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Annual Report 2013


Wesley College Annual Report 2013 Contents President of Council’s Introduction........................................................................................................................................... 2 Principal’s Overview................................................................................................................................................................... 4 Council Activities........................................................................................................................................................................ 8 Major Projects/Masterplan......................................................................................................................................................... 8 College Council........................................................................................................................................................................... 9 College Activities...................................................................................................................................................................... 10 Curriculum Developments....................................................................................................................................................... 10 Music and Performing Arts...................................................................................................................................................... 10 Sport....................................................................................................................................................................................... 12 Sustainability............................................................................................................................................................................ 12 Environmental Actions and Outcomes, 2013........................................................................................................................... 14 Wesley College Institute for Innovation in Education................................................................................................................ 16 Partnerships............................................................................................................................................................................ 18 Yiramalay/Wesley Studio School.......................................................................................................................................... 18 Alcanta International College ............................................................................................................................................... 21 Bunuba-Walmajarri Project: Indigenous Studies................................................................................................................... 21 Special Events........................................................................................................................................................................... 22 College Gala Night................................................................................................................................................................... 22 Samuel Alexander Lecture....................................................................................................................................................... 22 Wesley College Foundation..................................................................................................................................................... 24 Commonwealth Reporting Requirements.............................................................................................................................. 26 Key Student Outcomes........................................................................................................................................................... 26 National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy..................................................................................................... 26 Senior Secondary Outcomes............................................................................................................................................... 30 Post School Destinations..................................................................................................................................................... 32 Student Attendance and Retention...................................................................................................................................... 32 Value Added......................................................................................................................................................................... 32 Professional Engagement........................................................................................................................................................ 32 Staff Attendance and Retention........................................................................................................................................... 32 Teacher and General Staff Qualifications.............................................................................................................................. 32 Professional Development.................................................................................................................................................... 32 Community Feedback............................................................................................................................................................. 32 Parent Satisfaction Survey................................................................................................................................................... 32 Staff Satisfaction Survey....................................................................................................................................................... 32 Student Satisfaction Survey................................................................................................................................................. 33 Financial Statement................................................................................................................................................................. 34 Money Flow 2013.................................................................................................................................................................... 34 Revenue and Expenditure........................................................................................................................................................ 35 Strategic Plan 2004-2016......................................................................................................................................................... 36 Summary of 2013 Action Outcomes....................................................................................................................................... 36

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President of Council’s Introduction ...we are reminded of the wonderful legacy and foresight of our founders and the many generations of students, teachers and Old Collegians who have contributed to what Wesley is today.

2013 marks another year of significant achievement right across the College. We should all be very proud of the academic achievements, our success in sport and the creativity achieved through our performing arts program. This Annual Report gives us a great opportunity to reflect on what has been achieved by so many during 2013. It should be remembered that we now have approximately 3,100 students spread across our three main campuses with additional learning facilities at Clunes and our Outdoor Education sites at Chum Creek, Camp Mallana and Lochend. We also share a rich partnership with the Bunuba people in the Kimberley region of Western Australia, providing unique education opportunities for approximately 50 students from the local indigenous community and for students from Melbourne. What a wonderful array of opportunities we provide to all who attend Wesley in the 21st century. As we move closer to the sesquicentenary (150th) year since the foundation of the College in 1866, we are reminded of the wonderful legacy and foresight of our founders and the many generations of students, teachers and Old Collegians who have contributed to what Wesley is today. It is with this wonderful past planning in mind that Council, together with the College leadership, are now looking at where Wesley will be as we head towards 2030 and beyond. This is particularly important as the current Strategic Plan ends in 2016. Over the past year Council has re-established the Strategy Committee, which has the prime purpose of looking at our future options to lay the groundwork for the Wesley of the future. It is however important to remember that the basic philosophy and ethos of the College that has served so well in the past will not change in the future. The timeless principle of a “liberal education” for all who attend the College still “rings true”. Over the next two years, you will hear more about this. 2013 has seen the completion of the key building works for the Moubray Street Precinct redevelopment at the St Kilda Road campus. It was pleasing to see the students using the refurbished Menzies Wing during 2013 and as the 2014 year begins, see the enjoyment of all students and teaching staff as they use the new Music School and refurbished Adamson Hall. This $30 million project has been supported financially

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by the broader Wesley community and I am pleased to report that so far we have raised in excess of $8 million in donations for this project. This is a truly wonderful result and I thank all those who have supported the Wesley College Foundation. This year we have also sold surplus land along Rose Avenue which abuts the Glen Waverley campus. The proceeds of the sale of these properties of over $20 million will form a very useful corpus from which future College-wide building projects can be planned for and partly-funded. I would like to take this opportunity of thanking all those involved (including our neighbours along Rose Avenue) for their help in making this sale a success. I am pleased to advise that in August 2013, I attended the opening of the new Eco Tents at the Yiramalay/Wesley Studio School in the Kimberley. It was a great opportunity for me to see “first hand” the progress that has been made at this valuable partnership school. Talking to the students and staff it was very clear to me that all who are involved in the school are sharing wonderful life-changing experiences that will be carried with them for the remainder of their lives. In my opinion the model of learning here is one that could be applied in other parts of Australia for the benefit of the country as a whole. Finally, I want to thank everyone involved in making the 2013 year such a success. Particular thanks must go to: • All those on the College Council who give so freely of their time for the benefit of the College • Our College Principal and the College Executive consisting of the Heads of Campus, Richard Brenker at St Kilda Road, Peter Dickinson at Glen Waverley and Jacinta Janssens at Elsternwick, Cameron Moroney, Business Director and Chief Financial Officer, Andrew McAree, Director of Wesley Global, Andrew Blair, Executive Director of the Wesley College Institute and Isaac Quist, Director of Curriculum • All teaching and general staff across the College • All parents and students together with the broader Wesley community who have supported us in many ways Peter Harrison


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Principal’s Overview ...not only was there great pride in the outstanding, award-winning achievements, but there was also great pride in the less celebrated, quiet, unsung moments of struggle and growth through which the Wesley spirit expresses itself and endures...

Throughout 2013 our College theme was – Learning to be – one of the four timeless principles of our vision statement. Across the College the theme was examined from many angles, exploring how as individuals we engage in the process of becoming authentic human beings, and as an institution, how we stay true to our values, and the ways in which the educational experience can help to nurture, to develop, and to support the process for everyone in realising this. Throughout the year, a vast amount of learning was experienced through an enormous commitment to giving support to everyone, whether student, teacher, parent, alumni, Council member, or friend. With the publication of the Year 12 academic results for 2013, we again had much to celebrate. College highlights for 2013 included: • Five students achieved the highest possible ATAR 99.95 ° Nicholas Ensor ° Julia Heyward ° Roshan Karri ° Grant Silbert ° Anne Williamson • Wesley was the top IB school in Victoria • Wesley was the top coeducational IB school in Australia College key results for 2013: • Wesley median VCE/IB ATAR 86.50 • 38% all Wesley students IB/VCE achieved an ATAR > 90.00 • 148 perfect study scores were achieved across 30 VCE/ IB Diploma subjects • 50% Wesley IB students achieved an ATAR > 95.50 • 96.12% Wesley students offered First Round Tertiary places But throughout 2013, not only was there great pride in the outstanding, award-winning achievements, but there

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was also great pride in the less celebrated, quiet, unsung moments of struggle and growth through which the Wesley spirit expresses itself and endures, and through which the College makes a contribution to the wider community of Australia and the world. Early in the year, the College celebrated the 20th anniversary of the start of the IB Diploma at the St Kilda Road and Glen Waverley Senior Schools, and the 20th anniversary of the first Year 12 graduating class at Glen Waverley. Intensive work continued in our three Middle Schools at Elsternwick, Glen Waverley and St Kilda Road, on the implementation of the IB MYP in line with both IB and Australian Curriculum (ACARA) requirements. Staff across the College continued to participate in subject-specific and other professional development activities to support the IB MYP introduction and the College was instrumental in reviving the activities of the Victorian network of IB MYP schools, which provides another significant source of professional learning and collaboration for all. The iPad project was also successfully introduced at the Elsternwick and St Kilda Road Junior Schools following its introduction to the Glen Waverley campus. Throughout 2013, the Wesley College Institute provided a consolidated approach to research on many College projects to the benefit of the students and staff of the College and the broader community. Sport continued to play a vital part in the life of all Wesley students. Across APS/AGSV Sport throughout 2013, our Girls’ Firsts Teams again enjoyed a very successful year with seven APS Premierships. Summer season highlights included the Girls’ First Premierships in Tennis (fifth consecutive year), Girls’ First Swimming and Diving (second consecutive year), and Girls’ First Badminton. Winter season highlights included the Girls’ Cross Country (second consecutive year), and Girls’ First Netball. Spring season highlights included the Girls’ First Athletics (second consecutive year) and Girls’ First Water Polo (third consecutive year). The Boys’ Soccer team finished second, Boys’ First Table Tennis team third, and there were


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other excellent performances from our Boys’ Swiming, Diving and Cross Country squads. The Samuel Alexander Lecture on 27 August was delivered by the Hon Dr Barry Jones AO on the topic, Education as Commodity: The Search for Values, raised some important questions about the focus and quality of current debate in Australia about education. The College again enjoyed a number of notable occasions and embarked on significant building developments at each metropolitan campus and at Clunes and Yiramalay. At the St Kilda Road campus, the Moubray Street Precinct was completed on Tuesday 10 September and restoration of the Back Turf including the installation of a new synthetic practise surface was completed. At Elsternwick, The Annexe was completed and a new playground was installed adjacent to the Big Lawn. At Glen Waverley, 23 lots of land were sold on Rose Avenue and construction of a new internal road on the eastern boundary and car parking at the Sports Complex was completed. At Clunes, staff moved into the new Administration Office and renovations to the Weavery were completed in October. At Yiramalay, the Official Opening of the Eco Tents drew a gathering of people from all over Australia and was also a wonderful celebration of a remarkable partnership and educational model. Our most successful fundraising campaign in the history of the College, Wesley 2016 capital campaign for the Moubray Street redevelopment, generated more than $8m in cash donations and pledges in 2013. Significant donations were also received for the Yiramalay program from several philanthropic Trusts, in addition to donations from alumni and parents. The sixth Annual Foundation Business Breakfast with Mr Kim Williams AM, Chief Executive of News Corp Australia, was again a great success in 2013 with over 400 people in attendance and our bequest group, The Sapere Aude Society, continued its strong growth to help underpin the long-term future of the College.

