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FALMOUTH Classic Coastal Living on Cape Cod

Seasided E scapex

2015

Vol 1

ISSUE 1

FALMOUTHMAG.COM

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WE ARE PROFESSIONAL GR ADE

Visit Your Local New England Dealer at

www.NewEnglandGMC.com

IT MATTERS IN EVERY THING. TO US, IT MATTERS MORE THAN ANY THING. EXPLORE AT NEWENGL ANDGMC.COM Š2015 General Motors. All rights reserved. The marks appearing in this ad are the trademarks or service marks of GM, its subsidiaries, affiliates or licensors.

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The Appliance Experts

KAM’s Got You Covered! You can depend on KAM’s expert salespeople, professional delivery teams and factory trained service technicians to give you the best appliance experience available from start to finish.

Hyannis Showroom 201 Yarmouth Road • Hyannis, MA 02601 800-649-2221 Hanover Showroom 1176 Washington Street (Rte. 53) • Hanover, MA 02339 781-829-0810 Nantucket Showroom 54 Old South Road (In the Emporium Home Center) • Nantucket, MA 02554 508-332-4907 Locally Owned & Operated Since 1977 • www.kamonline.com • Follow us on

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We’ve opened more doors by closing more loans than anyone on Cape Cod.

Community Banking Since 1855 www.capecodfive.com NMLS# 401717 * #1 in Mortgage Lending as reported in The Warren Group, 2014 Year-End Residential Mortgage Market Share Report.

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t hom a s j o’nei l l, i nc

o’nei l l re a l e st ate

custom seaside homes

exceptional cape cod luxury

t hom a s j o’nei l l, i nc

o’nei l l re a l e st ate

508.477.5600 | thomasjoneill.com

508.477.7550 | capecodluxuryproperty.com

design

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build

interiors

landscape

real estate

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FAUCETS • FIXTURES • TILE

DESIGN | BUILD | INSTALL

CABINETS • VANITIES • CLOSETS

Kitchen and Bath Remodel or Renovation 419 Palmer Avenue, Falmouth, Cape Cod Bagel Plaza | 508-457-5900

www.baysidekitchens.com

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comfortable, High Performance residential & commercial Buildings that are Beautiful & truly Sustainable

+ energy efficient architectural Design + Property Planning + Design & construction  Management

S

New Homes + Additions + Remodeling www.integrata-ac.com

MEMBER AFFILIATIONS: American Institute of Architects Boston Society of Architects LEED Accredited Professional National Association of Home Builders National Trust for Historic Preservation Northeast Sustainable Energy Association U.S. Green Building Council

419 Palmer Avenue, Suite 200 |   Falmouth, MA 02540   |   508.495.6575

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There used to be one thing between Cape Cod and the most advanced cardiac and vascular care in the country. That was before the Heart and Vascular Institute. We’ve combined a team of top cardiac and vascular physician specialists with the full resources of Cape Cod Healthcare. This unprecedented partnership means that you and your family will get the best cardiac and vascular care right here on Cape Cod.

Heart and Vascular Institute Expert physicians. Quality hospitals. Superior care. capecodhealth.org/heartandvascular

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FA L M O U T H

GLASS

and

MIRROR

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w w w.falmout h gl ass.com

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R

P

N

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T H O M A S L . T U R CK E T TA B U I L D I N G 508. 385. 3672

& &

R E M O D E L I N G

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tom@tomturcketta.com Quality is never an accident... it is always a result of intellectual effort. There must be the will to produce the superior thing. –John Ruskin

REMODELING | RENOVATIONS | ADDITIONS | CABINETMAKING PERIOD MOLDING REPRODUCTION | HISTORIC PRESERVATION Now providing all aspects of property care and management services

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The ONE Store For Your Perfect Floor.

CAPE COD’S LARGEST TILE SELECTION Glass • Metal • Porcelain • Stone • Hand-Painted • Marble Whether it’s one room or your entire home, let our professional design consultants and installers show you why we are simply the best. We offer expert design solutions within your budget.

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HARDWOODS • LAMINATES • AREA RUGS WINDOW TREATMENTS • CABINETS • COUNTERS FALMOUTH

MASHPEE

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719 Main Street 508-548-1443

106 Falmouth Road 508-477-7847

30 Enterprise Road 508-775-5711

377 Main Street 508-398-4784

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108

} inside falmouth FEATURES CONT. 100 DINING Love At First Bite 9 tasty appetizer dishes that guarantee your first bite will taste just as good as your last.

108 OPEN WATER The Salty Frontier Sea Education Association offers students a rare on-the-water learning opportunity.

116 ART Working Across Mediums Three Falmouth artists show diversity across artistic mediums.

124 PHOTO ESSAY Enchanted Shoreline Showcasing the splendor of Falmouth’s coast.

DEPARTMENTS 18 Letter from the Editor 20 Contributors 22

Around Town • A Whale of An App • A Love for Locamotives • Signature Sips • Our Town • Fishing Falmouth

42 Out & About

136 Beach Guide

138 Calendar

144 Last Look

100 24

COVER PHOTO BY: Danielle MacInnes Wild Harbor, N. Falmouth

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HOME TO OVER 70 LOCALLY O WNED BUSINESSES

SHOPPING DINING & LIVING

IN ADDITION TO GREAT SHOPS AND RESTAURANTS, THE COMMONS PROVIDES FREE YEAR-ROUND FAMILY FRIENDLY ACTIVITIES AND EVENTS FOR THE COMMUNITY AND VISITORS.

KEEP IN TOUCH WITH US FOR DETAILS

MASHPEE COMMONS.COM

AT THE INTERSECTION OF ROUTES 28 & 151 IN MASHPEE

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EDITOR’S LETTER

FALMOUTH

Welcome to Falmouth!

E

ach year I find myself loving Cape Cod a little more. Despite these feelings ebbing slightly during the winter (who

VOLUME 1 • NUMBER 1 EDITORIAL & CONTENT DIRECTOR

Janice Randall Rohlf EDITOR

Colby Radomski: Falmouth Magazine LMS EDITORS

Maria Allen: South Shore Living

could forget last year?), each summer I feel

Rachel Arroyo: Home Remodeling

an overwhelming sense of gratitude. How

Lisa Leigh Connors: Cape Cod Magazine,

lucky I am to be living in such a beautiful and coveted area of New England.

Chatham Magazine Jaci Conry: Custom Publications Rob Duca: New England Golf & Leisure

As you can imagine, my role as editor of Falmouth Magazine has given me the opportunity to experience Falmouth like a local. It’s safe to say that the town has quickly become a favorite destination of mine. In my opinion, it’s the perfect seaside escape. And while the trip to this Upper Cape town (for out-of-towners like me) is not always easy in the summer, I find its distance from Route 6 one of its greatest draws, in addition to its trove of attractions. Falmouth offers something for everyone—from history buffs and science-lovers, to fishermen and beach bums. Each of its corners— from the Heights to Woods Hole—has its own charming personality. In this launch issue of Falmouth Magazine, my editorial team and I strove to

Danielle Raciti: Southern New England Weddings Colby Radomski: Hingham Magazine Tom Richardson: New England Boating Janice Randall Rohlf: Southern New England Home Jennifer Sperry: Southern New England Living ............................................ EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Christopher Lewis CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Eric Brust-Akdemir ART DIRECTOR

Sharon Bartholomew ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTORS

Alexandra Bondarek

include features that highlight the best this coastal community has to

Jennifer Oppenheim

offer. On page 52, you’ll read a story about the intriguing stilt cottages of

PRODUCTION MANAGER

Surf Drive Beach and, for one homeowner, what it means to own such an

Rachel Clayton

exclusive piece of property on Falmouth’s pristine shoreline. In “Faces of

DESIGNER

Falmouth,” we profile several influential town members. Their inspiring

Kendra Sousa

stories are true testaments to what makes Falmouth such a wonderful

............................................

place to live. We also spotlight Falmouth’s vibrant dining scene in “Love At

DIRECTOR ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT

First Bite,” and listed some of our favorite things about the town (including

Oceanna O’Donnell

some unique activities to try) in “Falmouth A to Z.”

ACCOUNT MANAGERS

Ailish Belair

You should notice that our team had a fun time putting this premiere issue together. On one of my recent trips to town, I met Guy Fieri while he was filming an episode of “Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives.” In the words of Guy, that day was definitely “off the hook!”

Michelle Overby Jessica Peacock SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

Allie Herzog VIDEO PRODUCTION

We hope that you enjoy reading this debut issue of Falmouth Magazine and we look forward to hearing from you!

Jimmy Baggott Published by

Lighthouse Media Solutions www.lhmediasolutions.com Single copy price $6.95. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced in whole or in part without the written permission of the publisher. Publisher disclaims all responsibility for omissions, errors, and unsolicited materials. Printed in the USA.

Colby Radomski Editor

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Woods Hole isn’t the only place you’ll find colorful marine life. Discover the latest styles of pullovers, shorts, polos, dresses and more from vineyard vines® at Puritan Cape Cod in Falmouth. Whether it’s stripers, blues, or prints, you’re sure to be colorful strolling along Main Street, or aboard the ferries.

Your life. Your style. Your store. Hyannis / Chatham / Mashpee Commons / Falmouth

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Facebook “f” Logo

CMYK / .eps

Facebook “f” Logo

CMYK / .eps

puritancapecod.com

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CONTRIBUTORS PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Russell A. Piersons rpiersons@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................ CHIEF OPERATIONS OFFICER (DIGITAL DEVELOPMENT)

LENORE CULLEN BARNES is a freelance writer, who contributes to various regional magazines with a focus on interior design, home remodeling, cultural events, destinations, weddings and personalities. Having lived in various places across the globe, she now embraces the year-round beauty of the Cape (but maintains the travel bug!).

David F. Jensen djensen@lhmediasolutions.com PRESIDENT (VIDEO-TV)

Gene Allen gallen@lhmediasolutions.com VICE PRESIDENT SALES & MARKETING

Steve Wyman swyman@lhmediasolutions.com

PAUL BLACKMORE is a regular contributor for Cape Cod Magazine, who helped shoot our “Faces of Falmouth” feature. In addition to working for a local newspaper and the Associated Press, he’s built a successful wedding photography business. He also enjoys drumming, furniture building, cooking and gardening.

JACI CONRY was long captivated by the cottages of Surf Drive Beach, the subjects of her article “Built on Stilts.” She edits custom publications for Lighthouse Media Solutions and is a contributor to The Boston Globe. She lives with her husband and two young children in Falmouth, not far from Surf Drive Beach.

DAN CUTRONA is a Cape Cod resident and long-time contributor for Cape Cod Magazine and Southern New England Living. He got up close and personal with some of Falmouth’s most inspiring residents for our “Faces of Falmouth” feature. He also shot “Built on Stilts,” about the intriguing cottages on Surf Drive Beach.

RACHAEL DEVANEY is a freelance writer for several regional publications as well as a regular business and entertainment contributing writer for the "Cape Cod Times," "The Barnstable Patriot," Wicked Local, and for lifestyle guide "Madame Noire." She currently resides in Wareham with her daughter Fressia Jones.

MEG FLANAGAN is a freelance writer who penned this issue’s feature article “The Salty Frontier,” about SEA’s semester at sea program. Her work has been featured in several southeastern Massachusetts publications. She resides with her husband, two children, a happy golden retriever and a fat cat in South Plymouth. JACK FOLEY South Shore-based photographer Jack Foley has traveled the world with a camera in his hand. His work is regularly featured in our sister publication South Shore Living. For this issue, he shot tasty dishes for our “Great Escapes” feature, which profiles local inns and their signature breakfast dishes.

LAURIE HIGGINS is an award-winning freelance writer who contributes weekly to two local newspapers. A Brewster resident, she enjoys family, writing, photography, good books and good food. When she moved to Cape Cod in 1981, she knew she found her one true home for all those things.

VP NATIONAL ACCTS & ACCT MGMT

Mike Alleva malleva@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................ REGIONAL SALES MANAGERS

Kathy Hitchcock khitchcock@lhmediasolutions.com David Honeywell dhoneywell@lhmediasolutions.com Erin McCluskey emccluskey@lhmediasolutions.com Janice Rogers jrogers@lhmediasolutions.com Suzanne Ryan sryan@lhmediasolutions.com Erin Soderstrom esoderstrom@lhmediasolutions.com Kelly Sykes ksykes@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................ REGIONAL DIGITAL SALES

Patty Wolf pwolf@lhmediasolutions.com SALES AD COORDINATOR (PUBLISHING, TV, WEB)

Hillary Portell hportell@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................

SENIOR WEB DEVELOPER

David Fontes dfontes@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................ DIGITAL CONTENT COORDINATOR

Tommy Costello tcostello@lhmediasolutions.com ............................................ CONTROLLER

Connie Walsh cwalsh@lhmediasolutions.com ASSISTANT CONTROLLER

Angela McPherson amcpherson@lhmediasolutions.com ASSISTANT TO CEO & OFFICE MANAGER

Kristin Gayle kgayle@lhmediasolutions.com

JORDAN HITCHCOCK is a recent graduate of Roger Williams University. She helped write several articles in this issue including our “Falmouth A-Z” feature and “A Day Downtown” shopping guide. A native of Cape Cod, she plans to pursue a career in the communications field and continue living on the Cape. Mondays at 6:30 p.m. on NESN

JACQUELYN MYSLIWIEC is a former assistant editor for Cape Cod Magazine, South Shore Living and Chatham Magazine. Her love for food culture lured her to Falmouth in search of the town’s tastiest cocktails and appetizer dishes, which are spotlighted in “Signature Sips” and “Love At First Bite.” TOM RICHARDSON is an award-winning writer, photographer and longtime fisherman. For this issue, Tom wrote “Fishing Falmouth.” The editor of New England Boating magazine as well as NewEnglandBoating.com, he is also the host of New England Boating TV, which airs on NESN. He lives in southeastern New England.

Cape Cod Office: 396 Main Street, Suite 15, Hyannis, MA 02601 508.534.9291 Boston Office: 850 Summer Street, Suite 207, Boston, MA 02127 508.534.9291 Rhode Island Office: P.O. Box 568, Portsmouth, RI 02871 401.396.9888

LUKE SIMPSON is a freelance photographer who frequently shoots surfers and sharks. We brought him on land to photograph “Love At First Bite,” which includes some of our favorite appetizer dishes. Simpson lives in Eastham with his wife and daughter and teaches marine sciences in Chatham.

