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Published by A Word in Edgeways LLP Wolverton Milton Keynes www.wordinedgeways.org.uk

September 2005

Designed by Allan Davies Edited by Clare Walton Music transcribed & arranged by Guy Jones Poem © 1998 Yaw Asiyama Illustrations © 2005 Yaw Asiyama & Allan Davies

Financial assistance for this project is acknowledged from Milton Keynes Arts Association, Milton Keynes Community Foundation and Community Champions.

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Dedicated with love to Sheniah Abena Joel Kwesi Ro-mi Mauena Destiny Afua


cr aw la lon

Don’t ask me, I have not seen him

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there is a creature a ric f A his name is d n a o Choo Cate lar o rpil Ch

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Creeply crawly creeply crawly creeply crawly

Up

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Creeply crawly, creeply crawly, creeply crawly

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He creeps and crawls across the Volta Then up to t he ri ve rL im po po

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Creeply crawly, creeply crawly, creeply crawly

gh eleph u an ro h T ts

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Through the courts of the chiefs

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Along the sands of ancient

Timbuktu


To Lake Tanganyika

To Madagascar Through the Kalahari


Now I have seen all of AFRICA Someday I will be a butterfly Then I will travel all over But this time I’ll flutter all around


CHOO CHOO CATERPILLAR SONG Mango

Choo Choo Caterpillar

Papaya

Kili - man - ja - ro


He creeps and crawls across the Volta Then up to the river Limpopo He creeps around the lake Nyanza The Veldt, Sahara to the pyramids Creeply crawly, creeply crawly, creeply crawly To the nose of Lions Creeply crawly, creeply crawly, creeply crawly To the Chimpanzee Creeply crawly, creeply crawly, creeply crawly Through Elephants and Rhinos Creeply crawly, creeply crawly, creeply crawly To the Wildebeest Along the walls of Great Zimbabwe Then the banks of the river Zambezi Through the courts of the chiefs Ashanti Along the sands of ancient Timbuktu Creeply crawly, creeply crawly, creeply crawly Through the Kalahari Creeply crawly, creeply crawly, creeply crawly To Madagascar Creeply crawly, creeply crawly, creeply crawly To lake Tanganyika Creeply crawly, creeply crawly, creeply crawly

Up the Baobab Now I have seen all of AFRICA Someday I will be a butterfly Then I will travel all over But this time I’ll flutter all around I’ll flutter flutter flutter flutter Spread my wings and flutter flutter Flutter flutter flutter flutter Flutter flutter everywhere I go! Solo or as one group Start off chanting ‘Creeply Crawly’ on the first and third beats of the bar for four bars at the start of each verse (shown as rests). The last verse (‘Now I have seen all of Africa..) is sung at half the original tempo then speeding up as you repeat ‘I’ll flutter, flutter, flutter...’ getting faster and faster. The song ends when you cannot get any faster ! With two groups Both groups start a chant of ‘Creeply crawly’ on the first and third beats of the bar. After four bars (shown as rests) the first group carries on the chant and the second group sings the first verse and chorus. Then repeat all with the second group singing the second verse, then alternate groups until the last verse. For the last verse all should sing in unison at half tempo, then repeat ‘I’ll flutter, flutter, flutter...’ getting faster and faster for as long as you can keep up.


KILIMANJARO This is the highest mountain in Africa. It is also snow capped despite it being near the equator. It is also the highest free standing mountain in the world. Kilimanjaro is in Tanzania. But was it always there? Find out about Queen Victoria moving Kilimanjaro.

THE LIMPOPO RIVER A slow and sluggish river in the southern part of Africa. This river runs through some of the harshest desert conditions, the Kalahari, to lush vegetation, and pours into the Indian ocean. This is a river of legend . Its wildlife has inspired poems and songs. Crocodiles seem to like hanging around this river. Rudyard THE VOLTA RIVER Kipling wrote some wonderful stories based Two rivers, the Black Volta and the White around the Limpopo. Volta merge to form the Volta River, Ghana’s biggest river. Later on a dam, the Akosombo LAKE NYANZA dam, was built across the river to hold back This is also called Victoria Nyanza. In the water for a hydro electric plant. This dam “good” old days, when discovering other was not very popular because it drowned peoples stuff was all the rage, some explorer about 750 villages. Another 75-80,000 people happened on a huge lake. Impressed, he were moved from their homes. However the asked the locals what it was called. ‘Oh dam now provides hydro electric power for that is Nyanza,’ was the reply. ‘In that case most of Ghana, Togo and Benin. There are I have discovered Lake Nyanza,’ he said hippos and crocodiles in the Volta River. rather smugly. The local must have been There are also some really strange electric bemused because he had known where fish. I wonder where they get their electricity the lake was all along. ‘Ah well if you say from ? so,’ he must have thought. ‘I hope you’ve discovered some fish in it as well, because