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Late in 2013, the Yiramalay Foundation was established with Joe Ross, Bunuba Elder from Fitzroy Crossing, appointed as inaugural Chairman. The Yiramalay Foundation will work alongside the Wesley College Foundation and be officially launched in Melbourne and Perth in 2014. During 2013 many actions were completed in the current Strategic Plan 2004-2016, and work began on the structure for the next plan 2017-2030. An initiative directed by the Strategic Plan in 2013 was the development of the design for a new Wesley Uniform, which saw the appointment of The Jonathan Ward Collective. The current uniform was designed more than 18 years ago by Prue Acton and, since then, only revisions to the cut and design of items have been made with original fabrics and yarns superseded by more modern materials. It is with great anticipation that the new uniform will be launched in 2016. The College Executive Team in 2013 consisted of Heads of Campus, Richard Brenker, Peter Dickinson and Jacinta Janssens, Business Director and Chief Financial Officer, Cameron Moroney, Director of the Wesley College Institute, Andrew Blair, Director of Curriculum, Isaac Quist, and Director of Wesley Global, Andrew McAree. This team, along with an outstanding Wesley College Council, led by President, Peter Harrison, has been inspirational this year and it is with enormous gratitude that I thank each of them for their excellent work, commitment, energy and vision throughout 2013. Helen Drennen


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Council Activities Wesley College is an Institution of the Uniting Church. The Wesley College Council is appointed under the terms of a Constitution. The Constitution provides for a Council of 12 people, including the College Principal. The Council is responsible for the College’s governance. The College Council meets approximately nine times each year and has appointed three Committees with particular responsibilities. The Nominations Committee considers and recommends to Council the names of people suitable for the office of Councillor and other Committees of the Wesley College Council. The Finance and Risk Management (FARM) Committee is responsible for the College’s financial affairs and risk management strategies. Council Member

Finance, Audit & Risk Management Committee

Council

Property Committee

Council Strategy Committee

Meetings attended

Meetings eligible to attend

Meetings attended

Meetings eligible to attend

Meetings attended

Meetings eligible to attend

Meetings attended

Meetings eligible to attend

Ian Brown

8

12

Lynda Cheng

10

12

1

2

Helen Drennen

12

12

9

9

7

9

2

2

Peter Harrison

12

12

2

2

Wendy Lasica

10

12

2

2

Peter Le Huray

9

12

9

9

2

Janet McGaw

11

12

9

9

Andrew Nicholls

12

12

7

9

Philip Powell

9

12

7

9

2

2

Marianne Stillwell

12

12

9

9

Douglas Turnbull

11

12

8

9

2

2

Sue Withers

10

12

1

2

Major Projects/Masterplan As always there has been a significant amount of capital works taking place across all campuses. The Annexe at Elsternwick was completed, adding a whole new teaching space to the Art area, and a new playground has been added adjacent to the Big Lawn. The floors in the Cato building were repaired and the lower floor was re-carpeted. Facility upgrades were ongoing including an upgrade to the Science prep room, the boys’ toilets and change rooms and staff toilets next to the Health Centre. The final stage of the fire detector system upgrade was completed as well as upgrades to lighting in the Sports Hall and several classrooms. At Glen Waverley a number of areas were remodeled to maximise flexibility of use by creating more functional modern spaces for both learning and study. These included a new Maths Annexe and Computer Lab in Senior School, Room M3 in Middle School has been redesigned as a Design Technology room and the Science prep room in Middle School was upgraded. The domestic water upgrade was

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The Property Committee establishes the policy framework for all property dealings by the College and reviews the construction and maintenance of buildings and grounds. The Strategy Committee has been established with the specific purpose of looking at the long term strategic options for the College and to position the College to maximise the opportunities of the 21st century. This includes ensuring that the College building and education facilities are appropriate and that supporting strategic plans are prepared to ensure their delivery. Councillors’ membership of committees, and attendance at Council and committee meetings, is listed in the following table.

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completed and air conditioning was added to several more areas of the Middle School. The final stage of the carpark was completed along the railway line at the rear of the campus. The rhododendron garden was reinstalled at the Senior School as part of a larger landscape project, and the front fence along High Street Road was replaced, along with part of the masonry wall at the front gates being demolished and rebuilt. At St Kilda Road the College took possession of a magnificent new Music School and many hands worked hard to relocate the Music, Drama and Visual Communication Departments in time for the commencement of Term 1, 2014. The Back Turf was completely rebuilt including a large multipurpose synthetic area. The Library received an upgrade and the new museum/gallery space was created in an adjoining area. The Staff Common Room was completely remodeled along with the Senior School English office and Middle and Senior School Counselors offices. The bottom level of the Senior School was given a fresh new makeover and the Cato Room toilets were upgraded. Another Science Room L9 was upgraded along with the Chemistry prep room and air conditioning was installed in the Senior Science area.


College Council Ian Brown

Wendy Lasica

Philip Powell

BEd BD

BA

BComm (Hons) CA F Fin

Ian is the Moderator’s nominee on the Wesley College Council and the Vice President of the Wesley College Council. He has been a member of Council for eleven years and serves on the Nominations Committee. Ian is a Minister of the Uniting Church, serving in the Camberwell Parish and has a background in education. His daughter attended the College.

Lynda Cheng

Wendy joined the College Council in mid-2011. She has been an award-winning performing arts producer in Melbourne, a director and board member of the Next Wave Festival, chaired funding panels for Arts Victoria, been General Manager of Stonnington Symphony, written a how-to handbook for emerging artists and managed a playwrights’ award at the State Library. Wendy has also worked extensively in New York. She is currently a member of the Board of Astra Chamber Music Society, and recently graduated with a Master of Urban Planning. Wendy’s son currently attends the College and her daughter is a recent graduate of Wesley.

Philip joined the Wesley College Council in May 2008, after a period as a co-opted member of the Finance and Risk Management Committee. Philip, who attended Wesley in the early 1970s, has a commerce background being a Chartered Accountant and has held senior roles in insurance, finance and property. Philip has two daughters who both attended the Glen Waverley campus.

BComm LLB(Hons) GAICD

Marianne Stillwell Lynda joined the Wesley College Council in November 2012. She is Director of Corporate Development, Mergers & Acquisitions at Pratt Holdings/Visy Industries and has held other positions, including Chief Financial Officer, since joining in 2005. After commencing her career at Blake Dawson, she moved into investment banking and spent nine years working with JPMorgan in their Melbourne, Sydney, San Francisco and New York offices. Lynda is a Non Executive Director of South East Water Limited. She has a son and a daughter who are current students at the College.

BA (Hons) MBA GradDipEd MAICD

Peter Le Huray BEc FCA FTIA

Peter was appointed to the College Council in 2010 and is Chair of the Finance and Risk Management Committee. Peter is a senior partner with PricewaterhouseCoopers and also a member of the Australian Board. Peter is a Fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accountants and a Fellow of the Tax Institute of Australia. Two of Peter’s children attended the College.

Marianne has been a member of the College Council since 2006 and is Chair of the Nominations Committee, Chair of the Wesley College Foundation and a member of the Finance and Risk Management Committee. After 12 years in various management roles with Ford Credit Australia Ltd, and 10 years of secondary teaching experience in Catholic and Independent schools, Marianne is currently Executive Director of the Stillwell Family Council. Marianne is also an active director of the family company, the Stillwell Motor Group, which operates ten motor vehicle dealerships and property investments across the Melbourne metropolitan area. Marianne has two sons and a daughter who are current students at the College.

