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THE

CAMPUS SERVING ALLEGHENY COLLEGE SINCE 1876

VOLUME 136, ISSUE 15

- FRIDAY, JANUARY 27, 2011 -

WWW.ALLEGHENYCAMPUS.COM

SPECIAL ISSUE For the first issue of the calendar year, The Campus reflects on the biggest events, changes and happenings of 2011 and takes a look at what’s in store for Allegheny in 2012.

Looking forward Looking back

THE YEAR’S TOP ALBUMS REVIEWED p.5 SPORTS HIGHLIGHTS p.6 NEW FACULTY PROFILES p.4 WHAT’S COMING IN 2012 p.3

INSIDE THIS ISSUE


MARCH-JUNE

February

LOOKING BACK:

1 2/8 WHOLE DARN THING BURNS DOWN

2011 in review

An early morning fire gutted neighboring businesses The Whole Darn Thing Sub Shop and The Neon Moon killing a second floor resident. The next day, structural engineers declared the burned establishment unsafe to renovate. “We will try our best to come back full force,” Whole Darn Thing Sub Shop owner Christine Jordan said, “It’s gonna take some time.”

2 2/11 SLUR APPEARS ON CAMPUS

An unknown person marked a student’s door with the word “faggot” in Walker Hall. There was no direct cause leading up to the incident, according to Joseph DiChristina, dean of students. “Sadly there are going to be people who are going to do bad things, and we have to deal with those things,” said President Mullen. “We’re never going to get to a perfect place.”

3 2/25 SECOND SLUR APPEARS ON CAMPUS

A second homophobic slur was found printed on a piece of computer paper in an undisclosed residence hall. Dean of students Joseph DiChristina said the incident was being investigated and that criminal prosecution was “an open possibility” should the targeted individual choose it. “It makes all of us sad. It makes all of us angry,” DiChristina said. “None of us have an answer to the why. It causes confusion and frustration. But we have to make a statement that this is not tolerated.”

1 3 “Allegheny College does not tolerate homophobia or any kind of harassment.”

OCT.-NOV.

JULY-SEPT.

4 3/16 STUDENTS PROTEST IN MARCH AGAINST HATE

More than 330 students, faculty and administrators gathered in the Gator Quad at 8 p.m. and marched their way through campus to rally in front of Bentley Hall. The event was organized by Q’nA and nine other diversity groups in response to recent hate crimes that occurred on campus. “When you’re doing a march, it doesn’t matter if someone’s trying to silence you or intimidate you because you can yell it,” said Annie Krol, ’12, vice president of Q’nA.

4/21 EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION BECOMES 5 AVAILABLE AT WISE CENTER

After ReproCo spent more than one year on bringing Plan B or a similar morning-after pill to campus, Sue Plunkett, director of the health center, announced at the Reproductive Health Coalition’s Sexual Health Panel that emergency contraception would now be available at the Winslow Health Center.

6 SUMMER CAMPUS BECOMES FULLY WIRELESS

The wireless network was extended across the rest of campus. The entire procedure of transforming the network from a wired to wireless infrastructure took over two years and cost approximately $500,000, Chief Information Officer Rick Holmgren said.

7 JULY OFFICE OF IDEA FORMS

10 10/15 TRUSTEES VOTE FIJI BACK TO CAMPUS

8 SUMMER LOCAL BUSINESS CLOSE THEIR DOORS

11 10/27 STUDENTS PROTEST IN SLUTWALK

9 9/1 SMOOTHIE STREET OPENS IN CAMPUS CENTER

12 11/1 SUB SHOP REOPENS

The Office of Institutional Diversity, Equity, and Access, or IDEA, headed by chief diversity officer Dr. Lawrence Potter extended its responsibility to all Allegheny College diversity groups and would exclusively supervise The Office of Diversity Affairs.

The Artist’s Cup Cafe and Gringo’s Mexican Grill both closed.

A new food station in the Campus Center opened at the beginning of the school year in the former Allegheny Baking Company window. Parkhurst’s idea of Smoothie Street originated after national smoothie company Freshens demanded more space than what was previously constructed.

The Board of Trustees voted for Phi Gamma Delta’s return in a surprise vote over fall break. Members of the Interfraternity Council expressed mixed feelings considering they recommended against allowing FIJI back onto campus. “We no longer feel that we have control,” said Cory Muscara, ‘12, president of IFC.

