers employed in

the construction industry. Restrictive zoning drives up housing prices, inhibits our ability to develop cost-effective infrastructure and forces everyone in our community to accept “one size fits all” housing. Last session, my colleagues in the Senate passed legislation that aimed to modernize zoning. I look forward to working with my Senate colleagues and members of the House to work towards commonsense zoning reform that meets the needs of residents and builders on the Cape and Islands. My friends in residential construction struggle to find reliable help who can stay and work. Workforce in trades and construction wasn’t such a challenge a generation ago. [But] a lack of developable land means that we need more diversity in our housing stock—more multi-unit developments in town centers, accessible housing for seniors and starter homes for young families, including those who work in residential construction and trades. Such a development scheme will allow the Cape and Islands to grow in an environmentally conscious way, meet the housing needs of all families and ensure that residential construction has the workforce it needs.

HOW HAVE YOU ADDRESSED THESE ISSUES? WHAT LEGISLATION HAVE YOU SUPPORTED THAT ADDRESSES THESE ISSUES? AND WHAT HAS BEEN THE RESULT? I am delighted to have been appointed Chair of the Joint Committee on Community Development and Small Business by Senate President Stan Rosenberg. This session, we have comprehensive zoning reform before us and a number of other bills that aim to update outdated zoning laws. I am a co-sponsor of Senator Harriette Chandler’s (D-Worcester) bill, An Act Promoting Housing and Sustainable Development (S81). This bill aims to modernize the state requirements for local zoning bylaws to ensure that every town is doing its share to build the housing our communities need. The bill also gives communities the planning and permitting tools they need to grow in functional locations and curb costly sprawl that degrades our environment and clogs our roads. For the Cape and Islands, this bill would provide a pathway for new residential and commercial construction that couldn’t be built under current zoning.

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INDUSTRY NEWS WHAT CURRENT LEGISLATION THAT AFFECTS CONSTRUCTION AND HOUSING DO YOU SPONSOR AND/OR SUPPORT? AND WHY?

design build remodel property management real estate

While zoning reform is integral to continued housing production on the Cape and Islands, I have also filed two bills that directly address the housing needs of young people and older adults this session. I partnered with the Cape Cod and Islands Realtors Association to draft An Act Authorizing First Time Homebuyer Savings Accounts (S1507), a piece of legislation that aims at making it easier for first-time home buyers to save for their first home. The bill allows any individual to open an account with a financial institution and designate that account, in its entirety, as a first-time homebuyer savings account. I have also filed An Act Relative to the Establishment of a Means-Tested Senior Citizen Property Tax Exemption (S1506). Addressing housing affordability on the Cape and Islands is multifaceted and not just for the young. This bill helps older adults who struggle to afford increasing property taxes on fixed incomes. It creates a local option to allow residential property tax bills to be reduced for taxpayers who already qualify for the existing senior circuit breaker tax credit.

WE’RE NOT JUST BUILDERS. WE’RE BUILDING PARTNERS.

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In addition to these two bills, I have also co-sponsored An Act Financing the Production and Preservation of Housing for Low and Moderate Income Residents (H675) filed by Representative Kevin Honan (D-Boston) in the House and Senator Linda Dorcena Forry (D-Boston) in the Senate. This legislation invests $1.7 billion through the capital budget in affordable housing over five years, providing critical funding to produce, preserve and modernize public and affordable housing in communities across Massachusetts. Lastly, I have been working closely with municipal officials and business leaders to develop new funding sources for the region’s infrastructure needs, primarily wastewater. Wastewater infrastructure remains a huge financial hurdle for our towns (estimated to be a $4 billion problem on Cape Cod, $2 billion on Martha’s Vineyard, and up to $1 billion


on Nantucket). Without investments in wastewater, continued growth and new construction on the Cape and Islands will slow to a halt, and the affordability trends that are driving residents from our communities will persist. We must invest in wastewater infrastructure—and find a responsible way to pay for it—so we can continue to grow and thrive.

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WHAT IS YOUR HOPE AND VISION FOR CONSTRUCTION AND HOUSING ON CAPE COD? We need to return to our roots. At the heart of nearly every town on Cape Cod, Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket is a historic, relatively dense, walkable village center. These village centers have provided opportunities for small business owners and workers. They have promoted connections between neighbors and healthy, active lifestyles. We need to foster further development in existing village centers and potentially create new mixed-use village centers in appropriate areas in Cape and Islands towns. This mode of development has multiple benefits. Having dense areas of housing means you can build more in an area, and be much more cost effective with infrastructure. It can also provide the housing options currently missing from our market—smaller units for young families and seniors looking to downsize. Plus getting folks out on foot not only improves health but also gets cars off our clogged local roads.

HOW CAN HBRACC SUPPORT AND WORK WITH YOU TO GROW THE RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY ON THE CAPE? The Home Builders and Remodelers Association of Cape Cod is an important and influential voice for the region’s economy. I would encourage the HBRACC to work in partnership with all invested parties—towns, business leaders, Realtors, smart-growth advocates, legislators and residents—to support initiatives that will create a fair and balanced housing market while also protecting the fragile environment that is inextricably tied to our coastal economy.

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INDUSTRY NEWS

My hope is that with the renewed emphasis on creating affordable housing all of the affected groups can come together to move forward with actionable steps.

though a qualified employee might be available, they can’t find a place to live that they can afford. Such restrictive zoning causes higher housing prices, causes young people to leave the Cape, and prohibits young people from moving to the Cape and filling much-needed jobs.

Senator Viriato “Vinny” M. deMacedo Republican Plymouth and Barnstable WHAT ROLE DO YOU THINK RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION PLAYS IN THE CAPE’S ECONOMY AND FUTURE? As a small business owner myself, I see and have experienced firsthand the fluctuations in our local economy. And we especially notice the changes when there is a slowdown in the construction trades. When the building and remodeling industry is strong, I notice the increase and consistent caravan of tradesmen and women who come in to gas up, fill up mowers and other machinery, pick up a quick breakfast or snack. I clearly understand that there is so much more the construction trades contribute to the economy than meets the eye. The ripple effect is almost limitless. The small and large business owners not only directly create jobs, but they support many others: lumberyards, nurseries, appliance retailers, plumbers, electricians and the list goes on. When you look at the value of issued permits in any year, it’s around $500 million, but that number is deceiving because that only represents the estimate of the construction to take place. It doesn’t account for all the other consumer goods necessary to finish the job.

WHAT DO YOU BELIEVE ARE THE TOP TWO TOUGHEST CHALLENGES FACING THE RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY ON CAPE COD? Do we really need so much one- and two-acre zoning? So many of your members are in desperate need of employees, and even

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The wastewater is also a primary challenge to building much-needed housing that is affordable for most Cape Codders. Many groups are working on solutions, and federal and state funding is necessary because the cost is far too high for us to bear. So how do we fund regional wastewater? Maybe we can find a way to tap into the large number of visitors, tourists and part-time residents—who all use our precious water resources—to help support a financial resolution to the wastewater issue. Airbnb has already made it clear that they want to be a responsible long-term enterprise in Massachusetts. Is there a way to work with them to be part of the solution?

HOW HAVE YOU ADDRESSED THESE ISSUES? WHAT LEGISLATION HAVE YOU SUPPORTED THAT ADDRESSES THESE ISSUES? AND WHAT HAS BEEN THE RESULT? I believe one of the ways where I have and can continue to make a difference is through meeting with and helping to bring various stakeholders together. We’ve lost the art of communication, negotiation and compromise. I have found that everyone may have a different viewpoint on an issue, such as builders, developers, energy advocates and environmentalists, regulators and municipalities—but if we can get everyone in the same room, a mutually satisfactory agreement is much more possible in a shorter period of time than the partisanship that has taken over much of our political process.

WHAT CURRENT LEGISLATION THAT AFFECTS CONSTRUCTION AND HOUSING DO YOU SPONSOR AND/OR SUPPORT? AND WHY? I certainly support legislation that addresses more reasonable commonsense approaches to zoning, clustering higher density housing zones, and incentives for towns and developers to create housing that is affordable.


WHAT IS YOUR HOPE AND VISION FOR CONSTRUCTION AND HOUSING ON CAPE COD? My hope is that everyone who has the desire to own a home will have that opportunity. We can have mixed-use village centers with more affordable units. My hope is that with the renewed emphasis on creating affordable housing all of the affected groups can come together to move forward with actionable steps.

HOW CAN HBRACC SUPPORT AND WORK WITH YOU TO GROW THE RESIDENTIAL CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY ON THE CAPE? Participation! A lot can be accomplished with the home builders, Realtors, bankers, young professionals, chambers and other civic organizations working together, and by also getting involved in town committees and boards. Also, HBRACC and other groups are the subject matter experts and it’s very important to stay in touch with their legislators to educate and inform us, allowing us to make better decisions.

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TREND REPORT • BUILDING & REMODELING

WHY HOMEOWNERS ARE

CHOOSING TO REMODEL INSTEAD OF BUILD I

f you review current building statistics in regard to building permits issued, you may notice a trend. The data shows significantly more permits for remodeling work than new-home builds. The question is: Why are homeowners choosing to remodel their existing home over building new? The monetary value of all building permits is on the rise for both remodeling and new homes. This is consistent with the rise in building costs in general over the past five to seven years following the recession in late 2007 to mid-2009. Costs of materials and labor have increased steadily during this time, so it makes sense that the overall value of the permits would reflect this pricing trend.

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PHOTO DEN CUTRONA

BY RICHARD FENUCCIO When reviewing building and remodeling permit data issued for the past decade, it is important to understand that building permits are not separated or tracked by category to any high degree of detail. From the local data readily available, all “renovation” building permits are rolled into one big bucket; every window, siding and roofing project goes into the same category as a small or large renovation or addition—which doesn’t necessarily reflect an accurate picture. With that in mind, here’s what I believe is fueling the trend of favoring renovation over building anew.


TREND REPORT • BUILDING & REMODELING MAINTENANCE

NEW HOMES

NUMBER OF BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED

696

440

264

351

354

420

442

495

523

441

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

REMODELS

NUMBER OF BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED

3,822 3,528 3,543 3,870 3,904 4,223 4,047 3,646 3,653 3,874 2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

A huge boom in housing development took place on Cape Cod in the 1980s and 1990s. These houses are now 30-plus years old. As properties get older, it stands to reason that they need more work. While the data is not as granular as to itemize windows, siding and roofing permits, one could infer that a significant portion of the permits are for the replacement of windows, siding and roofing because of the general aging of the structures. Technology, code requirements and general construction practices have come a long way since then. The overall condition of what was built in the 1980s does not usually meet the standards of what is being built today. We’ve seen significant evidence of less than top-quality work from that time period. Along with subpar workmanship, water infiltration stemming from our harsh coastal environment is clearly a contributing factor. Prolonged water infiltration into the exterior envelope of a building compromises many elements of the building structure, and it’s only a matter of time before these elements need repair or replacement. Due to Cape Cod’s weather conditions and the proximity to the ocean, our properties take a lot of abuse. The wind, rain, sleet, snow, wide swings in temperature and the salt environment all affect the longevity of building structures, and inevitably cause corrosion of exposed metal building components (deck hangers, flashings, outdoor lighting, fasteners, etc.). Over time, these conditions contribute to the slow deterioration of building structures. From pressure-treated decks, kitchens, roofing and siding to exterior trim, windows, doors and HVAC systems, many homes built in the 1980s and 1990s are starting to need repairs or upgrades.

Over the past 10 years, the number of remodeling permits issued yearly has far out paced those requested for new builds (above). Except for 2007 and 2014, the total yearly amount spent on remodeling projects has also surpassed new builds (below).

NEW HOMES

MONETARY VALUE OF BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED

$173,831,832

$175,758,466

2010

2011

2012

2013

$160,893,607

$142,766,937

2009

$212,843,936

$140,786,113

2008

$210,444,226

$87,666,770

2007

$169,393,916

$231,839,608

LIFESTYLE CHANGES

2014

2015

2016

REMODELS

2012

2013

$236,885,978

2011

$231,492,910

2010

$199,552,249

$163,327,058

2009

$213,019,719

$147,996,624

2008

$183,110,356

$209,354,469

2007

$168,770,051

$225,236,000

MONETARY VALUE OF BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED

2014

2015

2016

According to a 2013 study by the National Association of Home Builders, a typical singlefamily homeowner will stay approximately 13 years before moving out. As homes change hands, the new occupants may have different lifestyle needs and design preferences. Additionally, the way we live our lives and how we utilize the spaces in our homes is everchanging. We are confronted with many more choices and options at every turn. Whether it’s a home office, exercise room, craft room, mudroom or a family space, we are adapting our homes to meet these new work and lifestyle demands. Cape Cod, with its casual atmosphere and beautiful beaches, has a long history of being a family-friendly gathering place ideal for large get-togethers. This has led to more consideration in remodeling for multi-generational living and creating spaces within existing homes that can serve those needs. This

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TREND REPORT • BUILDING & REMODELING NEW HOMES

NUMBER OF BUILDING PERMITS PER TOWN OVER 10 YEARS

533

Barnstable

301

Bourne

379

Dennis

388 185 536 330 505

Mashpee Orleans Provincetown

Chatham 3,027 Dennis 4,664 Eastham 1,352

Falmouth Harwich

Barnstable 3,837 Brewster 3,242

Chatham Eastham

NUMBER OF BUILDING PERMITS PER TOWN OVER 10 YEARS Bourne 2,017

268

Brewster

REMODELS

186 61

Falmouth 4,263 Harwich 3,308 Mashpee 1,127 Orleans 2,287 Provincetown 1,358

Sandwich

190

Truro

142

Truro 1,207

Wellfleet

161

Wellfleet 1,608

Yarmouth

252

Sandwich 803

Yarmouth 4,010

usually includes a mix of quiet, private spaces and larger, shared ones. More and more we’re seeing clients create individual spaces or suites for adult children and their families. This provides privacy for both the owners and their guests while still incorporating areas for spending time together.

SCARCITY OF LAND Cape Cod has a limited amount of open space. Good, buildable raw land is relatively scarce, and land that allows one to acquire at a reasonable price and build a reasonably sized house while staying within a budget is an ever-increasing challenge. It is not uncommon to see people spend a considerable percentage of their overall budget on just the raw land and consequently come up short on funds for “bricks and sticks.” The regulatory environment presents challenges as well, including undersized lots, septic and wastewater, wetland and setback issues. All of these factors frequently leave property owners with larger than anticipated non-building costs and longer than anticipated design, permitting and construction timelines. In today’s era of instant gratification, homeowners may be surprised by the potentially long time it takes to design, permit and build a new home, and many times they don’t want to deal with such a prolonged process. This can result in a decision to renovate instead so that they can use the house as soon as possible.

FAMILY DYNAMICS Sometimes homeowners outgrow their current space. What may have worked for a family with small children no longer works as well for a family with teenagers or aging, live-in parents. At that point, they may enter the real estate market looking for something to fit their family’s new dynamics, but aren’t satisfied with what is available or can’t find something they like. People who have established roots within their neighborhood and local community find they are attached to their location, neighbors and friends, and aren’t interested in uprooting their family. They may also have a low initial cost basis where the basic financial economics tip the scales towards a “renovate in place,” or renovate with some level of expansion. Additionally, an updated and remodeled home can increase future real estate value. Homeowners may choose to remodel for 22

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themselves but also consider it as an investment in equity upon future sale. A few recent clients tested the sale market and did not achieve the results they were looking for, so they pulled their homes off the market and regrouped around a renovation.

YEAR-ROUND SHIFT Cape Cod has a large population of seasonal cottages, and the majority of these summer retreats were not designed for yearround use. Some don’t include reliable heating or adequate insulation for winter months, or have the original windows, which aren’t insulated. Renovations based on this situation typically include insulation and HVAC upgrades, kitchen, bath and window replacements, and oftentimes an entry redesign to include storm doors and/or mudroom space for inclement weather gear.

DISPOSABLE INCOME Many people move to Cape Cod for their retirement years. They may have spent summers here and have a cottage or are looking to find the right property. Because they are moving from another area, they often have equity from the sale of their previous home, which gives them flexibility in purchasing a new one, but they might not love all of its aspects and want to renovate.