Helen Drennen BA BSc (Hons) PhD DipEd AMP FACE FACEL Helen joined the Council on her appointment as Principal of Wesley College in 2003. Prior to this she was the Academic Director for the International Baccalaureate Organization, based in Wales, UK (1997-2002), and the Director for the Asia Pacific Region, based in Singapore (2002-2003). Before her overseas appointments, Helen held the position of Head of Campus, Glen Waverley at Wesley College (1994-1997). In October 2007, she completed the Advanced Management Program in The Harvard Business School at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. Helen is currently a member of the Governing Board of the International Baccalaureate, a Trustee of the Shrine of Remembrance and a member of the Monash University Council. In 2010 she was appointed a Fellow of the Australian College of Educators (FACE) and a Fellow of the Australian Council for Educational Leaders (FACEL) in 2011. Helen is a former Wesley teacher and parent and she brings extensive national and international experience to her role.

Janet McGaw BPD, BArch (Hons) MArch PhD

BE MEngSc MEng MIEAust Janet was appointed to the College Council in 2010 and serves on the Property Committee. She is a Senior Lecturer in Architectural Design at The University of Melbourne and has an award winning practice that works primarily on residential projects. Earlier in her career she worked for a range of architectural practices including MGS, Bochsler & Partners, Cocks Carmichael Whitford, and Bates Smart McCutcheon. She left full time practice in 1998 to develop her own firm, Janet McGaw Architects, and complete first a Masters and then a PhD by Creative Works at The University of Melbourne. Janet has a son and a daughter who are current students of the College.

Andrew Nicholls Peter Harrison

Douglas Turnbull

LLB BSc

Douglas was appointed to the College Council in 2005 and is Chair of the Property Committee. He is a director of a locally based consulting structural engineering and building firm, TD & C Pty Ltd. Douglas brings his valuable consulting experience in the building and construction industry to the Council. He has been involved in the development of many school and education facilities such as Mowbray College, Melton, a project he was involved with from its inception. Douglas, his father and his brother all attended the College and his twin daughters both attended the St Kilda Road campus.

Sue Withers DipT BTheol

BBus FCA

Peter has been a member of the Wesley College Council since 1993 and is the President of the Council and Chair of the Strategy Committee. He is also former chair of the Wesley College Foundation and the Wesley College Finance, Audit and Risk Management committee. Peter’s career includes a 20 year period as managing partner of accounting firm William Buck, two short-term roles as CEO of legal firms Phillips Fox and Herbert Geer and Rundle and a 10 year term with consulting engineering firm AECOM, as their CFO for operations in Australia, New Zealand, Asia and the Middle East. More recently he has been consulting to several leading legal and accounting firms in Melbourne. Peter and his two sons are former students of the College.

Andrew joined the Wesley College Council in 2010 and serves on the Property committee. Andrew is CEO Investments at Linfox Property Group where he has worked since 1998. Prior to that he was a lawyer at Blake Dawson Waldron from 1990 to 1998. Andrew has a daughter and two sons who are current students of the College and another son who graduated in 2011.

Sue originally trained as a teacher. She began her theological education at the Pacific Theological College in Suva, Fiji and completed it in Melbourne at the United Faculty of Theology. Sue has over 20 years experience in education, both with secular and Uniting Church schools including 15 years in the field of School Chaplaincy. Sue was ordained in 1997. Her School Chaplaincy work began at Geelong West Technical School and she later worked at Methodist Ladies’ College for 10 years. From 2003-2006, Sue was Moderator of the Uniting Church in Australia, Synod of Victoria and Tasmania. She has a great interest in adolescent education and is very pleased to contribute to the Wesley College Council.

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College Activities Curriculum Developments

Music and Performing Arts

2013 saw the commencement of the trial implementation phase of the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IB MYP) across all three Melbourne campuses of the College. This significant development in curriculum provision at Wesley College at once ushered in, advanced and gave renewed impetus to a wide range of major initiatives aimed at enhancing the quality of teaching and learning across the College.

Participation in cocurricular music remains high on each campus, with students performing frequently at assemblies, chapel services, school tours, community events and their own campus concerts and soirees, and participating in music camps and tours. Students enjoy a regular opportunity to sing together now, with the Combined College Choir workshop, sponsored by the Wesley College Society for the Arts. In 2013, the workshop with Jonathan Bam concluded with a concert at Deakin Edge. The combined choral work was also featured in the College Valedictory Service in St Paul’s Cathedral in October.

Highlights of the curriculum year include: • Development of College-wide scope and sequence documents for literacy and numeracy to ensure alignment of Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) requirements with International Baccalaureate (IB) Primary Year Programme (PYP) delivery • Initial efforts to review IB PYP reporting processes across the College • Implementation of a collaborative approach as the mechanism for developing College teaching and learning units in line with both IB MYP and ACARA requirements • Introduction of moderation and standardisation processes to support assessment practice across the College • Development of an interim student reporting model for Years 7 – 8 to support implementation of the IB MYP • Initial review and redistribution of contact time allocated to subjects taught in Year 7 and Year 8 across the College; this first step is to be followed by a comprehensive review and revision of the College’s Shape of the Day to ensure its fitness for purpose in the wake of significant changes • Review of existing Year 10 curriculum model to extend the delivery of Science and Humanities from semester to year-long subjects • Ongoing efforts to consolidate a Senior Years Learning Framework across the College that is responsive the learning needs of students and enhances the learning opportunities available • Implementation of new curriculum leadership structure for Years 7-12 • Focused capacity building for all Heads of Learning and Assistant Heads of Learning to support implementation of inquiry and concept based approaches to learning across the College • Implementation planning for key elements of the proposed Language Program Development model for the College • Inaugural participation of Senior Years’ students in the KULE program, a community engagement program of Service Learning in Kenya • Hosting an IB Asia Pacific regional workshop in July 2013 for IB PYP/MYP/DP teachers across and beyond the region

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The Society also supported a wonderful College Strings Day held at Glen Waverley, where students from Years 5-12 participated in Electrify Your Strings, a stunning contemporary music experience that literally had young violinists dancing as they played! Wesley College was invited to join a group of independent schools from across Australia in a Combined Schools Music Festival, held in 2013 in Brisbane. From the three campuses, fifteen Wesley students were selected to participate in the combined orchestra, symphonic band and choir, all performing at a very high level. We look forward to 2015, when Wesley will host the event in Melbourne.

...a stunning contemporary music experience that literally had young violinists dancing as they played! At Elsternwick, highlights included the McArthur Strings being awarded a Platinum Shield at the Victorian Schools String Festival, Booktown performances at Clunes, the annual Jazz Night, the Music A Recitals, and the annual Celebration of the Arts at Robert Blackwood Hall. Glen Waverley musicians enjoyed their concert series – Autumn Concert in the Prest Quad, Edge Concert at Deakin Edge (with a distinctly French flavour), Not Just Jazz at Leonda by the Yarra, and finished the year with a Beatlesthemed Celebration. St Kilda Road student musicians continued to thrive and grow in their temporary accommodation, watching the development of the new Music School with great excitement. Pop Choir rehearsed in the Senior School Lecture Theatre, as numbers rose to exceed 200 singers at some Friday 7.30am rehearsals! Participation in Mordialloc Sunsets Big Band Festival and the Australian Grand Prix, community and charity events at Ormond Hall, Music in the Quads, the Spring Symphony Concert and the Soirees were as always enthusiastically attended, and Music Festival at Elisabeth Murdoch Hall in the Melbourne Recital Centre was again a highlight, though with over 350 students participating, the event was sold out, and the hall, and adjoining salon were bursting at the seams with Wesley musicians.


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The theatre seasons were again of an extremely high standard, with numerous productions across the College. Adamson Theatre Company again performed in professional venues, in the absence of Adamson Hall. Productions included The Threepenny Opera, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, Peter Pan and Beauty and the Beast. Elsternwick staged Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, while Glen Waverley’s student theatre productions were The Beggars’ Opera, The Secret Society of Fotheringtower, Cosi, Electra, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, and The Gangster Tapes.

Sport The 2013 Sport year has again been a wonderful year of participation and achievement across all sports and year levels. There were 286 teams/squads competing across the 19 sports which were on offer during the three seasons. We had approximately 1,100 fixtures during the Summer season, 1,300 during Winter season and 113 during Spring season. Wesley provided our students with enormous sporting opportunities both within our system of APS/AGSV competition as well as state and national streams. The Summer sport season experienced weather from extreme heat to rain-interrupted matches and complete washouts, as well as running over the extensive Christmas, New Year holiday break interruption. Results were mixed, but effort and application were always very good. Season highlights were the premierships in Girls’ badminton, swimming and diving and tennis. The Girls’ First Swimming and Diving had a great night in the pool winning both events which goes to the overall combined total of points. The Girls’ First Tennis team completed the rare achievement of claiming the premiership for the fifth year in a row and have their eye on extending this winning streak. Other First team results for the Summer season were Boys’ badminton 8th position, cricket 10th position and rowing 6th in the A final at Head of River. Swimming and diving 5th position, table tennis 3rd position, tennis 6th position and volleyball 7th position. The Girls’ rowing were 4th in the A final at Head of River, softball 2nd position and volleyball 6th position. The Winter season saw standout performances by the Girls’ cross country and netball teams. The netball season went right to the wire with a last-match decider. The Girls’ soccer team were solid all year finishing 4th, basketball 7th and hockey had a great year finishing 2nd. In the Boys’ teams, soccer was our highest placed team finishing 2nd. Football had a tough season in a very competitive competition to finish 11th overall. The cross country team were 5th, basketball 6th and hockey 10th. The Spring season also provided great highlights with our Girls’ athletics team winning the APS competition at

Lakeside Stadium. The team included students from all three campuses and an age range from Years 5-12. Our Girls’ water polo squad also secured another premiership with a dominant season. Our Boys’ squads were also extremely competitive with the athletics squad coming 7th overall and water polo 4th. The Sports Directorate would like to acknowledge the grounds and maintenance staff for their tireless work in preparing quality venues at each of our campuses during the 2013 sport season.