ReproCo and Young Feminists hosted Allegheny’s first SlutWalk, a popular demonstration against victimblaming in cases of rape on the grounds of women’s choice of dress. After long months of reconstruction, the Whole Darn Thing reopened in a new building at the same location on Market Street. Co-owner Chris Jordan thought customers were pleased with the new building. “That’s been the biggest gratification,” she said. “Just looking and seeing a lot of the majority of the old customers back and new ones that haven’t been here before.”

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Design by Dana D’Amico


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|| The Campus || January 27, 2012

[Features]

www.AlleghenyCampus.com

Features Editors: Molly Duerig & Katie McHugh

Emmy-award winning Wide range of theatre productions to actor to perform happen this semester Plato’s “Apology” tonight in Shafer By KATIE MCHUGH mchughk@allegheny.edu

By MOLLY DUERIG duerigm@allegheny.edu

Tonight Theta Chi will host a performance of Plato’s classic work, “The Apology of Socrates,” in Shafer Auditorium at 8 p.m. The one-man production will be performed by Emmy-award winning Yannis Simonides, the father of Theta Chi brother Ion Simonides, ’14. Yannis has performed “The Apology” over 200 times in venues all over the world, including the United Arab Emirates, Uruguay, Mexico, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Ukraine and, of course, Greece. In many countries, a translation of the work is n e c e s s a r y. According to his son, Yannis is precise

at least 30 times, has done much of the technical work for his father’s performance since he was 14. Whenever Ion accompanied his father to performances, he would receive complimentary plane tickets as the technical assistant for the show. Ion will also do the technical work for tonight’s performance. Ion explained that his appreciation for his dad’s performance grew after actually reading the original text of “The Apology” in a philosophy class. “The text is very boring and dry to analyze,” he

said. “But m y d a d Ion Simonides/The Campus makes about the translations, which it really funny. There’s lots of end up in a PowerPoint pre- humor, irony and sarcasm in sentation that plays on a screen the show. People expect to see behind him while he performs. a lecture, but that’s not what it Ion, who has seen the show is at all. It’s a performance.”

Yannis attended Yale for drama and served at Tish School of the Arts as director of the drama department at the age of 28. At the age of 30, he was offered tenure but turned it down to start up his own theatre company, The Greek Theatre of New York. Yannis won an Emmy for the collection of documentaries about Greece that he produced and directed in the 80s. Yannis is traveling from New York City to perform at Alleghe n y today. He will remain in the States f o r three months, which, according to Ion, is a considerable length of time for him. Ion said the show has been successful at colleges and high schools across the nation. Proceeds from the tickets to tonight’s performance ($3 for students; $7 for general public) will benefit the local branch of CHAPS (Crawford County Mental Health Awareness Program), Theta Chi’s philanthropy.

Allegheny theatre students are going full throttle this semester. Playshop Theatre will show an Oscar Wilde play, The Importance of Being Earnest, directed by Dan Crozier and stage managed by Kevin van Develde, from March 1 to March 4. The main characters include Colleen McCaughey, Lee Scandinaro, Dylan Boucher and Gwyn Agnew. “I was really happy to be cast in this role because I never got to use a British accent onstage before,” said Colleen McCaughey, ’13, who will portray Cecily Cardew. “The whole cast is working really hard to make sure we’re working on the perceived pronunciation guide very closely and we’re working one on one with the director to make sure we’re pronouncing everything correctly,” she said. Another play, “Museum,” a recent play written by Tina Howe and directed by Beth Watkins, will run from April 19 through 22. Auditions will be held in late February. A huge cast of characters will walk in and out of an art gallery in the course of a single day, interact with one another and interpret the works of art. Student Experimental Theatre, or SET, will hold four

shows throughout the semester, including Flu Season, written by Will Eno and directed Michael Young from March 9 to 10, “Adaption of the Country Wife” written by Luke Wronski from April 6 to 7, a “Devised Piece” directed by Katie Beck and Blair Hartman from April 27 to 28 and “Cabaret Night” directed by Caitlyn Fuoco and Colleen McCaughey from May 1 to 2. Caitlyn Fuoco, ’13, helped run the a capella cabaret show last semester and looks forward to performing classical and contemporary musical theatre during study days after classes have ended. “We think it is so important to have a space for musical theatre at Allegheny and it is an aspect of the main Playshop theatre that does not often get utilized,” Fuoco said in an email. Fuoco will hold auditions from February 13 to 14 and ask interested students to sing 16 musical bars or 30 seconds of a song. Between the Playshop Theatre and the SET productions, this semester will be full of opportunities to go to the theater.