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Building dream homes on Cape Cod for over 30 years.

We do it all, from foundation to weathervane.

New Construction • Renovations & Remodeling • Property Management

Kitchens • Baths • Additions • Replacement Windows • Roofing & Siding

www.duffanybuilders.com

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} around town

A Whale of An App A new technology has a powerful purpose.

Photo by Sea to Shore Alliance (Permit 15488)

magine having the power to help save a whale’s life right at your fingertips. With Whale Alert, you can! Developed by researchers and shipping companies from across the Northeast, including local scientists from the Woods Hole Oceanic Institution (WHOI) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Whale Alert is an interactive technology that works to prevent accidental collisions between whales and vessels through NOAA’s Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary and shipping channels stretching from the Cape to Boston.

A North Atlantic right whale and her calf.

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Accidental collisions are the leading cause of right whale fatalities; in fact, the population of right whales is estimated to be between only 350 and 550, with a majority of that population residing just off the coast of Cape Cod. The technology, which was first launched in 2012 and updated to its 2.0 version last year, uses a state-of-the-art acoustic detection system and hydrophones located on “smart buoys” to record vocalizations of right whales onto a central database. A yellow whale tail appears on a nautical map to inform mariners using the app of a right whale’s presence in the area within the past 24 hours. Users may manually report any whale sighting to warn other vessels on the water. The app is also equipped with a detailed nautical chart that indicates seasonal management areas, mandatory ship reporting reminders, areas to avoid, recommended routes, speed restriction areas and a right whale identification gallery. Whale Alert can be downloaded for free on iTunes and is compatible with the iPhone and iPad. –Jordan Hitchcock fa l m o u t h m a g .co m

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PRIMITIVE TABLES and CUPBOARDS FROM ANTIQUE WOODS ALSO FURNITURE MADE FROM NEW WOODS Green Creative Furniture Since 1970

2454 Meetinghouse Way, Exit 5, Route 149, West Barnstable, MA 02668 508.362.2676 • open 7 days 9-4 • www.westbarnstabletables.com

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} around town BY RACHAEL DEVANEY PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARIANNE LEE

n 1948 Tom Brown was given a Lionel Train set for Christmas. He says it was “the biggest and most important gift” a kid could get at that time. The Christmas present was the beginning of Brown’s train collection, which has now grown to be one of the largest train sets in the state. So big in fact, that Brown, a retired neurologist and Falmouth resident, houses it in his two-car garage that was recently renovated with air conditioning and heating to complete what Brown calls his “train room.” The collection, which Brown has been toiling with for over 20 years, is modeled after the Pennsylvania Railroad of 1948 and includes 17 different storage tracks. With each track carrying a train and a locomotive that run off of small electric motors, there is also an electric transformer that generates electricity to the tracks. Brown says over time he managed to purchase one of each class of steam and diesel locomotive and says he explored a variety of avenues that would eventually help him complete his collection. “There are so many different places to buy classic trains, but my favorite is Grandpa’s Trains in Warwick, R.I. I also navigate the web and have found a number of large dealers that list what’s available,” Brown says. “Lionel Trains is also still in business and 24

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while it has changed hands several times they still sell great things of high quality.” In addition to the actual track system, Brown also spent extensive time on scenery and employed his friend and former Disney illustrator Kathleen Hall (see her work featured on page 118) to create a winter wonderland backdrop depicting central Pennsylvania’s infamous rolling hills and cavernous mountains. And while Brown contends that his collection has “pretty much” reached capacity, he finally feels a “great satisfaction” with the display that he built from the ground up. “For years I have been chasing pieces to complete this collection, so it is actually a recent phenomenon that I have realized that there is nothing left to chase—but only time to enjoy what I built,” Brown says. “Today’s kids get computers and things like that, but back at the age of five receiving a train set was a big deal. That is a typical story for many model railroaders and I’m happy to be able to share that.” fa l m o u t h m a g .co m

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HUGS AND KISSES

Custom Mahogany Screen & Storm Doors 1714 Main St., Brewster, MA • 508.896.8900 • www.seaportshutter.com

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} around town

Signature Sips Sit back, relax and sip on one of these sinfully-good signature cocktails from some of the town’s standout restaurants. BY JACQUELYN MYSLIWIEC PHOTOGRAPHY BY LUKE SIMPSON

Cappuccino Martini 1 oz. Van Gough Double Espresso vodka  1 oz. Absolut Vanilla Vodka  1 oz. Bailey’s Irish Cream  1 oz. Godiva Chocolate Liquor  Garnish with cocoa powder rim and chocolate syrup swirl inside the glass Celestino’s Restaurant 444 N. Falmouth Hwy #5 508-392-9741 celestinosnorth.com 

Mai Tai 1 oz. Light rum 1/2 oz. Amaretto  1/2 oz. Orange liquer,  1 oz.fresh squeeze orange juice  1 oz. Pineapple juice  Dash of grenadine  1 oz. Dark rum floater  Garnish with slice of fresh pineapple, orange, lime and a cherry 

C Salt Old Fashioned

Quahog Republic 97 Spring Bars Rd. 508-540-4111 quahogrepublic.com

2 1/2 oz. Old Grand-Dad 114 Bourbon  Dash of cherry bitters Dash of orange bitters Dash of old fashioned bitters  1 oz. Dark simple syrup   Garnish with brandy cherries, twist of orange, and twist of lemon C Salt, 75 Davis Straits 774-763-2954 csaltfalmouth.com

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HOME

BATH & BODY

TABLETOP

BABY

Simon Pearce • Bella Tunno • L’Occitane • Soundview Millworks Thymes • Portmeirion • Dune Jewelry • Peking Handicraft • Jelly Cat N O W O P E N I N O U R N E W L O C AT I O N 1379 Rte 28A Cataumet MA 508-539-0505 • villagetradingcompany.com

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} around town Side Car

(early 1900s classic) 2 oz. St.-Remy brandy 1 oz. Combier triple sec  1 oz. lemon cordial

Garnish with a twist of lemon Glass Onion, 37 North Main St. 508-540-3730, theglassoniondining.com 

Mango Margarita 1 1/2 oz. Camarena Silver Tequila  1 oz. Patron Citronge  Dash of Habanero sauce  1 oz. Fresh mango puree  1 oz. Margarita mix (Añejo has their own secret recipe) Garnish with habanero salt on rim, and habanero pepper (do not eat the pepper!)  Añejo, 188 Main St., 508-388-7631  anejomexicanbistro.com 

Bloody Mary 1/12 oz. Vodka of choice 3 oz. V8 juice 1 tsp. of house-made mexi-carrot pickling brine Small scoop of horseradish sauce  Dash of Worcestershire sauce Dash of smoked salt Fresh ground pepper  Garnish with Garden Veggies (Pickle Jar’s house-marinated mushrooms, cauliflower, olives, carrots and green beens) Pickle Jar Kitchen, 170 Main St. 508-540-6760, picklejarkitchen.com 

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TITLE

} around town

Totally Toffee

B

everly Ricketson knows her toffee. The Falmouth resident makes the decadent candy as a signature gift for friends and family, using a recipe that has taken her 25 years to perfect. While she enjoyed giving away her sweet treats, she had always wondered about starting a business. Last year, Ricketson stopped speculating and turned her pipe dream into reality, starting a new venture called Cape Cod Gourmet Toffee.

“I made it my New Year’s resolution,” Ricketson says. “Toffee is my passion.” Handmade in small batches in her kitchen, the candy strikes a perfect balance between crunchy and smooth to the taste. While only a few ingredients are used, making the toffee is extremely labor intensive. The conditions have to be just right, Ricketson says, and low humidity is key. She roasts the almonds herself, coats both sides with chocolate and walnuts and adds a special ingredient: sea salt sourced from Cape Abilities Sea Salt works. Ricketson credits her son with the idea to add salt, saying that the ingredient drove home the concept of making a truly local product. “For me, using Cape Abilities’ salt meant donating to a worthy cause,” she explains. In line with its gourmet flavor, the toffee is beautifully packaged by Ricketson in 2 to 8 ounce bags and gift sets, with tags that read “Touched by the Sea Salt Breeze.” This very special toffee is available at a number of Cape Cod gourmet food retailers including Falmouth’s Windfall Market, West Falmouth Market and Woods Hole Market. For more information about where to buy, at the end of visit: capecodgourmettoffee.com. –Colby Radomski

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Blinds, Shades, Shutters, Woven Woods, Drapes and more... Budget Blinds makes it easy! In-Home Consultation • Expert Measuring • Professional Installation • The Strongest Warranty

Contact your local Style Consultant today at 508.539.9989

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} around town

Our Town By Jaci Conry Photography By Robert Manz

C

ape Cod was named by English explorer Bartholomew Gosnold for the vast schools of codfish he found in the waters surrounding the sandy peninsula. Lore says that when Gosnold came upon the area that is now Falmouth, the explorer was so entranced by it that when the town was officially incorporated in1686, he gave it the name of his home port, Falmouth, Cornwall, England. Proud and protective of its heritage, Falmouth has seven historic districts, four of which are on the National Register of Historic Places including the Falmouth Village Green—a militia training ground during the Revolutionary War—which is surrounded by stately antique Colonial, Federal and Georgian homes. The green anchors Main Street, the town’s bustling center of activity.

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Falmouth Museums on the Green pays homage to all of the town’s eras by offering tours of its two meticulously restored 18th-century house museums. Additionally, the public is frequently invited into the organization’s newly constructed cultural center for lectures, exhibits and culinary demonstrations. When it comes to Falmouth’s architectural treasures, there’s no greater gem than Highfield Hall. Built by the Beebe family in 1878, the rambling Stick-style Queen Anne mansion was surrounded by 700 acres of woodland and had one of the country’s first billiard rooms, a grand entry hall and massive front staircase, and exquisite hand carved mantles on all of the summer home’s 16 fireplaces. Slated for a wrecking ball in the 1990s, Highfield had become a derelict structure that was unrecognizable fa l m o u t h m a g .co m

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} around town from its heyday. A group of concerned citizens rallied to save the building and thanks to an extensive restoration, the residence retains its original luster and now functions as a wedding venue and cultural center with events, classes for all ages, stunning gardens and nearly 400 acres of nature trails known as Beebe Woods. With 68 miles of coastline, 10 town-run beaches and 14 harbors, the town’s access to the ocean (and its proximity to Martha’s Vineyard — it is 6 nautical miles from Falmouth Harbor to Oak Bluffs) is one of the biggest draws. Of the town’s eight distinct villages, the most notable is Woods Hole, home to the worldrenowned Marine Biological Laboratory and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (responsible for the discovery of the RMS Titantic). At the end of Woods Hole’s main drag, Water Street, the Woods Hole Science Aquarium is the oldest aquarium in the nation. Marine exhibits and hands-on experiences have taken

YOUR CAPE

place since 1885, and seals have lived in the tank out front for as long as any local can remember. The words to the lauded patriotic ballad “America the Beautiful” were penned by Falmouth native Katherine Lee Bates. In honor of Bates, the Shining Sea Bikeway was named for a line in the song. The bike path follows the original route of the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad that once ran from Buzzards Bay, through North and West Falmouth, around Woods Hole and into Falmouth Station. Now an over 10-mile stretch beginning on Old County Road in North Falmouth, the rail trail traverses salt marshes, cranberry bogs, ponds and woodlands. Most awe-inspiring is the stretch that runs along the seashore just past Surf Drive Beach—it’s the only bikeway on Cape Cod that has a section along the ocean. From here, you can take in majestic views of the beach and its seashell-strewn coastline, the boating activity toward Martha’s Vineyard, and the storied beacon, Nobska Light, overlooking the Atlantic.

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} around town G O TO THAT PL AC E IN T IME W HE RE E V E RY T HING IS J US T RIGHT. Come, wiggle your toes in the legendary sands of Old Silver Beach. Enjoy creative cuisine inspired by the locale. Do as much or as little as you want. Leave with memories to last a lifetime, and plans to return again soon.

Located on

O l d S i lv e r B e a c h , C a p e C o d 350 Quaker Road, North Falmouth, Massachusetts

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seacrestbeachhotel.com

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Listen carefully, you’ll hear the sound of great local banking. If personal service from a bank that is always here for you and reinvests in our communities to keep them strong sounds good, then welcome to local banking at Martha’s Vineyard Savings Bank. Now with two convenient full service branches that serve Falmouth and Woods Hole.

397 Palmer Avenue, Falmouth 2 Water Street, Woods Hole

Banking that’s Vineyard Sound

508-627-4266 • www.mvbank.com Personal and Business Banking • Residential and Commercial Lending Member FDIC Member DIF

Enjoy a day on Pleasant Bay! 1/2

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WE CAN HELP YOU PLAN THE BEST DAY FOR YOUR TRIP

Nauset Marine offers an assortment of boats for rent or for cruising or sightseeing. By the half day or full day, Nauset Marine East Boat Rentals are the best on the Cape, worry free and ready to go. 235 Main Street, Orleans, MA 02653 • 508-255-3045 • www.NausetMarine.com fa l m o u t h m a g .co m

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TITLE

} around town

FISHING

Falmouth BY TOM RICHARDSON

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WITH MILES OF COASTLINE

and a close proximity to the Islands, Falmouth is an ideal place to walk the beach or launch a boat for a day of fishing. Here’s what you can expect to find in the local waters from spring through fall. MAY–early JUNE: The Falmouth fishing season generally kicks off in mid-May, when large schools of squid migrate into Nantucket Sound. Hot on their heels are big bluefish and striped bass. As water temperatures hit the 55-degree mark, “racer” bluefish in the 10-15 pound range invade the beachfronts and flats, from Waquoit to Wianno. Larger stripers also begin to arrive at this time, filtering into the local salt ponds, coves and estuaries in search of herring and silversides. Late May also marks the start of sea bass season, with prime fishing running through June. The waters of Buzzards Bay teem with big sea bass and scup, which gather to spawn in 15 to 35 feet of water at this time. JUNE: This month brings more consistent striper action, as the bigger fish begin taking up station in the rips and around the rocky shores and holes of the Elizabeth Islands, including Woods Hole, Quicks Hole and Robinsons Hole. The numerous rips in Nantucket and Vineyard Sounds will also hold stripers at this time. Black sea bass and scup continue to provide action for bottom fishermen through the month, although it’s best to target smaller rock piles, ledges and wrecks as June draws to a close. Fluke fishing also picks up CONTINUED

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} around town mid-month, with legal fish available in both Nantucket and Vineyard Sounds. This is great fun for summer boaters and can yield some tasty dinners, as well. For trophy flounder, head for Nomans Island or the deeper shoals off Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard. Also in June, bluefin anglers begin to keep their ear to the ground for tuna off Chatham or south of the islands.