UTILITY CONSCIOUSNESS Rising electric bills, more advanced technology and a higher level of environmental awareness have caused people to think more carefully about the efficiency of windows, doors, exterior wall and attic insulation, appliances, lighting, and heating and cooling systems. Many homeowners now expect homes and equipment to operate at a much more efficient level than they did 20 to 30 years ago. This can translate into window upgrades and exterior envelope improvements. Over the last 10 years or so, solar electric systems have become more efficient, affordable and commonplace on Cape Cod, and each of these improvements requires a building permit. The current building permit data clearly suggests a multiyear increase in remodeling building permits over new home construction. It is reasonably safe to conclude that, given our unique location, the age of our general housing stock, high land cost and increased awareness of higher efficiency building elements that this trend will continue over the long term.


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BUILDING & REMODELING • TREE HOUSES

ADVENTURE, NOSTALGIA AND UNWAVERING FASCINATION—SUCH ARE THE SENTIMENTS PROVOKED BY TREE HOUSES. BY KILEY JACQUES

T

ree houses strike a chord with just about everyone. They ignite imaginations, evoke memories and awaken a feeling of youthfulness. Whether they be boards nailed into the elbow of a tree or an elaborate enterprise designed for full-time living, tree houses are innately magical. For Tim Sawyer, senior associate and project manager with Brown, Lindquist, Fenuccio & Raber Architects (BLF&R), tree houses are multifaceted in their effect. “There’s something neat about being elevated off the ground—having a better vantage point over your surroundings and being more in touch with nature,” he says, noting that tree houses supported solely by trees offer an immediate connection to the natural environment. “They also satisfy childhood dreams . . . building one is a way to make you feel young again.” PYRAMID SCHEMA Sawyer describes BLF&R’s Osterville Village tree house project as an extension of the family’s estate. “We had an opportunity to do something that the kids could take ownership over,” he explains. “It will be a kind of legacy that adds to the family compound, which has been evolving since the late 1800s.” In fact, the tree house was modeled after sheds built by the patriarch, generations earlier. The wide-plank, rough-sawn pine board siding and pyramidal roof are direct references to those existing structures. Because the client wanted the bi-level house to be located in a specific location at the edge of the woods, where viable trees were lacking, Sawyer opted to build a self-supporting structure that works with a chosen tree. The plan was to have the tree come through the peak of the roof. To that end, they put a collar around the tree, set up the scaffolding, positioned the footings and worked from the top down. Since the elevated portion of the house needed to be flexible in order for the tree to sway in the wind, the stilts were built to move with the tree; for the same reason, the ship’s ladder is equipped with wheels so it floats back and forth on the lower platform. Simple in design, the tree house’s character is meant to come from the natural weathering of its materials—which include cedar for the roof and teak for the simulated windows, ladder and decking—in combination with their relationship to the site. The decision to build a bare-bones structure stemmed from a desire to let the kids make it their own by using their imaginations. “[We wanted] to let it evolve into what it may become rather than providing too much predetermined tree house stuff,” explains Sawyer, who envisions the house changing over time. “Everything evolves and there is a story behind everything on the property, including those sheds. Who knows what may evolve from this tree house.”

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BUILDING & REMODELING • TREE HOUSES

Right and left: For a family compound in Osterville, Brown, Lindquist, Fenuccio & Raber Architects built this tree house with a pyramidal roof and wide-plank, rough-sawn pine board, which was modeled after sheds built on the property generations ago.

CIRCULAR WHIMSY Ben LaMora, principal of Lineal Inc. Architects & Builders remembers an Eastham tree house he built for a client whose love for whimsy, painting and her marsh view inspired the project. Picking up on her enthusiasm, LaMora says, “I think the attitude from the beginning was, ‘This is fun and exciting so why not try it?’” Site analysis is a complex stage of the game. It starts with finding trees that measure in accordance with the design program and are the right size for supporting the structure’s estimated weight and expected wind load. In this case, the client had done a lot of scouting beforehand and had determined the location; she also supplied size specifications. LaMora’s team designed the look of it. Interestingly, during the planning phase, all of the trees they chose were healthy. In time, one succumbed to disease and they were forced to replace it with a post, which LaMora says was disappointing. To enable the structure to move with the trees, LaMora used bolts designed for that purpose from Greenwood Engineering. Once they determined the height for the bolts, which is key to making the structure level, they mounted temporary framing for building the exposed beams. With the platform in place, they constructed two curved walls on the ground to hold the shape of the staircase, which was then built between the walls—upon their removal stood the exposed curved stair. Cedar and pine finishing touches and lowmaintenance PVC pipe trim characterize the seating area. Lineal Inc. built this whimsical treehouse for a client who loves to paint.

Such a pleasure was this project that LaMora has undertaken another. “I love tree houses because they can fit right in without disturbing the natural topography,” he says, adding that he anticipates creating something whimsical with a view of an old cranberry bog. AT HOME ON CAPE COD / SPRING SUMMER 2017

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BUILDING & REMODELING • TREE HOUSES

COUNTRY CHARMER For the 2016 Boston Flower & Garden Show Michael Duffany of M. Duffany Builders fashioned a tree house from reclaimed materials. Enthralled with its country charm, a couple from West Falmouth bought it and had it moved to their home. “It really gives their property a nice, warm feeling—it is part of the landscape,” says Duffany. The self-supporting structure is nestled between a group of trees and features a gabled roof, palladian window, weathered cedar shingles, reclaimed boards, window boxes, a balcony and a seating area below—the effect being one of a “tiny house.” Duffany notes a growing trend toward incorporating tree houses into residential settings, and attributes it to the nostalgia people feel for their own childhood tree houses. “It’s like getting a kid a dog because you had a dog—tree houses are the same kind of thing,” he says. He appreciates the “throwback” aspect of tree houses. “Today, so much of that is missing.”

A couple saw this country-inspired, self-supporting tree house built and designed by M. Duffany Builders for the 2016 Boston Flower & Garden Show and couldn’t resist purchasing it for their West Falmouth home.

A wish granted When nine-year-old Connor said it was a tree house he wanted, Make a Wish Foundation Massachusetts and Rhode Island turned to Delphi Construction. “We treated him like we would any client,” explains Ed Smith, Delphi’s director of marketing and communications. “We had a pre-construction meeting to review the list of things he wanted, which included a draw bridge, a climbing area and an archery practice zone.” He also yearned for a place where he and his younger brother could play together. “I thought that was very sweet—the classic image of boys growing up . . . it’s a great reflection of that time of life,” says Smith. The all-volunteer effort was accomplished in a day. “When he left, it was an empty space, and he came home to this sprawling tree house.” Next to Connor, dozens of equally excited kids lined up waiting for the ribbon to be cut and access granted. The magic of this particularly special tree house was felt by all who participated.

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PETE NELSON

PETE NELSON

BUILDING & REMODELING • TREE HOUSES

Becoming a tree house master Pete Nelson, host of Animal Planet’s Treehouse Masters, recalls obsessing as a child over the potential of what he could build. “Those projects typically fell well short of what I had imagined,” he muses. Today, he has more than 350 tree houses to his credit. He has built in Japan, Spain, France, England, Germany and Canada, as well as in 17 states. After 25 years of boring into bark, the ability trees have to compartmentalize wounds continues to impress him. “Trees are so resilient. They don’t heal but they repair themselves,” he says, personifying their response: ‘OK, we’ve got an invasion here, send sap!’” He remembers a time when he worried about being able to find viable trees. “It turns out, there are trees everywhere that make wonderful tree houses.” Where did it all start for Nelson? With “The Swiss Family Robinson,” naturally. “That incredible multi-pod treehouse—that was absolutely the beginning. I just saw myself building those.”

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HOME BUILDING & REMODELING • WOMEN’S ROUND-TABLE DISCUSSION

WOMEN IN BUILDING A Round-table Discussion with Four Professionals Who Are Leading the Way

A

ccording to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, less than 10 percent of workers in the construction industry are women. So we sat down with four talented women in the local building and remodeling field to find out how they got into this industry, what they like best about their jobs and how more women can get into this profession. Here is what they had to say. How did you get into this industry? Did you always want to work in the building and remodeling field? APRIL DUCOTT: Right around middle school, my parents tried to flip a few houses. They had me out there tearing down plaster. I

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lived through a remodel a good chunk of middle school and into early high school. I just always wanted to know what the next step was. How can we get the house done? I knew that I had an interest in it and did a lot of work with my family. I went to a trade school for high school and spent four years doing that. I thought I wanted to be a designer because that is what women do—they’re designers when they are in construction. I went to college and thought I was going to be an architect and quickly realized the first year that it wasn’t for me. So, I started to freak out a little bit until someone said ‘Have you ever heard of construction management?’ And


HOME BUILDING & REMODELING • WOMEN’S ROUND-TABLE DISCUSSION I had never heard of it. It was exactly what I wanted to do, managing the process of construction. AT HOME ON CAPE COD: What appealed to you about managing construction? APRIL: Just getting stuff done! And I really liked the process of it. Just being able to see something on paper and then nine or 10 months later it is actual reality. It’s very gratifying. DEBORAH PAINE: I’ve been designing and building since I was six. It started with my parents. My dad was a Seabee, which is the construction side of the Navy. He was always remodeling the house. So, from a very young age, I picked up a hammer. I was out building forts and sketching houses and the whole nine yards. This is actually my third career. My parents really urged me to have a more conforming job. So, I worked for Mariott Corporation for 10-plus years. I was in restaurant management. I got really burnt out. So, I worked my way into [construction]. I had the opportunity, when I was out in California, to buy my grandparents’ place back on the island in Maine. It needed remodeling, so I jumped right in. I didn’t even know what I was doing. Fortunately, there were some guys around me who could give me advice. A couple of years after that I started my own business. I think I was born to do this on some level. KATHY DEMEYER: For me it was kind of a second career. My husband and I owned a convenience store for 11 years. So, when we sold it I needed a new career. I had been doing bookkeeping for a builder in Brewster, and he said ‘Why don’t you come work for me full time?’ He was definitely my mentor. I ran his business [for nine years]. I left him when I got my construction supervisor license. He had decided he just wanted to do roofing. I’ve been at Encore ever since—14 years. GAIL O’ROURKE: I came into kitchens and cabinets through cabinet-making. About 16 years ago, I decided to be a cabinetmaker. I found someone who hired me in a builder’s cabinetmaker shop and I learned from the ground up. It was just the two of us, so we did kitchen after kitchen. I knew nothing at the start, but I had already found out cabinetmaking was what I wanted to do; it made good use of my talents—math, design, the ability to see things in pieces and parts and work with tools. Later I opened my own business called Hometown Woodworking, where I was a custom cabinetmaker for eight years. And in the slump of 2008 and 2009, I ended up looking for work. And the next few years I ran a custom shop on the Cape as a shop foreman. I worked as a project manager on a multimillion dollar project in Rhode Island, and then I ended up, in a roundabout way, opening a cabinet dealership four years ago that’s now White Wood Kitchens. What do you like best about your job? APRIL: What I like best is that building a house for

somebody is a pretty intimate process. You are involved in bathroom discussions, and how they’ll use their kitchen and through that process you develop a relationship. My favorite part is walking through a house with someone who hasn’t been there for a few months and just seeing their face light up as they see it. Most of the people I build houses for, I have wonderful relationships with—Christmas cards and birthday cards come in the mail many years after we are done. That’s definitely my favorite, that connection you make during that process. I am a people person. DEBORAH: It’s definitely the relationships. It’s funny, I’ve built many new homes and I’ve done a lot of whole house remodeling and additions, and I think the thing that really amps me up the most is—especially in a remodel—figuring it out. We touch some really antique homes and inevitably you always discover something new and different in a house that’s been built 100 years ago. How to capitalize on those things and how to make everything fit and fit well, like it belongs there, is the part of my job I really enjoy the most. And I enjoy my clients. KATHY: I would definitely say that the relationships are right up there. I know sometimes there will be a conflict with someone but for the most part that’s rare. I like that every day is different, and some days are more challenging than others. But just trying to figure out what the best approach is for the build as well as the client, I think that is my favorite part of the day. Every project is different. GAIL: I love collaboration. I love having a problem and sitting down with other designers and the homeowner and saying ‘I don’t have the right answer, but let’s fix this together.’ I love when a client designs their own space. I like really spurring them on to own the projects themselves. And I think we all do that. We don’t walk in and say this is what you’re going to do. We say, ‘How can we help you do what you want to do?’ Have you or are you experiencing any hardships or challenges working in a male-dominated industry? KATHY: There are hardships for women who are in this industry. I think men tend to treat you like a secretary [instead of] an equal. I was elected president of the National Association of Remodelers in Eastern Massachusetts. First woman, but it all came about, of course, when you open your mouth. At a meeting six years ago, when they had all the past presidents standing up, I said to someone, ‘They’re all men.’ Afterward, someone asked me to join the board and I said ‘Yes, I would be interested because I think you guys need a woman’s perspective.’ When I took my construction supervisors license, many years ago, there were almost 3,000 people. And there were three women. I do think [the number of women in construction] is growing, even more than just five years ago. APRIL: When I was in college for construction management, AT HOME ON CAPE COD / SPRING SUMMER 2017

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HOME BUILDING & REMODELING • WOMEN’S ROUND-TABLE DISCUSSION

KATHY DEMEYER, general manager at Encore Design Remodel and first woman president of the Eastern Massachusetts chapter of the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (EM NARI)

APRIL DUCOTT, senior project manager at Cape Associates, Inc.

I was one of probably 400. There were a few others, but they never made it all the way through. In high school, I was the only girl. For me that part was my biggest hardship—high school. KATHY: I am seeing more [women in construction]. NARI and the Home Builders [and Remodelers Association of Cape Cod] did their youth career day last year, and it was really interesting to see how many more girls there were in the trade schools. I thought it was really inspiring to see that there is interest there and that these girls are getting mentored. I think it’s important. I think honestly it is on us to make sure that happens.

GAIL O’ROURKE, cabinetmaker, kitchen designer, project manager and owner of White Wood Kitchens

DEBORAH PAINE, general contractor, president and owner of Deborah Paine, Inc.

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DEBORAH: I was just thinking the same thing. If it doesn’t happen in the workplace, it’s all for naught. So, If you don’t have a culture that is supportive, you’ll never have one. GAIL: I’ve been at the high school level, working with the Plymouth schools for 15 years, and a lot of the people you have to sway are the parents.


HOME BUILDING & REMODELING • WOMEN’S ROUND-TABLE DISCUSSION

KATHY: That’s true! DEBORAH: And there is a certain amount of common sense and nurturing that comes with being a woman in putting this all together. AHCC: Did you have a mentor, Deborah? DEBORAH: I had a couple of guys the first few years I started out that I could talk to, one told me how to use a sawzall—that’s the big joke. But, no, I had to learn on my own. Nobody would talk to me. Really, the guys would not talk to me. There were one or two that would wave and that I actually became friendly with over that period of time. APRIL: It can be isolating. If you could change anything about your job, what would it be? GAIL: Deadlines. Everything would happen when it happened. Right? I will always strive to complete a project. I find satisfaction in completing a project. I just wish it wasn’t on a deadline that is unrealistic. My philosophy is let’s get it done right. Everyone— builders, designers, homeowners—will tend to want to make a poor choice because of a deadline. And that’s a short-term issue and not a long-term solution. KATHY: I would definitely agree that deadlines are huge because, like you say, people make bad choices when they are given a deadline. APRIL: My parents were super supportive with trade school. GAIL: But Plymouth can’t fill its carpentry program, even for boys, because parents don’t think there’s enough money in construction. DEBORAH: Yeah. My parents were the same way 35 years ago. GAIL: It’s the parents you have to convince. And being a successful woman in construction is important for the parents to see. Construction management is this whole big field that no one knows about. I started my master’s at Roger Williams in construction management. I didn’t finish, but I looked everywhere for a master’s program and there are just so few. It’s still new. DEBORAH: I haven’t experienced hardships. I have 33 years in this industry. But I’ve also made sure that I have the answers before they ask the question. And then there’s that whole thing about being prepared and being confident. I think that helps a lot in my everyday life. If nothing else, I think it’s been an asset being a woman contractor. I really do. The wife tends to like having an ally.