Allegheny Theatre Productions: Spring 2012 “The Importance of Being Earnest” written by Oscar Wilde directed by Dan Crozier March 1 - 4 “Flu Season” written by Will Eno directed by Michael Young March 9 - 10 Adaptation of “The Country Wife” original written by William Wycherley written by Luke Wronski April 6 - 7 “Museum” written by Tina Howe directed by Beth Watkins April 19 - 22 “Devised Piece” directed by Katie Beck and Blair Hartman April 27 - 28 “Cabaret Night” directed and produced by Caitlyn Fuoco and Colleen McCaughey May 1 - 2

New 2011 faculty members reflect on Allegheny experiences

By MOLLY DUERIG duerigm@allegheny.edu

Originally from western Illinois, Zachary Callen says Meadville is the most rural place he’s ever lived in. But as far as universities go, Allegheny College isn’t the smallest he’s seen. Assistant professor of political science Zach Callen arrived at Allegheny last semester from the University of MontanaHelena, where he’d been teaching for the previous two years. “[Helena] was about half the size of Allegheny,” Callen said. Although he and his wife liked the town, it was not where they envisioned themselves living in the future.

Molly Duerig/The Campus Molly Duerig/The Campus

He said that there were three faculty members in Helena’s entire political science department, and 75-80 faculty members total at the university. Callen said he was impressed by Allegheny’s students, faculty and location. He also really appreciated that the College supports faculty writing and research. Callen said that he is very happy at Allegheny thus far. “The students are bright, they work hard, they’re pleasant to interact with,” he said. “Earnest is a good word to describe them.”

Travis English/The Campus

Matt Ferrence is an assistant professor of English at Allegheny, specializing in creative nonfiction and American literature, with a particular focus on Appalachian literature. Last semester, Ferrence also participated in the Single Voice Reading Series, sharing from his own various projects. One essay he read aloud was from a collection of golf essays, which took place in Arizona, where he used to live. One recounted an experience he once had while golfing with two men that attempted to cross the Mexican border. “It was one of those situations where you end up being involved whether you want to be or not,” Ferrence said. When Visiting assistant professor of art history Travis English was attracted to Allegheny’s liberal arts setting. In regards to Meadville, he isn’t disappointed. “I tend to be a misanthropic homebody, so Meadville is as good a place as any,” he said. Though English’s specialty is in early 20th century European art, he teaches art history beginning from the 16th centu-

he waved to the men in greeting, they fled. Later, he saw them being escorted away by border control and realized he’d inadvertently flushed two men out. To Ferrence, one of Allegheny’s most appealing aspects is the open interaction between faculty members and between faculty and students. “I have spent time at many English departments and universities, and this is by far the most authentic,” he said. Overall, Ferrence said he would like to stay at Allegheny permanently. “My radiator’s a little chipped, but besides that I don’t have any complaints,” he said. “The blush still hasn’t gone off the rose.” ry up until modern times. Originally from Butler, PA, English had lived in New York since 2006 and came to Allegheny after deciding that it would be nice to be close to home. He added that the other member of his household has also adapted well to Meadville. “My family consists of a cat named Wooby, and he hasn’t complained much about our new dwellings,” English said.

Samira Mehta’s year has been full of lots of hard work. That’s because she’s here at Allegheny to complete her dissertation, entitled “Beyond Chrismukkah: A Cultural History of the Christian/Jewish Blended Family from 1960—2010.” As Allegheny’s Diversity Dissertation Fellow and Humanities Scholar-in-Residence, Mehta has kept busy working on her own project and teaching a class: Religion in American Life. She attended Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, so she said Allegheny’s small liberal arts environment feels almost like home to her. “The faculty has been very welcoming, and I’ve been making new friends,” Mehta said. “The support I’ve been getting from the faculty members has

been fabulous.” Mehta said that overall she has been very well taken care of here at Allegheny. She has been able to devote a lot of time to her own work. “[The Fellow position] is a very generous opportunity that the school offers,” she said. Mehta’s dissertation explores how American society talks and thinks about interfaith families, and how that affects the religious lives of those families. She is also examining how those trends have changed during the past 65 years. “The interfaith marriage rate has grown since 1965,” she said. According to Mehta’s research, in 1965 10% of marriages were interfaith, and by 1990 that rate had grown to 50%.