JULY: Come July, fishing for stripers largely becomes a night or dawn-patrol game for plug- and fly-casters. Seasoned fishermen looking to take a decent fish on light gear often make the run to the Elizabeth Islands to score in the false-dawn hour. Those who arrive after 7 a.m. may not get a sniff. Trolling tube lures and parachute jigs on wire line is often the key to scoring keeper-size bass and bigger blues during the mid-day hours; sharpies target the big rips and rocky areas in the Sounds, off Monomoy or around the islands. Night fishing with eels is another go-to technique for trophy bass in midsummer, but takes plenty of local knowledge to do it safely and effectively. Offshore fishing hits high gear in July, and Falmouth makes a great jumping-off spot for trips to the canyons or the closer grounds along the 20- and 30-fathom lines. Sharks, mahi, tuna and white marlin are all possible on daytrips if conditions are right.

Bait & Tackle

Charters

eastmanstackle.com

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Eastman’s Tackle

Riptide Charters Bluefin Charters bluefin-charters.com

Islander Sportfishing falmouthcharters.com

AUGUST: Late August often brings action with false albacore and bonito, as well as Spanish mackerel, to the waters of Nantucket Sound, Vineyard Sound and Buzzards Bay. “Albies” and “bones” are powerful inshore fish, but can be fiendishly hard to hook at times (tip: try small, unweighted Slug-Gos and Zoom Flukes). Both species hang around through mid-October. FALL: Fall fishing for stripers and blues, once the best of the year, has been lackluster in recent years, although inshore blitzes are still possible as the fish migrate west and south. Baiting with eels or menhaden (if available) in the Elizabeth Islands can produce some hefty bass at this time, however. As October rolls around, many anglers put the cap on their season by targeting tautog, which move inshore to feed over shallow wrecks and rock piles at this time. Prime fishing can last right through Thanksgiving, if the weather holds.

License Requirements

A Recreational Saltwater Fishing Permit is required to fish the marine waters of Massachusetts out to 3 miles from shore. Cost is $10 for both residents and non-residents. For more information, visit: mass.gov/dmf

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} out & about

DE R B Y PA R T Y Highfield Hall & Gardens hosted its annual entucky Derby party in May 2015.

H O L I DAY B A L L Highfield Hall & Ga dens hosted a dazzling holiday party in December 2014.

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Home to 45 stores & restaurants! Enjoy wide sidewalks, benches, and detailed landscaping, including a Main Street section perfect for walking and window-shopping. Conveniently located on Route 28 near the intersection of Routes 495 and 195.

Retailers include: Target | Lowe’s L.L.Bean Outlet T.J.Maxx | JCPenney Staples | Old Navy

Dining: Casa Cancun Cosi LongHorn Steakhouse Qdoba Mexican Grill Red Robin

2421 Cranberry Highway, Wareham

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www.warehamcrossing.com

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Faces Of A radio personality. A farmer and a founder of the Falmouth Road Race. Award-winning scientists and a local bookstore owner. These are some of the individuals who’ve left a mark on the community and are featured in this issue’s “Faces of Falmouth.” While their stories are unique and wildly inspiring, they all share one common mission: to make their beloved Falmouth a better place. BY RACHAEL DEVANEY PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAN CUTRONA

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PAUL BLACKMORE

BILL ZAMMER The Entrepreneur

H

E MOVED TO CAPE COD TO RETIRE, but in a twist, businessman Bill Zammer launched his first restaurant in Mashpee, instead. After opening the Popponesset Inn in 1988, 10 more ventures followed over the next 14 years, including Ballymeade Country Club, Flying Bridge Restaurant, Coonamessett Inn, Falmouth Hotel, Red Horse Inn, Cape Cod Catering and Pinehills Golf Course in Plymouth, to name a few. With a spectrum of venues, Zammer says he felt like he had “finally made it” career-wise and began building a buzz around the Flying Bridge and Coonamessett Inn as prime wedding locations. With hundreds of weddings passing

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through the two locations, he says he felt “instantly gratified,” helping couples begin their lives together. Zammer has a presence on a number of boards across the Cape including Cape Cod Health Care, Cape Cod Community College, and the Boys & Girls Club of Cape Cod among others. He says it is his duty as a community member to “give back.” “I am very Cape-centric and my wife and I feel that it is our duty to help improve the community that we live in,” Zammer says. “I just love the community in general, and I feel like the whole upper Cape is home to a great group of people. It’s funny that when I think back, I had always wanted to be on Cape Cod to retire. But coming and being able to expand and be in business here, and now be so involved in the community— it is really everything I ever wanted.”

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INTERVIEW

C

AROL CHITTENDEN IS A SELF-PROCLAIMED “BOOK WOMAN,” whose love of reading extends from biographies to cereal boxes. The former owner of Eight Cousins bookstore on Main Street (which she sold this year), one-time librarian Chittenden and her store have been fixtures in the Falmouth community for nearly three decades. Among its numerous accolades, in 2009, Eight Cousins was recognized as the “Best Children’s Bookstore in New England” by New York Magazine. With 20,000 titles on its stock list, it is now the last standing privately owned bookstore in Falmouth, one of a small handful left on Cape Cod. Eight Cousins has maintained a following—even in spite of big box stores and the evolution of reading tablets. “No gadget will replace the sense of a sleepy child sitting in your lap as you turn the pages of a picture book,” Chittenden says. “There is that physical sense about reading that our customers still very much want and while we are aware that they use tablets, they still come into the store when they are ‘Kindled-out.’” Chittenden says the store’s change of ownership was a long time coming. Though change is inevitable, she is confident that certain things will remain the same—like the store’s “Giving Tree,” which hosts 500 names of local children in the area who will receive donated gifts from customers, at a 15 percent discount from the store. “Eight Cousins has always been very connected to the community, which has always been important for our survival. I have always enjoyed that aspect and even after I retire, I plan to stay here,” Chittenden says.

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INDY TODD ADMITS SHE “HAD THE JITTERS,” before she hit the air as a disc jockey back in 1981.

But Todd found her voice soon enough. Now, with more than 30 years of television and radio under her belt, she is the managing editorial director for WCAI. On her award-winning show, “The Point,” she tackles a number of critical topics through the mic—from gardening and birding to politics, mental health issues, and even science and music shows. At the start of her career, there were few opportunities for women in broadcasting. “You would often find women as sidekicks [on radio shows]. For a woman to have her own show was a big deal back then,” Todd explains. If Todd has it her way, she says she will stay at WCAI for the remainder of her career. She will

also continue to be involved with organizations including the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s Sea Grant Marine Outreach Guidance Group, Marine Biological Laboratory’s Falmouth Forum Fundraising Committee, the Turkey Land Cove Foundation on Martha’s Vineyard and the The ARC of Cape Cod. As for the future of “The Point, which she hosts and produces, Todd says the Cape community at large has so many interesting people and topics that she will “never run out of material.” “I love it here and, whether it’s Woods Hole or Provincetown, this is a magical place and that is what keeps the material fresh,” she says. “Each Cape town has a different personality and charm. To be able to meet people and find out what they are interested in is the best part of my job.”

The Woman Behind the Mic

MINDY TODD

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INTERVIEW

RON SMOLOWITZ Falmouth’s Farmer

W

HEN RON SMOLOWITZ WAS A BOAT CAPTAIN AT SEA he had dreams about “becoming a farmer” after retirement. And that’s exactly what he did. From a patch of land the former fisheries research expert bought in 1984, his Coonamessett Farm, a membership pickyour-own farm, has grown into a year-round operation, with a greenhouse, a general store, a petting zoo, a Jamaican buffet and even an ice cream stand. With no formal farm training, Smolowitz admits he gained the bulk of his knowledge through “trial and error.” He grows vegetables, flowers and berries, houses livestock and raises turkeys for meat and chickens for eggs. There are alpacas and sheep for wool.

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“Now when you look out on the back deck, it looks like Tuscany,” says Smolowitz, a Falmouth resident since 1971. In 2008, Smolowitz helped form the Coonamessett Farm Foundation, a nonprofit whose mission is to develop technology in support of farming and fishing communities that are environmentally sound, socially equitable, economically feasible, and compatible with a sustainable future. The farm itself is equipped with a photovoltaic array system, a wind turbine, and it composts using green manure crops. “Many of the younger members are on board with buying fresh and buying local [even if it costs more] and that makes a world of difference,” he says. “Falmouth is also a highly educated and diverse community, and people pay attention to the environment they live in. We don’t build high-rises and vast shopping malls and people appreciate small businesses like Coonamessett Farm.” fa l m o u t h m a g .co m

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OMMY LEONARD SAYS HIS LIFE “WOULD HAVE BEEN INTOLERABLE” without a dream.

Leonard’s reverie of the Falmouth Road Race came true in 1973, on his birthday, with the help of former Falmouth High School track coach John Carroll and then town recreation director Rich Sherman. Ninety-three runners participated in the inaugural race—including Leonard—which raised money to support the girls track team. He

remembers the day “like it was yesterday,” with the weather a challenging combination of high winds and rain. Runners pushed on eagerly to finish the 7.3-mile route “I was inspired by Frank Shorter, who had just won the gold medal in the Munich 1972 Olympics. I was tending bar up in Falmouth Heights and as I watched him run, I realized that I wanted to share my love of running with everybody,” Leonard says. “And when we actually went through with it, and saw the smiles on every single runner as they crossed the finish line, we knew we would continue this race. But it wouldn’t have become what it is now if it wasn’t for Rich and John—they are the unsung heroes.” After 43 years, the race has morphed into one of the most famous running events in the country. With New Balance as its title sponsor, it now attracts more than 12,000 runners, including many of the world’s elite. The event has become what Leonard calls “the heartbeat of Falmouth,” and while Leonard is not involved with planning anymore, he still attends every year to cheer on his friends and fellow runners as they cross the finish line. “Once we secured Perrier as our first sponsor, things really took off. Olympic champions like Frank Shorter and Bill Rodgers showed up, which encouraged runners from all over the world to be here,” Leonard says. “And when The Boston Globe brought in a helicopter and caught a picture of everyone running past Nobska Lighthouse it was picked up by papers all around the world. We knew we had made it.” As the 24-time marathon runner turns 82 this year, he says he will be “front and center” at the race. “Falmouth is like an addiction. It has a hold on me and the people here support me and are behind me 100 percent,” he says. “And as far as the race goes, it turned into something that kept me alive and became my salvation.”

T O M M YThe Racing Legend LEONARD fa l m o u t h m a g .co m

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INTERVIEW

A M Y K UK ULYA F

OR AMY KUKULYA, THE OCEAN HAS ALWAYS BEEN HER “PLAYGROUND.” As a senior engineering technician at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Kukulya designs underwater robots, also called REMUS autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV), which have the capability to track, follow and film underwater animals like sharks, whales and turtles. Kukulya and her team of ocean physicists and engineers recently completed two field seasons of successful expeditions studying sharks and documenting never-before-seen behaviors. The results have been nationally published and featured on TV.

A New Jersey native and a graduate of Rutgers University in environmental policy, Kukulya says with remotely operated vehicles (ROVs), “ignited” her love for underwater robotics. While she admits that her work can be “highly complicated,” there are also “huge perks to the job,” including a recent charter to Guadalupe where her team was filmed by

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The Robotics Researcher the Discovery Channel while they did research from underwater shark cages. “The first time I went into the cage with the rest of the charter, we were packed in like sardines and I felt like I was in a fish tank and the sharks were paying admission to come see the humans. But the next day I went in alone and I felt free and it was so cool to observe the sharks in their own element,” Kukulya says. “It was a neat experience, and it makes this job pretty unique.” And as Kukulya and her team continue to pique interest around the world, she says the ocean continues to be her “therapy,” especially when the goes out in her recreational lobster boat. “It’s a different form of exploration for me that I do on my own time, and something as simple as visiting a deserted island and appreciating simpler things reminds me how much I really love the water—it’s my temple.”

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W

Since taking over at WHOI, Avery made it a priority to increase awareness of the ocean’s importance, often focusing her energy on the intersection of atmospheric, earth and ocean science. Her research includes studies on circulation and precipitation, climate variability and water resources, and the development of new radar techniques and instruments for remote sensing. “I’ve been really pushing the frontiers of new oceanographic observing infrastructure and have also subscribed to larger projects like state-of-the-art ocean observing systems. We have also furthered the development of autonomous underwater vehicles, and have explored several projects on informatics, and spent a lot of time making administration functions more efficient by updating systems so that we are an up-to-date 21st-century scientific research institution,” Avery says. “We also opened the Laboratory for Ocean Sensors and Observing Systems, which has been quite successful, and then of course we have a new ship coming in— so those are a few highlights.” Without a doubt, Avery will leave a standing legacy at WHOI, and as she embarks on the next chapter of her career, she just wants to be remembered for her “passion for discovery.”

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PAUL BLACKMORE

PHOTOGR APHY BY PAUL BL ACK MORE

HILE SUSAN AVERY BECAME THE FIRST WOMAN PRESIDENT AND DIRECTOR of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in 2008, she says she would rather be recognized for being the “first atmospheric scientist.” Avery, who left her position on July 1, says she hopes she has helped implement projects at WHOI that “will serve as building blocks” for the next president.

SUSAN AVERY The Science Pioneer

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TITLE

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THE YEAR I GRADUATED from high school, a friend’s parents owned a weathered cottage perched on the sands of Surf Drive Beach. It was one room with a pellet stove. The interior walls were clad with unfinished wood planks and the pine floors had a layer of sand that perpetually covered them like a permanent finish. Outside there was a deck; a few steps down, the beach. We gathered there, my friends and I, a lot during that spring and summer. I loved that place. There was no television or phone line; it felt sealed up in time. In the darkness we listened to waves rolling in, dipped our toes in the surf and counted the stars. Being at that cottage on the beach felt like heaven.

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COASTAL LIVING TITLE

5 LIGHTHOUSES ARE VISIBLE FROM THIS COTTAGE ON SURF DRIVE BEACH.

1 3

4 5

2

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4 East Chop 5 Cape Poge

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Since then, the tiny cottages along Surf Drive—a lovely meandering strip that follows the contours of the coast winding its way from Falmouth to Woods Hole—have held a mystique for me. I smile as I take in their gray-shingled exteriors, the rustic wooden signs proclaiming names like “Summersworth” precariously affixed to their facades. In this era of high tech and architectural largess, the cottages represent a simpler time. These happy little houses are relics of a time gone by. I fantasize about owning one someday, somehow.