DEBORAH: The thing I wish I could change is, I wish there were more resources for help on the lower Cape. Hiring qualified people on any level in my business is almost impossible, whether it is a carpenter or a carpenter’s helper, construction manager, architect, doesn’t matter. It is the lack of help and the lack of affordable housing that is limiting and makes everything so much harder. GAIL: So, it’s hard to hit the deadlines. (Laughs) No, but really, the client wants it done sooner and I’ve got one tile guy serving 40 builders on the Cape. APRIL: I’m a full-time mom of two young children and a full-time employee. And I’d like for there to be just a few more hours a day to get everything done. And, yes, finding people to take over some of the responsibilities that we need help with. And, I’d like to see more women doing this. I think women are naturally good at planning, organizing and communicating. The construction part can be scary but it’s easy to learn. The other parts you can’t easily learn. How do you see yourself in three years? Are you planning an expansion and growth? GAIL: We are opening a second location, so we are growing. In Falmouth. It’s hot-off-the-press news. Very exciting. And then my longer-term retirement goal is to develop a training program over

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HOME BUILDING & REMODELING the next 10 years, so that I can bring people up with a real training program for the kitchen design business. I’m going to spend my 15 minutes a year developing that. (Laughs) APRIL: Is it a mentoring program for younger kids? GAIL: I think it will evolve, but I think some of it will take the mystery out of what kitchen design is and working in the building industry and the methodology of working with a client and dealing with contractors, subcontractors and vendors. You can go to school for interior design but you aren’t going to learn kitchen design. It’s very different. So, it’s how to be a dedicated subcontractor: How you get hired back, how you get referrals. DEBORAH: The actual training for your line of work is you learn as you go. You can either learn the right way or the bad way. I think being a good, dedicated subcontractor and understanding that math is so important and putting a level on the job when you are designing are all things that are not taught. And I think it would be wonderful. I really think it needs to happen. KATHY: I am pretty much running Encore right now. The owner is stepping back. I don’t see it changing a lot. Yes, my NARI affiliation and getting more involved with the Home Builders [and Remodelers Association of Cape Cod], and trying to mentor trade school people. We’d like to start a program at Encore too, to bring on interns. DEBORAH: Probably still doing what I am doing. I am trying to slowly build up the cabinet business a little bit because I really enjoy it. We do mostly construction and it will probably stay mostly construction. APRIL: So for me, as a dedicated employee of Cape Associates, I plan on being right where I am now. My littlest ones will be in school full time and I’ll have maybe a little extra time to do more community stuff. Maybe get involved with some of the town boards.

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Do you have any advice for women who are interested in getting into the construction trade? KATHY: Be prepared to work hard. I think trade schools are a fantastic opportunity for a lot of kids. Not everyone needs to go to college. And if they feel they need to go to college, they can go into the construction management program. I think they need to be self-assured. GAIL: It is not a sit-behind-a-desk kind of a job. DEBORAH: It’s a really fun job. I think anyone entering this profession needs to have their own sense of self and be confident. If you are insecure at all, I think you are just inviting the pack to feed on you, and it will happen. And I think you have to be willing to make mistakes because you will make mistakes all the time. And I think you have to be patient. It takes 10 years to master something, so they say. So it will take 10 years to feel halfway confident, if not longer, in this industry. I learn something new every day, even now. And you have to really like people because it is all about relationships.

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APRIL: Don’t be afraid to ask questions and get as much information as you can. Talk to as many people as possible and be a sponge, and don’t be afraid to get your hands dirty. You have to get out into the field, sweep those floors, and experience what is going on around you to get a look inside. GAIL: My only advice is to find the industry, don’t find the job. So, if construction is your industry, just get into construction. Get any job because you don’t know what you are good at until you are doing it. When I found cabinetmaking, I knew it was the industry that I wanted to be in. Construction is the industry I wanted to be in, and it was a relief to have found my industry.

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BRIAN VANDEN BRINK

HOME BUILDING & REMODELING • DESIGNING FOR GUESTS

The do’s of designing guest accommodations.

BRIAN VANDEN BRINK

Designed by Polhemus Savery DaSilva, the Hen House is a 512-square-foot guest house with a small kitchenette and lower level sleeping accommodations that sleeps four.

B Y C A R O LY N S H A N L E Y

N

Pool tables, pinball machines and other recreational amenities are popular requests for guest spaces, says Susan Gerlach, a longtime designer at Encore Design Remodel in Dennisport and Sudbury. Bunk rooms are also a ‘do’ when designing sleeping space. “Outdoor space is also important to clients,” Gerlach reports, as well as patios and pergolas where everyone can socialize together.

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BRIAN VANDEN BRINK

othing says welcome to family and friends like a separate guest space just for them. On Cape Cod, some homeowners have taken guest quarters to a new level. “People tend to get a lot of guests on Cape Cod,” says John DaSilva, design principal at Polhemus Savery DaSilva, an integrated architecture and construction firm. “Many settle or retire here because they want to be in a place where their extended family loves to come. It is an added incentive if they can give them great accommodations.”


HOME BUILDING & REMODELING • DESIGNING FOR GUESTS Gathering rooms ideal for entertaining open to a series of decks and patios at an oceanfront home built by Sea-Dar Construction.

Many settle or retire here because they want to be in a place where their extended family loves to come. It is an added incentive if they can give them great accommodations. — JOHN DASILVA, DESIGN PRINCIPAL AT POLHEMUS SAVERY DASILVA

GREG PREMRU

According to DaSilva, a successful design for guest quarters should incorporate great natural light, a connection to any scenic view, social and private spaces and reflect the owner’s lifestyle and individual aesthetic. “Functional issues are not, however, secondary,” he points out. “Successful design comes from discussion between the designer and client; thoughtful analysis; and synthesizing often competing aesthetic, programmatic and regulatory needs.” There are no hard and fast rules for designing guest accommodations except adhering to what local zoning allows. “Guest quarters are a temporary place to stay and are used seasonally for the most part, although the trend is to have heat and air conditioning

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GREG PREMRU

HOME BUILDING & REMODELING • DESIGNING FOR GUESTS

The oceanfront home built by Sea-Dar Construction includes a main house with plenty of open space for entertaining, a guest house, a pool and a T-shaped garage.

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for those cool spring and fall days,” observes Gerlach. Clients need to consider how many people can legally sleep in the space, which differs from town to town on Cape Cod. Who will actually use the space is also important to the design. “Clients like to build attached guest quarters for adult guests and detached for young adults or college-age visitors,” she says. But both types of guest spaces should have separate, private entrances. Not all homeowners can build guest quarters, however, especially detached, explains Joe Regan, director of development at Sea-Dar, a construction firm with offices in Boston, Manhattan and Osterville. “It is really hard to get these things through,” he says. “The biggest ‘do’ when planning guest quarters is to hire a professional who knows exactly what the rules are in each town. Most property owners on the Cape have half-acre lots or less and don’t have the acreage required.”


HOME BUILDING & REMODELING • DESIGNING FOR GUESTS

GREG PREMRU

A close-up of the guest house built by Sea-Dar Construction.

Guest accommodations built on Cape Cod often involve tearing down existing structures and rebuilding, says Gerlach. The structure must stay within the original footprint unless a special permit or variance is given to go outside the footprint. “You can only do so much with the space you have,” Gerlach explains, adding: “The best looking guest quarters are whatever fits best on the land and complements the existing buildings.” The structure should also try to match key features of the main house, such as shutters, roof shingles and wood trims, says Gerlach. Regan, whose firm Sea-Dar recently completed “Bay Haven,” a large project in Hyannisport, says the overall percentage of a structure’s footprint to land plot is another consideration that differs from town to town. Bay Haven, which replaced an older residence with a 5,300-square-foot main house, detached garage, pool and guest quarters on the same lot, was built after very careful planning. “Seeking out the right professionals is time well spent,” Regan says. “We have some of the finest minds in the business on Cape Cod. Talk to them. You could go in thinking one thing and come out with a whole new perspective on the project.”

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MARKETPLACE

Innovative Products for the Home

Two-pronged Solution

Catching a Lift Keep your kitchen appliances close at hand and your counters clutter free with a motorized Touchstone Whisper Lift II. Ideal for big, bulky, hard-to-reach appliances, the Whisper Lift will quickly and quietly lower or raise kitchen essentials to counter level at the push of a button. The lift is made of steel, includes a remote control and can be used in a pop-up or dropdown application. Available at TouchstoneHomeProducts.com

Smart and Efficient Upgrade your electrical outlets with a SnapPower Charger cover plate. Not your ordinary wall plate, this easy-to-install design includes a built-in, low-profile USB port that requires no batteries or wires. Just pop the plate into place and secure with a single screw. With a built-in USB port, the wall plate frees up electrical outlets that might have otherwise been used to charge a USB device, like your smartphone or tablet. Available in white, light almond and ivory. Price: $20, single wall plate. Snappower.com

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In addition to protecting your home, a locked window is three times more energy efficient than an unlocked one. With Andersen’s VeriLock® integrated wireless security sensors, homeowners can not only check if windows and doors are open or closed but also if they’re locked or unlocked by using a smartphone or tablet and a self-monitoring provider, such as Honeywell or ADT Security. For a sleek look, the electronic sensors are integrated into the hardware. VeriLock® is compatible with Andersen E-Series, A-Series and 400 Series windows and doors as well as 200 Series gliding patio doors. Available in five colors: stone, white, black, gold dust and taupe gray. Andersenwindows.com


Perfecting the art of building and restoration since 1971.

architect: b architecture studio

www.capeassociates.com 508.255.1770

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MARKETPLACE

The Right Light A new lighting fixture can transform a room as dramatically as a whole new suite of furniture, and it’s a lot more affordable. But actually doing it can be a hassle and best left for a professional. Now, with Safety Quick Light, switching your style is fast and easy—you don’t even need to hire an electrician. This patented, quick-connect device replaces the conventional support bar currently found on light and fan fixtures. It can be used in the installation of ceiling fans as well as lighting fixtures, whether a pendant, a chandelier or a flush mount. It’s as easy as plugging in a lamp and just as safe. Safetyquicklight.com

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The Jet Age In these days of automated everything, it was only a matter of time before the eyesore of an overflowing laundry basket became a thing of the past. Now, with Laundry Jet, the first modern, on-demand wholehome vacuum laundry delivery system, the chore of schlepping soiled clothes and towels is replaced by just the touch of a button. Almost magically, dirty laundry from anywhere in the house is zipped away to wherever your washer and dryer are located, even if it’s a floor or two above you. Laundry Jet is designed for any sized home or number of rooms and ports, and being modular, it’s perfect for your own home’s specific layout. Laundry-jet.com

Outdoor Shower Power Quick and easy, you can build your own outdoor shower in three hours or less with a kit made by Stonewood Products. All you need is a drill gun and a level. Basic kits come with instructions, TimberLOK® screws, walls, posts and a door; complete kits also include post caps and a floor with lattice panels available as an additional option. Outdoor shower kits, which can be attached to the home or assembled as a freestanding structure, are offered in three sizes: 4 feet by 4 feet, 4 feet by 6 feet, and 4 feet by 8 feet. Pricing starts at $899. Available at Stonewood Products, Harwich; 508-430-5020: stonewoodproducts.com.

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BUILDING COMMUNITY • BEACON MARINE

STRIKING GOLD WITH WATERFRONT INFRASTRUCTURE Childhood friends band together to run Beacon Marine Construction. BY BILL O’NEILL

B

eacon Marine Construction acquired Gillmore Marine Contracting two years ago, but Beacon’s roots go much further back. The three principals were childhood friends growing up on Cape Cod.

Jon Hagenstein says his longtime bonds with Chris Hagerty and Matt Bourque have helped the company thrive, but even more important has been the team he inherited from Gillmore Marine. “We are lucky to have the talent that we have,” says Hagenstein. “Three of the guys were with the previous owner for over 20 years and a fourth was with him for over a decade.” RETAINING THE RIGHT TALENT Beacon Marine builds waterfront infrastructure, including docks, piers, seawalls and revetments, and also provides dredging and barge services and does beach nourishment and dune stabilization. “Through the years, they’ve seen it all and done it all,” says Hagenstein of his staff. “They know all the tricks. Every pier they’ve ever built, they know what tool to bring when we do our annual service or what little surprise each one has that we need to be prepared for. Otherwise you’d have to run back to the shop for something. That saves a lot of time, keeps us efficient and keeps us productive throughout the day.” Since the company’s jobs vary in type and size, requiring different equipment and different expertise, it helps to have a staff with a range of skills. “We don’t just have a guy who is an operator or a laborer,” says Hagenstein. “Everybody wears every hat. We have a machine operator who’s a carpenter and can weld on steel and aluminum and move boats around.” He adds that finding people with such a mix of skills is difficult. Hagenstein focuses on sales and marketing, Hagerty directs operations, and Bourque is a crane operator and licensed captain. “We bring our own skill sets to the table as owners,” he says. HOW IT ALL BEGAN Hagenstein met Bourque growing up in Sandwich and Hagerty, who grew up in Osterville, was a family friend. As teenagers, Hagenstein and Bourque worked summers at the Chatham home of Jay Cashman, a marine contractor whose company is based in Quincy. Cashman hired them when they graduated from college. Bourque ran cranes and tugboats up and down the eastern seaboard, while Hagenstein worked on business development. “One of the projects that came across my desk was to go mining and dredging for gold in the Bering Sea in Nome, Alaska, kind of like the TV show,” he says. Hagenstein put together a business plan and helped create a partnership with an Alaska company. Hagerty, who had been working for a custom home builder in Osterville, joined his old friends for two summers in Alaska. “Ultimately it wasn’t a successful venture but we got an incredible learning experience,” says Hagenstein. “It gave us the confidence that we could work well together.” 42

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A private dock in Osterville was dredged to accommodate the four-and-a-half-foot draft of a large sportfish boat.


BUILDING COMMUNITY • BEACON MARINE

Beacon Marine built a beautiful residential pier made of ipe wood for a waterfront property in Osterville.

A few years later, the three decided to form their own marine construction business. They also reached out to George Gillmore, to see if he was interested in selling his company. Hagenstein said it made sense to go that route. Instead of building from scratch, they’d have a client list, the appropriate equipment and the intellectual capital of the employees. “Everyone stayed with us,” Hagenstein says of the staff (five full-time and one part-time). “They appear to be pretty happy and we hang out after work sometimes and we have a good company culture.” CARVING OUT A NICHE Waterfront infrastructure can be anything from a stone seawall to a timber pier to pile foundations for houses on the waterfront. Beacon builds many new structures, but also has a steady business in rebuilding old piers and seawalls. “The ocean is an extreme environment,” says Hagenstein. “It eats away at things and it tears away at things.” Another of Beacon’s specialties is dredging boatslips or channels for homeowners. Often they then use the dredged material to renourish the homeowner’s beach, a job for the company’s excavators, front-end loaders and other land-based equipment. “We’re dealing with a clientele that’s very smart with their money,” he says. “They see the value in spending money to protect their property or to increase the value of their property.” Hagenstein is grateful for the support the new owners have found from homebuilders and others in the business community. “Nobody ever looked at us as mid-20-year-old kids and turned the other way because they didn’t take us seriously. “We’re excited to take the reputation of a great local contractor and build upon it. In a short period of time, we’ve been able to build a sound reputation for good quality. We haven’t had a single disgruntled customer yet. That’s what we’re the most proud of.”

Beacon Marine’s talented team, from left to right: Jon Hagenstein, Jimmy Perry, Michael Whiteley, David Eldredge, George Paquette, Matt Bourque, Scott Hanson, Akeem McPherson, and Chris Hagerty.

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HB&RACC • BUILDING SERIES Permit coordinators like Bowden look at the following, and much more depending on the project and the town. We’ve only included one item to consider under each bullet point, but there could be several more: CURRENT ZONING • Are your plans to build, add on or remodel allowed by your town, and in that specific zone? TOWN HEALTH DEPARTMENT • Are you adding bedrooms, bathrooms, or increasing waterflow and septic use? HISTORICAL BOARD • According to Bowden, even a simple window replacement in a Historical District has to be reviewed. SETBACKS, LOT COVERAGE, OLD VARIANCES • Some properties are in zones that do not allow for expansion of bedrooms or even the footprint of the house.