I have got a boat ready.’ Nyanza was the local dialect for lake. So somewhere in Africa is a lake called Lake Lake. The biggest lake is Victoria Nyanza which is the biggest tropical lake in the world. VELDTS All over the continent there are great stretches of grasslands. In the south, they are usually called the veldts, and above the equator they are called savannas. Contrary to popular expectation, you will more likely find the king of the jungle, the lion, in the Veldt or savannah rather than in the jungle. THE PYRAMIDS The legendry resting places of the great kings of the greatest ancient civilization, Egypt. These gigantic stone structures were an unequalled feat of engineering. They still stand to this day, about 3000 years later. It was OK for the king to be buried in these magnificent tombs because he was dead already. However, all his servants and

favourite pets had to be buried with him to serve him in the after life. Not good if you only got the job the week before he died ! GREAT ZIMBABWE The largest ruins of a city in Africa, they cover 1800 acres and were a great architectural and engineering feat. The European explorers would for a long time not accept that such structures could be built by Africans and as such credited it to every other civilization but‌.present day Zimbabwe reclaimed this name when they regained independence from the empire. Archaeologists now believe this town/city once housed 40000+ people and were built by the Shona people around the 13th century.


ASANTE (ASHANTI) CHIEFS During festivals, and important occasions, the great chiefs of the Asante tribes of Ghana in West Africa are carried up high in elaborate palanquins and protected from the sun by even more elaborate umbrellas. The Omanhene (the King) has the most elaborate gold encrusted crowns, amulets and jewellery. His procession is led by a ceremonial sword bearer, usually carrying the king’s ceremonial gold sword. This looks really good, but it is only a symbol of office and would be rather useless in battle TIMBUKTU Between the 12th and 16th centuries, Timbuktu was one of the greatest seats of learning in the world. Where the desert meets the savannah, now modern day Mali, traders from the western African kingdoms met to trade and to learn in this university and trade capital with people from the north. From as far as present day Saudi Arabia, Baghdad and Cairo, these traders brought salt from

the desert. The famous Taghaza salt mines, to the south, gave goods to exchange for gold from black Africa. Great scholars set up camps to teach. At its peak, there were 25,000 university students in Timbuktu every year. There still exist in modern day Timbuktu 600 year old manuscripts of great Islamic teachings. However, the legendary gateway to the Sahara is only a shadow of its ancient glory. Yet still the camels come in from the desert laden with salt. MADAGASCAR You may have a secret box at home where you keep all of your cutest, rarest and most exciting things. Call this box Madagascar. The place where the most unusual of flora and fauna can be found; Fanaloka, Aye-Aye, Lemurs, Tenrecs, Fossa, Tomato Frogs (don’t try these in your salad) Safika, half the world’s chameleon species, including one an inch long one, and six of the worlds eight species of Baobab trees. A large island, found off the southeast of Africa, and geographically part


of the great continent, Madagascar seems to have a life of its own. BAOBAB One of the weirdest trees you will ever come across. Called the upside down tree. There are lots of legends as to why it is so. Basically, it is said that when this tree was created, it whinged so much that God pulled it out by the roots and stuck it back into the earth branches first. There are wonderful scientific explanations for why the Baobab is like it is, but this is much more fun. Every part of this tree is useful. People even use it as a house. Honest!

KELI WELI (SPICED PLANTAIN) Ingredients 4 Plantain Ginger Garlic Red Chilli Salt Vegetable Oil Method First of all slice 4 plantain in 2.5cm squares. Then marinade the plantain in a blend of pureed ginger, garlic, red chilli and salt to suit your taste. Infuse for 30 mins then deep fry in vegetable oil, remove when golden brown. Drain and serve


YAM BALLS Ingredients 2 Yam peeled 2 Eggs Sweet Chilli (Red Pepper) Sweetcorn Vegetable Stock Cube Vegetable Oil Method Boil then mash yam Mix in 2 eggs Thin slices of sweet chilli (red pepper) Add half a tin of drained sweetcorn Crumble in a vegetable stock cube Roll yam mixture into a ball, flatten slightly and shallow fry gently until crispy golden brown. Add: diced fried bacon, chilli, shredded dried fish, chopped onions

Remember that it is the seeds of the chilli that are the hot bit. Always wash your hands in hot soapy water after chopping chillis as they are hot, hot, hot!


Yaw Asiyama

is an artist, poet, playwright, fashion designer, father and husband. Born in Ghana, Yaw now lives in, and animates, Milton Keynes. He hopes to one day be an all around good guy. Ideally he would also like to add singer to the list....but unfortunately he has got the most terrible voice !

A Word in Edgeways

is a storytelling company with extensive experience of telling traditional tales orally and developing stories for print. A Word in Edgeways have many years of experience working with schools and the wider Milton Keynes Community. We especially enjoy working with the diverse communities in Milton Keynes and exploring stories from different cultures and places, developing these tales and ideas among the people of our city !


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This publication was made possible by funding from

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Choo Choo Caterpillar  

Children's story by Yaw Asiyama, designed & illustrated by Allan Davies

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