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COASTAL LIVING

These cottages along the beach date back more than 120 years, says Michael LeBlanc, president of the Falmouth Bathing Beach Association, the group that maintains the stretch of beach upon which more than half of the cottages reside. The tiny structures were initially built as simple beach cabanas. Residents of The Moors Association—a collective of homes located in and around Elm Road and Surf Drive—utilized the structures as spots to change into their swimsuits before hitting the beach. According to the 300 Committee—a local, private non-profit

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By the 1950s and 1960s, the early cabanas had been

land trust formed in 1985 with a mission to preserve Falmouth’s

rebuilt and more had been constructed. No longer

natural lands—for many years the length of beach along Surf

just changing areas, the cottages had evolved in

Drive was home to 26 privately owned cabanas. In the summer

design, becoming more robust with multiple rooms,

of 1991, Hurricane Bob hammered the coast of Cape Cod, causing

including bathrooms, and several had kitchenettes.

extensive flooding and destruction to much of the exposed

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COASTAL LIVING

shoreline. The cabanas were caught in the storm’s fury. Eleven of the 26 cabanas were destroyed or severely damaged, and several of the buildings not destroyed were carried off their foundations into Salt Pond across the street. Only a handful escaped with little structural damage.

In an effort to reclaim more open space, the town bought six parcels of land occupied by cottages that had been destroyed. The owners of the remaining cottages could not repair their damaged homes unless they complied with flood insurance regulations, says Bill Peters, who owned one of the cottages during Hurricane Bob. “Before Hurricane Bob, all of the cottages had foundations on the ground. After Hurricane Bob, if your cottage was more than 50 percent damaged it had to go up on stilts,” says LeBlanc, who is reluctant to share too many details about the community of cottages he’s belonged to since the 1980s. “We’ve lasted this long mostly because we stay to ourselves,” says LeBlanc. “We’ve got a unique set-up down here. We run through our own sets of rules and governing.” Many of the cottages are passed on from one generation to another. “A couple of the

letters for five years asking if anyone would consider selling.

cottages have been in the same family for 70 or 80

In 2012, a “For Sale” sign appeared in front of one cottage on a

years,” says LeBlanc.

Friday night. “On Saturday morning, we went to see it and put in an offer right away. It was accepted before anyone else had

Apparently, I’m not the only one yearning to claim

a chance to see the place,” recall the homeowners.

one of the cottages as my own. One Falmouth

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couple (who have asked to remain anonymous),

After the homeowners purchased the house, they put in a

now the owners of a Surf Drive Beach cottage, sent

new floor and an upgraded bathroom. “Otherwise, it’s pretty

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much the way it was when we bought it,” they explain.

Their family spends most of the summer at the cottage.

While the cottage was one that blew across the street

They gather on the beach, swim, fish and kayak, and host

and into Salt Pond during Hurricane Bob, much of the

barbecues on the spacious deck overlooking the sea. They

original 1950s structure remains intact. “I was told that

also use it as a retreat in the fall and even on the coldest

even though the house was laying in the pond, things were

winter days.

still neatly arranged in the cabinets and drawers,” says the homeowner. “A crane lifted the structure and put it on top

“It’s a special place,” the homeowners say. “Everybody here

of stilts.”

is very appreciative of what they have.”

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TITLE DESIGN

Kitchen designed by Roomscapes Luxury Design Center. Photograph by Dan Cutrona

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Mark takes special pride in the stairway, with stringing cut from a solid piece of steel and finished with black primer. The living room’s raised hearth (left) is visible from the dining room table.

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Industrial elements, such as the pendant lighting and stainless steel cabinetry seen in this kitchen, may also be integrated to align with contemporary trends.

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HOME DESIGNS DESIGN

The functional areas, including laundry, powder room and storage closets, are clustered near the entry to the home, away from the living spaces.

dining area to the left. At the far end, a sunroom extends to the rear of the property, overlooking the meadow and wetlands beyond. “The main floor is basically one room with a wooden box in it,” Mark says. A home office/study area is tucked into that box but open to the living areas because, he notes, “There’s a theory that children don’t like to be sent to Siberia to study.” The “box” also houses a powder room, closet, laundry and storage space. “When you walk in, you have stuff,” says Mark. “This is a place to drop your stuff.” This area is easily accessible from the entry, but discreetly tucked to the side, so visitors simply bypass the functional space en route to the living areas. The kitchen showcases a custom designed island/counter crafted by Richard Corner, who made all of the specialty steel components in the house. Rosemary Porto, senior designer for Poggenpohl – Boston (and recent inductee into the New England Design Hall of Fame), assisted in the design of the kitchen, which features Poggenpohl cabinetry and gray laminate counters that tie into the gray painted beams.

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The gray laminate counters and Poggenpohl cabinetry reference the ceiling beams.

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Instead of cabinets flanking the cooktop and vent, two windows allow natural light to flood into the room. Upper cabinets are turned so that the sides face out and the open shelves are more easily accessed. Mark has a special appreciation for the craftsmanship reflected in the staircase, a focal point of the main floor, constructed of ash planks and steel. The stair stringers were cut from a single, solid piece of steel and then coated with black primer. “It’s customary for steel workers to grind the edges off, but the machines get away from them and make these erratic markings,” says Mark, who chose to leave those markings visible. “It’s so beautiful. The hand of man is on them. How it’s made makes it better. If you express how things are made, there’s an authenticity to that. And that’s important to this house.” That authenticity is apparent again in the acid-etched steel fireplace surround, also fabricated by Corner. The mantel is a simple raw I-beam and the raised hearth is concrete. “You drop acid onto a steel plate, it oxidizes, then you hose it off and seal it,” explains Mark. “Working with artists like Rich Corner allows us to do things like this. Again, how it’s made makes it better.”

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TITLE DESIGN

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“We created a textural, open-flowing house. This is my experimental house.” —Mark Hutker

A private retreat off the master bedroom holds a spa with views of the meadow and wetlands below.

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TITLE DESIGN

The sunroom, with rot-resistant red cedar tongue and groove walls that reference the red cedar outside, is a “no-brainer,” according to Mark. “Every house should have one,” he says. “It draws you in and allows you to enjoy the breeze and sun without bugs.” Upstairs, a custom-fitted studio provides a light-drenched space for Carla to exercise her talents as a fashion designer, fabric painter and jewelry maker. The adjacent master suite includes a custom headboard, perfectly proportioned to the couple’s sizes, and exposed fir ceiling. The en suite bathroom features Carrara marble on the countertops and radiant heated floors; ash shelving below the sinks and rectangular mirrors affixed to the windows above ensure maximum natural light. An outdoor shower, perched high above ground and enclosed by canvas sailcloth, is accessed directly from the indoor shower. If you prefer an al fresco soak, an inviting hot tub sits on the deck outside the master bedroom. The interior décor, according to Mark and Carla, “evolved.” They acknowledge a few revisions made along the way before achieving the eclectic, contemporary and comfortable ambience they sought. Art throughout the home is all by friends or acquaintances, including several pieces by Joe McGurl of Cataumet. The lower level houses a media/family room with sliding panel doors, so the space can be closed off if the viewing gets particularly loud. Daughter Harly’s room features a granite-topped sink, and son Evan’s room includes the curved wall with built-in shelving. A full bath, wine storage and Mark’s spacious office complete this walk-out level. “The house appears modest at first, but it kind of unfolds,” says Mark. Unfold it does, “like the hand of man,” revealing thoughtful, original design that adheres to the ethic of simplicity the Hutkers embrace. 70

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The Hutkers’ first home had an exposed fir ceiling, so they replicated it here in their master bedroom. “It makes us feel at home,” says Mark.

Hutker Architects has designed more than 300 homes in New England. Hutker Architects’ second book, A Sense of Place, (The Monacelli Press, 2015) showcases more than 200 stunning photographs and five essays detailing the evolution of the contemporary “Cape House.” For more information, visit: hutkerarchitects.com.

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Interior Design by Sundries

Visit Our Shop for a Curated Selection of: Furniture • Accessories • Lighting • Pillows & Thows Linens • Window Treatments fa508.495.5588 l m o u t h m a g .co|mRte. 28

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Across from the Falmouth Mall | SundriesFurniture.com

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A DAY DO W The shopper’s walking guide to boutiques in downtown Falmouth. BY COLBY RADOMSKI AND JORDAN HITCHCOCK PHOTOGRAPHY BY TOMMY COSTELLO

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O WNTOWN Dress, In The Pink; Skim boards, Board Stiff; Hanging chair, Twigs; Cheese cutting board, The Homespun Garden; Skateboard, Board Stiff; “Falmouth” sign, The Homespun Garden; Bag, Touché

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SHOPPING

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With a number of shops, boutiques and galleries all intermixed and within walking distance of one another, downtown Falmouth is an ideal destination for those looking to shop ‘til they drop! All you need is a pair of comfy shoes and you’re ready to hit the pavement.

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REAL BODIES Queen’s Buyway 100 Palmer Ave. 508-548-5260 realbodies.com

234 Main St. 508-495-0598

This welcoming shop at the heart of Main Street carries affordable women’s clothing, stylish handbags, sandals and funky accessories. They have a huge display of jewelry, including pieces from LeStage, Dune Jewelry, and My Cape/My Town Designs, as well as a number of nauticalthemed and monogrammed necklaces, bracelets and earrings. Touché has a large children’s corner that includes toys and books, as well as a wide selection of unique gifts, like model ships and clocks, etched glassware, pet gifts and greeting cards.

Home Décor, Gifts & Furnishings

Queen’s Buyway, 95 Palmer Avenue | FALMOUTH 508.540.8439 | vagabondview.com

AVAILABLE ANYTIME,

ANYWHERE

Touché

This woman-owned store at Queen’s Buyway specializes in unique clothing that’s suitable for individuals of all shapes and sizes … quite literally for the real body! Their beautiful batik and print fashions, which come in various styles including dresses, caftans, scarves, pants and skirts, are both comfortable and affordable, with patterned material sourced from Bali, Indonesia.

TOUCHÉ

“Two great businesses, one great location”

DOWNLOAD THE

APP

Download the Cape Cod Magazine app at the iTunes App Store or at the Amazon Kindle Store. Buy a single issue or subscribe for the whole year.

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SHOPPING

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GREEN EYED DAISY 3

199 Main St., 508-495-0403 greeneyeddaisyboutique.com

MAD HATTER

This mother-daughter owned boutique specializes in fashion-forward and any-occasion wear, for day or evening. The store features affordable names as well as high-end designer styles from Aidan Mattox, 360 Sweater, Ecru and Tracy Reese. Green Eyed Daisy also carries a number of American-made brands including Bella Dahl, Hudson Jeans, Luna Luz, Komarov and Three Dot. Because no outfit is complete without the right accessories, the store sells footwear, bags, belts and jewelry. Bora, Liza Schwartz and Seasonal Whispers are among the domestically made jewelry lines sold in the store, as are locally made designs from Coastal Charms.

261 Main St. 508-548-1037

Your search for the perfect headwear ends at the Mad Hatter. From chic Derby hats and men’s fedoras, to cowboy hats, stylish sun visors, children’s wear and fun hats, this store has something for everyone! Brands include Scala, Helen Kaminski, Eric Javits, Elope, Rasta Imposta, Tilley, Sunday Afternoon and more.

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CAPE CHIC Queen’s Buyway 104 Palmer Ave. capechiccompany.com

Just a short wander from Main Street and nestled in Falmouth’s historic Queen’s Buyway, Cape Chic carries a fresh and exciting collection of coastal, casual, chic women’s apparel, jewelry and accessories. All Cape Chic items are selected for their unique contemporary styling, as well as their effortless ease to wear. You’ll discover unique items and finds not seen in other stores.

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TREASURE CHEST 233 Main St., 508-540-5000 treasurechestgifts.com

A ladies’ boutique carrying the hottest fashion trends for the savvy shopper, with styles ranging from Cape Cod casual to black tie affair. You’ll find a wide variety of classic and funky accessories, jewelry, chic handbags and colorful scarves to complete any new look. For gift-giving and entertaining, the store offers an eclectic selection of hostess pieces, decorative oil candles and fine metalware from brands like Nora Fleming and Beatriz Ball.

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IN THE PINK 199 Main St. 508-540-0697 inthepinkonline.com

Embrace the bright and lively patterns of the newest and trendiest Lilly Pulitzer selections. You’ll find clothing and accessories for any occasion, from comfortable and fashionable beachwear to colorful wedding attire. Shop dresses and bathing suits in a number of patterns and styles as well as sandals, earrings, statement necklaces and handbags that embody the signature look of Cape Cod and the Islands.

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MAXWELL & CO. 200 Main St. #1 508-540-8752 shop.maxwellandco.com

The trendy selections here are perfect for the discerning shopper who loves those hard-to-find pieces. Specializing in women’s and men’s fashions, Maxwell & Co.’s inventory includes top designer clothing, footwear, handbags and accessories from names like Maliparmi and John Varvatos. The store also offers an exceptional tailoring service where all items are hand-tailored, hand-pressed and perfected in-store. fa l m o u t h m a g .co m

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Trendy and elegant women’s clothing and accessories that take you from day to evening.

Featuring: 360 Sweater, Aidan Mattox, Ecru, Ted Baker and Tracy Reese. As well as American made brands: Bella Dahl, Bora, Hudson Jeans, Komarov, Luna Luz, Seasonal Whispers, Three Dots, Etc.

199 Main Street, Falmouth, Massachusetts 02540

508.495.0403

Shop our new and evolving online store at:

greeneyeddaisyboutique.com

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SHOPPING

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BOARD STIFF 193 Main St. 508-548-9555 boardstifffalmouth.com

Board Stiff

Surf’s up! Board Stiff carries gear for the adventure-seeker and has a wide selection of surfboards, skateboards and biking accessories from top name brands like Freestyle, Armor, Fat Tire and Element Skate. They also have a vast selection of men’s and women’s clothing and shoes from names like RipCurl, Reef, Fossil, Quiksilver, TOMS, Rainbow Sandals and Sanuk. The sunglass selection at Board Stiff is one of the largest on Cape Cod, featuring styles by Michael Kors, Ray Ban, Maui Jim, Oakley, Tom Ford and Oliver Peoples.