What Goes into Building a House? Conquering the Permitting Process

W

hether you are contemplating building a new home or renovating an existing one, the decision starts the same way: Your home no longer meets your functional or aesthetic needs. But where do you begin?

There are many steps in the building and remodeling process. In this six-part series, we will explore the typical stages of building or remodeling a home, with a behind-the-scenes look at how builders and other trade professionals manage the ins and outs of a home project from start to glorious finish. This list is meant to be a guideline, some steps happen simultaneously, others last longer than others and some may be reversed, but it is our hope that this will paint a picture of the overall process. A LOOK AT THE PERMITTING PROCESS The first step, after selecting the right builder or remodeler, is permitting. Many builders and architects have permitting experts and experienced project managers on staff or may contract with a permitting consultant to assist in the process, and sometimes the builder will handle permitting on their own. Jean Bowden, production assistant and permit coordinator with Capizzi Home Improvement, handles all the pre-project research and filings for all of Capizzi’s projects. Every project is different and permitting can be a very complex, confusing and time-consuming process. Here are just a few of the things permitting experts must research and clarify before the project can move forward. 44

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FIRE CODE SAFETY • In many cases the fire department gets involved to sign off on smoke detector placements. CONSERVATION COMMISSION • Is your project in a flood zone? If so, what are the restrictions? How extensive are your building or renovation plans? REGISTRY OF DEEDS • Is there a clear title? WATER DEPARTMENT • Is there town water? Will you have to upgrade? SEPTIC • Is there a septic or cesspool? What will it take to upgrade? BUILDING CODE & ENERGY CODE • Are there any additional costs for your projects in order to make it conform to codes? WIND/COASTAL CONSIDERATION • What is required if your property is within a certain distance of the coast? UTILITIES • Is your property in a gas moratorium area? PERMIT EXPIRATION • Was a permit issued for the property/project years ago? Is it still in effect? LAND SURVEY/EASEMENTS • Confirm your legal lot lines and setbacks. CAN YOU BUILD DURING SUMMER MONTHS, HOURS?


HB&RACC • BUILDING SERIES

CHOOSE OUR AWARD-WINNING TEAM TO LEAD THE WAY

MONETARY VALUE OF BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED

$56,018,922

January - April 2017

$48,304,016

January - April 2016

Permits for the Cape Cod area saw an upward trend in the first four months of 2017 in both the number of permits issued and the total monetary value.

NUMBER OF BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED Outstanding Engineering Project Cape Cod Bible Alliance Church

153

138 • Site Development

January - April 2017

• Stormwater Management

January - April 2016

• I/A Wastewater Treatment

It’s not only structural projects that need research and permits. In many cases new or replacement roofing, siding, windows, room remodels, decks/porches, etc. are subject to review and town approval and inspections. This permitting process has many steps, takes time and is ongoing throughout the project. Most Cape towns do not have electronic forms and systems at this time. Permitting is a necessary step in the building and remodeling process, one that is rarely noticed by homeowners. Builders and permit coordinators spend many hours on paperwork, checklists, copying reams of required documents and blueprints, meetings, hearings, traveling, waiting and following up before receiving a building permit. Upfront planning and research is imperative as is good communication with your builder—all of which will increase the likelihood of a smooth project from beginning to end.

• Environmental Permitting • Land Use Planning • Waterfront Infrastructure • Shorefront Protection • Building Technologies • Specialty Structures • Historic Preservation Orleans | Sandwich | Nantucket 508.255.6511 coastalengineeringcompany.com

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HOME IMPROVEMENT • GUTTER SYSTEMS

GUTTER GUIDELINES What style, size and material is right for you? B Y R E B E C C A M AY E R K N U T S E N

A QUICK LOOK AT THE ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF THE FIVE MOST POPULAR GUTTER MATERIALS:

COPPER Pros: Attractive, pairs well with cedar roofs Cons: Expensive, prone to theft, cannot mix with aluminum

ALUMINUM

FIBERGLASS

Pros: Cost-effective and efficient, doesn’t crack, low maintenance

Pros: Low maintenance, attractive, holds more rainwater than traditional gutters

Cons: Can dent if a branch hits it, cannot mix with copper

VINYL

WOOD

Pros: Most affordable, easy for DIYers

Pros: Aesthetically pleasing because it fits in with wood trim

Cons: can become brittle and crack, sold in sections that are susceptible to leaks, not very functional 46

.

Cons: Different quality levels available, pricey

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Cons: High maintenance, doesn’t hold a lot of water and quality of wood sold can be inferior


HOME MAINTENANCE • GUTTER SYSTEMS

D

uring a major rainstorm, a home’s roof-water conductors kick into high gear. Otherwise known as gutters, these hardworking vessels come in a variety of materials, shapes and sizes. Three experts familiar with needs specific to Cape Cod and the surrounding areas share a few pointers to help guide those in the market for new or replacement gutters.

WEIGHING MATERIAL OPTIONS Selecting the right material for your gutter system depends on a variety of factors, including cost, durability and aesthetics. Gutters often get our attention when something goes wrong— such as when the system clogs or a section becomes detached from the home’s exterior. But according to Russ Allen, business manager at the Fiberglass Gutter Company in Pembroke, Massachusetts, the gutter is an important part of a home’s appearance and trim. “It’s not purely functional, though that’s what many people think,” he says. Many of the older homes on Cape Cod were outfitted with wood gutters. “Although attractive, they require regular coatings of linseed oil and paint, and must be cleaned at least once a year,” explains Tony Pola, project consultant at Capizzi Home Improvement in Cotuit, Massachusetts. When replacing gutters in some historic districts, homeowners are required to use wood or fiberglass gutters designed to replicate the knots and grains of real wood. Although, gelcoated fiberglass gutters are easy to maintain and complement the aesthetics of the home’s exterior. Aluminum wins the most common gutter material title on Cape Cod, lauded for its durability and price point. “Seamless aluminum gutters installed by professionals are often the best option,” Pola says. “But homeowners should be sure the system is held with the proper fasteners to prevent it from pulling off the building.” Matthew Hunter, manager of Aluminum Products of Cape Cod in Dennisport, Massachusetts, also sings aluminum’s praises for its long-lasting and low-maintenance exterior finish. “A properly installed system can last 30 to 40 years in some cases,” he says.

SELECTING THE GUTTER’S SIZE AND STYLE When it comes to gutters, it turns out size does matter. And one of the best indicators of gutter size is the type of material used on the roof. “Cape Cod roofs are primarily white cedar so water flies off of them and needs a landing point,” Allen shares. In addition to the material comprising the roof, a gutter’s size also depends on how steep the roof is and its square footage. According to Hunter, the standard five-inch K-style gutter can handle most roofs on Cape Cod. “Some of the newer homes have more roof and valleys that require a six-inch gutter because it can hold more water,” he explains. Whatever size and style gutter is chosen, Hunter advises homeowners and builders to turn to a professional when installing or replacing a gutter system. “The advent of seamless gutters means homeowners won’t have to worry about leaks and breakage,” he explains. “Gutters are sold in sections at bigbox stores but we use 55-foot runs with no joints.”

KEEPING GUTTERS FUNCTIONING PROPERLY Though the task doesn’t rank high on anyone’s to-do list, proper cleaning of gutters is critical. “I tell my customers that no gutter or gutter protection system is maintenance free,” Pola says. He recommends cleaning each element a minimum of once a year. If the home is surrounded by trees, then two or more times a year will likely be needed. Although aluminum cannot escape the regular cleaning requirement, its popularity has soared because of its longlasting exterior finish that requires no painting. Hunter recommends periodically cleaning with soap and water or a non-abrasive alternative to prevent surface scratches. Ice dams—which occur when an ice ridge forms on the roof’s edge and prevents the drainage of melting snow—have become more of a concern on the Cape in the last few years. Pola cautions homeowners to keep an eye on snow build-up and be aware of upcoming melting and freezing cycles. “Ice dams can happen with and without gutters,” Hunter says. “The gutter area tends to be the least insulated part of house. Keeping the roof clear is the best advice I have.”

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LANDSCAPE • FENCES

ON THE FENCE HOW TO SELECT THE BEST ENCLOSURE FOR YOUR YARD

B Y C O L L E E N S H I E L D S, O U T S I D E S A L E S R E P R E S E N TAT I V E F O R A .B. S. F E N C E , I N C.

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hoosing a fence for your yard can be challenging. There are many things to take into consideration that will determine the utility, price, longevity and overall look of your fence. As an outside sales representative for A.B.S. Fence, Inc. in Wareham, I always ask my customers “what is the goal of the fence?” Are you looking for a full enclosure to keep dogs and kids inside the yard? Are you looking to add privacy or curb appeal? Finding the answer to these questions can help reveal what fence material would be the most appropriate. CHAIN LINK Let’s start with the most economical option: chain link. Chain link is a cost-effective way to create a large enclosure. Typically I recommend a coated, galvanized fence product, usually in black. A black chain-link fence will blend in with surroundings and is a great option if you have a view to preserve or are not looking for privacy. WOOD AND VINYL For those who are looking to add privacy or enhance curb appeal,

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I recommend wood or vinyl, both of which are versatile in appearance and have a wide range of price points. When choosing between the two materials, customers value aesthetic and ease of maintenance over price. A vinyl fence is low maintenance, but a cedar fence is no maintenance. A vinyl fence needs to be cleaned periodically to maintain its pristine look. While the vinyl will not rot due to algae and mold, they can certainly make your vinyl fence unsightly. Cedar fence, on the other hand, is naturally decay resistant, and can last upwards of 15 or 20 years without any maintenance. It also ages to an attractive silver color, and is typically visibly unaffected by algae or mold, if given the opportunity to dry in the sun occasionally. Other wood species, such as spruce, tend to last half as long as cedar. If you like the look of a white or colored fence, I would stick with vinyl because wood fences require periodic repainting. FENCE TYPES The least expensive privacy option for wood and vinyl fence products is obviously the most basic: For wood, it’s a stockade fence with pointy pickets and for vinyl that means the typical


plain white wall fence you see in large sub developments. If you are looking for something more decorative, there are options out there, but some of them can run you upwards of $200 a panel, not including posts or labor needed to install the fence. If you are looking for containment without privacy, or to add some “jewelry” to your home, a vinyl or wood picket is a nice choice. Traditionally a picket fence is more cost effective than a privacy wall. If you are looking for that white picket fence style, I would always recommend vinyl (as long as it complies with your homeowners’ association or historic district regulations.) There are many different styles of vinyl and wood picket fence, and they can run the gamut price-wise. If you are looking for a simple spaced picket (a short stockade fence with spaces between each one-bythree picket), wood is more affordable. There is also an anodized aluminum fence product, which is commonly mislabeled these days as “wrought iron.” Aluminum is a great look for a pool, or a property with a more “estate” feel. When you get into products like a shadow-box or baluster fence (with square pickets rather than flat pickets) wood can get expensive because parts can be labor intensive to create. Vinyl fences, however, are cheap and easy to make and come in any color you desire, eliminating the maintenance of painting your fence. Fencing is much more expensive than people assume, and its not uncommon to see customers experiencing sticker shock. It’s also not uncommon for them to get several other proposals that are all right around the same number. Usually the skeptical customer is much more receptive once they realize our price is in line with the competition. When not in line with our competition, it is important to make sure we are quoting comparable products and measurements and comparing apples to apples. If I lose a job over price, I like to help customers understand exactly what they are getting. We are a professional company that will stand by our work and our products, return phone calls, and get the work completed in a timely fashion for the agreed-on price. Bio: Colleen Shields is an outside sales representative for A.B.S. Fence Inc. in Wareham, Mass., a full-service fence company that builds cedar fence panels and sells highquality Activeyards vinyl and aluminum fences, as well as offers fence design and installation services.

AT HOME ON CAPE COD / SPRING SUMMER 2017

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PRODUCTS & SERVICES • INSURANCE

SIGNING ON THE DOTTED LINE

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW BEFORE CHOOSING AN INSURANCE POLICY FOR YOUR HOME OR RENTAL. B Y R E B E C C A M AY E R K N U T S E N

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ettling on insurance coverage is unlikely to top anyone’s list of favorite activities, but that doesn’t make the task any less important. Whether a tree smashes the shiny new station wagon parked in the driveway during a windstorm or a burglar has taken off with grandma’s silver, homeowners are subject to potential calamities on a daily basis. Well-crafted insurance policies can ease stress and minimize bank account withdrawals in the event of a catastrophe. When it comes to selecting coverage for a new or existing home, the options and the terminology can be overwhelming. Finding an agent who listens to the client’s individual needs—including associated assets and how they are used—is an important first step and one that’s critical to writing an appropriate policy, says Dave Nommensen, sales executive with Rogers and Gray

Insurance Agency in Hyannis, Massachusetts. According to John Curley, an insurance producer with Dowling & O’Neil Insurance Agency, in Hyannis, Massachusetts, homeowners tend to focus solely on premium numbers and not what is covered under the various policies. “Buying based on price alone is a mistake,” he remarks, cautioning homeowners to steer clear of insurance quotes that seem too good to be true.

INSURANCE ISSUES UNIQUE TO CAPE COD A fair number of insurance claims processed on Cape Cod occur because of wind damage. One common scenario is a heavy rainstorm that switches to a windy, wet snowstorm. “Tree roots are saturated from the rain and can become uprooted by wind quite easily,” Curley explains. “Incidents involving pipe breaks and fires are also a concern on the Cape, but wind is by far the biggest culprit of property loss.”

INSURANCE: WHAT TO DO & WHAT NOT TO DO

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Carefully weigh the policy’s cost and coverage

Select a policy with your checkbook

Discuss all needs with a qualified professional

Disregard the input of a qualified insurance professional

Customize the coverage to suit individual needs

Assume that certain scenarios are covered

Prioritize the coverage that’s most important

Put the policy in a drawer and forget about it

SPRING SUMMER 2017 / AT HOME ON CAPE COD


PRODUCTS & SERVICES Policies often cover wind damage but those not written properly can have sky-high deductibles. The result? The out-of-pocket expenses quickly reach thousands of dollars when a storm strikes, often to the homeowner’s surprise. Curley recommends his clients review their homeowner’s policies to become familiar with coverage limits and deductibles before an event occurs. Understanding how your policy works in certain scenarios can save big headaches in the case of a catastrophe. “Insurance policies are a transfer of risk,” Nommensen explains. “Hopefully you’ll never need it, but if you do, then you need it to respond correctly.”

Customized porch enclosures manufactured here on Cape Cod with three generations of experience and service.

FINDING THE RIGHT COVERAGE An umbrella policy is one of the best values in the industry, according to Nommensen. A $1 million umbrella for a new home and two cars, he explains, can cost the homeowner as little as $155 a year. Aptly named, the umbrella hovers over all other policies and waits there in the case of a major issue. “The mechanism is in place to keep you from catastrophic loss of your assets,” he says. “It’s inexpensive but offers a tremendous amount of coverage.”

CALL FOR A FREE ESTIMATE OR VISIT OUR SHOWROOM

Household changes can affect the level of coverage needed from one year to the next so it’s important to regularly review the policy. Endorsements—or changes to the policy’s deductibles or terms—can be made anytime. As a rule of thumb for homeowners, Curley recommends annual policy reviews and scheduling agent meetings every three years to ensure the Weatherpanels coverage meets current needs.

Porch Enclosures

Savvy homeowners also might want to shop around for the best insurance company to suit their particular needs. Smaller agencies may be somewhat limited on what they can offer their clients. With a more expansive menu of options, larger agencies are generally able to find a carrier to write policies in different ways, Curley shares.

FORGOING RENTER’S INSURANCE IS A MISTAKE You may have heard this common scenario: “My family is renting a house for six to eight months while our primary home undergoes a major renovation. Do I need renter’s insurance?” The answer is a collective “yes” from insurance agents everywhere. A renter’s insurance policy is affordable and easy to obtain, covering liability, the rental property and the renter’s personal belongings. “For a couple hundred dollars, you can have peace of mind and the coverage you need,” Curley explains. In addition to protecting personal belongings and the rental property, an insurance policy covers liability outside the home. “Imagine you play a round of golf on a sunny Saturday morning, and your ball smashes a window in someone’s house. A liability policy covers the cost so you don’t have to pay out of pocket,” Curley explains. “Your insurance policy follows you around and is always with you.”