Sustainability This report presents environmental data from the four urban sites for 2012 and notes the environmental actions or outcomes across the College for 2013. Environmental Data, 2012 Table 1: Energy and water usage and cost by campus, 2012 Electricity1

Gas

Water

(kWh)

$

(Mj)

$

(kL)

$

333,773

55,943

260

3526

2819

8,953

9,399

92199

14839

54,563

806

6034

848

3,534

1,280,749 203,748

5,956

45,389

14817

45,027

TOTAL 3,529,243 543,344

16,421

147,148

33,323

112,077

E

1,639,203 240,284

GW SKR Junior School SKR

275,518

43,369

Source: CarbonMetrix Database2.

Consumption levels essentially follow the size and population of each campus, but are also affected by the factors such as the reliance on electricity instead of gas for heating at Elsternwick, and the reduction in grassed surfaces at the smaller sites. The extra water required to maintain the extensive grounds and gardens at Glen Waverley is partially addressed by the water harvesting and storage capacity at this site. A comparison with the previous year, in Table 2, below, shows an increase in electricity demand, a small drop in gas use, and a marked increase in water use. Table 2: Energy and water usage, 2006, 2011 and 2012 Electricity (kWh)

Gas (Mj)

Water (kL)

2006

3,405,004

18,136

66,150

2011

3,448,287

16,702

27,028

2012

3,529,243

16,421

33,323

Change from previous year

2.3%

-1.7%

23%

Change from 2006

3.6%

-9.4%

-49.6%

The environmental data for the four urban sites has been fully collated since 2006. This enables the College to use 2006 as a benchmark year and track trends over time.

1. Costs for electricity and gas are recorded ex GST. No GST applies to water bills 2. A database/software package is now used to store and extract data for gas and electricity. Where a billing period extends beyond the 2012 calendar year, the data is normalised. Water is taken directly from billing data, to the nearest calendar year billing

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The comparison of consumption in 2006 and 2012 is also shown in Table 2. This longer term comparison indicates that our electrical demand has increased by 3.6% above the 2006 level. Gas is 9.4% below 2006 levels. Water use is a commendable 49.6% below 2006 levels

Storing student consumption data also allows us to compare season to season and term to term, with each incoming group being sent energy and water targets based on the best outcomes for their given terms over time. In 2013 the results were:

Table 3: Energy and water costs, 2006, 2011 and 2012

Table 4: Average water and energy consumption in student houses, 2013

2006

Electricity (kWh)

Gas (Mj)

Water (kL)

295,773

110,530

92,327

2011

456,632

120,522

83.924

2012

543,344

147,148

112,077

Change from previous year

19%

22%

54%

Change from 2006

83.7%

33.1%

21.4%

There are far more marked changes in costs compared to the previous year, and again, to 2006, shown in Table 3. Significant price rises for each resource amplify the effect of increases in electricity consumption and counter the economic benefit of reducing our usage of gas and water. Without those reductions, however, gas and water costs would have increased more dramatically again. With the six year perspective, electrical use has increased by 3.6%, while costs have increased by 83.7%. The change in electricity contracts undertaken in 2013 is likely to keep costs under control in the short term, but the long-term cost trend is likely to remain. This is where efficiency measures will be most beneficial. Gas usage, in contrast, has fallen 9.4%. Costs, however, have increased by 33.1% since 2006. Water use has decreased by 49.6% between 2006 and 2012; however the annual costs have increased by 21.4%. Gas and water costs are still relatively low, but continued increases of this magnitude will swallow an increasing proportion of our recurrent budget, without providing any increase in amenity or value.

Environmental Actions and Outcomes, 2013 Clunes The 19 kW solar system at Clunes has been running now since 17 August 2011, generating over 70,422 kWh3 (as at February 28 2014), and saving over $14,0004. For 2013, the web-based data collection system registered a generation of 27756.47kWh, slightly above the rated expectation of 27,000kWh pa. Environmental Living at Clunes Environmental sustainability continues to maintain a high focus at Clunes with it being one of the six core areas of all students to study, and more importantly, live. With the unique living arrangements at Clunes, students can see what their environmental impact is by directly measuring their power and water consumption each week, along with their waste production. This can then be looked at in terms of their carbon footprint empowering students with the knowledge of how to become carbon neutral for two months of their lives. 3. Web-based data, SunnyPortal, Clunes Plant records. 4. Assuming a base usage rate of 20c/kWh

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W e s l e y C o l l e g e Annu a l Re po r t 2 0 1 3

Group (term)

Average Average Average Average water water energy energy Carbon Carbon offset Group consumption consumption consumption consumption offset (# of trees/ No’s (litres/ (litres/ (kWh/ (kWh/ (# of trees/ pp/term) house/ pp/ house/ pp/ group) wk) day) week) day)

53 (1)

82

5136.47

107.62

91.19

2.31

30

2455

54 (2)

75

5403.06

113.25

393.06

8.36

41

3053

55 (3)

72

5875.64

128.74

477.55

10.54

39

2817

56 (4)

81

6027.66

117.1

254.36

4.95

25

2013

We can then compare these group totals against past terms, but also show the possibilities for students given the best house outcomes in a particular group, as per below. NB: House 1, in Term 1, was the lowest water use by a house that we have recorded Table 5: Minimum consumption levels for water and energy, per term, student houses Lowest Lowest average Lowest Lowest average water energy average waste carbon offset Group (term) consumption consumption (litres/house/ (# of trees/ (litres/person/ (kWh/person/ week) person/term) day) day) 53 (1)

54.8 (H10)

1.41 (H10)

90 (H8)

15 (H2 + 4)

54 (2)

88.3 (H9)

6.32 (H3)

130 (H13)

28 (H10)

55 (3)

85.1 (H2)

9.11 (H12)

127 (H9)

29 (H2)

56 (4)

96.6 (H1)

3.9 (H12)

130 (H12)

19 (H2)

Against this we also compare their total energy use compared to the solar energy we have been able to harness, both through the efficient use of their solar hot water systems, but more so the solar panels that have been recently installed at Clunes. The solar yield and the electricity use by student houses is recorded in Table 6. Table 6: Solar contribution per term from the Clunes system Group

Total yield Total yield start finish

Yield for term

Total energy use student houses

Solar offset %

53 (1)

41,493

45,980

4,487

6,565

68%

54 (2)

48,313

50,413

2,100

30,266

7%

55 (3)

51,837

54,180

2,343

30,267

8%

56 (4)

56,493

61,642

5,149

19,586

26%

TOTALS

14,079 kWh 86,684 kWh generated used


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Note: this 14,079 kWh figure is the yield within the 8 week periods those students are in residence. A total of 27,000 kWh is recorded for the full year. Total house use during this set of 4 x 8 weeks is 86,684 kWh. The annual generation therefore provides 32% of this student demand, well above the 25 % target in the original project brief. We are then able to assess all of this versus their dietary choices and implement the notions of Food Miles, processed food and packaging through activities like our Harvest Feast Day. We then reinforce this through our House Program in an Ethical Eating class. All of this aims to have students make informed decisions about both what they purchase as consumers and what they eat. Throughout 2013 we have also assisted a number of local environments focusing on the waterways and creeks systems of Clunes and the Mt Beckworth area. This is through both the Environmental Program at Clunes and the Collective Potential program. Energy Efficiency A roll-out of highly efficient LED lighting across the College has begun with a fit-out of two classrooms at Elsternwick, and large external floodlights at Chum Creek. Further lights will be replaced as existing halogens and fluorescent lights fail, or come up for replacement in the normal maintenance schedule, whichever comes first. Good quality LED lights will use 20-25% of the power of a halogen downlight, will last much longer and will operate at much cooler temperatures. The reduced power demand and the longer operating life can cut the costs of lighting and maintenance Land Management 1. “Bush Tender” funding and actions, Lochend For the last five years, this funding has supported on-going management action on about 49 ha in the western section, and a small 0.8ha section uphill from the homestead. In 2013 we received the final allocation funding of $2,750. This paid for the removal of woody weeds and the control of feral animals. 2. Vegetation Restoration, Lochend A further fully-funded project was completed on part of the eastern acreage of Lochend. The aim was to restore original woodland vegetation to a 7ha block of cleared land, using funds and planting volunteers from Greening Australia. In 2012, an initial area of 1ha was planted out by hand with tube stock, and protected with a solar-powered electric fence. In 2013, the remaining 6ha was planted out, again with a mix of indigenous groundcovers, grasses, bushes and trees.

Wesley College Institute The Institute’s focus of activity is organised via the following organising themes. The projects and programs under each heading represent the major priorities undertaken throughout 2013.