Molly Duerig/The Campus

“He has more windows to sit in and a longer hallway to run down, so he’s happy.” English will only teach at Allegheny for the year, so he said he hasn’t been too concerned with integrating into the faculty-at-large. However, he said he has really enjoyed getting to know the art department faculty. “They’re a great bunch,” he said.

Got a story to tell? Write for The Campus! editor @allegheny campus.com


[Features]

www.AlleghenyCampus.com

The Campus || January 27, 2012 ||

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Features Editors: Molly Duerig & Katie McHugh

   

TOP ALBUMS 1 1

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8 9 by CODY MILLER 1. COIN COIN CHAPTER ONE: GENS DE COULEUR LIBRES by MATANA ROBERTS Matana Robert’s Coin Coin Chapter One: Gens de Couleur Libres is an experience nothing short of exhausting. Backed by a 16-piece ensemble, Coin Coin is rife with tense, visceral instrumental flourishes, which only magnify the sheer tension underlying these pieces. Roberts’ pieces force one to, in some sense, confront his or her conception of African-American history and the racial dynamics of modern American society. No album this year provokes as much thought nor elicits such a maelstrom of emotions as this avant-garde masterpiece.

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2. LET ENGLAND SHAKE by PJ HARVEY PJ Harvey is the epitome of a great songwriter because she is constantly evolving. With her eighth studio Let England Shake, she reaffirms this, with a collection of twelve harrowing, brilliant pieces, expounding upon the sheer destructiveness of war and British national identity. Harvey‘s lyrics read more like vivid, eloquent diary entries than political statements. She handles her subjects with grace and a sense of unaffected authenticity. 3. HELPLESSNESS BLUES by FLEET FOXES Fleet Foxes front-man Robin Pecknold muses about the trappings and misgivings of adulthood on the Seattle folk group’s superb impressive sophomore release Helplessness Blues. While in some ways sounding like a rustic, aged piece of Americana, the album simultaneously creates a world that is so timeless, so ethereal and so endearing that it seems like it could go on forever. Fleet Foxes has managed to craft a masterpiece of American folk and breathtaking ambition, far eclipsing their already stellar self-titled debut.

5 BIGGEST DUDS HURRY UP, WE’RE DREAMING by M83 KAPUTT by DESTROYER SMOKE RING FOR MY HALO by KURT VILE BURST APART by THE ANTLERS KING OF LIMBS by RADIOHEAD

4. THE BIG ROAR by JOY FORMIDABLE At a time when anthemic, arena rock seems so unfashionable, Welsh trio The Joy Formidable craft a defiant ode to grandiosity with their debut album The Big Roar. But what’s so striking about this debut is not the band’s unapologetically grand ambition, but rather how they situate it within the context of front-woman Ritzy Bryan’s downright heavenly vocals. She is a master of the pop hook, and while never fully reveling in this forte, Bryan uses this ability to create pieces which, while lengthy and epic, seep into the psyche of the listener. 5. W H O K I L L by tUne-yArDs On her second release, W H O K I L L, Merill Garbus infuses elements of afrobeat, R&B, folk and electronica into a surprisingly cohesive whole. Yet beneath the album’s volatility is a striking sense of grace. Garbus accomplishes the high task of rendering her multifaceted work accessible by discerningly drawing from this diverse range of genres. As a result, Garbus crafts W H O K I L L into a penetrating, singular artistic statement. 6. EMPROS by RUSSIAN CIRCLES With Empros, Chicago-based post-metal trio Russian Circles have put out a release that sounds nothing short of a revelation in a genre, which has drifted into creative stagnation and at times, near-pretentiousness. While the Circles’ mini-symphonies are carefully calculated and meticulously constructed, the songs feel so raw and open that the album sounds at times as if it was recorded impromptu. It is this balancing act between visceral freeness and subtle virtuosity that places Empros amongst the finest post-metal releases of recent years. 7. HOUSE OF BALLOONS by THE WEEKND This semi-anonymous mixtape by 21-year old Canadian vocalist Abel Tesfaye is perhaps this year’s most promising debut. Tesfaye juxtaposes his fervent and at times sensual vocals against engrossing, murky aural and lyrical landscape that feels refreshingly singular amongst the plethora of trite R&B releases this year. Graphic, intense, and alluring, Tesfaye’s songs create a world so engrossing, 8. UNDUN by THE ROOTS Easily the best commercial hip-hop release of the past year, the Roots construct their magnum opus with their eleventh studio album Undun. Few albums manage to successfully channel the sort of ambition found on Undun, and even fewer, do so in a manner that seems to natural and effortless as the pieces of this release. Never before has the band sounded as cohesive, organic, and self-assured, and in this sense, Undun embodies the spirit of the Roots better than any release before it. 9. NO DEVOLUCIóN by THURSDAY Thursday’s No Devolución is the sound of a band desperately pushing itself to write the best record it could possibly make and succeeding. More so than anything, No Devolución is a bold statement to the nested potential of a band marred by a catalog of overly angsty, mediocre, melodramatic releases. Thursday does not abandon its core sound. But, for the first time, the caliber of songwriting is so great and such angst is articulated so poignantly, that the band creates a piece that not only sets a new standard for themselves, but also for their respectively genre as a whole. 10. DIOTOMA by KRALLICE On Diotima, black metal quartet Krallice wage an all-out assault. As with their previous releases, Krallice keeps to their characteristic brutish and gruelling roars and swift, pummeling guitar interplay. While the band has always favored the vile over the pure, Diotima has a uniquely atmospheric and, at times, progressive tinge that illustrates their willingness to take significant artistic leaps, even if it does make the band sound somewhat out of place at times amongst many of their black metal counterparts.