Sliding Windows Screens

Aluminum Products of Cape Cod

476 Rte. 28, Dennisport

508-398-8546

www.apofcc.com

Est. 1962

Customized porch enclosures manufactured here on Cape Cod with three generations of experience and service.

Call for a free estimate or visit our showroom today!

Aluminum Products of Cape Cod 476 Route 28, Dennisport, MA 508.398.8546 I www.apofcc.com

Porch Enclosures I Weatherpanels I Sliding Windows I Screens AT HOME ON CAPE COD / SPRING SUMMER 2017

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BUILDING COMMUNITY • GIVING BACK

Cape Cod businesses team up with local high school students for a community art project. BY ROB DUCA

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hen students from Sturgis East Charter Public School in Hyannis embarked on a project to reclaim a discarded sailboard and transform it into a work of art, the Cape Cod business community came together to turn their concept into a reality.

Coastal Engineering worked with the students, local artists and businesses, volunteering their time and expertise to produce a set of certified plans for a foundation that met building code standards. There were also numerous other contributions from local businesses and artists. A1A Steel of East Falmouth manufactured the sailboard’s support beam, Maffei Landscaping of Mashpee installed the sonotube before filling it with concrete, and Orleans sculptor Syd Ahlstrom gave the metal beam a sleek finish before leading the install process. “The local businesses love being part of something that is important to the community,” says Clare O’Connor, director of economic initiatives for the Cape Cod Chamber of Commerce. “They could not have been more gracious in donating their time. These local businesses are so invested because they want things done right. Everybody is thrilled with the result.” The sailboard is one of four pro bono projects that Coastal Engineering has undertaken in recent years. They also supplied design plans for the “Tides” sculpture off South Street in Hyannis, the “Whale” sculpture off Cove Road in Orleans, and the “Nature Frames” sculpture, which will soon be on display in front of the Barnstable Court Building in Barnstable Village. The sculptures are a part of the Creative Placemaking project, partially funded by the Massachusetts Cultural Council Adams Arts Program, which is aimed at revitalizing communities, creating jobs, growing creative industries, and increasing engagement in cultural activities by Massachusetts residents and visitors. “We think it’s important to support the arts and cultural activities in the community,” says John Bologna, president and CEO of Coastal Engineering. “Engineers are not typically associated with art endeavors, but there is a lot of creativity in the kind of work that we do, so this is a good way to express that. I have artists in my family and I’ve always had an affinity toward the creative arts. Science and art are complementary; one is a function of the cerebral and analytical, while the other deals more in the realm of human emotions. But both come together quite nicely. So, when we have a chance to show our creative side by working with local artists on these community projects, we’re happy to do that. And these projects are a lot of fun.” Sturgis East students donated their time after school and on weekends to create the sailboard, working on the illustrations, painting, gluing and finishing touches. They collaborated with local artists Steve Swain of The Frying Pan Gallery in Wellfleet, Steven Kemp of Kemp Pottery in Orleans and artist Sarah Holl of West Yarmouth, under the guidance of Ann Forget, their art teacher. “Coastal Engineering gave us their time and knowledge, showing us how we can keep this sailboard from flying away,” Forget says. 52

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Inspired by a discarded 12-foot sailboard found on the beach, Sturgis East Charter Public School students seized the opportunity to transform their fortuitous find into a public sculpture to raise awareness for environmental conservation.

A group photo taken at the unveiling ceremony.

“So many people came together to make this project happen. The students had this sailboard that was wrecked and they thought, What can we do with this to make it into something that the community would like to see? It was nice for the students to see something through from start to finish. It was a great team-building experience.” The multi-colored sailboard features a blue-green background that evokes images of the ocean, and displays a mermaid, a fisherman, a seal, abstract waves, Cape Cod at sunset and various other species of fish. Thanks to Holl’s method of layering opalescent paper over paint, the board sparkles in the light. “Arts are pivotal to enlivening an area and making businesses more [attracted] to that space,” says Ben Hughes, who worked on the project as the creative economy projects manager for the Cape Cod Chamber. “Look at the revitalized areas that have used public art; those areas are a draw for businesses.” This year, Sturgis students paraded past the sculpture during graduation ceremonies. “They love seeing their artwork and knowing that this piece of art will always be there,” says Forget. And it never would have come to fruition without the efforts of Cape Cod’s business community. “I don’t hesitate to ask local businesses to take on these types of projects because I know they are happy to do it. It was always done with a smile. There was a great sense of cooperation all along the line,” says the chamber’s O’Connor. “People should understand that what local businesses bring to the community is critical in keeping our community healthy, vibrant and beautiful.” AT HOME ON CAPE COD / SPRING SUMMER 2017

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HOME IMPROVEMENT • ENERGY SAVER 101

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HOME IMPROVEMENT • ENERGY SAVER 101

AT HOME ON CAPE COD / SPRING SUMMER 2017

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AS OF MAY 7, 2017 ACCOUNTING thru BUILDING MATERIALS SUPPLIER

RESOURCE GUIDE PG CATEGORY 56 56 56 56 56 56

Accounting Alarms & Security Appliances   Architectural Design & Build   Attorney  Audio/Video/Home Theater & Technology  56 Auto/ Trucks 56 Banking/Lending  56-57 Building Materials Supplier 57 Building Mover  57-59 Building/Remodeling/ Home Improvement  59 Closets/Organizers  59 Concrete/Aggregate   59 Consultant/Business Management  59-60 Disaster Emergency/ Flood & Smoke 60 Education/School   60 Electrical Contractor  60 Embroidery 60 Engineering/Surveying  60 Excavation 60 Fences/Railings/Pergolas  60 Flooring/Wood Floors/ Carpeting  60 Foundations/Basements  60 Garage Doors/Openers 60 Generator Sales & Service  60 Granite/Stone/Marble 60 Green Products/Solar 60 Gutters  60 HVAC/Electric/Plumbing 60 Insulation  60 Insurance/Title  60 Interior Design  60 Kitchen & Bath Design  60 Landscape Design & Build  60 Marketing/Publishing  60 Masonry/Paving/Stonework  60 Metal Work 60 Millwork/Lumber 60 Miscellaneous  62 Non-Profit  62 Painting Interior/Exterior  62 Photography  62 Pools  62 Propane/Gas/Fuel  62 Real Estate Sales  62 Tile  62 Tools  62 Truck/Truck Products 62 Utilities  62 Waste Disposal  62 Waterproofing  62 Well Drilling  62 Window Blinds/ Shades/Shutters  62 Windows/ Skylights/ Doors 62 Woodworking & Carpentry 

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RESOURCE DIRECTORY GUIDE CAPECODBUILDERS.ORG

ACCOUNTING CLIFTON LARSON ALLEN LLP James Pratt 700 Pleasant St. Third Floor New Bedford, MA. 02740 (508) 990-1368 claconnect.com LOGIE CPA Gary Logie 724 Main St., Unit F Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 771-0329 logiecpa.com ALARMS & SECURITY ALARM NEW ENGLAND Chris Connors 22 Whites Path South Yarmouth, MA. 02664 (860) 616-7568 alarmnewengland.com APPLIANCES CRANE APPLIANCE Ken Leblanc 249 Teaticket Highway East Falmouth, MA. 02536 (508) 548-8179 craneappliance.com FERGUSON ENTERPRISES Greg Wills 106 Falmouth Road Mashpee, MA. 02649-2744 (508) 539-8704 ferguson.com KAM Kevin Gralton 201 Yarmouth Road Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 771-2221 kamonline.com MIELE, INC. Christopher Pike 555 Washington St. Wellesley, MA. 02482 (781) 591-1878 mieleusa.com ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN & BUILD AI ENTERPRISES, INC. Peter Pometti PO Box 2056 Cotuit, MA. 02635-2056 (508) 428-4219 aienterprisesinc.com BROWN LINDQUIST FENUCCIO & RABER ARCHITECTS INC Kurt Raber 203 Willow St., Suite A Yarmouth Port, MA. 02675 (508) 362-8382 capearchitects.com COTUIT BAY DESIGN, LLC Steven Cook 43 Brewster Road Mashpee, MA. 02649-2923 (508) 274-1166 cotuitbaydesign.com D. MICHAEL COLLINS ARCHITECTS Michael Collins 1383 Rte 28A Cataumet, MA. 02534 (508) 651-7099 dmcarch.com DANIEL LEWIS AIA, ARCHITECT Daniel Lewis 269 South Main St. Centerville, MA. 02632 (508) 612-8771 daniellewisarchitect.com

HUTKER ARCHITECTS INC - FALMOUTH Tom McNeill 533 Palmer Ave. Falmouth, MA. 02540 (508) 540-0048 hutkerarchitects.com

LAW OFFICES OF WARREN H BRODIE PC Warren Brodie 2 Salt Hay Road East Falmouth, MA. 02536 (774) 763-2951

HUTKER ARCHITECTS INC VINEYARD HAVEN Gregory Ehrman PO Box 2347 79 Beach Road Vineyard Haven, MA. 02568 (508) 693-3344 hutkerarchitects.com

AUDIO/VIDEO/HOME THEATER & TECHNOLOGY ADVANCED COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES, INC. Paul Diggin 62 Ledgewood Place Rockland, MA. 02370 (781) 741-5959 actces.com

INTEGRATA ARCHITECTURE + CONSTRUCTION LLC Andrew Borgese 419 Palmer Ave, Suite 200 Falmouth, MA. 02540 (508) 495-6575 integrata-ac.com

AUDIO VIDEO DESIGN Rob Henry 383 University Ave. Westwood, MA. 02090 (617) 965-4600 avdesigns.com

LDA ARCHITECTURE & INTERIORS, LLP Kyle Sheffield 919 Main St Osterville, MA. 02655 (617) 621-1455 lda-architects.com LINEAL CONSTRUCTION INC Ben LaMora PO Box 1118 Barnstable, MA. 02630-2118 (508) 275-7512 linealinc.com NICHOLAEFF ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN Doreve Nicholaeff 891 Main St. Osterville, MA. 02655 (508) 420-5298 nicholaeff.com PATRICK AHEARN ARCHITECT LLC Patrick Ahearn 160 Commonwealth Ave. Suite L3 Boston, MA. 02116 (617) 266-1710 patrickahearn.com PETER MCDONALD ARCHITECTS, LLC Peter McDonald P.O. Box 888 North Eastham, MA. 02651 (508) 240-0843 capecodarch.com POLHEMUS SAVERY DASILVA ARCHITECTS BUILDERS Peter Polhemus 157 Brewster-Chatham Road (Route 137) East Harwich, MA. 02645 (508) 945-4500 psdab.com SALT ARCHITECTURE, INC. Chris Harris 116 Highland Avenue North Falmouth, MA. 02556 (508) 560-9903 saltarchitecture.com SIEMASKO + VERBRIDGE Katelyn Grooms 403 Main Street Chatham, MA. 02633 (508) 348-5485 svdesign.com ATTORNEY FREEMAN LAW GROUP LLC Peter Freeman 86 Willow St. Yarmouth Port, MA. 02675 (508) 362-4700 freemanlawgroup.com

SPRING SUMMER 2017 / AT HOME ON CAPE COD

NANTUCKET SOUND Jim Roberts 491 Iyannough Road Airport Rotary Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 771-4434 nantucketsound.com RON SNELL AUDIO VIDEO Ron Snell 27 Pinehurst Dr. Bourne, MA. 02532 (508) 989-8112 rsavs.com TECHNICAL OPERATIONS AND DEVELOPMENT Kristine Fernandes 30 Perseverance Way, Unit 6 Hyannis, MA. 02601 (866) 316-8623 toadallyawesome.us WOW MEDIA Luis Rodriguez 81 Carey St. Somerset, MA. 02725 (781) 964-9044 wowmediaht.com AUTO/TRUCKS MARTY’S CHEVROLET Erika Pikor 420 Macarthur Blvd. Bourne, MA. 02532 (508) 417-8675 martyschevrolet.com BANKING/LENDING CAPE COD FIVE CENT SAVINGS BANK Terry Walther P O Box 10 / 19 West Road Orleans, MA. 02653 (508) 247-2125 capecodfive.com EASTERN BANK Rana Murphy 375 Iyannough Road Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 923-2466 easternbank.com FIRST CITIZENS’ FEDERAL CREDIT UNION John Cotton 66 Falmouth Road Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 979-4707 firstcitizens.org MARTHA’S VINEYARD SAVINGS BANK Jason Mead 1379 Rt 28a Catuamet, MA. 02632 (774) 310-2038 mvbank.com

MURRAY & MACDONALD INSURANCE SERVICES Gabriel DeSouza 550 MacArthur Blvd. Bourne, MA. 02532 (508) 289-4126 riskadvice.com ROCKLAND TRUST Mark Sexton 442 Main St Hyannis, MA 02601 (508) 778-7375 rocklandtrust.com SANTANDER Timothy Brown PO Box 2151 Vineyard Haven, MA. 02568 (508) 696-4400 santander.us THE COOPERATIVE BANK OF CAPE COD Christina Bologna 25 Benjamin Franklin Way Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 568-3400 mycapecodbank.com BUILDING MATERIALS SUPPLIER 84 LUMBER Tony Frias 54 High St. Holbrook, MA. 02343 (508) 837-0882 84lumber.com A.W. HASTINGS Barry Sturgis 138 Lakeview Dr. Centerville, MA. 02632 (860) 745-0333 awhastings.com BEACON SALES CO INC Lionel Larivee 96 Lombard Ave. West Barnstable, MA. 02668 (508) 362-7109 beaconsales.com BOSTON CEDAR Garry Prevedini 80 Hampden Road Mansfield, MA. 02048 (508) 851-3300 bostoncedar.com BOTELLO HOME CENTER Stephen Botello 26 Bowdoin Road / Route 28 Mashpee, MA. 02649 (508) 477-3132 botellolumber.com BROCKWAY SMITH CO George Green 35 Upton Dr. Wilmington, MA. 01887 (978) 475-7100 brosco.com CAPE COD BRASS & SECURITY HARDWARE, INC. Alan Goode 1180 Route 28, #28 South Yarmouth, MA. 02664-4463 (508) 394-2300 capecodbrass.com DRYWALL MASONRY SUPPLY Kristen Cronan 277 Whites Path South Yarmouth, MA. 02664-1217 (508) 398-4100 drywallmasonrysupplies.com FALMOUTH LUMBER COMPANY 670 Teaticket Highway East Falmouth, MA. 02536-5846 (508) 548-6868 falmouthlumber.com


RESOURCE GUIDE

BUILDING MATERIALS SUPPLIER thru BUILDING/REMODELING/HOME IMPROVEMENT FIBERON Seth Aronson 81 Vernon St. Waltham, MA. 02453 (508) 918-5068 fiberondecking.com GULF EAGLE SUPPLY Richard Rose 181 Queen Anne Road Harwich, MA. 02645 (508) 432-4200 gulfeaglesupply.com HENRY Joe Burgoyne 3 Harmon Road Waltham, MA. 02452 (781) 316-6975 henry.com HUBER ENGINEERED WOODS Andrew Collins 258 West Road Ashby, MA. 01431 (978) 400-1941 huber.com METRIE MOULDING Mark Grant 425 Whitney St. Northborough, MA. 01532 (508) 393-9959 metrie.com MID CAPE HOME CENTERS Jack Stevenson 465 Route 134 South Dennis, MA. 02660-1418 (508) 398-6071 midcape.net PARKSITE Richard Herald 10 Rose Glen Dr. Andover, MA. 01810 (603) 397-7123 parksite.com PREMIUM PLYWOOD & SPECIALTIES Michael Whitelaw 700 Bearses Way Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 771-7590 premiumply.com ROYAL BUILDING PRODUCTS Zane Swanepoel 52 Westcliff Dr. Plymouth, MA. 02360 (508) 735-3375 royalbuildingproducts.com SHEPLEY WOOD PRODUCTS, INC. Tony Shepley 216 Thornton Dr. Hyannis, MA. 02601-8103 (508) 862-6200 shepleywood.com SIMON’S SUPPLY CO. Sue Sidney 586 Higgins Crowell Road West Yarmouth, MA. 02673 (508) 775-0740 simonsupply.com SNOW AND JONES, INC. Danielle Jones 167 White’s Path South Yarmouth, MA. 02664 (508) 394-0911 snowandjones.com SPECIALTY BUILDERS SUPPLY, INC. Christopher Dias 59 Commerce Park Road Brewster, MA. 02631 (508) 896-8866 sbscapecod.com STONEWOOD PRODUCTS Anthony Baroni 15 Great Western Road Harwich, MA. 02645-2312 (508) 430-5020 stonewoodproducts.com

