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A LOOK AT ADDICTION - It makes a big difference at what age a person starts to smoke or drink 2011-12-08 SC (Music). Hi, everybody. Welcome to Studio Classroom Worldwide. Thanks for joining us today. My name is Steve. Adolescence can be a tough time in life. One of its many challenges lies in deciding what to do when confronted with an addictive substance, like alcohol, for example. Studies tell us that teenagers who get involved in drinking are more likely to get hooked or addicted quicker and sooner than those who start after they turn 21. So if you're a teenager who is thinking about experimenting with an addictive substance, the message of this lesson is: Do yourself a favor and wait. So much will change in a short period of time. Let's jump into today's reading now on page 19. (Music). A Look at Addiction. "The combination of adolescence, an American culture that glorifies and promotes substance use, and easy access to tobacco, alcohol and other drugs creates a perfect storm for our teens and for taxpayers," said Jim Ramstad, a board member of the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) who chaired the report's national advisory commission. "We no longer can justify writing off adolescent substance use as bad behavior, as a rite of passage or as kids just being kids. The science is too clear, the facts are too compelling, the health and social consequences are too devastating and the costs are simply too high," he said. Hello, friends. Thank you so much for joining us here in the studio. My name is Kaylah. And my name is Ryan. Now substance abuse is a leading problem among teenagers in America. And it can cause people to form an addiction later in life. That's right. Yesterday we talked about adolescence and addictive behavior, addictions to certain substances. Now today we're going to continue talking about that and why it is an important problem to look at, why it is important to understand. That's right. As we start day two, we see that one of the major problems, or the reasons that it is a problem is the combination of adolescence, an American culture that glorifies and promotes substance use. Now Ryan, this research that we're looking at did take place in America.


But because of American culture, the way it does reach around the world through media, through movies, music, it's important for us to look at it as a whole because the culture is affecting a lot of people. That's right. Yeah, we're looking at a study that happened in Colombia University in America. But really, this is true for the entire world. And so we see some problems here. That's right. We're talking about a combination of things. That means when we add multiple small things together. Now the first two pieces that we combine are what? American adolescence, or teenagers that are using these things and a culture in America that glorifies substance use. Now when we talk about "glorifying" something, that means we make it seem excellent or splendid, or something so wonderful you have to try it because it's so great. And it's usually to make something seem excellent when it's really not. And so in this case, especially substance use is not excellent, it's not good for you. And really some people might think it's fun, but I don't think it is either. No, it's... it is not good for you. And they are glorifying it, so this word works well. So the first two pieces of our combination are adolescence and an American culture. What's next? That's right. Well, it's also an easy access to things like tobacco and alcohol as well as other drugs, which creates a perfect storm for American teens. That's right. So first we see adolescence and then the culture. And now how easy access they have, how easily they can get to something, how easy it is for them to buy alcohol and tobacco and to find these drugs. Yeah. Now there are laws designed to keep teenagers from getting these things. But all it takes is for them to have a friend that can get it for them. It really is easy for them to get alcohol and drugs. And when we say a perfect storm, that means it is the correct conditions for a big problem - a storm being a big problem. Well, this creates a problem for our teenagers and the taxpayers. This was said by Jim Ramstad, a board member of the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse that we call CASA, who chaired the report's national advisory commission. So this man was in charge. Yeah. And so he says that this is a real problem not only for the people using drugs, but also taxpayers. That's right. We can... we no longer can justify writing off adolescent substance use as bad behavior. So this is something else he's talking about. Yeah. You shouldn't write it off. And that means to say that it's OK, it's not a big problem, it's just bad behavior. He says as a rite of passage or as kids just being kids, that's not true either. That's right. We cannot say that it's just something they try, it's just something that kids are going to do no matter what we teach them.