6 ||January 27, 2011 ||

The Campus

AlleghenyCampus.com

[ S P O RT S ]

Sports editor : Colleen Pegher || sports@alleghenycampus.com

2011: Sports in Review COURTESY OF SPORTS INFORMATION COURTESY OF SPORTS INFORMATION

1. After finishing with 5-5 this season, Gators’ Head Coach Mark Matlak reflected on the season, which included several close games. “We’re trying to find the best way to give them a chance to be successful and I think we did that,” Matlak said. “We just came up short in a couple of contests and didn’t do the little things we needed to do.” In spite of their .500 finish, the squad had several standout performers, finishing the season with six players earning All-Conference honors. In addition, the Gators had two All-Region performers in Andrew DeJong, ’12, and Colin Hartford, ’13. Left tackle Sam Taylor, ’12, was the first player to earn All-American honors since 2003.

2. Senior Emily Karr finished her Allegheny career as the fourth all-time leader in shutouts for Division III women’s soccer, in addition to holding the school record for single-season and career shutouts.

CHARLIE MAGOVERN/THE CAMPUS

3. Last season, the women’s lacrosse team earned a spot in the playoffs after a 12-6 finish. The Gators would fall to Wooster 14-10 in their playoff contest after defeating the Fighting Scots earlier in the season for the first time in the program’s history. AJ CROFFORD/THE CAMPUS COURTESY OF SPORTS INFORMATION

4. After a season spent atop the conference rankings, the women’s soccer team fell in the NCAC Championship game to Ohio Wesleyan despite dominating the Battling Bishops in statistics for much of the contest. They finished with a record of 11-5-3. 5. The men’s cross country team wrapped up another successful season, finishing 24th overall at Nationals. The team boasted an All-American (Bobby Over, ’13) for the fifth consecutive year in a row.

AJ CROFFORD/THE CAMPUS

“Our men’s cross country program is pretty well known throughout the country and they’ve been working hard to keep that tradition alive,” Head Coach Brent Wilkerson said. “It was a little harder to get back to Nationals because we graduated six varsity runners last year and as far as cross country goes, especially for getting to the National Championships, you usually have a lot of seniors in those groups.”

6. On the women’s side, Kristina Martin earned a spot in Nationals. 7. Volleyball struggled this season after losing five players. The loss left the team with more defensive players than offensive, forcing Coach Bridget Sheehan to move some of her players around. The Gators are a part of a tough conference. Their opponents included eventual National Champion Wittenberg. “We have a very core group of very committed players and it took a while for us to get to that during the season,” Sheehan said. “We ended with fifteen players who were tremendously committed to the program and playing at the next level.” On the defensive end the squad was fairly successful, with senior Winnie Wong leading the conference in digs. Three players earned All-Conference honors and the Gators were able to win their fall tournament. 8. The 11 wins by the men’s soccer team this year marked their best winning percentage since 2006. They also had six players receive All-Conference honors, while junior Tim Egan earned All-Region honors. The Gators’ five-game winning streak early in the season put them in the top 25 for the first time since 2004.

COURTESY OF SPORTS INFORMATION

Looking Ahead... Coaches' Predictions COURTESY OF SPORTS INFORMATION From left, Brent Wilkerson (Men and Women’s Cross Country), Mark Matlak (Football), Bridget Sheehan (Women’s Volleyball)

Allegheny Campus- 1/27/12  

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