TAYLOR FOREST PRODUCTS, INC Len Taylor 765 Washington St. Pembroke, MA. 02359 (800) 837-7480 taylorforest.com THE WOOD LUMBER COMPANY Dana Miskell 81 Locust St. Falmouth, MA. 02540 (508) 548-3154 woodlumbercompany.com TRIMBOARD, INC. David Townsend 983 Page Blvd., Suite 2 Springfield, MA. 01104-1636 (413) 575-4455 trimboard.net

BALTIC COMPANY, INC Linas Revinskas 87 Camp Opechee Road Centerville, MA. 02632 (774) 228-3462 balticcompany.com

BARNES CUSTOM BUILDERS Charles Barnes 580B North Falmouth Highway North Falmouth, MA. 02556 (508) 776-6294 barnescustom.com

VERSATEX TRIMBOARD Kris Fornuto 7 South Pond Dr. Coventry, RI. 02816 (401) 585-7176 versatex.com

BAYSIDE BUILDING, INC. Brian Dacey P.O. Box 95 Centerville, MA. 02632 (508) 771-1040 baysidebuilding.com

BUILDING MOVER HAYDEN BUILDING MOVERS INC Robert Hayden P.O. Box 496 Cotuit, MA. 02635 (508) 428-6380

BAYSWATER DEVELOPMENT, LLC Joseph Colasuonno 20 Red Brook Road Mashpee, MA. 02649 (508) 539-8255 newseabury.com

BUILDING/REMODELING/ HOME IMPROVEMENT A F HULTIN & CO INC Art Hultin PO Box 504 11 Lawrence Way North Truro, MA. 02652 (508) 487-1651 arthultin.com

BEACON MARINE CONSTRUCTION LLC Jon Hagenstein 37 Bowdoin Road Mashpee, MA. 02649 (508) 477-7880 beaconmarineco.com

ALUMINUM PRODUCTS OF CAPE COD Matthew Hunter 476 Main St. Dennisport, MA. 02639 (508) 398-8546 apofcc.com ANDERSON FRAMING & REMODELING Matthew Anderson 241 Route 6A East Sandwich, MA. 02537 (508) 367-4653 anderson-framing.com ANDREW A FLAKE, INC. Andrew Flake 80 Iroquois Ave. Vineyard Haven, MA. 02568 (508) 693-3340 andrewaflakeinc.com

CAPEWIDE CONSTRUCTION Joao Junqueira 759 Falmouth Rd Unit #4 Mashpee, MA 02649 (508) 477-0353 capewideconstruction.com

BANNON CUSTOM BUILDERS Paul Bannon 2 Tupper Road Sandwich, MA. 02563 (508) 833-0050 bannonbuilds.com

UNILOCK Scott Benson 35 Commerce Dr. Uxbridge, MA. 01569 (781) 389-5375 unilock.com

A&A BUILDING AND REMODELING Artak Sahakyan 17 Balfour Ln., Unit K Chatham, MA. 02633 (508) 348-0065 aabuildingremodelingllc.com

CAPEBUILT DEVELOPMENT Rob Brennan 11 Chestnut St. Suite M-304 Amesbury, MA. 01913 (617) 233-4897 heritagesands.com

BADERA HOME BUILDERS Jim Badera P O Box 1113 North Eastham, MA. 02651 (508) 737-0047

CAPIZZI HOME IMPROVEMENT Thomas Capizzi 1645 Newtown Road Cotuit, MA. 02635-2512 (508) 428-9518 capizzihome.com CARSON CONSTRUCTION LLC Chris Carson PO Box 1326 Brewster, MA. 02631 (508) 237-4110 carsonconstructionsite.com CATALDO CUSTOM BUILDERS INC. Ralph Cataldo 172 E Falmouth Hwy East Falmouth, MA. 02536 (508) 548-1133 cataldobuilders.com CENTER LINE INSTALLATIONS AND REMODELING Stephen Mathias 304 Strawberry Hill Road Centerville, MA. 02632 (508) 737-0103 CHAPPY LLC Warren Dalton PO Box 1051 28 Blue Shutters Ln. North Falmouth, MA. 02556 (508) 560-9910 chappyllc.com

BENGER CONSTRUCTION Kevin Benger 143 Pond View Dr. Brewster, MA. 02631 (508) 385-2858 bengerconstruction.com

CHARLES W. BOSTON CONSTRUCTION LLC Charles Boston 173 Audrey’s Ln. Marstons Mills, MA. 02648 (774) 521-3358 cwboston.com

BILEK BUILDERS LLC Christopher Bilek 975 Main St. South Harwich, MA. 02661 (508) 945-0018 bilekbuilders.com

CROCKER ENTERPRISES LTD James Crocker 68 Wianno Ave. Osterville, MA. 02655 (508) 428-1951 wiannorealty.com CUDDY BUILDING & DEVEL CO Paul Cuddy 81 Captain Bearse Ln. Harwich, MA. 02645 (508) 432-4323 CUSTOM CRAFTED HOMES Jeff Baroni 64 Christmas Way South Yarmouth, MA. 02664 (508) 648-1432 customcraftedcc.com DALE C. DAVIES Dale Davies 23 Newtown Road Sandwich, MA. 02563 (508) 428-6916 dalecdavies.com DAVENPORT BUILDING COMPANY Christian Davenport 20 North Main St South Yarmouth, MA. 02664 (508) 398-2293 thedavenportcompanies.com DAVID COX INC. David Cox PO Box 401 South Yarmouth, MA. 02664 (508) 962-5289 drcinc87.webs.com DEBORAH PAINE INC Deborah Paine PO Box 272 Provincetown, MA. 02657 (508) 349-9100 dpicc.com DELPHI CONSTRUCTION, INC. Tom Howes 17 Cape Drive Mashpee, MA. 02649 (508) 815-5555 delphiconstruction.com DONALD BAKER JR BUILDER Donald Baker P O Box 1216 Dennis, MA. 02638 (508) 385-8222

BILODEAU BUILDERS INC. Peter Bilodeau 83 Bunker Hill Road Osterville, MA. 02655 (508) 362-0550

CJ RILEY BUILDER, INC Craig Riley 10B Wianno Ave. Osterville, MA. 02655 (508) 428-6376 cjriley.com

E B NORRIS & SON Craig Ashworth 138 Osterville-West Barnstable Road Osterville, MA. 02655 (508) 428-1165 ebnorris.com

BRIAN W SHANAHAN COMPANY Brian Shanahan 32 Goff Terrace Centerville, MA. 02632 (508) 360-3567 brianwshanahan.com

CLEARY CONSTRUCTION Richard Cleary PO Box 900 Brewster, MA. 02631-0900 (508) 896-5558 clearyconstructioninc.com

E J JAXTIMER BUILDER INC E.J. Jaxtimer 48 Rosary Ln. Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 771-4498 jaxtimer.com

COASTAL HOME CONSTRUCTION, LLC Ernie Johnson 18 Barlee Way Dennis, MA. 02638 (508) 385-3751 capebusiness.com

EASTWARD COMPANIES BUSINESS TRUST Bill Marsh 155 Crowell Road Chatham, MA. 02633 (508) 945-2300 eastwardco.com

COLONIAL REPRODUCTIONS, INC. Norman Rankow 140 Cooke St. Edgartown, MA. 02539 (508) 627-5100 colonial-reproductions.com

EH SPENCER & CO LLC Matthew Spencer 71 Enterprise Dr / POB 116 Chatham, MA. 02633 (508) 945-4222 spencerandcompany.net

C.H. NEWTON BUILDERS, INC. Ryan Newton 549 West Falmouth Hwy / PO Box 399 West Falmouth, MA. 02574 AP KIMBALL CONSTRUCTION (508) 548-1353 chnewton.com Peter Kimball 84 Homers Dock Rd CAPE ASSOCIATES, INC. Yarmouth Port, MA. 02675 Matt Cole (508) 737-1258 345 Massasoit Road apkimballconstruction.com PO Box 1858 North Eastham, MA. 02651 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN (508) 255-1770 INC. AD BUILD LLC capeassociates.com John Ingwersen 62 Route 6A CAPE DREAMS BUILDING & Orleans, MA. 02653 DESIGN, LLC (508) 255-0606 Paul van Steensel ad-archts.com PO Box 801 B.L. MOSHER CONSTRUCTION 21 Eli Rogers Road South Orleans, MA. 02662 Bert Mosher (508) 255-1291 P.O. Box 1131 capedreamsbd.com South Dennis, MA. 02660 (508) 364-6554 blmosherconstruction.com

CREGG SWEENEY, LLC ARTISAN BUILDERS Cregg Sweeney P.O. Box 203 South Orleans, MA. 02662 (508) 255-1967 csartisanbuilders.com

ENCORE CONSTRUCTION Dale Nikula 103 Main Street Dennisport, MA. 02639 (508) 760-6900 encoreco.com

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GEIGER-PHILLIPS INC Steven Phillips PO Box 1456 39 Briar Lane Wellfleet, MA. 02667-1456 (508) 349-9543 geiger-phillips.com GEORGE DAVIS, INC. FINE BUILDING & FINISH INC. George Davis 33 N Main St Stephen Klug South Yarmouth, MA. 02664-3145 79 Mid Tech Dr., Unit D (508) 394-0832 West Yarmouth, MA. 02673 georgedavisinc.com (508) 240-4286 finebuildingandfinish.com GOOD BUILDERS INC / COLECHESTER FINELLI BUILDING INC. DEVELOPERS INC. Thomas Finelli Stephen Good 172 Middle Road 171 Chester St. Southborough, MA. 01772 North Falmouth, MA. 02556 (508) 460-6963 (508) 563-1858 finellibuildinginc.com goodbuildersinc.com FORE & AFT INC. GOOD LIFE NEW Larry Brutti PO Box 92 ENGLAND LLC Harwich Port, MA. 02646 Glenn Meader (508) 432-1076 132 Front St. #202 foreandaftinc.com Scituate, MA. 02066 (781) 545-1500 goodlifenewengland.com FRASER CONSTRUCTION LLC GRAHAM LLC Dean Fraser Chris Graham 31 Bowdoin Road 66 Brant Way Mashpee, MA. 02649 Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 428-2292 (508) 778-1461 fraserconstructioncapecod.com grahamllc.net GABLE BUILDING CORP GREG CLANCY James Gable 1291 Main St. CONSTRUCTION, INC. Chatham, MA. 02633 Greg Clancy (508) 945-4002 68F Nicoletta’s Way gablebuilding.com Mashpee, MA. 02649 (508) 265-4911 clancyconstruction.org GC CUSTOM BUILDERS INC Glenn Crafts 259 Great Western Road South Dennis, MA. 02660-3749 (508) 394-1612 gccustombuilders.com FALCONEIRI CONSTRUCTION INC Matthew Falconeiri 88 West Grove Middleboro, MA. 02346 (508) 947-3226 fcinc.com

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HALF CAPE CONSTRUCTION, INC. Steve Ottani P.O. Box 1050 Sandwich, MA. 02563-1050 (508) 888-4831 halfcapeconstruction.com

JC DONALD COMPANY, INC. Donald Connelly 167 Route 6A Orleans, MA. 02653 (508) 255-9804 jcdonald.com

HALLIDAY BUILDERS, INC Jim Halliday 44 Route 28A Pocasset, MA. 02559 (508) 563-6600 hallidaybuilders.com

JIM GRONSKI CONSTRUCTION Jim Gronski PO Box 167 / 14 Aunt Zilpas Road West Chatham, MA. 02669 (717) 870-6683 jimgronskiconstruction.com

HANDREN BROS BUILDERS, INC. John Handren P.O. Box 10 Harwich, MA. 02645 (508) 432-2047 handrenbros.com

KENDALL AND WELCH CONSTRUCTION Ron Welch 32 Wianno Ave. Osterville, MA. 02655-0490 (508) 428-4900 kendallandwelch.com

HELIOS CONSTRUCTION Ron Bonvie 23 Southport Dr. Mashpee, MA. 02649 (508) 539-1110 southportoncapecod.com/ development-team/

KENNETH VONA CONSTRUCTION, INC. Jon Fox 11 Fox Road Waltham, MA. 02451 (781) 890-5599 kenvona.com

IKARIA DEVELOPMENT Timothy Howes 36 High Street Dartmouth, MA. 02748 (508) 878-4727 ikarialiving.com

KENT & VAN HOLLEBEKE CONSTRUCTION INC, Jared Kent 552 MacArthur Blvd., Suite 4 Bourne, MA. 02532 (508) 759-0354 kvhconstruction.com

J.J. DELANEY, INC. Jack Delaney 20 Rascally Rabbit Road, #2 Marstons Mills, MA. 02648 (508) 420-6855 jjdelaneyinc.com

LAUREN F STAPLETON RENOVATIONS LLC Lauren Stapleton 414 Phinney’s Ln. Centerville, MA. 02632 (508) 932-5900

LEESIDE CONSTRUCTION CO., INC. Gary Lee 16 Giddiah Hill Road Orleans, MA. 02653 (508) 255-8885 leeside.com LEMIEUX CONSTRUCTION INC. Philip LeMieux 40 Pleasant Bay Road Harwich, MA. 02645 (508) 274-7871 LIGHTSHIP HOMES Bob Landry POB 897 / 9 Cedar Hill Road East Dennis, MA. 02641 (508) 385-8595 lightshiphomes.com M. DUFFANY BUILDERS Michael Duffany 200 Palmer Ave. Falmouth, MA. 02540 (508) 540-3625 x15 duffanybuilders.com M.J. NARDONE BUILDING AND REMODELING Mike Nardone 299 Whites Path South Yarmouth, MA. 02664 (508) 771-9927 mjnardone.com MACALLISTER BUILDING, INC Mark Macallister 64 Ebenezer Road Osterville, MA. 02655 (508) 428-6408 macallisterbuilding.com


RESOURCE GUIDE

BUILDING/REMODELING/HOME IMPROVEMENT thru DISASTER EMERGENCY/FLOOD & SMOKE MACKENZIE BROTHERS CORP Glenn Mackenzie 214 Cotuit Rd Marstons Mills, MA. 02648 (508) 420-4424 mackenziebrothers.com MATT SCAVARELLI REMODELING & FINISH CARPENTRY Matthew Scavarelli 274 Ames Way Centerville, MA. 02632 (508) 776-9698 MATT YORK CONSTRUCTION INC. Matthew York PO Box 826 / 29 Crestview Dr East Sandwich, MA. 02537 (774) 200-1889 yorkbuildingcapecod.com MCPHEE ASSOCIATES OF CAPE COD Rob McPhee 1382 Rte 134 / PO Box 799 East Dennis, MA. 02641 (508) 385-2704 mcpheeassociatesinc.com

PATRIOT BUILDERS, INC. Christopher Childs 537 Route 28 Harwich Port, MA. 02646 (508) 430-0771 patriotbuilders.com PAUL J CAZEAULT & SONS INC James Cazeault 1031 Main St. Osterville, MA. 02655 (508) 428-1177 cazeault.com PETER EASTMAN, CUSTOM BUILDER Peter Eastman 144 Fisk St West Dennis, MA. 02670 (508) 430-7911 petereastmanbuilder.com PINSONNEAULT BUILDERS Michael Lahart 541 Thomas B Landers Road East Falmouth, MA. 02536 (508) 477-1835 pinsbuilders.com

ROGERS & MARNEY BUILDERS INC Gary Souza 445 Osterville West Barnstable Road Osterville, MA. 02655 (508) 428-6106 rogersandmarneybuilders.com RYLEY CONSTRUCTION LLC John Ryley P O Box 1444 Duxbury, MA. 02331 (401) 484-2315 ryleyconstruction.com SCOTT E. CROSBY BUILDER, INC. Scott Crosby 1112 Main St. #7 Osterville, MA. 02655-1566 (508) 428-9090 scottcrosbybuilder.com