Board Stiff

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LIBERTY HOUSE

CALINE FOR KIDS

BUYWAY BOUTIQUE

119 Palmer Ave. 508-548-3900 libertyhousecapecod.com

149 Main St. 508-548-2533 calineforkids.com

Queen’s Buyway 47 N. Main St. 508-540-4884 buywayboutique.com

Located in Queen’s Buyway, Liberty House has a diverse selection of women’s clothing and accessories, including styles appropriate for work as well as fabulous looks for a night on the town. If you’re meandering down in Woods Hole, check out their second location on Water Street.

Caline For Kids is the go-to spot for fashionable finds for your little ones. Their extensive inventory includes stylish clothing for boys and girls, newborn to size 14, shoes, accessories, and high-quality baby gifts and toys. They carry over 50 name brands, from Patagonia to Tea and Sperry Topsider.

Frugal fashionistas look no further! This consignment boutique in Queen’s Buyway features upscale designerlabel clothing, shoes and accessories at a fraction of the original price.

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Coastal Casual Chic Effortlessly Stylish Delightfully Comfortable Uniquely Cape Chic

104 Palmer Avenue, Falmouth • 508.548.1232 capechiccompany.com

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THE HOMESPUN GARDEN 174 Main St. 508-457-4441

The Homespun Garden

We dare you to resist the beautiful special-occasion gifts and elegant items for you and your home. Exquisitely crafted pottery, jewelry, attractive frames, table linens and small decorative items are highlights of this charming shop’s bountiful goodies. Sailcloth bags made in Gloucester are perfect for the beach or a stroll around Main Street.

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SHOPPING

TWIGS OF FALMOUTH ............................. UNIQUE GIFTS, JEWELRY, PERSONAL & HOME ACCESSORIES

Twigs

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TWIGS 178 Main Street, Falmouth MA | 508.540.0767

Hats for Every Occasion!

From Sun Protection to The Kentucky Derby, We’ve Got You Covered. FE ATUREING: SC AL A , K ANGOL , KOORINGAL , BE TM AR, HELEN K A MINSK I, TILLE Y, PE TER GRIMM, FL AP HAPPY & MORE!

178 Main St. 508-540-0767

From candles to stylish handbags, jewelry to pottery and artwork, the items at Twigs are unique and have a story. Just ask the staff who found these treasures. The pieces bring people back time and again, with new and ever-changing inventory to make every guest’s experience memorable.  Proud to be the “go-to” store for that special gift, Twigs staff love to send people on their way with a package in the store’s signature wrapping.

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PORT CARGO Also carrying a wide range of women’s accessories & exclusive t-shirt lines. Follow us on Facebook!

261 Main Street, Falmouth, Massachusetts 02540 Open year round & daily through Christmas 508-548-1037 ~ call for winter hours

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156 Main St. 508-540-4466

Enjoy browsing the selection of moderately priced clothing

for women as well as a variety of accessories, including colorful scarves and handcrafted jewelry that’s sure to turn heads. Brands include Lisette, I.C. Fashion, Papillion and Funky Dorman.

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PURITAN CAPE COD 199 Main St. 508-548-0116 puritancapecod.com

Shop the looks of the season’s latest trends from casual to elegant. Women will find beautifully crafted jewelry and handbags from designers such as Longchamp and Kate Spade. The large shoe selection offers designs from Jack Rogers, Frye, Hunter and more. Men will find the perfectly fitted suit from designers like Hugo Boss, Vineyard Vines and Tommy Bahama.

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VAGABOND SIMPLE TREASURES Queen’s Buyway 95 Palmer Ave. 508-540-8439 vagabondview.com

This shabby-chic shop in Queen’s Buyway features a number of handmade jewelry items, children’s attire, upscale home décor, picture frames and unique hostess gifts. Vagabond View photo studio is located right next door.

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THE PINK POLKA DOT Queen’s Buyway 45 N. Main St. 508-540-3015

is a party planner’s paradise, carrying a beautiful assortment of stationery, notecards and personalized gifts. They also offer invitation and planning services on-site.

The Homespun Garden Linger Awhile

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UNDER THE SUN 22 Water St., Woods Hole, 508-540-3602 underthesunwoodshole. com

While it’s not on downtown’s main drag, Under The Sun is a spot worth visiting while in Falmouth for their collection of locally made pottery, jewelry, leather, glass and original watercolor prints. They have a wide variety of shoes, clothing and accessories from names like Birkenstock, Dansko, Reef, Chaco, Ariat and Teva.

Featuring Gifts and Home Décor made on Cape Cod. 174 Main Street, Falmouth | 508.457.4441

This chic boutique

Puritan Cape Cod

cape cod jewelry

234 Main Street Falmouth MA 508.495.0598

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COURTESY OF INN ON THE SOUND

great

ESCAPES BY COLBY RADOMSKI

IN N ON THE SOUND H AS STUNNING VIEWS OF V I N E YA R D S O U N D A N D M A R T H A' S V I N E Y A R D .

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W

hether you’re a visitor to Falmouth and need a place to stay or a local who’s craving overnight pampering, checking into one of the town’s cozy bed-and-breakfasts might be just the ticket. While there’s certainly no place like home, these three inns provide luxurious accommodations year-round and, in our book, come in at a pretty close second.

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CAPTAIN’S MANOR INN 27 West Main Street 508-388-7336 captainsmanorinn.com

COURTESY OF CAPTAIN' S M ANOR INN

COURTESY OF CAPTAIN' S M ANOR INN

I

F YOU’RE IN NEED OF SOME QUIET R&R laced with a little romance,

look no further than the Captain’s Manor Inn. Steps from downtown Falmouth, the stately bed-and-breakfast, historically known as Mostly Hall, offers luxurious accommodations that guarantee guests will leave feeling reinvigorated. Owned and operated by husband-and-wife innkeepers Kevin and Trish Robinson, the Italianate Southern plantation-style manor, which dates back to 1849, exudes sophisticated, yet simple elegance. While it was completely refurbished to include modern-day amenities, the inn maintains a distinct historical appeal, featuring original architectural elements like marble fireplaces and beautiful pink granite pillars at its entrance. The guest quarters feature rich mahogany finishes, fireplaces and updated en suite bathrooms. Captain’s Manor is known for its decadent breakfast dishes (think Eggs Benedict, cider-poached apples, and Grand Marnier French toast, pictured), which can be enjoyed outside on the wraparound veranda overlooking the inn’s tranquil grounds and flower gardens. Breakfast is served throughout the morning and includes fresh fruit and homemade pastries. Coffee, tea and lemonade are available during the day and fresh-baked snacks, like gooey chocolate chip cookies, zesty lemon squares and fudge brownies are served at 3 p.m.

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JACK FOLEY

Guests love the inn’s prime location, mere steps away from downtown Main Street. With a number of boutiques, unique shops, museums and restaurants, there’s no shortage of activities nearby. In addition to attractions downtown, Kevin suggests guests take a day trip offshore to Martha’s Vineyard. Shuttle pick-up for the Steamship Authority ferry is just a short walk from the inn.

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Grand Marnier French Toast S ERVES 8 INGREDIENTS: 10 eggs 1/2 cup half and half cream 1 1/4 teaspoon sugar 1/2 teaspoon vanilla 1/2 teaspoon Grand Marnier liqueur 1/8 teaspoon cinnamon 16 slices of bread of choice (the Captain’s Manor uses French toast bread, apple fritter bread and/or blueberry streusel bread) PREPARATION: • Crack eggs into a bowl and mix with half and half cream. • Stir in sugar, vanilla, cinnamon and Grand Marnier liqueur. • Pour mixture into a rectangular baking dish so it is easier to place bread in for coating. • Place bread slices in the mixture and soak for about 1 minute; then flip the slices over and soak for another minute. • Coat griddle with a light spray of canola oil and a little butter. • Grill French toast slices for approximately 4 minutes per side. • Plate French toast and sprinkle with a little confectionary sugar. Serve with warm maple syrup.

Innkeeper Pick Best dinner spot within walking distance: The Glass Onion (theglassoniondining.com)

JACK FOLEY

JACK FOLEY

COURTESY OF CAPTAIN' S M ANOR INN

• Preheat griddle to 350˚F.

Read about this restaurant in the dining feature “Love At First Bite”

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INN ON THE SOUND 313 Grand Avenue 508-457-9666 innonthesound.com

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COURTESY OF INN ON THE SOUND

ANT A ROOM WITH A VIEW? Inn

on the Sound is your place. Set on an elevated bluff in the Falmouth Heights neighborhood, this tranquil bed-andbreakfast on Grand Avenue offers stunning panoramic views of Vineyard Sound and nearby beaches.

There’s a distinct “home away from home” vibe about the inn, from the inviting common area complete with a roaring fire in the stone hearth (in the chillier months, of course), to the inn’s friendly resident feline. Each of the 10 guest rooms is named after a different part of Falmouth (think Sippewissett Lake and Chapoquoit Beach) and decorated in a sophisticated coastal-contemporary style. Eight rooms have direct water views and several have their own private balcony—perfect for watching the sunrise or sunset over the water. The inn is also within short walking distance to Falmouth Heights Beach. Didn’t bring your sand gear? No problem! The inn has plenty of chairs, towels and umbrellas for guests to borrow.

Innkeeper Pick Photo caption, photo caption Unique Activity: photo caption.

Geocaching (geocaching.com)

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Breakfast is treated like an art form at Inn on the Sound and is served by owner Howard Grosser each morning from 8:30 until 11. Guests have a choice of an egg-based hot dish, which varies from day to day, as well as access to a full buffet of homemade granola, yogurt, fruit and fresh-squeezed juices, homemade croissants and pastries hot out of the oven. fa l m o u t h m a g .co m

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JACK FOLEY

*ADAPTED FROM FOOD.COM

Southwestern Salmon Soufflé M A K ES 4- 6 INGREDIENTS: 1 (6 oz.) can salmon (flaked and bones crushed) 1/2 cup whole kernel corn 1/2 cup canned black beans 1/2 cup fresh salsa 3 tablespoons butter 3 tablespoons flour 1 cup milk 1 teaspoon salt pepper (to taste) 3 eggs, separated

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PREPARATION: • Melt butter in small saucepan. • Add flour, milk, salt and pepper. • Boil until thick and then remove from heat. • Add salmon and slightly beaten egg yolks. • Beat egg whites until stiff and fold in corn, salsa and black beans. • Pour into greased soufflé dish or other deep baking dish. • Bake at 350˚F for 20 – 25 minutes or until golden brown. • Remove from pan and serve with sour cream and pumpernickel bread. Enjoy!

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Asparagus and Ham Crêpes M AK E S E IG H T 6 - O R 7 - IN CH CREPES SER V ES 4 INGREDIENTS: FILLING 1/2 red onion, chopped 1 pound asparagus spears (cut into 1-inch diagonal lengths) 1 egg 3/4 cup (6 oz.) ricotta cheese at room temperature 1/2 cup shredded Gruyere or Emmental cheese CREPES 2 large eggs 1 cup milk 1/3 cup water 1 cup flour 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons melted butter, plus 2 – 3 teaspoons for coating the pan PREPARATION: CREPES • Blend eggs, milk, water, flour, salt and 2 tablespoons of melted butter for 5 seconds (or until smooth) using a blender or food processer. • Cover and refrigerate mixture for 2 – 24 hours. • Gently stir batter if it has become separated. • Heat in a seasoned 6- or 7-inch nonstick crepe pan over medium-high heat until hot.

• Coat pan lightly with butter then lift pan from heat and pour 2 – 3 tablespoons of batter into pan, rotating until batter coats the pan’s surface. • Cook about one minute or until almost dry on top and lightly brown. • Loosen edges with a metal spatula and flip over crepe with fingers. Cook other side for about 15 seconds and then remove crepe from heat, onto a clean tea towel to cool. Repeat with remaining batter. SAVORY FILLING • Preheat oven to 350˚F. • Steam onion and asparagus in covered container over boiling water until asparagus is crisp-tender (5 – 7 minutes). • In a medium bowl, beat egg and mix in cheeses, garlic, parsley, dill, ham and steamed vegetables. • Spoon 1/2 cup of filling in ribbon down the center of each crepe and roll to enclose. Arrange in greased 9x13-inch baking dish and bake in oven for 10 – 15 minutes or until heated through. • Serve at once and enjoy!

Innkeeper Pick Best places to watch the sunset:

Photo caption, photo caption photo caption.

The Knob, Nobska Light or Quissett Harbor

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WOODS HOLE PASSAGE 186 Woods Hole Road 508-548-9575 woodsholepassage.com

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OCATED A SHORT DISTANCE FROM THE VILLAGE of Woods Hole,

Woods Hole Passage Inn is set in a historic, circa-1910 carriage house owned by innkeepers Martha Bridgers and Julie Brienza, and the couple’s three daughters. With two acres of immaculate grounds abutting conservation lands, the inn is an ideal getaway for families and those wanting a peaceful place to unwind while being surrounded by nature. Guests can enjoy some seriously good eats made by Martha, who is a professionally trained pastry chef. Gourmet breakfast items, like savory ham and asparagus crêpes (see their recipe to make at home), are often prepared with fresh vegetables from the inn’s garden. Homemade snacks, like crunchy granola bars, are provided in the afternoon. The well-appointed guest rooms each feature a private bathroom, hookups for iPods and iPhones and free Wi-Fi. While most visitors plan their trips in advance, Martha and Julie have plenty of budget-friendly suggestions for what to do during a stay in Falmouth. “People can come with no agenda,” Julie says, “and we can give them all the ideas.” Guests can take a map and access nearby walking trails or borrow the inn’s complimentary bicycles and hit the bike paths or take a ride into Woods Hole. The innkeepers have partnered up with local businesses and attractions to offer discounted tickets and passes for the Steamship Authority, Woods Hole Discovery Center and Heritage Museums & Gardens, located in Sandwich. Martha and Julie even have a book chock-full of rainy day ideas. “We strive to make our guests’ trips as easy as possible,” they say.