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1. Exploring new frameworks for Learning • Concentrated focus on high quality implementation of the IB Middle Years Programme (MYP) • Management and growth of the IB Primary Years Programme (PYP), IB Diploma, and VCE programs • Investigation of expanded options within the Senior Years Learning Framework • Applications and subsequent success for participation in two new programs Cultures of Thinking and the Melbourne University network in order to build capacity within Wesley • The imbedding of the new teacher development model for the College 2. Building sustainable cross-cultural relationships for learning • Strengthening the relationships and opportunities for Wesley through the Alcanta and Li Nan partnerships. • Support and contribution to the Learning in Residence development 3. Transforming teaching and learning practices with technology • Bringing coherency to the collection, analysis and interpretation of multiple data sets on student progression • Further concentration on the analysis and improvement of elements of NAPLAN and VCE performance at Wesley • Continued coherency and consistency in the application of Individual Needs programs across the College • The first stage of implementation of the SEQTA Learning Management system to provide “real time” data for teachers • The first stages of the redevelopment of the St Kilda Road library • The implementation of digital text for Years 7 and 8 students • The effective use of AARNET to deliver video conferencing and virtual excursions within Wesley classrooms Research Participation in research efforts with Victoria University/ Australian Institute for Sport in Sporting Success, the University of New South Wales in attitudes/usage of mobile technology and internally with evaluations of the Holt and Menzies Wings have been ongoing and useful for the College The two Menzies Fellows – Tim O’Leary and Matt Jones from St Kilda Road have begun their research projects looking at progression and prediction in the College’s use of student progression data. Their project is titled From hindsight to Foresight


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Public Programs

Library and Information Services

Throughout the year some 1,800 members of the Wesley Community attended events such as the Monday Series, Institute Dialogues and the Samuel Alexander Lecture delivered by the Hon Barry Jones. Our partnership with the Melbourne Writers Festival saw us being able to bring Tavi Gevinson to Wesley.

Library Narrative In November 2013 the refurbishment of the St Kilda Road library commenced, bringing physical shape to the concepts outlined in the Library Narrative November 2011 and the Educational Brief 2012. The Library Narrative articulates changing educational needs brought about by digitisation in the information industry, the uptake of tablets for reading and information access worldwide.

Partnerships with MLC and Lauriston Girls School enabled us to bring Professor Andy Hargreaves to Melbourne to work with members of the College Leadership group. There is a growing momentum and interest in these programs from all sections of the College community.

Teacher Development In 2013 the focus of teacher development was to begin shifting the culture from one focused on meetings, compliance and one off professional development events, to a more cohesive, relevant program that made explicit links between the core work of teachers and the College vision for learning. The rationale for this change, as well as the structures and processes required for success, was introduced to all staff across the College. To further support this work, leadership forums targeted areas such as building effective teams, leading a high performance culture, evidence based change and developing collaborative practices. Within their respective professional learning teams, teachers chose to work in small groups of three in order to examine student achievement outcomes while reflecting on the efficacy of their own practices. The data gathered from this process, both quantitative and qualitative, was then used by teachers to identify a specific area of student learning that they would like to improve as well as practices that they would like to change. The importance of using data to drive change was reinforced to all teachers. Professional readings relevant to the areas of investigation were provided via the portal and this allowed teachers to draw upon contemporary research to make informed decisions about how to move the student learning forward. Peer observation and feedback allowed teachers to reflect on strategies that were working, those that needed to be improved and possibilities for new directions and change. The final stage in the action learning cycle required teachers to share their findings more broadly with colleagues. While this is new and challenging terrain for teachers, many have welcomed the opportunity to focus and reflect on the core business of student learning. While there is still a way to go before the culture of open classrooms and authentic collegial work is embedded, solid foundations have been established for what promises to be a more engaging and relevant program, the focus of which will, increasingly, be directed by the teachers themselves.

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W e s l e y C o l l e g e Annu a l Re po r t 2 0 1 3

Consistent with trends in academic libraries, roles in the library have changed. New roles include the curation of digital collections, assisting students and staff with training, and packaging digital content for learning.

The star attraction was worldfamous teenage blogger Tavi Gevinson, who shared ideas and experiences with Middle School girls from all three campuses Readers and Writers Festival The festival was held in August 2013 during Children’s Book Week for students in the Middle School. The festival offered opportunities for students to participate and be involved. The program featured authors and performers, and forums exploring issues in our multicultural world. The star attraction was world-famous teenage blogger Tavi Gevinson, who shared ideas and experiences with Middle School girls from all three campuses. Feedback from students via online survey indicated the festival had a positive impact on students. E-Text Books The library supported the decision by College Executive, to create greater uniformity in the booklist across campuses. The e-Text implementation for the booklist at year seven and eight across the College was undertaken by the library team, who provided training for all teachers and later for all students, to ensure that accounts were set up, activated and downloads were completed. The library team worked closely with the Information Technology department to make the transition as smooth as possible.

Partnerships Yiramalay/Wesley Studio School The Yiramalay/Wesley Studio School completed another year of growth in student numbers, infrastructure and staff development. The studio school continued to move “with the seasons� with Terms 1 and 4 spent in Melbourne and Terms 2 and 3 (the dry season) spent at Yiramalay in the Kimberley. This is an important part of the program as it enhances the


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cultural learning of the students from the Kimberley and from Melbourne. The Yiramalay curriculum is based on the Senior Years Learning Framework, which has three circles of learning personal development, academic and industry. The Yiramalay program focuses on developing the students through engagement with education and personal growth. Building self-confidence and resilience prepares the students for the challenges of today and tomorrow. The academic program consists of two levels, standard and advanced, which assess literacy and numeracy according to the Australian Core Skills Framework. For the standard course, Academic Learning will be reported from provider developed courses or in terms of the Certificate II for Vocational Preparation. For the advanced course, Academic Learning will be reported through the processes of the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE). In the advanced level students, follow the same program as the standard level in addition to core and elective VCE subjects. The academic program at standard level includes literacy and numeracy and forms part of the competencies students complete alongside numerous industry units. The studio school continues to work closely with our many registered training organisation partners. Units of competencies in Horticulture, Construction (welding) and Child Care were completed in Term 1 at Holmesglen TAFE. In Terms 2 and 3, units of competencies were attained in IT with students

Yiramalay continues to be a unique story of two communities, Bunuba and Wesley College working together to provide learning experiences through hands-on education learning basic computers skills and an introduction to touch typing. Money management training was provided by Kimberley Employment Services and Nindilingarri Cultural Health delivered a health and wellbeing program which covered nutrition, hygiene, sex education and relationships. Kimberley Training Institute undertook training in basic servicing and safety checks on a motor vehicle as part of the introduction to mechanics course an competencies in units in Certificate I in Business were achieved by some students. Year 10 students completed their competencies in Work Safely in the Construction Industry and were presented with their White Card. This was delivered by the local trading provider Karrayili and allowed the successful students to seek employment on a construction site. Throughout 2013 students participated in a Personal Development through Community Activities. These activities were linked to academic pursuits whilst advancing students Personal Develop skills, namely;

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W e s l e y C o l l e g e Annu a l Re po r t 2 0 1 3

• Self confidence • Leadership • Teamwork • Cultural awareness Term 1 commenced in Melbourne with all the students attending classes within the Glen Waverley campus and residing in a cluster of houses near the school. Weekend and personal development activities included a camping trip to Lochend (a Wesley outdoor education site), lessons in surfboard riding, a ferry ride down the Yarra River and a local basketball competition were just a few of the many and varied learning opportunities. Back in the Kimberley for Term 2, some of the highlights were fishing at Windjana Gorge – though there was only an average wet season in the north, there was still enough water to catch plenty of fish. There was a cultural trip to Mimbie Caves, which is about 100km east of Fitzroy Crossing on Mount Pierre Station. There were two camps – first the girls to focus on women’s business with senior female elders and then a separate men’s business camp for the boys to carry on the cultural practice of oral storytelling and learning language and traditional law. Cultural learning continued alongside mainstream education during Term 3. There was an excursion to Bell Gorge on the Gibb River Road to learn more on country and share stories with the Melbourne induction students, including a swim at the waterfall. Sport also featured with some fierce competition in the Yiramalay soccer and basketball matches, where students played off against staff with neither side dominating the competition. Another sporting highlight was the Troy Bycroft Cup football competition, with students included in teams from Broome, Derby, Halls Creek and Fitzroy Crossing. Horseriding was also popular as an early morning and after school activity or for those who preferred a gentler pace, a jog or walk down to the spring on the new track. There were many highlights during 2013: • Community engagement with the families of the Fitzroy Valley and other Kimberley communities and the Melbourne Wesley campuses. I would like to thank all the parents, guardians, staff and students from both communities who have made the time to attend the many exciting events that we have held at Yiramalay • The student community project constructing a pathway to the Yiramalay spring from the school. Culturally appropriate signs were created along the path to provide information on the stories and history of the country and to assist with the identification of local plants • The establishment of the community garden where students work with our cook to grow herbs and salad for all to enjoy • The induction programs have continued to run alongside the main program during Terms 2 and 3. In 2013, there were 3 inductions (Groups 7, 8 and 9) in which 67


students and 14 Wesley staff participated. A graduation celebration marked the conclusion of each induction program • A significant event in August was the official opening of the eco tents. Guests from all around Australia attended. The ongoing commitment of Wesley College and the Wesley College Council needs to be acknowledged, as the eco tents would not have happened without their support. The construction of a large eco tent which can be used as a learning area and a meeting area for mob meetings and the six staff accommodation tents provide a much-needed addition to the infrastructure of the campus • Two Year 12 students from the Fitzroy Valley were part of a group of Wesley students and staff to represent Yiramalay in China at a student exchange program with the partner school Alcanta International College, Quangzhou, China • Year 12 students marked the end of their secondary schooling at Speech Nights in Melbourne and were able to celebrate with family and other, students and staff from the Yiramalay campus • A graduation function was held in Fitzroy Crossing In December, so that all students could celebrate with family members and the local community their success in completing another year of the Yiramalay program Yiramalay continues to be a unique story of two communities, Bunuba and Wesley College working together to provide learning experiences through hands-on education. For the students from the Kimberley and for those from

Melbourne spending time in each other’s backyard provides considerable scope for learning well beyond that offered by more structured, classroom-based learning. The Yiramalay program is dedicated to Two Way Learning. There is nothing that will replace the face to face interaction with parents, guardians, friends and the community in general. This support and commitment is the strength within the Yiramalay/ Wesley Studio School partnership with the common goal of providing the best possible education for our young people.