THOR CONSTRUCTION Thor Baum 20 Ryder Court Wellfleet, MA. 02667 (508) 237-7262

SEA-DAR CONSTRUCTION John Kruse 2957 Falmouth Road Osterville, MA. 02655 (617) 423-0870 seadar.com

MIKE SMITH BUILDING & REMODELING INC. Mike Smith P.O. Box 2792 Orleans, MA. 02653 (508) 255-1573 caperemodeling.com

PRIME PROPERTIES LTD PARTNERSHIP Kenneth Marsters 509 Falmouth Road Mashpee, MA. 02649-0001 (508) 477-4444 primehomesandrealty.com

SHEPLEY WOOD ESTIMATING DEPT Elizabeth Kovach 216 Thornton Dr. Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 862-6224 shepleywood.com

MILLER STARBUCK CONSTRUCTION Andy Tricca 766 Falmouth Road Unit D-20 Mashpee, MA. 02649 (508) 539-1124 millerstarbuck.com

R.W. ANDERSON & SONS, INC. CUSTOM BUILDERS Rick Anderson 6 Willow St. Sandwich, MA. 02563 (508) 888-5720 rwanderson.com

SKYLINE HOMES John Largey 140B Massasoit Road Eastham, MA. 02642 (508) 237-1662 skylinehomescapecod.com

MULLEN BUILDING & REMODELING LLC Douglas Mullen P O Box 1274 Marston Mills, MA. 02648 (508) 737-3249 mullenbuilding.com NAUSET CARPENTERS, INC. Stephen Curley P.O. Box 412 South Wellfleet, MA. 02663 (508) 349-9845 NORDY’S CONSTRUCTION, INC. David Nordberg P.O. Box 660 South Yarmouth, MA. 02664 (508) 760-1114 nordysconstruction.com OMAN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY Eric Oman 28 Oxbow Way Dennis, MA. 02638 (508) 385-7699 P.L.F. CONSTRUCTION INC. Paul Francis 251 Tonset Road Orleans, MA. 02653 (508) 237-3051 plfconstruction.com PADGETT BUILDERS INC Rob Padgett PO Box 133 Cotuit, MA. 02635 (508) 428-0001 padgettbuilders.com

REEF CAPE COD’S HOME BUILDER Matthew Teague P.O. Box 186 24 School St. West Dennis, MA. 02670 (508) 394-3090 capecodbuilder.com

THE HOUSE COMPANY Mike Rockwell 30 Perseverance Way Suite 2 Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 771-0303 thehouseco.com THE VALLE GROUP, INC. Christian Valle 70 East Falmouth Highway #3 East Falmouth, MA. 02536 (508) 548-1450 vallegroup.com

PRESTIGE HOMES OF CHATHAM Rolf Nixon P.O. Box 1586 Chatham, MA. 02669 (617) 877-4758 prestigehomebuilding.com

RANNEY & RIMINGTON CUSTOM BUILDING Patrick Rimington P.O. Box 816 Marstons Mills, MA. 02648 (508) 428-7147 thecapecodcarpenters.com

TERRANCE J SOUZA BLDG & RMDLG Terrance Souza 191 Blacksmith Shop Road East Falmouth, MA. 02536 (508) 540-0178 souzabuilding.com

SCOTT PEACOCK BUILDING & REMODELING Scott Peacock 1046 Main St Suite #3 Osterville, MA. 02655 (508) 428-7600

MEYER AND SONS, INC Trevor Meyer P.O Box 635 South Yarmouth, MA. 02664 (508) 362-2922 meyerandsons.com

MOGAN & CO INC Francis Mogan 63 Joyce Anne Rd Centerville, MA. 02632 (508) 776-2070

T.A. NELSON CONSTRUCTION CO INC Tom Nelson 1112 Main St. Suite 12 Osterville, MA. 02655 (508) 428-7801 tanelson.com

SOUTH MOUNTAIN COMPANY John Abrams PO Box 1260 West Tisbury, MA. 02575 (508) 693-4850 southmountain.com SPRINKLE HOME IMPROVEMENT Brad Sprinkle 199 Barnstable Road Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 775-1778 sprinklehome.com

STELLO CONSTRUCTION Robert Stello REEVES FINE HOMEBUILDING P.O. Box 776 South Chatham, MA. 02659 & REMODELING (508) 432-2218 Jared Reeves stelloconstruction.com 340 Queen Anne Road Harwich, MA. 02645 STEVEN NICKERSON (774) 836-0961 BUILDING & reevesbuild.com REMODELING, INC. Steven Nickerson RICHARD DESMARAIS PO Box 362 BUILDER LLC North Chatham, MA. 02650 Richard Desmarais (508) 945-4038 115 Old Townhouse Road stevennickerson.com South Yarmouth, MA. 02664 (508) 394-0052 STICKS & STONES ARTISANS Tim Coveney RICK ROY PO Box 1465 CONSTRUCTION Sandwich, MA. 02563 Rick Roy (774) 326-0026 123-A Queen Anne Road Harwich, MA. 02645 T A LABARGE INC. (508) 432-6840 Todd Labarge rickroyconstruction.com 195A Briar Ln. Wellfleet, MA. 02667 RK FOX BUILDERS (508) 364-7015 Robert Fox thelabargecompanies.com 44 Waterline Dr. Mashpee, MA. 02649 T EMANUEL HEYLIGER INC (508) 477-9665 T Heyliger rkfoxbuilders.com PO Box 23 Wellfleet, MA. 02667 (508) 349-3444

TIM SHERRY HOMES Tim Sherry P.O. Box 169 East Dennis, MA. 02641 (508) 527-5634 timsherryhomes.com TIMOTHY GRAY BUILDING & REMODELING, INC. Timothy Gray 68K Nicoletta’s Way Mashpee, MA. 02649 (508) 477-3364 timothygraybuilding.com TOBY LEARY FINE WOODWORKING INC. Toby Leary 135 Barnstable Road Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 957-2281 tobyleary.com TOM HAGUE III BUILDER, INC. Tom Hague PO Box 1394 Orleans, MA. 02653 (508) 240-1143 hagueremodeling.com TOM TURCKETTA INC. BUILDING AND REMODELING Thomas Turcketta 65 Red Top Road Brewster, MA. 02631 (508) 385-3672 TomTurcketta.com TONELLO BUILDERS, INC. Thomas Tonello 21 Deer Hollow Road Forestdale, MA. 02644-1713 (508) 477-8269 VATH & HIGGINS BUILDERS, LLC Peter Higgins 94A Commerce Park South South Chatham, MA. 02659 (508) 430-7277 vathandhigginsbuilders.com WELLEN CONSTRUCTION COMPANY Charles Gadbois 488 Boston Post Road East PO Box 5967 Marlborough, MA. 01752 (508) 460-9508 wellenconstruction.com WELLFLEET CUSTOM BUILDERS Robert Bacon 249 Gross Hill Road Wellfleet, MA. 02667 (508) 349-6332

WHALEN RESTORATION SERVICES William Whalen 22 American Way South Dennis, MA. 02660-3439 (508) 760-1911 x14 whalenrestorations.com CLOSETS/ORGANIZERS CALIFORNIA CLOSETS Robert Cleary 16 Avenue E Hopkinton, MA. 01748 (857) 972-3732 CaliforniaClosets.com CLOSET FACTORY David Townsend 1 Auston Road, Suite D Harwich, MA. 02645 (774) 408-7004 closetfactory.com/boston CONCRETE/AGGREGATE ACME-SHOREY PRECAST CO INC Dennis Lajoie PO Box 374 North Falmouth, MA. 02556 (508) 760-1070 shoreyprecastconcrete.com CAPE COD READY MIX Peter Joy 300 Cranberry Hwy Orleans, MA. 02653-3114 (508) 255-4600 capecodreadymix.com D.P. FUCCILLO, INC. David Fuccillo 548 Thomas Landers Road East Falmouth, MA. 02536 (508) 540-2848 fuccilloconcrete.com LAWRENCE - LYNCH CORP Christopher Lynch PO Box 913 Falmouth, MA. 02541 (508) 548-1800 lawrencelynch.com ROBERT B OUR CO INC Christopher Our PO Box 1539 24 Great Western Road Harwich, MA. 02645 (508) 432-0530 robertbour.com SUPER FLAT CONCRETE FLOORS Charles Bess 18 Huckleberry Ln. Marstons Mills, MA. 02648 (774) 327-4202 super-flatconcrete.com CONSULTANT/BUSINESS MANAGEMENT BESSETTE FINANCIAL SERVICES Bill Bessette 100 Independence Drive Suite 7, #407 Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 775-5510 bessettefinancial.com CAPE COD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Wendy Northcross 5 Patti Page Way Centerville, MA. 02632 (508) 362-3225 whycapecod.org HOME ENERGY RATERS LLC Kevin McKenna 180 State Road, Unit 2U Sagamore Beach, MA. 02562 (888) 503-2233 energycodehelp.com DISASTER EMERGENCY/ FLOOD & SMOKE ARS RESTORATION SPECIALISTS Jason Chamsarian 110 Old Town House Road South Yarmouth, MA. 02664 (508) 568-8247 arsserve.com

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DISASTER EMERGENCY/FLOOD & SMOKE thru MISCELLANEOUS

RESOURCE GUIDE OCEANSIDE RESTORATION Steven Jenney 217 Thornton Dr. Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 771-3110 OCEANSIDEINC.COM EDUCATION/SCHOOL CAPE COD REGIONAL TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL Brent Warren 351 Pleasant Lake Avenue Harwich, MA. 02645 (508) 432-4500 capetech.us UPPER CAPE COD TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL Wilbur Lavoie 220 Sandwich Road Bourne, MA. 02532-3310 (508) 759-7711 uppercapetech.org ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR FRONIUS ELECTRIC Matthew Fronius 35 Barque Dr. Hatchville, MA. 02536 (508) 444-8144 froniuselectric.com JOHN NOONAN ELECTRIC, INC. John Noonan 12 Millennium Dr. Unit I Cataumet, MA. 02534 (508) 563-5436 johnnoonanelectric.com REILLY ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS, INC. (RELCO) Scott Ventura 110 Old Townhouse Road South Yarmouth, MA. 02664 (508) 230-8001 gorelco.com EMBROIDERY TALKING THREADS EMBROIDERY Carol Hayward 35 Portanimicut Road Orleans, MA. 02653 (508) 255-1436 talkingthreads.com ENGINEERING/SURVEYING COASTAL ENGINEERING COMPANY, INC John Bologna 260 Cranberry Highway Orleans, MA. 02653 (508) 255-6511 x565 coastalengineeringcompany.com J.M. O’REILLY & ASSOCIATES, INC. John O’Reilly 1573 Main St. 2nd Floor Brewster, MA. 02631 (508) 896-6601 jmoreillyassoc.com EXCAVATION S&J EXCO John Shea 200 Great Western Road South Dennis, MA. 02660 (508) 398-9206 sjexcoinc.com FENCES, RAILINGS, PERGOLAS A.B.S. FENCE, INC. Colleen Shields 2700 Cranberry Hwy. Wareham, MA. 02571 (508) 295-4150 absfence.com PERFECTION FENCE Lauryn Beecher 635 Plain St. Route 139 Marshfield, MA. 02050 (781) 837-3600 perfectionfence.com

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FLOORING/WOOD FLOORS/ CARPETING CARPET BARN CARPET ONE FLOOR & HOME Bonnie Alferes 719 Main St. Falmouth, MA. 02540 (508) 296-8189 carpetbarncarpetonefalmouth.com FOUNDATIONS/ BASEMENTS A & E FORMS, INC. Iain MacArthur 18 Rebecca Ln. South Yarmouth, MA. 02664 (508) 364-4439 GFM ENTERPRISES INC. Gregory Morris 2 George Holbrook Way Harwich, MA. 02645 (508) 349-7300 gfmexcavating.com RAMJACK NEW ENGLAND Anthony Capelle 10 Kendrick Road, Unit 17 Wareham, MA. 02571 (855) 674-5121 ramjack.com/locations/ram-jack-ne/ GARAGE DOORS/ OPENERS OVERHEAD DOOR OF CAPE COD Thomas Skayne 50 Joaquim Road Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 778-6251 overheaddoorcapecod.com GENERATOR SALES & SERVICE CAPE COD INDEPENDENT POWER Lester Wade 23 Bowdoin Road Mashpee, MA. 02649 (508) 477-8887 ccipgenerators.com RCA GENERATORS & ELECTRICAL Contractors Sharon Brown 381 Old Falmouth Road Suite 13 Marstons Mills, MA. 02648 (508) 428-0449 rcaelectric.com GRANITE/STONE/MARBLE CAPE COD MARBLE & GRANITE, INC. Wanessa Franca 38 Rosary Ln. Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 771-2900 capecodmarbleandgranite.com

HVAC/ELECTRIC/ PLUMBING HARWICH PORT HEATING & COOLING, INC. Andy Levesque 461 Lower County Road Harwich Port, MA. 02646 (508) 432-3959 HarwichPortHeatingandCooling.com ROBIES HEATING & COOLING John Robichaud 279 Yarmouth Road Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 775-3083 robies.com W. VERNON WHITELEY INC. Eric Whiteley 28 Village Landing West Chatham, MA. 02669 (508) 945-1100 wvwhiteley.com WALTER SMITH PLUMBING & HEATING, INC. Robert Smith 9 Weeks Lane Edgartown, MA. 02539 (508) 627-5661 waltersmithplumbing.com

MARTHA’S VINEYARD INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. Sarah Hughes PO Box 998 State Road Vineyard Haven, MA. 02568 (508) 627-7111 x1803 mvinsurance.com

GREEN PRODUCTS/SOLAR E2 SOLAR INC Jason Stoots 831 Main St Dennis, MA. 02638 (508) 694-7889 e2solarcapecod.com

MASON & MASON INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. Brian Robertson 458 South Avenue Whitman, MA 02382 (781) 523-0062 masonandmasoninsurance.com

SOLAR RISING LLC Christopher Peterson 759 Falmouth Road, Unit 8 Mashpee, MA. 02649 (508) 744-6284 solarrising.net

ROGERS AND GRAY INSURANCE AGENCY Jeff Cotto 434 Route 134 South Dennis, MA. 02660 (508) 760-4621 rogersgray.com

SPRING SUMMER 2017 / AT HOME ON CAPE COD

DETAILS, INC. Mike Consalvi Details, Inc. 574 Main St Dennis Port, MA. 02638 (508) 394-0944 detailsinteriorsinc.com FRESH INTERIORS Richard McLaughlin 581 Main St. #2 West Dennis, MA. 02670 (508) 394-3032 freshinteriorsinc.com PASTICHE OF CAPE COD Irina MacPhee 1595 Main St / Rte 6A West Barnstable, MA. 02668 (508) 362-8006 pasticheofcapecod.com

KITCHEN & BATH DESIGN ARTISAN KITCHENS INC. Amy Britton CKD 937A Main St. Osterville, MA. 02655 INSULATION (508) 428-8828 ANDERSON INSULATION, INC artisankitchensinc.com Adam Piccirilli CLASSIC KITCHENS & PO Box 2003 INTERIORS 706 Brockton Ave. Rebecca Brown Abington, MA. 02351 127 Airport Road (781) 857-1000 Hyannis, MA. 02601 andersoninsul.com (508) 775-3075 ckdcapecod.com CAPE COD HERS RATERS Chris Picariello F W WEBB PO Box 1010 Julie Borjeson South Yarmouth, MA. 02664 108 Breeds Hill Road (508) 737-8011 Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 775-2130 CAPE COD frankwebb.com INSULATION, INC. John Cassidy IKITCHENS ETC 18 Reardon Circle Rich Carl South Yarmouth, MA. 02664 321 East Falmouth Highway (508) 775-1214 East Falmouth, MA. 02536 capecodinsulation.com (508) 457-1530 ikitchensetc.com GREENSTAMP CORP Andrew Clemons LEWIS AND WELDON CUSTOM 184 Riverview Ave. Cabinetry LLC Waltham, MA. 02453 Chuck Hart (781) 899-3618 111 Airport Road greenstampco.com Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 778-5757 INSURANCE/TITLE lewisandweldon.com DOWLING & O’NEIL INSURANCE AGENCY OASIS SHOWER DOORS JOHN CURLEY Brett Barker 973 Iyannough Road 50 Finnell Drive Hyannis, MA. 02601 Weymouth, MA. 02190 (508) 957-4235 (781) 340-2700 doins.com Oasisshowerdoors.com