COURTESY OF WOODS HOLE PASSAGE

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TITLE

With its rich nautical history, miles of pristine coastline and its charming sea-village allure, Falmouth offers abundant activities for natives and tourists alike. We’ve put together an alphabetized list of our favorite things about this coastal town for you to enjoy. BY JO RDA N H ITC H COC K A N D CO LBY R A DOMSKI

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Seal at Woods Hole Science Aquarium

Seals, lobsters and crabs, oh my! These are just a few of the 140 species of sea creatures you’ll find swimming in the tanks at Woods Hole Science Aquarium (aquarium.nefsc.noaa. gov) and the Buzzards Bay Discovery Center (savebuzzardsbay.org), both located in Woods Hole. PH

O

COURTESY OF WOODS HOLE SCIENCE AQUARIUM

T

O CO

UR TE

Falmouth is an epicenter of the Cape’s lively arts

SY OF

and culture scene, with year-round festivals, events

OSB R U GH G A L L E R Y ORN &

and other opportunities to channel your inner artist. Celebrate the work of over 50 artisans and crafters at the annual Arts Alive Festival (artsfalmouth. org), a free, three-day arts extravaganza that takes place every summer. Need a creative night out? Pick up a brush at Paint It! (paintitfalmouth.com), an art bar where you can sip your favorite cocktail and paint like Picasso. For those who just want a little artful sightseeing, there are plenty of galleries to meander through, including the Osborn & Rugh Gallery (osbornandrughgallery.com),

Doug Rugh of Osborn & Rugh Gallery

owned by husband and wife Doug Rugh and Hillary Osborn.

DAN CUTRONA

Check out what’s brewing at Pie in the Sky Bakery and Café, whose claim to fame includes a giant locomotive-like With more than 68 miles of coastline—the most on Cape Cod—Falmouth is just the place to enjoy a day at the beach. Find the perfect piece of sandy real estate in our Beach Guide on page 136.

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Pie in the Sky Bakery and Café roasting beans

machine that owner Eric Gura uses to expertly roast coffee beans each evening. With a tantalizing array of fresh-baked treats and artisanal drinks, it’s easy to see—and taste—why this quaint café is hailed as one of the best places on the Cape to grab breakfast and a cup of joe. pieintheskywoodshole.com

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ACTIVITY

CAMPING Want to fill up on fresh air? Spend a night outdoors at family-friendly Sippewissett Campground. While you won’t exactly rough it (the campground has modern amenities), there are plenty of opportunities for you to become “one with nature.” Check out the campground’s most unique accommodations—tipis. sippewissett.com

JACK FOLEY

The origin of diners dates to the late 1800s when restaurants shaped as railroad cars became exceedingly popular. Although this trend seems to be a thing of the past, two popular spots, Betsy’s Diner and Boxcar’s Diner, maintain an authentic diner atmosphere and serve up comfort-food favorites like banana pancakes and homestyle meatloaf. Looking for some real down-home grub? The hearty portions at Doggz & Hoggz (doggzhoggz.com) are sure to satisfy. You can’t go wrong with a rack of their expertly smoked ribs, homemade mac ‘n’ cheese, or one of their creatively constructed jumbo hot dogs.

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Saddle up a horse at Haland Stable and take a trail ride through Falmouth’s picturesque woodlands, salt marshes and cranberry bogs. Expand your knowledge of horsemanship while bonding with an equine friend. halandstable.com

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PHOTO COURTESY OF SIPPEWISSETT CAMPGROUND

Sippewissett Campground.

As the sport’s greatest amateur Bobby Jones once said, “The best practice

Locavores will love the selection of fresh-off-the-vine fruits and

for a golfer is golfing.” Boasting

vegetables at the Falmouth Farmers Market at Peg Noonan Park. Browse

lush and flat fairways, 27-holes,

tables piled high with artisanal breads and cheeses, seafood and lobsters

and open year-round to the public,

caught right off Falmouth’s shores, homemade pies and other unique

the Falmouth Country Club is

products. Every Thursday. Noon – 6 p.m. falmouthfarmersmarket.org

definitely a hole-in-one in our book. falmouthcountryclub.com

Cast a line into the calm waters or sport-fish in the choppy seas of the sound. Patriot Party Boats (patriotpartyboats.com) and Bluefin Charters (bluefin-charters. com) specialize in striped bass and bluefin fishing so those aboard can reel in a “keeper.”

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Just a mere seven miles from the mainland on Falmouth Harbor, Martha’s Vineyard is home to KEN ALEXANDER

a number of award-winning restaurants, shops, beaches and activities to enjoy both indoors and out. It’s a perfect getaway for an extended stay or just the day. steamshipauthority.com

Jazz Fest 2014 - Henry Duckham and Friends performing at Pickle Jar Kitchen

Celebrate all-things jazz at Falmouth’s largest musical event of the year, where fiery and soulful notes waft through the streets of downtown. Keep an eye out for some famous faces as Jazz Fest regularly hosts prestigious performers. Last year’s lineup included Grammy-award winning artists Catherine Russell and Alan Broadbent. Check online for a detailed schedule of events. jazzfestfalmouth.org

With plenty of access to fresh and saltwater, Falmouth is an idyllic place to launch a kayak. Paddle your way through the shallow and calm waters of Waquoit Bay, a narrow expanse of water that is suited to kayakers of all levels and leads to Washburn Island, a 300-acre island off the coast of Falmouth. Don’t have a kayak? No problem! There are plenty of spots to rent one in town. www.capecodwindsurfing.com; www.sherpers.com

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Your search for the perfect “lobstah”

Discover the days of old at the

roll is over. Reputed as one of the

Falmouth Museums on the Green

tastiest in New England, the Barking Claw lobster

(www.museumsonthegreen.org) or

roll comes with a heaping, 4-ounce pile of knuckle

the Woods Hole Historical Museum

and claw meat that’s packed into a butter-toasted

(www.woodsholemuseum.org), which

split-top roll. facebook.com/thebarkingclaw

offer diverse exhibits rich in history for people of all interests.

NOBSKA LIGHTHOUSE It’s known as the town’s most picturesque landmark, and to see it is to believe it! Built in 1829, Nobska Lighthouse boasts arguably the best panoramic views of Vineyard Sound and beyond. newenglandlighthouses.net/nobsk

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ACTIVITY

Applaud the dramatic and vocal talent of students from across the country at College Light Opera, an educational theater that produces extraordinary musicals and operettas suitable for audiences of all ages. collegelightoperacompany.com

COURTESY OF COLLEGE LIGHT OPERA

Grab a set of wheels and pedal your way along Falmouth’s well-liked bike trail, Shining Sea Bikeway, aptly named after for Katharine Lee Bates’ famous song. The 10.7 miles extend from North Falmouth all the way to Woods Hole, winding through beautiful scenery of marshes, cranberry bogs and beaches. capecodbikeguide. com/shiningseabikeway.asp

Feeling a little nostalgic? Take a trip down memory lane at Blast from the Past and peruse through their collection of hard-to-find vintage items, including Coca-Cola signs, Star Wars figurines and original Beatles memorabilia. blastfromthepastma.com

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JOHN BONDAREK

You might be gasping for breath yourself as you cheer on runners in the annual Falmouth Road Race. The famous 7.3-mile course, held each year in August, travels along the town’s scenic drives and draws more than 12,000 athletes from around the world as well as a lively throng of spectators. falmouthroadrace.com

Falmouth Road Race.

With its mix of little shops and trendy boutiques, downtown Falmouth is a perfect shopping destination for fickle fashionistas and retail therapy junkies. Check out our shopping guide starting on Page 72 for a walking guide of downtown Falmouth’s boutiques. Woods Hole Theater Company

“Ready, set, action!” Local thespians and national acting troupes wow crowds at a handful of theatrical venues in town: Woods Hole Theater Company (woodsholetheater. org), Cape Cod Theatre Project (capecodtheatreproject.org) and the Falmouth Theatre Guild (falmouththeatreguild.org).

Get the full grape-to-glass experience at Cape Cod Winery. Take a tour through the vines, learn about the viniculture process and, best of all, sip and savor the local whites, reds and Cranberry COURTESY OF CAPE COD WINERY

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Blush. capecodwinery.com

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ACTIVITY

Z

No summer day is complete without a trip to the local ice cream shop. The sinfully indulgent and toothsome flavors at Smitty’s Ice Cream (smittysic.

COURTESY OF LIBERTÉ SCHOONER

com) will linger even after your sweet treat has melted away.

WO

Liberté Schooner

FA

Make sure you’ve got your sea legs when you hop aboard the Liberté Schooner. Take a daytime or sunset cruise on Vineyard Sound for jaw-dropping views and fun camaraderie theliberte.com

Smitty’s Ice Cream

COURTESY OF FALMOUTH RAW BAR

u

Arghhh-uably one of the most entertaining events of the summer, the Raw Bar’s annual Pirate Party,

Get up close and personal with

held this year on August 9, is a great

Falmouth is in full glory

the furry critters at Coonamessett

way to spend the day listening to live

during the warmer months,

Farm. Home to alpacas, goats,

bands, jumping in moon bounces and

but there are plenty of things

lambs and donkeys, the farm is a

getting your face painted. This festive

to do throughout the fall

delight for all ages, with pick-your-

family event is fun for people of all

and winter. Check out our

own vegetables and a café, too.

ages. falmouthrawbar.com

calendar on pages 138-142.

coonamessettfarm.com

SIP

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U BY JACQUELYN MYSLIWIEC

PHOTOGRAPHY BY LUKE SIMPSON

LOVE at FIRST bite

Eating your way through Falmouth isn’t a tough task, nor is it an undesirable one—especially when you can feast on some small plates that may very well wind up being the most memorable part of your meal. Here’s to nine of Falmouth’s staple restaurants and their tasty appetizer dishes that guarantee your first bite will taste just as good as your last…maybe even better!

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Garlic and dill pickle chips from Pickle Jar Kitchen fa l m o u t h m a g .co m

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DINING

QUICKS HOLE TAVERN No matter if you’re dining on the upper or lower level of this two-story tavern diagonal from the Woods Hole Steamship Authority, you’re sure to get a good taste of land and seaside fare mixed with the comfort of savory and sweet tavern flavors. We’re talking about bites that make your taste buds do a little dance, such as their famous pig’s candy. A best seller on the menu since their opening, this small plate consists of thick, juicy slices of fruit-smoked pork belly coated in a maple syrup and brown sugar glaze COURTESY C SALT

that come served atop an apple and guava puree. In the chillier months, they take it one step further and use the extra sugar glaze to make a special bourbon cocktail. Cheers to that! 29 Railroad Ave., Woods Hole 508-495-0048 • quicksholewickedfresh.com

C SALT WINE BAR & GRILLE C is for charming, contemporary and creative—all of which describe the ambience, food and flavors found at C Salt, nestled along Davis Straits in Falmouth. Chef and owner Jonathan Philips is regularly seen behind the kitchen line inside his quaint restaurant, which boasts a bit of a relaxed,

rustic-meets-upscale-urban vibe. The brick oven behind the small bar is ain St. • 508-388-7631 • anejomexicanbistro.com a clear giveaway of a customer favorite—gourmet flatbreads. But it’s the variety of small plates inspired by Asian and French influences that truly stand out. Philips says his diverse menu reflects his training at Johnson & Wales College of Culinary Arts as well as his time spent working at revered restaurants Tosca and Square Café, both located in Hingham. Among his top fusion apps are the pan-seared diver scallops sautéed in a thyme yuzu (a citrus fruit from Asia) brown butter with hen-of-thewoods mushrooms and baby arugula, and served with a micro green garnish. The C’s say it all, plus one “D” for delicious. 75 Davis Straits • 774-763-2954 • csaltfalmouth.com

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ASHLEY BILODEAU

com

PICKLE JAR KITCHEN This farm-to-table breakfast and lunch hot spot has created some serious buzz around town for its fresh, garden- and pickle-inspired menu offerings, as well as its cozy interior decorated with vintage, up-cycled materials. If you’ve already dipped your hands into their pickle jars and tasted some of the house-made briny treats, including the owners’ (Kevin and Elisabeth Lay and Benjamin and Cassandra Gallant) signature Kirby sour dills, then feast your eyes and appetite on a more modern take on the classic dill. An order of their homemade garlic and dill pickle chips is a home run if you’re looking for that salty and spicy fried fix, especially with their secret-recipe tellicherry ranch dipping sauce, which packs its own flavorful punch. 170 Main St. • 508-540-6760 picklejarklitchen.com fa l m o u t h m a g .co m

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BELOW: COURTESY CAPTAIN KIDD

CAPTAIN KIDD “Sitting on the dock of the bay...” That’s exactly what you’ll enjoy doing at Captain Kidd Restaurant and Bar. Hugging Eel Pond Harbor in the heart of Woods Hole, Captain Kidd has attracted quite a crowd for their gourmet, stocked-to-the-brim raw bar showing off the day’s fresh catch. A chalkboard lists the raw specials each day, which always include an assortment of local oysters, shrimp,

When you’re the locals' favorite spot for authentic Mexican in an

crab legs, lobsters and little-neck

eclectic upscale eatery in a seaside town, there’s no choice but to keep

clams caught straight from the waters

adding to the “local.” At least that’s what owner Jamie Surprenant had

of Sippewissett, Washburn Island,

in mind in his efforts to offer customers a variety of fresh and local

Buzzards Bay, Martha’s Vineyard and

finds featured in a non-traditional Cape Cod way. The lobster taquitos

Nantucket. The best part—you don’t

speak well to this sought-after style. Using locally caught lobster, the

have to worry about missing out on

chef lightly fries the fresh tail, knuckles and claw meat in a flour tortilla,

all the good stuff if you’re part of the

then complements the creation with a chipotle aioli drizzle whose bite

later crowd. This iced-down treasure

is offset by dabs of guacamole and sour cream. And if these cooling

chest of ocean treats is restocked to its fullest throughout the day. 77 Water St., Woods Hole 508-548-8563 • thecaptainkidd.com

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accompaniments aren’t enough to stifle the spicy fire, there’s nothing like the fresh lime juice and tequila in a tasty house margarita to fix it! 188 Main St. • 508-388-7631 • anejomexicanbistro.com

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THE GLASS ONION Named after the famous Beatles song, The Glass Onion is defined by its classic and cozy atmosphere. Dining inside an old colonial establishment that boasts beautiful coffered ceilings, Shaker-style wooden booths and tables dressed in white linen, you will enjoy comfort foods inspired by the region’s four distinct seasons. Owner Josh Christian works with the chef to regularly adapt the menu to feature seasonal local produce and regionally caught seafood. One appetizer, however, is so popular year round that diners might protest if it were removed from the menu—the lobster strudel. The savory pastry made of phyllo dough, stuffed with fresh lobster meat and mascarpone cheese is baked and finished with a lobster butter sauce. KRIS MARIE HUGHES