We have to be clear. We have to lay down rules and protect adolescents. That's right. He says the science is too clear, the facts are too compelling, and health and social consequences are too devastating and the costs are simply too high. This is a lot of things that are too much. So first it's too compelling. That means it's something that we need to work on. The health and social consequences are too devastating. Yeah. And that means that they cause a lot of damage or a lot of problems. People are using these. It's bad for their health. And he says it causes problems with money too. That's right. Socially and financially, there are big problems with drug abuse. Well, we're going to keep talking about this after the break. We're going to talk about the consequences of these actions. But first, let's see today's skit. Hey, kid, have a cigarette. Take a drink. How about some prescription drugs? No! Thank you. Come on! Our culture glorifies and promotes substance use. And it's so easy to access. True. It's the combination for the perfect storm. Teens and taxpayers will suffer. That's not your problem. Besides, kids are kids. Have fun. No. I cannot justify this problem of adolescent substance abuse. It's not a big deal. It's cool. It's cool for a fool! Ha... Hey! Well, listen. The science is clear. The facts are compelling. Consequences are devastating and costs are high. There's nothing anyone can do about it. Oh, yeah? We can take measures to reduce use. We can find positive role models, like our parents. They can prohibit substance use. It's not enough. Well, we'll have strong schools and communities and churches and prevention programs for high-risk teens. Hey... teens have other problems too. Worry about those and stop worrying about substance abuse. Leave me alone.


Well, leave you alone? Now you listening to me. I refuse to turn a blind eye. This common problem is an epidemic. Epidemic? Yes. But drug addiction can be prevented. Prevented? Oh, no! Well, now stop bullying me and go away. And you know what? Stop bullying other kids too. Now get out, now. Go! (Music). OK, everybody, welcome back from the break. So we've established that it makes a big difference when a person begins to use addictive substances. The earlier they do it, the more likely they'll have addiction problems later in life. Here are more reasons why young people should wait. Teenage substance abuse weakens self-control, judgment and emotional stability. It damages memory, reduces motivation and learning. Adolescence is a time when character and life skills should be developing, not weakening. And this is the tragedy: The lost period of growth can never be recaptured. OK, time to wrap up the lesson. We'll finish up the reading on line 7. A Look at Addiction. Measures to reduce teen substance use include having positive adult role models, rules from parents prohibiting substance use, participation in clubs and activities, and involvement in religious or spiritual practices. Also included are a strong school and community attachment, early screening and intervention programs, a reduction of pro-substance use advertising and media messages, and targeted prevention programs for teens at high risk. Susan Foster, vice president and director of policy research and analysis for CASA, said: "We rightfully worry about other teen health problems like obesity, depression or bullying, but we turn a blind eye to a more common and deadly epidemic that we can in fact prevent.". So Jim Ramstad says that the... the reason that it is such a problem for teenagers using drugs and forming an addiction is because America glorifies its use and they are very easy to get. That's right. And we need to step in and make a difference because the science is too clear. We know the truth. And it's too devastating, it's too awful on the students' health as well as their social lives. Yes, and with finances as well. It's hard on taxpayers, people who are paying money to the government. Measures to reduce teen substance use include having positive adult role models, rules from parents prohibiting substance use as well as participation in clubs and activities.


That's right. So we're going to have a list here of ways we can help adolescents not be involved. So we've talked about the problems with substance abuse and addiction. And now we're going to look at some solutions to help adolescents not find them. Now what's his first suggestion? Well, the first suggestion here is to have positive role models. You want to have parents who are positive and can say good things to the child so that they don't feel like they need to use these drugs to feel better. Now a role model is someone that we look up to because we like what they do. We would like to be like them. A lot of... a lot of adolescents have role models that are famous, and who then glorify some of these bad behaviors. So we need to have positive role models, someone who can encourage them. Yes, exactly, whether it'd be your parents or someone famous, you want it to be someone positive. But we do need parents to prohibit drug use and alcohol use. And to "prohibit" means to officially not allow something, to say that something should not be done. That's right. And that's not meaning your... your child just knows I don't agree with it. That means you've taken the time to sit with them and tell them that they are not allowed to participate in this, and that there are punishments and consequences for their actions if they decide to do that. So as a parent, you need to step in and make it a rule. Make it a rule in your home that that is not allowed. Yeah. So they can also participate in clubs and activities. That means they can join these clubs or join these activities. If it's at school, perhaps they're playing sports. Or they are in a club where they read; it keeps them doing something. Also involvement in religious or spiritual practices. So if they're involved with people, if they're in the community involved with positive role models, involved with fellow peers, other adolescents, they are doing good things in life instead of encouraging bad behavior. These are great ways to keep your adolescent away from this bad behavior. Yes. Now also included are a strong school and community attachment, early screening and intervention programs. Now that's a couple first. But here we see they need to have a strong role in school. That's right, a strong role. That means they're secure, they're safe at school. They have good teachers, a good community, good friends. And that means usually involvement as well. That's right. And also we see here early screening and intervention. Now this is important to have programs that can first screen and then have an intervention. OK. To "screen" something means you are testing for it in the first place. You examine to make sure that it is not there or to check to see if it is there. For example, at the airport, you go through a screening process with your luggage to make sure you have only the right things with you.