Wesley College/Alcanta International College Partnership In September 2013 a Wesley College delegation of 14 students and four members of staff (including the College Principal) visited Guangzhou, China, to participate in the first direct engagement with students and staff of the Alcanta International College (AIC) under the partnership arrangement between the 2 schools. The diverse program for the visit, which also extended to the Lian Nan county of the Yao minority peoples of China, offered rich immersion experiences that fostered relationship building, language and culture learning, appreciation of cross-cultural perspectives and leadership development.

Bunuba-Walmajarri Project: Indigenous Studies The 2013 Year 4 unit of inquiry on indigenous ways of knowing ran slightly differently. Owing to the unavailability of Annette Kogolo, Walmajarri, the College called upon David Rogers aka Bullen, a male Walmajarri elder, who spent a day at each campus leading activities for the unit. Bullen’s different perspective was well received and provided a greater focus on indigenous language.

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Special Events College Gala Night

Samuel Alexander Lecture

The theme for the 10th Annual Wesley College Gala Night was A Venetian Carnevale and close to 500 members of the Wesley community, many taking the opportunity to dress with a Venetian “touch”, enjoyed a wonderful evening on Saturday 10 August at Peninsula at Docklands.

The 2013 Samuel Alexander lecture was delivered on the 27 August at Ormond Hall.

Drinks and canapés were served accompanied by pre-dinner entertainment given by a stilt walker and assorted roving performers. The room had been spectacularly decorated with magnificent and eye-catching table centrepieces, ranging from vases of flowers (hanging gardens) to fabulous displays of feathers. It was wonderful to see so many of our community enter into the spirit of the evening, by dressing to the theme. Indeed, our judges for the “best masked competition”, Julie van der Eynden from the Allardice Group and Joel Victoria from Abercrombie & Kent, assisted by Kenneth Park, Wesley’s Curator of Collections, found the final decision a great challenge! This year’s master of ceremonies was David Kennedy, who did great job of directing the proceedings of the evening and spruiking the Silent Auction. A real “wow” in the evening was a performance by an aerial artist who defied gravity with a spectacular show whilst hanging from the roof on a slender piece of material. The Silent and Live Auctions were generously supported and the proceeds will be distributed back to various parent support groups across the College. The total raised on the night was in excess of $60,000. These events rely on the support of sponsors and, as always, the College was most grateful for the following business support – Abercrombie & Kent, Allardice Group, Barry Plant Real Estate-Glen Waverley, Campion Education, Cox Architects, CMC Property Services, Fuji Xerox, nab Private Wealth, Singapore Airlines, Total Facility Maintenance and Visual Jazz Isobar. The support of parents in helping plan this event is also critical the members of the organising committee Dawn Anderson, Jyoti Singh, Nat Fine, Deborah Clark, Carmela Nankervis, Jodie Tatterson, Ravit Tidhar, Sarah Polce, Dennis Freeman, Andrew McAree, Jack Moshakis and Kenneth Park were tireless in the planning for this wonderful evening.

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An audience of in excess of 300 listened to an engaging presentation titled Education as commodity – Gonski and beyond by the Hon Dr Barry Jones AO.

An audience of in excess of 300 listened to an engaging presentation titled Education as commodity – Gonski and beyond by the Hon Dr Barry Jones AO Barry Jones has been a public servant, high school teacher, television and radio presenter, academic and lawyer. A member of parliament for Melbourne in the Victorian Legislative Assembly 1972-77, he transferred to the Commonwealth Parliament as MHR for Lalor 1977-1998 and was Minister for Science 1983-90, Prices and Consumer Affairs 1987, Small Business 1987-90 and Customs 1988-90. He is the only person to have been elected as a Fellow of all four Australian learned academies. He was awarded an AO in 1993. He was named by the National Trust in 1998 as one of Australia’s 100 Living National Treasures. The College community was privileged to welcome Dr Jones – his address being both topical and challenging.


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Wesley College Foundation The Foundation’s suite of fundraising programs continues to be generously supported by parents, alumni, past parents and the philanthropic community. In 2013, the Foundation raised a record quantum of $2m in cash donations and bequests to the following funds: • The Wesley College Foundation Building Fund • The Wesley College Scholarships, Bursaries and Prizes Fund • The Wesley College Library Fund The Foundation is also registered through the Australian Sports Foundation and the Australian Independent Schools USA Foundation to enable tax effective gifts to sport and for alumni living in the United States.

In 2013, the Foundation raised a record quantum of $2m in cash donations and bequests... During 2013, the Moubray Street Capital Campaign continued to be a major focus of activity for the Foundation. A number of functions were held to brief parents, past parents and alumni of the College about the historic $30m redevelopment that has transformed the Menzies Wing and Adamson Hall and created a superb new Music School. These functions provided a personal environment for the Principal, President of College Council and Chair of the Foundation Advisory Committee, to speak with members of the College community about this exciting project. A small number of events were held in SE Asia and, as a result, alumni contributed more than $350k in cash donations and pledges. As a result of all this activity, the Foundation has raised more than $7m in cash donations and pledges to date making this the most successful fundraising campaign in the College’s history. Fundraising will continue throughout 2014 to secure further support from parents and alumni and minimise borrowings.

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The Foundation’s bequest group, The Sapere Aude Bequest Society, continues to attract new members and support for our bequest program. An exciting event program underpinned activity for members and their guests including functions at the NGV, Montalto on the Mornington Peninsula and a tour of the Mt Macedon property, Dreamthorpe. The Society’s newsletter was another highlight and contains fascinating stories about members and their broader contribution to society in addition to historical pieces. The Society’s Advisory Committee provided valuable assistance throughout the year under the leadership of Malcolm Hastings (OW1958). Corporate sponsorship and private philanthropic support continue to support a variety of events and programs, including the Yiramalay/Wesley Studio School. The Foundation’s Business Breakfast attracted 450 guests to the Ballroom of the Grand Hyatt on Collins Street. Our speaker was the Chief Executive News Corp Australia, Mr Kim Williams AM. The function was again very ably compered by Graeme Samuel AC (OW1963), who was a previous Chair of The Wesley College Foundation. The Foundation is most grateful to the many hundreds of members of the College community who so generously support its philanthropic programs each year whether through donations to buildings, scholarships or sport or through their Wills. The Foundation also acknowledges the work of its Advisory Committee, Chaired by parent and College Council member, Marianne Stillwell, who work tirelessly to improve the facilities and programs for Wesley students.


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Commonwealth Reporting Requirements Key Student Outcomes

Year 3 Wesley College

National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN)

National Bands For Year 3 the national minimum standard is Band 2. All figures are registered as percentages.