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It’s a dish so divine, rich and melt-in-your-mouth good, you would think it was made for a king. 37 N. Main St. • 508-540-3730 • www.theglassoniondining.com

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COURTESY QUAHOG REPUBLIC

DINING

QUAHOG REPUBLIC At this local dive bar, you’ll find not only your standard pub chat, but also some serious local quahog tales—that are backed up by some of the offerings listed on the menu. The eatery was opened by two local shellfishermen—Cape native Erik Bevans and washashore Tom Hughes—who met while digging quahogs in Popponesset. The pair developed a great friendship as well as an idea to open a small, eclectic seaside bar that would represent what they love to do—relax and enjoy the stories and company of other locals while having a taste of their fresh ocean finds. And what could be more signature to the Quahog Republic than a stuffed quahog? A giant quahog shell comes packed with a mixture of fresh quahog meat and linguiça that’s baked to a slightly crisp, golden brown perfection, and served with a side of drawn butter and lemon. Complement it with a cup of quahog chowder and you’ll satisfy any sinful seafood craving. 97 Spring Bars Rd. • 508-540-4111 • quahogrepublic.com

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CELESTINO’S After opening Celestino’s Café in the heart of Chatham in 2012, chef and owner Juan Celestino Paredes decided to return to his hometown of Falmouth and bring his beloved restaurant with him. Choosing a cozy space on North Falmouth Highway, Paredes has lured in passersby with a menu filled with modern American and Mediterranean flavors. Celestino’s restaurant is similar to its Lower Cape sister restaurant, which has since closed, but with a few twists. A sucker for bone-in meats, Paredes offers one of COURTESY QUAHOG REPUBLIC

his favorite dishes—a lamb lollipop appetizer that delivers more than just a delicacy. After hand-trimming the lamb chops and seasoning them with an aromatic Moroccan rub, Paredes grills the lollipops to a perfect medium-rare. They come accompanied with a roasted red pepper piquant

father), customers can expect plenty of inventive creations popping up on the menu this year.

sauce. The culinary magic doesn’t stop there, though. With Paredes working as part of a dynamic duo with his son, Juan Jr. (who learned to cook from his

444 North Falmouth Hwy. #5 • 508-392-9741 celestinosnorth.com

LA CUCINA SUL MARE Savoring a hearty Italian meal is no challenge at this Little Italy-style family-owned restaurant and kitchen by the sea (which translates to La Cucina Sul Mare in Italian). Chances are you won’t be able to stop yourself from indulging in a dish done the traditional Italian way—with lots of garlicky goodness. Chef and owner Mark Cilfone doesn’t mess around when it comes to big, bold flavor and presentation, serving some of his fresh seafood straight from the pan. Their signature mussels appetizer is no exception. A heaping pile of these briny bivalves, drenched in a simple yet flavorful white wine, garlic and herb sauce, is served sizzling in a sauté pan hot off the stove. It’s an app big enough to share with the whole table—and maybe the next table over, too! Just as warm and comforting as the food they serve is the couple behind the whole operation. Since opening their Main Street eatery in 2002, Mark and wife, Cynthia, have welcomed regulars and newcomers into the restaurant as if they were their own family. 237 Main St. • 508-548-5600 • lacucinasulmare.com fa l m o u t h m a g .co m

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“THE SEA, ONCE IT CASTS ITS SPELL, HOLDS ONE IN ITS NET OF WONDER FOREVER.” – JACQUES COUSTEAU BY MEG FLANAGAN PHOTOS COURTESY OF SEA EDUCATION ASSOCIATION

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OPEN WATER

SSV Robert C. Seamans

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It’s mid-watch on the open ocean. The midnight moon shines bright up above, while pinpricks of light form tiny constellations in the black Southern Hemisphere sky. Sam Gartzman stands watch at the bow of the full-sailed vessel, scanning the dark horizon for signs of other ships and any potential hazards. “The water was luminescent that night—all glowing and so surreal,” Gartzman recalls. “Suddenly, I heard a splash and there, riding the bow, were the dolphins. They were glowing outlines alongside the ship. I kind of let out a scream—I mean—I was just speechless. I immediately knew this is what I’d been looking for. This trip was a good decision.” Gartzman’s story is one of the many remarkable tales told by students fortunate enough to be part of the Sea Education Association (SEA)’s experiential maritime semesters abroad. A junior studying environmental chemistry at Wisconsin’s Beloit College, Gartzman was a participant in last fall’s SEA Semester to New Zealand. A young man from the Midwest, he discovered a deep-seated love and appreciation of the ocean, thanks to SEA’s extraordinary educational opportunity. “I grew up on Lake Michigan and have always had a passion for the water,” he says. “But before I went to Woods Hole, I had only seen the ocean three times. I couldn’t have gotten this experience any other way.”

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OPEN WATER

Sea Education Association believes that understanding the ocean and its relationship to humankind is of utmost importance in the global scheme of life, and the facility provides a rare opportunity for college students from across the country and the world to explore this dynamic. The program’s emphasis is on the underlying theme of studying the ocean from a scientific, cultural and historical point of view. The brainchild of Corwith Cramer Jr. and Edward MacArthur, SEA came to life in 1971 in an unlikely place—Chicago. Cramer, realizing the importance of the marine environment and taking advantage of the newness of this field of study, developed a curriculum around teaching about the ocean from the deck of a sailing vessel. His vision was to offer students, in all disciplines, a way to understand the bond between the human race and the body of water that provides half of all of the oxygen in the atmosphere; and how vital it is to keep this body of water clean, sustainable and alive. After a short stint in Boston, the school moved to its current location on a five-acre campus in Woods Hole in 1975. Woods Hole had already distinguished itself as a hot spot of marine studies with the establishment of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI), so it was a fitting location for SEA. Since planting itself in Falmouth, SEA has maintained a strong relationship with its neighboring scientific facilities. MBL and WHOI scientists and faculty are among the notable professionals who lectures to students of SEA.

SSV Corwith Cramer

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SEA Semester is regarded as one of the best educational opportunities in the world. Its unique program of study has several components, including intensive, on-land courses that build the skill set required by students once they’re onboard a ship exploring the salty frontier. “We are the best kept secret, not only in Woods Hole, but in a global context as well,” SEA president and seasoned sailor Peg Brandon explains. “We have a shore component that is different from any other ship-board educational program around. The students come here for 12 weeks, spending six weeks in the classroom and six weeks out to sea.” Logically, each course contains a strong oceanographic element, but the program overall is designed to benefit all majors of study—from humanities to environmental and conservation studies. Students of every academic discipline are encouraged to apply to the SEA Semester, even though it’s considered an upper-level science program. During the first six weeks on campus, students learn how to live with others in close quarters, as part of a team—essentially practicing how to be good shipmates. Housed in several cottages, they plan meals, shop, cook and clean together. They go to class, study and spend free time with one another, all in preparation for their weeks at sea.

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SSV Corwith Cramer

During this time they also attend classes, deciding in which area to concentrate. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT: Sea Education Association 171 Woods Hole Rd., Falmouth, MA 02540 508-540-3954 sea.edu

They must develop a thesis, prepare a program of study and plan their field research for the voyage—all of that in addition to learning how to be a successful crew member. A wealth of information is packed into six weeks, but when it comes time to set sail the students will have learned how to do everything from plotting a course and standing watch to actually sailing the ship. Each will be able to steer the course. Sailing aboard one of two tall ships, the SSV Corwith Cramer or the SSV Robert C. Seamens, both state-of-the-art research vessels, students “explore, dream and discover,” as Mark Twain once said. Remarkably, no prior sailing experience is required. All a student needs in order to participate in SEA Semester is a passion for learning. East Falmouth native Alissa Dalpe participated in SEA Semester last fall. A junior at Connecticut College studying physics, Dalpe focused her SEA studies on exploring the redevelopment of the waterfront of Auckland, New Zealand, as it relates specifically to tourism. “It was a great trip,” she says. “There is nothing better than seeing the sun rise or set while out on the ocean. It was an adventure, to say the least. I have always been around the water and have always loved the ocean. This trip helped to bring it to the next level.”

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ART

O W

G N I RK

ME

S M U DI

S S O R AC

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BY

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H IG G IN L AU R IE

OTO S | PH

A R IA N Y BY M GRAPH

NE LEE

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ARTIST

W

RON GEERING Woods Hole artist Ron Geering doesn’t have a

the red clay underneath. When the pieces are

long commute to work. He simply walks into

glazed and fired, the resulting colors are a rich

his backyard and enters his charming pottery

yellow and brown.

studio. The colorful little house was once an outbuilding of the original Hose House Number 3 firehouse, which covered the Quisset area of Woods Hole until the turn of the 20th-century. The main building was converted into a residence in 1922.

Each piece Geering makes in his studio for his

business, R. Geering Pottery, is either sculpted by hand or hand-thrown on a potter’s wheel. He forms his pieces out of red clay, which he then paints over with a very thin coating of white clay. Using techniques such as slip trailing, marbling, feather combing or sgraffito, he scratches a pattern in the white layer to reveal

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The earthy style of Geering’s redware pottery was influenced by an early job he had at the Edison Institute in 1970 while studying ceramics at Wayne State University in Detroit. He was hired to work alongside craftsman Don Kaake to reproduce early American pottery for the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village, a living history museum. “It was quite different from the college experience because in school you may make six or seven pieces over a semester,” he says. “When I was working at Greenfield Village it was like a hundred pieces a day, so it really improved my throwing skills.”

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Geering’s earthy style of redware pottery was influenced by an early job he had at the Edison Institute in 1970 while studying ceramics at Wayne State University in Detroit.

In school, Geering was doing mostly stoneware with a Scandinavian influence, using fine glazes and simple shapes. He decided he preferred the more rustic redware. Around the same time, he set out to learn blacksmithing as well and worked as a blacksmith in Colorado for 10 years. “I came back here because Plimoth Plantation was looking to build a forge in the Pilgrim Village so I went there basically as a blacksmith,” he says. “I really got into 17th-century research, and I brought all my pottery making equipment with me. That really filled a niche for them because they hadn’t been able to get any of that type of pottery.”

FUN FACT: Each of Geering's mugs contains a black spot at the bottom-a fun, subtle tribute to the Robert Louis Stevenson classic "Treasure Island," in which pirates accused of a crime were presented a card that had a "black spot" on it, signifying their guilt. fa l m o u t h m a g .co m

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Plimoth Plantation received a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts and sent Geering to England to study the type of pottery that would have been shipped to America during that era. He had the opportunity to see a broad range of shapes and designs from the period. Geering has been on his own since the late 90s. “Just reproducing pottery is not really adding anything to the craft,” he says. “I use the same materials, processes and colors but add my own thoughts and designs to it. I have one line that is more traditional and another that is more contemporary.”

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K ART

Kathleen Hall refuses to be hemmed in by

one medium. The lifelong artist is best known for her paintings, especially her murals. But she doesn’t stick with just walls or canvases; she’s painted everything from portraits to motorcycles and school buses. She also does face painting at Renaissance fairs every weekend. Learning new things is a major passion of Hall’s, so last winter. “I made several bowls and an ornament,” Hall

says. “It was fascinating to learn the process.” Hall had the opportunity to learn glass blowing

because a friend in Florida was the manager of the hot shop at the Chihuly Collection at the Morean Arts Center in St. Petersburg. Hall says it was an honor to learn free form shapes and vivid colors in the manner of Chihuly, arguably the country’s finest glass blower. “The hot shop is the room where they keep the

KATHLEEN HALL While Hall is best known for her paintings-specifically her murals--she has recently tried her hand at blowing glass.

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Hall painted the mural for Falmouth resident and train collector Dr. Tom Brown. (Read his story on page 24.)

fire going,” Hall explains. “That’s where you do all the glass blowing. You have a six-foot-long hollowed stick (known as a punty) that you use and you go to one of the furnaces and pick up molten glass, which is white.” The molten glass must be continuously turned while in its liquid state, to prevent it from falling off of the blowpipe. Once the glass mass is secured around the punty, it is rolled in powdered glass to add color. The glass then goes into another oven that’s even hotter and it is continually rolled until the colors meld. Then comes the fun part: blowing the object into a shape. “I enjoyed it very much,” she says. “I’m not your average artist who has one medium and works in that. I want to experience it all. I’m doing silversmithing now. My sister and I are setting sea glass in sterling silver.” Hall was commissioned to build a fairy house for an installation at Highfield Hall called “Fairy Houses of Beebe Woods,” open to the public this summer until August 30. The tiny house, perfect for wee folk, was made by incorporating seashells, coral and natural sponges. A tiny house perfect for wee folk out of seashells, coral and natural sponges. “I’m so honored to be chosen to do one because that’s my kind of thing,” she says. “Every time the phone rings it’s for something unique. I love it.”

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ART

Dumpster diving is all in a day’s work for artist Sue Beardsley, who uses recycled materials for her art, which includes both metal work and glass. One of her favorite finds occurred when a regional glass company moved to North Carolina. They left behind train car- sized dumpsters with no lids and Beardsley jumped right in. “My friend called me up and said, ‘It’s the mother lode of all mother lodes,’” she says. “And he was right. My God, it was wonderful. I thought the pieces were beautiful.” Beardsley didn’t become an artist until shortly after she turned 50. She took a six- month sabbatical from her job as a psychotherapist and never went back. During that time, she took an adult education course in art welding and discovered she enjoyed it. She began her creative transition collecting metal. “I’m a recycle artist so the things I make are made out of stuff that’s being reused,” she says. “It used to be that you could pick at the dump, but you can’t do that anymore. Over the years I’ve gotten quite a collection.” People often give her scrap metal or she’ll find interestingly

SUE BEARDSLEY

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Dumpster diving is all in a day’s work for Beardsley, who uses recycled materials for her glass and metal artwork.

shaped, discarded pieces during her walks through the

a lobster. Once she had that image in her head, she set out

woods.

to find metal that could become the tail, feelers and claws.

Beardsley enrolled in classes at Rhode Island School of Design. At first, not owning a welder, she would design her pieces and take them to a local auto body shop to be

She painted that piece red, but these days she leaves most of her sculptures natural. Similar to Kathleen Hall, Beardsley enjoys experimenting

welded. A couple of years into her art, she finally bought

across different art mediums. She recently began carving

a tool of her own and kept it right in her living room. Now,

wooden bowls, and a large part of her art is making three-

she has turned half of her garage into a welding shop. In

dimensional stained glass pieces. She uses broken vases,

addition to a MIG welder, she also uses an acetylene-oxygen

pitchers, ornaments, shells, pieces of wood and stones and

torch and a plasma cutter.

incorporates them into the traditional stained glass to

Sometimes Beardsley begins with an idea, but more often the shape of the metal suggests a figure to her. For example,

create stunning collages. “If you don’t have fun, what’s the point?” Beardsley says.

the iron front of an old woodstove sat in her collection for

“I try to live my life that way and I’m lucky that I’m able to

about three years, until one day she realized it looked like

do that.”