So you screen students to make sure they're OK. Yes. And if they are using drugs, you need "intervention." And that means to be involved in something to improve it. So you make sure they stop using these drugs. Now what else would help, Kaylah? Well, these programs help. Well, a reduction of pro-substance use advertising and media messages and targeted prevention program for teens at high risk. So don't let them be involved in media that encourages it. Yes. Now Susan Foster, vice president and director of policy research and analysis for CASA, said: We rightfully worry about other teen health problems like obesity, depression or bullying, but we turn a blind eye to a more common and deadly epidemic that we can in fact prevent. So she's talking about other health problems for teenagers. And one of those is "bullying," which is when you hurt or frighten someone smaller or less powerful than you are. Well, I hope you've enjoyed learning about addictions. Let's visit Liz with Grammar on the Go, and then visit the Chat Room. Hello, friends. Welcome to Grammar on the Go. My name is Liz. And our article today is on addictions. According to the writer: We rightfully worry about other teen health problems like obesity, depression or bullying, but we turn a blind eye to a more common and deadly epidemic that we can in fact prevent. That's our Grammar Tip sentence. Notice the phrase, to turn a blind eye. If a person has a blind eye, they can't see with that eye. In order to see things, that person would always turn to use their good eye. But if that person were to ever turn and use their blind eye, then they're trying to not see something on purpose. In other words, this idiom means to ignore on purpose. Going back to today's sentence, the writer is saying that we deliberately pay no attention to a more common and deadly epidemic that we can in fact prevent. Use this idiom, to turn a blind eye, when you want to talk about how somebody chooses to ignore something and act like something isn't there or doesn't exist. For example, when you see someone really needing help, you should help that person. You should not turn a blind eye to someone who needs help. Or let's say Tony is very messy, and his mother could never get him to clean his room. So we can say: Tony's mother had to turn a blind eye to Tony's mess. If you want more example sentences, they're available in today's Grammar Tip section in your Studio Classroom magazine. This is Liz with Grammar on the Go, signing off. Bye-bye. Hey, Bryan. Hi, Ken.


I was just over at the young adult section. Who is that section for, exactly? Well, young adults are basically teenagers. So the young adult section is the teen section. So a teenager is a young adult? Well, that's true. A teenager refers to a young person. But it is a word that specifically describes a young person between the ages of 13 and 19. Why 13 and 19? Well, just try saying the numbers out loud. "Thirteen" is the first number with the word "teen" in it after 10, 11 and 12. And "nineteen" is the last number with the word "teen" in it before 20. Oh, I see. What about adolescent? Is an adolescent a teenager? An adolescent is someone who is transitioning between childhood and adulthood. So all teens are adolescents, but not all adolescents are teens. Oh, you mean someone who is younger than 13! That's right. We can refer to someone between the ages of 9 and 12 as a preteen. And recently in the U.S., the term "tween" has become more and more popular. Tween? What's that? Well, a tween is a child between middle adolescence and maturity. So this means someone between 8 and 12 years old, usually. The word is a combination of the words teen and between. And the term is often used by the marketers who are trying to sell products to kids in the tween age range. I see. Well, I think I'm a bit old to be browsing in the teen section then. No. Don't let the name stop you. You just might find some books there that you really like in the young adult section. OK, I'll go take a look then. (Chinese). Hi, everyone. I'm Michelle. (Chinese). And that's it for today's Language Tips. Make sure you come back next time. Bye-bye. Thank you again, Michelle. Friends, here's another reason why substance abuse prevention and awareness is really, really important: money. CASA estimates that U.S. federal state and local governments spend $500 billion of taxpayer money every year on addiction and substance abuse-related problems like crime, child abuse, domestic violence and homelessness. Don't forget the burden it places on the court and prison systems. Of course, there's no way to put a monetary value on all the human misery addiction and substance abuse


creates. So everyone, please, keep it clean. Have a great day. And then join us tomorrow for some crazy uses for Coca-Cola. Bye-bye. (Music).


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