Introduction The National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) was conducted for the sixth time in May 2013. The program assessed students in Years 3, 5, 7 and 9 across the nation in literacy and numeracy Trend Data Looking at five year trend data using mean scores for the state and College, emerging and established trends can be noted. An emerging positive trend is evident where the percentage difference from the state mean indicates improvement over two years ie: 2011 – 2013; likewise a negative emerging trend occurs where there is a decrease in differences between the state and College over two years. An established trend exists where there is a trend of three years or more. Using this information, the following observations can be made: • Emerging positive trends are evident in Year 3 Writing, Year 7 Spelling and Year 9 Spelling • There is an emerging negative trend in Year 9 Reading • There is an established positive trend in Year 9 Numeracy (four years of improving percentage data difference relative to the state) • Established negative trends are evident in Year 3 Spelling and Year 3 Grammar and Punctuation

Grammar & Band Level Reading % Writing % Spelling % Punctuation Numeracy % % Band 1

National Benchmarks The National Assessment Program scale maps student outcomes onto a ten band continuum. Scaled scores provide an ability measure of student outcomes. These scores range from 0 to 1000 and form the numeric continuum from which the ten reporting bands are derived. Since the inception of NAPLAN, a national minimum standard, defined by a particular band, has been identified:

2

1

1

Band 2

2

1

2

6

1

14

14

22

10

9

Band 4

20

15

26

14

24

Band 5

20

49

26

20

33

Band 6

44

21

22

41

25

Wesley at and above minimum band

98%

99%

96%

97%

97%

Assessment Area Report Analysis The Assessment Area report shows the average number of correct answers in the assessment areas of Reading, Spelling, Grammar and Punctuation, Number and Measurement, Chance and Data, Space and Structure. Wesley College students performed better than the state in all areas and significantly so in Measurement, Chance and Data. Reading 36 Spelling 25 Grammar & Punctuation 26 Number 11 Measurement, Chance & Data 10 Space 11 Structure 3 0

20

40

60

Percentage of items answered correctly in short answer questions

State

Year 5 Wesley College National Bands For Year 5 the national minimum standard is Band 4. All figures are registered as percentages. Grammar & Band Level Reading % Writing % Spelling % Punctuation Numeracy % % Band 3

0.5

2

3

1

1

Band 4

4

6

5

3

8

Band 5

15

27

19

15

14

Band 6

23

29

27

13

33

Band 7

28

25

30

41

21

• For Year 5 the minimum standard is Band 4

Band 8

29.5

11

16

27

23

Wesley at and above minimum band

96%

92%

92%

96%

91%

• For Year 9 the minimum standard is Band 6 With the introduction of the Australian Curriculum, it is no longer feasible to compare results to the Victorian Essential Learning Standards (VELS).

W e s l e y C o l l e g e Annu a l Re po r t 2 0 1 3

80

Wesley College

• For Year 3 the minimum standard is Band 2

• For Year 7 the minimum standard is Band 5

26

0

Band 3

Using median scores, all College results, with the exception of Year 3 Spelling, are skewed positively against the state. Overall, the results have accurately reflected the cohorts’ abilities, and there are no major surprises in any year levels or discipline areas. Ongoing work continues with Writing and Spelling at Years 3 and 5 as a result of previous scores and as a recommendation from the Academic Review earlier in the year.

0

Assessment Area Report Analysis The Assessment Area report shows the average number


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Commonwealth Reporting Requirements Year 9 Wesley College

of correct answers in the assessment areas of Reading, Spelling, Grammar and Punctuation, Number and Measurement, Chance and Data, Space and Structure. Wesley College students performed significantly better than the state in all areas.

National Bands For Year 9 the national minimum standard is Band 6. All figures are registered as percentages.

Reading 37

Grammar & Band Level Reading % Writing % Spelling % Punctuation Numeracy % %

Spelling 25 Grammar & Punctuation 26 Number 12

Band 5

Measurement, Chance & Data 12 Space 12 Structure 4 0

20

40

60

Percentage of items answered correctly in short answer questions

State

80

Wesley College

Year 7 Wesley College National Bands For Year 7 the national minimum standard is Band 5. All figures are registered as percentages.

1

1

2

2

0

Band 5

4

8

5

5

2

Band 6

12

23

20

17

15

Band 7

27

27

30

22

29

Band 8

34

28

30

26

28

Band 9

22

13

13

28

26

Wesley at and above minimum band

95%

92%

93%

93%

98%

4

4

5

5

3

4

14

14

21

21

14

Band 8

33

35

44

35

22

Band 9

39

23

19

19

20

Band 10

9

19

10

21.5

29

Wesley at and above minimum band

95%

91%

94%

97%

95%

The Assessment Area report shows the average number of correct answers in the assessment areas of Reading, Spelling, Grammar and Punctuation, Number and Measurement, Chance and Data, Space and Structure. Wesley College students performed appreciably better than the state in all areas. Reading 49 Spelling 30 Grammar & Punctuation 28 Number 16 Measurement, Chance & Data 16 Space 15 Structure 17

Spelling 30 Number 19 Measurement, Chance & Data 17 Space 15 Structure 13 Percentage of items answered correctly in short answer questions

Wesley College

60

Wesley College

80

Continued actions arising from the Academic Review should be reviewed against these results and adjustments made accordingly. The procedures and process of organising and running NAPLAN across the three city campuses and Clunes went smoothly. The systems and structures we have in place have ensured an effective and transparent delivery of the testing program. PYP Coordinators, MYP Coordinators and the Deputy Head of Clunes (Daily Organisation) are to

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W e s l e y C o l l e g e Annu a l Re po r t 2 0 1 3

80

Comprehensive campus reports have been developed by the respective Primary Years Programme (PYP) Coordinators and Middle Years Programme (MYP) Curriculum Coordinators. These have been shared with all key teaching and administration staff at each campus. Heads of School and Heads of Campus have been briefed and are part of the ongoing discussions about the development of strategic planning for the respective year levels. Overall, NAPLAN results have been favourable across year levels and subject areas. There have been no surprises.

Grammar & Punctuation 28

60

40

Concluding Remarks

Reading 50

State

20

Percentage of items answered correctly in short answer questions

State

The Assessment Area report shows the average number of correct answers in the assessment areas of Reading, Spelling, Grammar and Punctuation, Number and Measurement, Chance and Data, Space and Structure. Wesley College students performed significantly better than the state in all areas.

40

1

Band 6

Assessment Area Report Analysis

20

0.5

Band 7

0

0

1

Assessment Area Report Analysis

Grammar & Band Level Reading % Writing % Spelling % Punctuation Numeracy % % Band 4

1


Wesley College Annu a l R epo r t 2013

29


be congratulated for their organisation and management of these tests and for the subsequent delivery of results to parents and analysis of the data. Heads of Learning are also to be thanked for their further work in the analysis of the data and recommendations for actions.

• 37.99% of all VCE/IB Diploma students achieved and ATAR greater than 90.00 • 50.47% of IB Diploma students achieved an ATAR greater than 95.00 • 148 perfect score were achieved across 59 VCE/IB (145 IB + 3 VCE) Diploma subjects

Senior Secondary Outcomes VCE and IB Diploma Senior students at Wesley College are able to choose from a range of curriculum programs and senior secondary qualifications. At Year 12 the two key choices are the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IB DP) and the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE), which for some also includes studies from the Vocational Education and Training sector (VET). All students studying within context of the ACER National Diploma Framework obtained the relevant qualifications to ensure their eligibility for the award of the ACER National Diploma. The 2013 school year saw a combined total of some 358 students graduate Year 12 from the senior school (Glen Waverley and St Kilda Road campuses) with generally excellent results in all programs – the combined median ATAR for both IB DP and VCE (including VET) was 86.50, a performance consistent with those for previous years. Year 12 Academic Results 2013 • Median VCE/IB Diploma ATAR – 86.50 (358 students) • Median IB Diploma ATAR – 95.50 (107 students)

The distribution of ATAR scores for the 2013 Wesley College Year 12 graduating class is as follows State Ranking

2009

2010

2011

2012

> 99.00

4.91

5.09

4.37

3.66

3.91

> 95.00

22.22

22.14

22.37

23.04

21.23

% of students with ENTER/ATAR > 90.00

39.79

36.39

39.59

40.84

37.99

% of students with ENTER/ATAR > 80.00

65.12

62.60

63.50

63.61

62.01

% of students with ENTER/ATAR > 75.00

75.45

74.30

75.84

70.16

68.99

% of students with ENTER/ATAR > 70.00

80.88

80.92

83.29

78.01

75.42

% of students with ENTER/ATAR > 50.00 or = 50.00

95.87

96.18

96.92

93.98

90.22

% of students with ENTER/ATAR < 50.00

4.13

3.82

3.08

6.02

9.78

Post School Destinations Tertiary Destinations Homesglen TAFE 2% Box Hill TAFE 1% Victoria University 2%

Other 1% Australian Catholic University 1% Deakin University 12% Federation University Australia 1% La Trobe University 3%

University of Melbourne 26%

Swinburne University of Technology 6% RMIT University 17%

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W e s l e y C o l l e g e Annu a l Re po r t 2 0 1 3

2013

Monash University 29%


Wesley College Annu a l R epo r t 2013

31


Post School Destinations Student Attendance and Retention In 2010, 306 students entered Year 9 at the College and 266 of them completed Year 12 in 2013. This represents a retention rate of 86.93%. The overall attendance rate was 96.79%.

Value Added Wesley College offers very broad curriculum and cocurricular choices including the visual and performing arts, sport, International Baccalaureate programs, Clunes, Outdoor Education, tours – both national and international – and overseas exchanges. The College also provides opportunities, via the Yiramalay/Wesley Studio School in the Kimberley region of North Western Australia, for sustained authentic engagement with indigenous ways of knowing and perspectives on land, language and culture. The central focus of the Wesley College Institute for Innovation in Education on activities – research related initiatives, teacher development, and curriculum development – aimed at continuous improvement to teaching and learning is significant to enhancing the quality of education provided at Wesley College.