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enchanted

S hor e l i n e s

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Robert Manz (robertmanz.net) is a fine art photographer who loves exploring the coast of Cape Cod in search of beautiful, natural light. This photo essay comes from Manz’s many wanderings along the shoreline of Falmouth in its most alluring places.

"Nobska Evening," WOODS HOLE

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PHOTO ESSAY

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“Surf Drive," FALMOUTH fa l m o u t h m a g .co m

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PHOTO ESSAY

"The Calm Before," WOODS HOLE

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PHOTO ESSAY

"A Misty Walk," WOODS HOLE

"A Red Pail at Woods Neck," SIPPEWISSET

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PHOTO ESSAY

"Nobska View," WOODS HOLE

Wa En

Vis wo pa "Quissett Idyll," QUISSETT HARBOR

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Amazing sunsets ~ Spectacular Views

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Wednesday thru Sunday: 3 pm till 12 pm Friday & Saturday Lunch: 12 pm till 5 pm

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PHOTO ESSAY

"Chapoquoit Sunset," WEST FALMOUTH

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TITLE

Beach Guide FALMOUTH

Old Silver Beach (public) Overlooks Buzzards Bay, features soft sand, sand bars and shallow water. (Season sticker required to access resident-only beach.) Quaker Road. P *

Surf Drive Beach Close walk to Falmouth Center; picturesque views of Martha’s Vineyard and Nobska Light. Surf Drive Road. P *

Bristol Beach Quiet spot in Falmouth Heights overlooking Vineyard Sound. Menahaunt Road.

Wood Neck Beach Shallow, bay-side waters. Ideal for families with children. Woodneck Road. (off Sippewissett Road.)

Chapoquoit Beach Secluded; a favorite among families and windsurfers. Chapoquoit Road. Grews Pond Fresh water beach with volleyball courts and barbeque grills. Goodwill Park, Gifford Street. P

P

Public parking available (* indicates fee) Note: all beaches require beach sticker to park unless noted. Handicap accessible/beach wheelchairs available Lifeguard

Falmouth Heights Beach One of the longest and most popular beaches in town. Street parking only for visitors. Grand Avenue. Megansett Beach Small beach in Megansett Harbor. County Road. Menauhant Beach Quiet beach with views of Martha’s Vineyard. Menauhant Road. P * Stoney Beach Secluded beach nestled in Woods Hole. Gosnold Road.

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Concessions Mobile concession/ice cream truck Grilling/picnic area Sanitary facilities Bath house Swimming lessons

Additional Information: Town of Falmouth Beach Department 508-274-2213 | www.falmouthmass.us/beach

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Coonamessett Farm

September 5 & 6: ANNUAL FALMOUTH ROTARY CRAFT FAIR & ANTIQUE SHOW Alongside Falmouth Harbor, don’t miss this event which features local crafts and antiques. There will be activities for children and grilled food to order. Bigelow Marine Park, Scranton Ave., falmouthrotary.com September 10 — 13: CRANBERRY CLUSTER DOG SHOW Four days of AKC recognized dog shows held at the Barnstable County Fairgrounds. 1220 Nathan Ellis Hwy., cranberrycluster.com

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September 16 — 20: SONAR FLEET 2015 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP RACE Over 30 boats from around the world participate in this world class event hosted by the Falmouth Yacht Club. falmouthyachtclub.com September 17: FALMOUTH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ANNUAL GOLF TOURNAMENT Join Chamber members at the Falmouth Country for the 26th annual golf tournament. Dinner and awards at Sea Crest Beach Hotel afterwards. falmouthchamber.com

September 26: ZOOMA HALF MARATHON & 10K RACES Take in the sights and smells of a quieter Cape Cod in the fall during this 13.1- or 6.2-mile race. After the race enjoy a post–race party in a beachside courtyard. 7:30 a.m. Sea Crest Beach Hotel, 350 Quaker Rd., zoomarun.com/capecod

CHRIS BERNSTEIN

September 2 — 29: FALMOUTH BY THE SEA TROLLEY TOURS Every Wednesday take a two–hour guided tour and explore Falmouth’s seafaring past. The tour departs from Hallett Barn Visitor Center. Reservations strongly recommended. 10 a.m., museumsonthegreen.org

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September 26: JAZZFEST FALMOUTH One of Falmouth’s most popular events of the year, this music extravaganza brings nationally known artists to to town to showcase their rich talent. Enjoy the talents of soloists, combos, wall–to–wall brass bands playing anywhere from oldies to cutting edge sultry jazz. jazzfestfalmouth.org September 26: ON THE WATER’S STRIPERFEST Celebrate the closing of the Striper Cup and the end of another striped bass fishing s ason. StriperFest brings together anglers from all of the Northeast to toast their favorite gamefish. The vent offers live music, delicious food, games and attractions. Marina Park, Falmouth Harbor, onthewater.com/striper–cup/striperfest Sept 26: 4TH ANNUAL CAPE COD BREW FEST A celebration of American craft brewers. Sample from 50+ breweries and over 200 styles of beer. The event will have two, three-hour sessions from 1 – 4 p.m. and 5:30 - 8:30 p.m. Each session will feature live music. Food trucks and vendors will be on-site for purchase. Every attendee will receive a custom glass. VIP ticket holders will be able to sample additional rare and specialty beers from select breweries as well as enjoy complimentary food. A portion of every ticket sold will benefit the Barnstable ounty

Scallop Festival September 18 — 20: Enjoy the tastes of famous scallop and herb roasted chicken dinners, chowder, lobster rolls, beer, wine, raw bar, hot dogs, burgers, fried dough and more! The event offers fantastic entertainment, rides, games, and an arts and crafts show. $7 adult/$2 children 6–12/Free children 5 and under. Fri. — Sat. 10 a.m. — 9 p.m. Sun. 10 a.m. — 6 p.m. Barnstable County Fairgrounds, 1220 Nathan Ellis Hwy., scallopfest.org

Quality Cedar & Vinyl Fencing Full Color Chain Link Flag Poles & Flags West Virginia Split Rail Garden Tool Sheds Dog Kennels With over 75 years of combined experience and expertise, VJ & Vic Enright aim to provide professional, high quality, affordable products and services for our valued customers.

570 East Falmouth Hwy (Rt. 28), East Falmouth, Massachusetts 02536 508-540 -3161 • 508-420 -3033 • www.EagleFenceCapeCod.net fa l m o u t h m a g .co m

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JON MOORE

Highfield Hall & Gardens Open House September 20: Ring in Fall at Highfield Hall at their annual fall open house. Artist reception, poetry reading and more. 56 Highfield D ., highfieldhall org

Agricultural Society. 21+ event. Cape Cod Fairgrounds, 1220 Nathan Ellis Hwy., E. Falmouth, capecodbrewfest.com

Cape Cod Gourmet Toffee Blended by hand in small batches and crafted into the perfect combination of sweet and salty. This smooth, buttery crunch is simply Cape Cod’s best!

October 2: JAZZ STROLL Travel down Main Street and enjoy the sounds and talents of jazz and blues bands. This celebration of arts includes a variety of concerts and a stroll in the park and shops of Falmouth. artsfalmouth.org October 4: BUZZARDS BAY WATERSHED RIDE Each October avid cyclists and casual riders enjoy coastal scenery as they bike across the Buzzards Bay region on a 75 mile or 35 mile race. savebuzzardsbay.org October 21 — 23: SIXTH INTERNATIONAL OYSTER SYMPOSIUM Celebrate the 6th International Oyster Symposium, the world’s leading conference devoted to oyster science, industry, and culture. Hosted by the Marine Biological Laboratory. oystersymposium.org

The perfect gift for any occasion or a decadent treat for yourself! For local stores to purchase, or to place an order, please visit

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October 24: HIGHFIELD HALLOWEEN PARTY Wear your best costume and dance the night away to the sounds of 4 Guys in Tuxes. Tarot card readings and belly dance performances will also take place. 7:30 p.m. — 11 p.m. 56 Highfield Hall D ., highfieldhall org October — November: VILLAGE OF SCARECROWS See downtown Main Street transform in celebration of the autumn season. Merchants will display imaginative scarecrows in their stores and restaurants. falmouthvillageassociation.com fa l m o u t h m a g .co m

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Pumpkin Day October 10: Spend a beautiful fall day of picking pumpkins, riding ponies, face painting, bounce houses, petting zoo, crafts, and hay rides. Free admission, ticket sales per activity. 9 a.m. — 3 p.m. Bourne Farm, saltpond.info

˜ ejo an

Mexican Bistro & Tequila Bar

October 24 — 25: CAPE COD MARATHON RUNNING WEEKEND As many as 1,200 marathoners and 200 relay teams will gather to run in beautiful downtown Falmouth. Half marathon is on October 24 7:30 a.m. Full marathon and relay is on October 25 8:30 a.m. Village Green, capecodmarathon.com October 25: 3RD ANNUAL HALLOWEEN SPOOKTACULAR Children wear their Halloween costumes for some friendly and spooky fun! This event offers games, costume parade, decorations and more. 1 p.m. — 2:30 p.m. 56 Highfield Hall D ., highfieldhall org October 30: A VISIT FROM THE NIGHT WATCHMEN Spirits and memories come alive in the old houses of Falmouth after dark. Join the night watchmen to see what spirits inhabit Dr. Francis Wick’s House. For adults and children over the age of 6. Reservations suggested. $6 adults/$5 children and senior citizens. falmouthvillageassociation.com October 31: TRICK OR TREAT STROLL ON MAIN STREET Collect candy and join the fun of the Halloween Parade on the Village Green. 1 p.m. falmouthvillageassociation.com November 27 — December 6: HOLIDAYS AT HIGHFIELD HALL Holiday spirits are in full effect at this event which features an extensive gift shop, model train display, Santa and tea shoppe. Many special exhibits will be featured as well. 56 Highfield Hall Dr., highfieldhall org November 28: SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY Support local small businesses by shopping and dining at the shops and restaurants around Falmouth. fa l m o u t h m a g .co m

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December 4 — 6: HOLIDAYS BY THE SEA WEEKEND Begin the festive holiday weekend by singing carols at Nobska Lighthouse as the winter’s sun sets over the Vineyard Sound. Greet Santa as he arrives by boat in Falmouth Harbor or run the Jingle Jog, a 5k race along the Vineyard Sound. falmouthchamber.com

December 5: HOLIDAY STROLL IN THE VILLAGE Take a trolley ride down festively lit Main Street in Falmouth. Visit Santa’s Workshop and celebrate the holiday festivities with movies, music, refreshments and caroling. Extended shopping hours. falmouthchamber.com or falmouthvillageassociation.com

December 5: A COLONIAL CHRISTMAS AT THE FALMOUTH MUSEUMS ON THE GREEN The 1790 Francis Wick’s House will be decorated in Christmas splendor and there will be a number of holiday activities for visitors to take part in. Museums on the Green, 55 Palmer Ave., museumsonthegreen.org

December 6: 52ND ANNUAL CHRISTMAS PARADE Join the town of Falmouth for the largest holiday parade featuring themed floats, ma ching bands, animals and Santa Clause! 12 p.m. Main St., falmouthchamber.com

December 5: 4TH ANNUAL JINGLE JOG 5K AND KIDS ELF RUN Wear your musical jingle bells and your most festive outfit. Course starts at the Flying Bridge Restaurant and finishes through Falmouth Heights. The Elf Run is a half-mile for children under 12. falmouthchamber.com December 5: LIGHTING OF THE FALMOUTH VILLAGE GREEN Caroling by the Falmouth Brass Choir, a visit from Santa Clause and the festive lighting of the Village Green. Dress warmly. 7 p.m. Palmer Ave., Main St., falmouthchamber.com

December 12: HIGHFIELD HALL HOLIDAY BALL Dance the night away at the annual holiday ball to benefit educational prog ams at Highfield Hall. The vent also features a silent auction, hors d’oeuvres and drinks. 7 p.m. — 11 p.m. 56 Highfield Hall D ., highfieldhall org December 13: WEST FALMOUTH LIBRARY HOLIDAY HOUSE TOUR & BOUTIQUE Find unique handmade gifts and festive decorations. 11 a.m. — 4 p.m. 575 W. Falmouth Hwy., westfalmouthlibrary.org

Robert Manz

Photographs in Natural Light

‘Meditation at Chapoquoit’

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TITLE

Beach Guide FALMOUTH

Old Silver Beach (public) Overlooks Buzzards Bay, features soft sand, sand bars and shallow water. (Season sticker required to access resident-only beach.) Quaker Road. P *

Surf Drive Beach Close walk to Falmouth Center; picturesque views of Martha’s Vineyard and Nobska Light. Surf Drive Road. P *

Bristol Beach Quiet spot in Falmouth Heights overlooking Vineyard Sound. Menahaunt Road.

Wood Neck Beach Shallow, bay-side waters. Ideal for families with children. Woodneck Road. (off Sippewissett Road.)

Chapoquoit Beach Secluded; a favorite among families and windsurfers. Chapoquoit Road. Grews Pond Fresh water beach with volleyball courts and barbeque grills. Goodwill Park, Gifford Street. P

P

Public parking available (* indicates fee) Note: all beaches require beach sticker to park unless noted. Handicap accessible/beach wheelchairs available Lifeguard

Falmouth Heights Beach One of the longest and most popular beaches in town. Street parking only for visitors. Grand Avenue. Megansett Beach Small beach in Megansett Harbor. County Road. Menauhant Beach Quiet beach with views of Martha’s Vineyard. Menauhant Road. P * Stoney Beach Secluded beach nestled in Woods Hole. Gosnold Road.

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Concessions Mobile concession/ice cream truck Grilling/picnic area Sanitary facilities Bath house Swimming lessons

Additional Information: Town of Falmouth Beach Department 508-274-2213 | www.falmouthmass.us/beach

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Falmouth Magazine  
Falmouth Magazine  

Falmouth Magazine, launched in 2015, showcases stunning photography, fashion, history, restaurants, architecture, art and culture and the pe...