GLOBAL MARBLE & GRANITE, INC. Fabio DeOliveira Bell Tower Mall, Unit 9 1600 Falmouth Road Centerville, MA. 02532 (508) 771-1001 globalmarbleandgraniteinc.com

GUTTERS THE FIBERGLASS GUTTER COMPANY Russ Allen P O Box 26 North Pembroke, MA. 02358 (781) 826-3711 fiberglassgutter.com

CATHY KERT INTERIORS LLC Cathy Kert 420 Barlows Landing Road Pocasset, MA. 02559 (603) 566-0977 cathykertinteriors.com

INTERIOR DESIGN ANTHI FRANGIADIS ASSOCIATES Anthi Frangiadis 11 Spring St Marion, MA. 02738 (508) 748-3494 anthif.com

WHITE WOOD KITCHENS Gail O’Rourke 160 Route 6A Sandwich, MA. 02563 (508) 353-9183 whitewoodkitchen.com LANDSCAPE DESIGN & BUILD BOBCAT OF BOURNE Tom Ratacik 170 MacArthur Blvd. Buzzards Bay, MA. 02532 (508) 759-5020 bobcatbourne.com CONTEMPORARY LANDSCAPES (CLMV, LLC) Caleb Nicholson 33 Kates Way Vineyard Haven, MA. 02568 (508) 693-6788 clmvland.com EXECUTIVE LANDSCAPING Christopher Cotoia 17 General Holway Dr South Yarmouth, MA. 02664 (508) 790-4777 execlandscaping.com

JENICK STUDIO & CRAWFORD LAND MANAGEMENT Jennifer Crawford 28 Black Watch Way Mashpee, MA. 02649 (612) 756-0942 jenickstudio.com JOYCE LANDSCAPING, INC. Christopher Joyce 68 Flint St Marstons Mills, MA. 02648 (508) 428-4772 joycelandscaping.com THE DAVEY TREE EXPERT CO. INC. Natascha Batchelor 996 East Falmouth Highway East Falmouth, MA. 02536 (508) 548-2662 davey.com WHITTEN LANDSCAPING Craig Whitten 45 Commercial Avenue P O Box 1210 South Yarmouth, MA. 02664 (508) 394-5051 whittenlandscaping.com MARKETING/PUBLISHING LIGHTHOUSE MEDIA SOLUTIONS Rusty Piersons 396 Main St #15 Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 534-9291 lhmediasolutions.com NEW ENGLAND REPROGRAPHICS Bob Kesten 80 Mid Tech Drive West Yarmouth, MA. 02673 (508) 790-1114 newenglandrepro.com PARACLETE MULTIMEDIA David Ortolani 36 Southern Eagle Cartway Brewster, MA. 02631 (508) 255-4685 *339 paracletewebdesign.com/web/ portfolio/ MASONRY/PAVING/ STONEWORK IDEAL CONCRETE BLOCK COMPANY, INC. Fred Adams 45 Power Rd / POB 747 Westford, MA. 01886 (978) 692-3076 idealconcreteblock.com METAL WORK MAKE ARCHITECTURAL METALWORKING LTD Paul Meneses 2358 Cranberry Highway West Wareham, MA. 02576 (508) 273-7603 makearchmetal.com MILLWORK/LUMBER FAIRVIEW MILLWORK, INC. Earl Rehrauer 49 Whites Path South Yarmouth, MA. 02664 (508) 394-2219 fairvu.com HERRICK & WHITE Gary Rousseau 3 Flat St. Cumberland, RI. 02864 (401) 658-0440 herrick-white.com SEACOAST MILLWORK WOOD PRODUCTS Kurt Esche 7 Livingston Dr. Plymouth, MA. 02360 (774) 454-0348 seacoastmillwork.com MISCELLANEOUS CAPE COD VACUUM Robert Boffoli 85 Route 6A / POB 1438 Orleans, MA. 02653 (508) 255-7011 capecodvac.com


AT HOME ON CAPE COD / SPRING SUMMER 2017

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NON-PROFIT thru WOODWORKING & CARPENTRY

RESOURCE GUIDE NON-PROFIT CAPE COD LANDSCAPE ASSOC. Diane Johnson 407 North St., Suite 7-B Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 827-4639 capecodlandscapes.org CHAMP HOMES INC. Mark Adams 82 School St. Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 771-0885 Ex. 20 champhomes.org HABITAT FOR HUMANITY OF CAPE COD Victoria Goldsmith 411 Main St., Suite 6 Yarmouth Port, MA. 02675 (508) 362-3559 habitatcapecod.org HOUSING ASSISTANCE CORP Laura Reckford 460 West Main St. Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 771-5400 haconcapecod.org PAINTING INTERIOR/ EXTERIOR CIA PAINTING Fernando Cia 48 Seaboard Ln. Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 469-0429 ciapaintingcapecod.com SHERWIN-WILLIAMS PAINT COMPANY Thomas Ruo 276 Falmouth Road Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 326-2727 s-w.com PHOTOGRAPHY ROE OSBORN PHOTOGRAPHY Roe Osborn 440 Pleasant Lake Ave. Harwich, MA. 02645 (774) 237-0051 roeosbornphoto.com POOLS VIOLA ASSOCIATES John Viola 110 Rosary Ln., Unit A Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 771-3457 violaassociates.com PROPANE/GAS/FUEL AMERIGAS PROPANE Paul Laudani 193 Iyannough Road Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 209-1040 amerigas.com SNOW’S FUEL COMPANY LLC Jorge Castillejo 18 Main St. Orleans, MA. 02653 (508) 255-1090 snowsfuel.com REAL ESTATE SALES ROBERT PAUL PROPERTIES Debra Caney 279 Main St. Falmouth, MA. 02540 (508) 540-9800 x371 robertpaul.com TILE BEST TILE DISTRIBUTORS OF NEW ENGLAND, INC. Bill Stacy 10 Pilgrim Hill Road Plymouth, MA. 02360-6123 (508) 732-8911 besttile.com

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CLOUTIER SUPPLY Anthony Raggio 445 W Main St. Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 775-6100 cloutiersupply.com TIMELESS STONEWORKS George Ajami 316 Tremont St. Carver, MA. 02330 (508) 866-8460 TIMELESSSTONEWORKS.COM TOOLS NORTHEAST TOOL SUPPLY COMPANY Chris Saucier 19 Lots Hollow Road Orleans, MA. 02653 (508) 240-0764 northeast-tool.com TRUCKS/TRUCK PRODUCTS BUCKLER’S TOWING SERVICE, INC. Nathan Buckler 116 Ridgewood Ave. Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 775-2803 bucklerstowing.com

INTERNATIONAL UPRIGHT SERVICES Bob Doolin 31B Leicester St. North Oxford, MA. 01537 (781) 767-4022 ius.us.com NEW ENGLAND SHUTTER MILLS Karl Ivester 189 Rte 28 West Harwich, MA. 02646 (781) 729-7800 newenglandshutter.com SHADE & SHUTTER SYSTEMS, INC. Paul Craig 350 Kidds Hill Road Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 775-6057 shadeandshutter.com WINDOWS/SKYLIGHTS/ DOORS ANDERSEN WINDOWS Brian Harding 68 Lombard Ave. West Barnstable, MA. 02668 (508) 375-0997 andersenwindows.com

UTILITIES NATIONAL GRID Bill Ciocca 127 White’s Path South Yarmouth, MA. 02664 (508) 760-7679 nationalgrid.com

MARVIN DESIGN GALLERY BY MHC Terry Hills 73 Falmouth Road Hyannis, MA. 02601 (508) 771-6278 marvinbymhc.com

WASTE DISPOSAL M.A. FRAZIER DISPOSAL Matt Frazier 10 Kear Circle Wellfleet, MA. 02667 (508) 349-7969 mafrazier.com

PELLA WINDOWS & DOORS Normand Fontaine 1600 Falmouth Road, Suite 9 Centerville, MA. 02632 (508) 771-9730 gopella.com/Showrooms/ Centerville

NAUSET DISPOSAL Shawn DeLude PO Box 826 / 3 Rayber Road Orleans, MA. 02653 (508) 255-1419 nausetdisposal.com WATERPROOFING DRYZONE BASEMENT SYSTEMS Courtney Kuzmich 850 Bedford St. Bridgewater, MA. 02324 (508) 657-6012 dryzonebasementsystems.com GIBSON WATERPROOFING Bill Gibson 21 Six Penny Ln. Harwich Port, MA. 02646 (508) 432-2417 gibsonwaterproofing. thebluebook.com KEYES ENTERPRISES Kenyon Keyes 133 Tonset Road Orleans, MA. 02653 (774) 836-5344

VELUX AMERICA LLC Dave Poikonen 754 Rainbow Road Windsor, CT. 06095 (888) 838-3589 veluxusa.com WOODWORKING & CARPENTRY PINE HARBOR WOOD PRODUCTS Jamie McGrath 259 Queen Anne Road Harwich, MA. 02645 (508) 430-2800 pineharbor.com SHAW WOODWORKING, INC James Shaw 31 Jonathan Bourne Dr. Unit 5 and 6 Pocasset, MA. 02559 (508) 563-1242 shawwoodworking.com

WELL DRILLING DESMOND WELL DRILLING, INC. Tom Desmond 5 Rayber Road Orleans, MA. 02653 (508) 240-1000 desmondwelldrilling.com WINDOW BLINDS/ SHADES/SHUTTERS CAPE COD RETRACTABLE ScreensNshutters, LLC Stephen Daley 9 Jonathan Bourne Dr., Unit 2 Pocasset, MA. 02559 (508) 539-3307 screensnshutters.com

SPRING SUMMER 2017 / AT HOME ON CAPE COD

ADVERTISERS INDEX A.B.S Fence Inc.�������������������������������������������������������������������51 Aluminum Products of Cape Cod�������������������������������������������51 Andersen Windows and Doors������������������������������������������������ 3 A.P. Kimball Construction������������������������������������������������������58 Beacon Marine Construction�������������������������������������������������10 Best Tile�������������������������������������������������������������������������������49 Boston Cedar�����������������������������������������������������������������������39 Cape Associates, Inc.�����������������������������������������������������������39 Cape Cod AeroSeal���������������������������������������������������������������61 Cape Cod Five Cents Savings Bank����������������������������������������14 Cape Cod Independent Power�����������������������������������������������41 Cape Cod Ready Mix�������������������������������������������������������������19 Classic Kitchens & Interiors��������������������������������������������������� 6 Coastal Engineering Co.��������������������������������������������������������45 Crane Appliance�������������������������������������������������������������������63 Davey Tree Expert Company��������������������������������������������������64 Executive Landscaping���������������������������������������������������������40 Falmouth Lumber Company������������������������������������������������ IFC Ferguson Bath, Kitchen & Lighting Gallery������������������������������� 7 Fiberglass Gutter Company���������������������������������������������������36 First Citizens’ Federal Credit Union����������������������������������������23 Greenstamp Insulation Co.����������������������������������������������������61 Harlow & MacGregor�������������������������������������������������������������49 Herrick & White Architectural Woodworkers���������������������������28 Ideal Concrete Block Co.�������������������������������������������������������23 Joyce Companies�����������������������������������������������������������������33 KAM Appliances������������������������������������������������������������������ BC Kitchen & Bath Gallery – Supply New England������������������������� 1 Lineal Inc. Architects & Builders��������������������������������������������33 Michael A. Duffany Builders, Inc.�������������������������������������������� 8 Marvin Design Gallery by MHC ����������������������������������������������13 McPhee Associates of Cape Cod�������������������������������������������16 Mid-Cape Home Centers����������������������������������������������������� IBC New England Living��������������������������������������������������������������41 Overhead Door of Cape Cod��������������������������������������������������61 Patriot Builders��������������������������������������������������������������������20 Paul J. Cazeault & Sons, Inc.�������������������������������������������������32 Pella Windows & Doors���������������������������������������������������������� 7 Robie’s Heating, Cooling and Generators �������������������������������13 Shepley Wood Products, Inc.�������������������������������������������������� 5 Siemasko + Verbridge�����������������������������������������������������������19 Snow’s Fuel Company�����������������������������������������������������������10 Specialty Builders’ Supply������������������������������������������������������ 2 Stonewood Products������������������������������������������������������������35 Sunpower by E2 Solar ����������������������������������������������������������19 White Wood Kitchens������������������������������������������������������������17


MEMBER BENEFITS

MEMBER BENEFITS

A VOICE FOR THE INDUSTRY, A CODE OF ETHICS FOR HOMEOWNERS

ADVOCACY THREE-IN-ONE MEMBERSHIP Three memberships for the price of one: local, state, national. VOICE FOR THE INDUSTRY Advocating for housing and development issues. We keep you informed on legislative and regulatory issues that affect the building trades. PROFESSIONAL GROWTH Join a committee or council. Help guide the future of home building and development on the Cape & Islands. NEWS AND INFORMATION Economic and forecasting information, legal assistance and consultation.

T

he Home Builders & Remodelers Association of Cape Cod (HBRACC) is affiliated with the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and the Home Builders & Remodelers Association of Massachusetts (HBRAMA). Members adhere to a strong professional code of ethics ensuring that consumers receive the highest quality of service. We support homeownership on Cape Cod and our individual members through legislative, educational, promotional and civic efforts.

EDUCATION

NETWORKING, SAVINGS, COMMUNITY

PUBLICATIONS Complimentary subscriptions to Builder Magazine, Nation’s Building News Online and At Home on Cape Cod. CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDITS We offer approved courses to renew your Construction Supervisor License and stay atop of code review, workplace, lead safety, energy and other issues. CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS We provide programs to earn Certified Master Builder, Graduate Master Remodeler, Certified Green Professional, Certified Aging in Place Specialist and other designations.

GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY The association is involved in numerous community groups. MEMBER DISCOUNT PROGRAMS Member-only discounts provide saving on travel, financial services, automobiles and more. BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS We provide countless ways to network and build relationships. PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION Our local building industry awards competition distinguishes award-winning members of the industry.

AT HOME ON CAPE COD / FALL WINTER 2016

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HB&RACC • CHRIS’ CORNER Welcome to another edition of our “At Home on Cape Cod” magazine. For this issue, I had the pleasure of meeting with the elected members of our Cape & Islands state legislature—Senators Vinny deMacedo and Julian Cyr, Representatives Will Crocker, Sarah Peake and Randy Hunt —to learn about their positions, ideas and hopes for the future of construction and housing on the Cape. Their interviews begin on page 8. Next issue we’ll speak with Representatives Timothy Whelan, David Vieira and Dylan Fernandes. Our association is proud to have an open and honest line of communication with our elected officials, and to have the opportunity to work with them to support and improve: • Business owners

CHRISTINE DUREN

• A safe, efficient and uniform building code

Executive Officer

• Codes, legislation and regulations that affect construction without adding unnecessary costs to homeowners

Home Builders & Remodelers Association of Cape Cod

• Creating more affordable housing for working individuals and families across the Cape • Programs that will train construction business workers, owners and leaders of tomorrow It was not only encouraging, but also exciting to hear our legislators speak to these issues. Their dedication to improving the lives of their constituents (who are their families, friends and neighbors) is without question. At the end of each conversation, I asked what we, the members of our association, can do to support them in supporting us. The answers were consistent: get involved in your local and state issues, communicate with your representatives and senators and take time to give them facts that will inform their decisions. We took the time to vote for them to represent us; it’s also up to us to let them know why we did.

What’s next? Fall/winter 2017 Read more from our elected members of Cape & Islands state legislature: Representatives Timothy Whelan, David Vieira and Dylan Fernandes weigh in on the residential construction industry and their vision for the future.

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SPRING SUMMER 2017 / AT HOME ON CAPE COD


LET THE LIGHT IN ENHANCE THE NATURAL BEAUTY OF YOUR HOME

EVERYTHING FOR BUILDING, REMODELING & HOME IMPROVEMENT SINCE 1895 SO UTH D EN N IS • O RLE ANS • WELLFLEET MARTHA’ S VI N EYARD • M I D D LEBO RO • PLYM O UTH

800-295-9220 www.midcape.net


At Home on Cape Cod Spring-Summer 2017  
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