Professional Engagement Research identifies the vital role of teachers and the general staff in support of ensuring that all students achieve their best in an educational setting. Wesley College supports this and one of the five key areas of the Wesley College Strategic Plan 2004-2016 is teaching, which has as its main objective being to recruit, support attract and retain high quality staff. Staff Attendance and Retention At the end of the 2013 school year, the College employed 393.08 full time equivalent (FTE) teachers and 213.87 (FTE) general staff. The average number of personal leave days (sick and carer’s leave) taken per staff member in 2013 was 5.10 days, which is lower than in the previous year. The staff turnover rate for the 2013 school year was 14.97%; this is higher than the turnover rate in 2012 which was 12.11%. These attendance averages and retention rates are largely consistent with Victorian Government and other Independent schools. Teaching and General Staff Qualifications All of the teaching staff are registered members of the Victorian Institute of Teaching (VIT). They all have as a minimum, a tertiary qualification in Education and nearly half of them hold an additional postgraduate qualification such as a Doctorate or Masters. Many of the general staff also have tertiary and post graduate qualifications in their respective specialist fields and other related areas of expertise. All staff qualifications are published annually in the Chronicle. In 2013, Wesley College once again retained the services of a number of indigenous staff in support of the Yiramalay/ Wesley Studio School program.

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W e s l e y C o l l e g e Annu a l Re po r t 2 0 1 3

Professional Development A strong culture of professional development is promoted throughout the College. The College provides professional development opportunities that respond to the staff’s identifiable needs of personal learning and teaching. It does this by creating opportunities, time and funding for the extension, renewal and growth of all staff as it seeks to build the capacity of all staff to ensure the best possible outcomes for all students.

Community Feedback Parent, staff and student surveys are conducted annually to assist in the measurement of performance and the development of College priorities. Parent Survey In 2013, parents from across the College with children in the following year levels were invited to participate in parent surveys: Prep, Year 4, Year 7, Year 9 and Year 10.

Parents at Wesley College continue to feel very welcome and are encouraged to be involved in all aspects of their children’s learning The parents identified many positive aspects about the College, these included: • Parents at Wesley College continue to feel very welcome and are encouraged to be involved in all aspects of their children’s learning • Students are encouraged to be responsible for their own learning • High academic standards have been maintained • Parents again perceive the College as a safe and secure learning environment • Parents have again indicated that they are well informed about the learning programs undertaken by students • Teachers remain committed and enthusiastic in their approach to teaching and the methods used generally motivate students to want to learn • There has been an improvement in the way bullying issues have been handled at the College Staff Survey The 2013 staff satisfaction surveys were based on the same questions as those used in the preceding five years, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012. Highlights from 2013 included: • There are forums where staff can express their views and opinions


• There remains opportunities for professional learning and developing new skills • The rules and consequences relating to discipline are well understood and reinforced in a consistent fashion Areas where further improvements could be made included:

• The variety of sport • Music concerts and camps and the ANZAC music tour • The Formal • Being part of the Yiramalay program • Theatre/drama productions

• There needs to be better coordination and planning of curriculum and its implementation

• House activities

• There needs to more work done in the area of communication between leaders and staff

• Winning the athletics premiership

Student Surveys As in previous years, the 2013 student satisfaction surveys were conducted at both the Year 6 and Year 12 levels. The Year 6 surveys indicated that what the students liked best about Wesley was:

• Outdoor Education camps • Gaining Leadership roles

Just an awesome school

• The teachers • Wesley’s culture

General comments from Year 12 students included the following:

• The colour purple • The liveliness of Wesley College • Opportunities including the International Drama Tour • How the Yiramalay students are included • Having a lot of choices

• Just an awesome school • Be yourself Wesley, you are awesome just as you are • I had an amazing time at Wesley – thank you!

• Everyone is your friend and is nice to each other The Year 12 students identified the following highlights from their time at Wesley College: • Overseas exchanges and tours • Clunes • Teachers willingness to assist students when required

W es l ey College Annu a l Repo r t 2013 Wesley College Annual Repor t 2013

33


Financial Statement During 2013, the College continued to apply conservative and sound financial management coupled to an active management of the College asset and investment portfolio. In this context, the College continued to enjoy strong enrolments across all campuses, experienced improved investment returns, realised a substantial gain ($20.1m) on the sale of surplus to educational requirement Rose Avenue land at Glen Waverley and continued to assist a number of families in managing their timely payment of fees.

from the financial details, remains the largest single item of expenditure, with a key metric throughout the year being â&#x20AC;&#x153;salary cost as a percentage of net revenuesâ&#x20AC;?. For 2013, this percentage is 68% compared to 67% for 2012 reflecting the additional cost of a voluntary redundancy program during 2013 and adjustment to general staff long service leave provisions in line with market conditions.

The result for 2013, as displayed below has delivered a surplus, including the contribution from the sale of the Rose Avenue land which will settle mid-2014, the proceeds of which will be directed towards the part retirement of debt and future development priorities of the College. In support of the significant capital development program of the College, in particular the completion of the Moubray Street Precinct Redevelopment on time and on budget, the College drew down a further $14.0m on the College loan facility bring the cumulative loan balance to $21.0m at year end. Interest expense associated with the loan facility will commence during 2014 in line with the commissioning, opening and use of the refurbished and newly built facilities at St Kilda Road. The College auditors, Deloitte, have issued an unqualified audit opinion for the year ended 31 December 2013. The attraction, development and retention of high quality staff continues to be the cornerstone to delivering a Wesley education to our students and, as can be seen

In terms of cash flow, the operating activities of the College generated a strong $11.0m in net cash. This net position enabled the College to continue its commitment to ongoing capital expenditure to support its philosophy regarding an appropriate range of educational opportunities. To this end, the College spent $22.1m on capital works throughout the year ($66.0m over the five year period 2009-2013) including the completion of the Moubray Street Precinct Redevelopment. The 2014 year has commenced with strong student enrolment across the three campuses, a continuation of a robust and efficient cost structure and further major capital works programs underway. The support of the Old Wesley Collegians Association and the Wesley College Foundation continues to be of critical importance, none more so than during recent years. Continued strong College operational cash flow coupled to the generous support of the Wesley Community, particularly for the Moubray Street Precinct, through the Wesley College Foundation enabled the loan draw down of $21.0m to be significantly less than the approved limit of $30.0m.

Money Flow 2013 $120m $110m

Concessions & Discounts Business / Donations

$100m $90m

Government Salaries

$80m

Capital Expenditure 2013 Moubray Street Precinct $12.2m Facilities $ 5.3m Educational $ 1.7m IT / AV $ 2.9m

$70m $60m $50m

Tuition Fees

Facilities

$40m $30m

Communications

Administration Finance & Insurance

Cash Available

$20m $10m

34

W e s l e y C o l l e g e Annu a l Re po r t 2 0 1 3

Depreciation

Debt

Surplus


Revenue 2013 2012 $m $m Fee income 80.1 75.9 10.4 9.4 Government grants – Commonwealth Government grants – State 2.0 2.0 Profit / Loss on disposal of property, plant and equipment 19.7 (0.1) Donations 0.8 3.1 Other income 3.8 3.5

116.8

1%

93.8

3%

17%

Fee income Government grants – Commonwealth

2%

Government grants – State 68%

9%

Profit / Loss on disposal of property, plant and equipment Donations Other income

Expenditure Salaries Administration expenses Communication expenses Depreciation and amortisation Facilities expenses Finance expenses, discounts and concessions

2013 2012 $m $m 63.0 58.8 4.3 4.2 3.6 3.4 6.8 7.0 10.5 9.7 9.9 9.0

98.1

92.1

10% 11%

Salaries Administration expenses Communication expenses

7% 64% 4%

Depreciation and amortisation Facilities expenses Finance expenses, discounts and concessions

4%

Wesley College Annu a l R epo r t 2013

35


Strategic Plan 2004-2016 Summary of 2013 Action Outcomes Learning • Audit of academic performance conducted, recommendations reviewed and actions to be implemented in 2014 developed • Proposal for Wesley to offer an English Language Preparation Program for international students commencing in 2014, was approved by College Council • Consideration given to the introduction of Learning in Residence in 2015 • College Early Childhood Learning Centre (ECLC) policies and procedures detailed in comprehensive manual, reflecting best practice in all our centres • Policies, procedures and practice related to Individual Needs programs across the College aligned and enhanced • New model of Professional Learning for teaching staff created and implemented • Implementation of the Middle Years Programme (MYP) commenced in Year 7

Teaching • New model for induction and orientation of new staff implemented • Annual satisfaction surveys, (parents, staff and students) completed and data used to inform practice • Terms and conditions for general staff in the Independent School Sector reviewed, and a subsequent change to long service leave provisions made to align with that of teaching staff • College performance management policy and practice reviewed and updated

Programs, Structures and Settings • Continued development of policy and practice related to the Yiramalay Wesley Studio School • Wesley partnership with Alcanta International College in Guangzhou, China has progressed and opportunities to develop educational programs in China are unfolding

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W e s l e y C o l l e g e Annu a l Re po r t 2 0 1 3


Printed on recyled paper


Elsternwick

5 Gladstone Parade Elsternwick Victoria 3185

elsternwick@wesleycollege.net

Telephone: + 61 3 8102 6888

Glen Waverley

620 High Street Road Glen Waverley Victoria 3150

gw@wesleycollege.net

www.wesleycollege.net

St Kilda Road

577 St Kilda Road Melbourne Victoria 3004

stkildaroad@wesleycollege.net

ABN 38 994 068 473 CRICOS 00354G

Wesley College Annual Report 2013  
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