Architecture Portfolio

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ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

ALISON CARROLL TULANE UNIVERSITY



TABLE OF CONTENTS

5 Personal Statement 6 Education 7 Work Experience

10 Confronting Infrastructure 20 Entry Street 26 The Horizon 30 Creating Campus 34 A Sustainable Home 37 Urban Collector 42 A Sentimental Typology



PERSONAL STATEMENT Through the development of many projects, I have come to describe my architectural passion as simple and elegant design that communicates an idea clearly while using beautiful, well-crafted materials. I believe the most successful architecture is able to provide an almost spiritual connection between the built environment and the people who inhabit it. My focus is first and foremost on user experience as well as local context.

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EDUCATION TULANE UNIVERSITY, NEW ORLEANS 2009-CURRENT - Tulane school of architecture - 5 Year masters of architecture program - Model building workshop with Michael Gruber of Richard Meier Architects - Spent semester abroad in the Tulane School of Architecture Rome program - Spent a semester in the Preservation studio - Current gpa: 3.23 - Will graduate in May 2014 THE CHAPIN SCHOOL, NEW YORK CITY - Physics and calculus taken to the highest possible level - Took cad and intro to engineering - Gpa: 3.4 COMPUTER SKILLS - Revit, AutoCAD - Adobe Creative Suite: Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign - Rhino, V-Ray - Google Sketch-up - Microsoft Office

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1996-2009


WORK EXPERIENCE ARCHITECTURE INTERN, RONALD SCHMIDT & ASSOCIATES, ENGLEWOOD, NJ

2013

STORE DESIGN INTERN, BURCH CREATIVE CAPITAL, NEW YORK CITY

2012

ARCHITECTURE INTERN, SUK DESIGN GROUP, NEW YORK CITY

2011

- Prepared past work documentation and descriptions for updated website - Prepared and constructed physical model and renderings for project competition - Preliminary design work for a gatehouse project - Wrote, designed, and sent email-blasts to updated contact lists - Created a cost/bid comparison for past competition entries

- Created a scheme for the secondary store designs (store concept tiering) - Created and organized a specifications binder for all store fixtures and materials - Drew area, egress, and furniture plans as well as signage details - Worked in a team to implement new usage of the brand’s logo - Drew up initial project plans using Revit - Worked on spec writing for a public school project - Updated drawings with project edits - Organized keynotes and layouts for final construction documents

SAILING INSTRUCTOR, OLD COVE YACHT CLUB, NEW SUFFOLK, NY

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2006-2010 Instructed children ages 4-15 and trained junior instructors Taught basic sailing skills, sailing safety, and competitive racing Organized club events and implemented new fund-raisers Responsible for class plans and program schedule, children, and parent relations 7


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

A SUSTAINABLE HOME: NEW ORLEANS

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

PROJECTS

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Interior Rendering 12" = 1'-0"

30 degree roof shields southern sun Wood Framing

Greenscreen provides privacy

Water Wall cools air before it enters the home.

3' - 0"

Home is raised 3' for flood protection

15' - 6"

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8' - 0 19/32"

Section 1/2" = 1'-0"

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

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CONFRONTING INFRASTRUCTURE

Pumping Station I New Orleans, LA I Design Studio I Fall 2013 This project’s site is located in a somewhat awkward area where two parishes, Jefferson and Orleans, merge. Resulting in an irregular grid, streets not conducive to pedestrians and the inaccessibility to the levee contribute to the site’s ‘problems.’ This project seeks to gently negotiate the industrial scale of an urban storm water pumping station with a pedestrian-friendly ‘main street’ within a residential neighborhood. As an attempt to extend Oak Street’s prominence through the entire corridor, a long bar building, mirroring a typical street-front edge is placed on the site to define the street more clearly. This location also provides an opportunity for the building to act as a monumental gateway into Orleans Parish. The bar is then modified due to the site’s ‘obstacles:’ a water-intake station and train rail. These moves accentuate the industrial nature of the project.

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diagram | site location

diagram | extend oak street

oak street

parish line

site location

diagram | modify bar

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ic e l l o Mont

CONFRONTING INFRASTRUCTURE

Pumping Station I New Orleans, LA I Design Studio I Fall 2013 Ave. Oak St.

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The city’s excess storm water runoff is collected in an open canal that runs down Monticello Avenue. It culminates by the pumping station in a reservoir. When water needs to be pumped to the river, however many pumps are needed are turned on to do so. perspective |current condition of Leake ave

The project, meant to allow public access to infrastructure, moves Leake Avenue closer to the rail road tracks to allow for a sidewalk on the city side. Planting trees, adding parking, and creating designated crosswalks slows down the traffic and produces a pedestrian friendly zone. Bike ramps and terracing allows for easy access to the levee and river.

perspective |proposed condition of Leake ave

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CONFRONTING INFRASTRUCTURE

Pumping Station I New Orleans, LA I Design Studio I Fall 2013 The building anchors the end of Oak Street and works to draw the public towards the site. Mainly, the building is a solid bar with a void that allows the freight train to run through it. It is wrapped in a steel and wooden structure with louvers that provide sun-shading to the building and public rooftop, and a wall of water cascading down the front of the pumping station both celebrates water and masks the noise.

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Besides a pumping station, the building has other types of program, attracting the public to the site. Levee Access The building can be uses to access the levee. Previously, when a train was crossing, there was no way to get to either side. The building’s design allows perspective |public rooftop for this. Water Museum New Orleans is world famous for its water management. This museum tells about this and features a mezzanine through the pumping station. perspective |rooftop restaurant/bar Restaurant/Bar This restaurant, on the roof, has a unique view of the Mississippi River. The restaurant keeps the building occupied day and night.

Public Rooftop The rooftop provides shade, views, and a reflective pool where anyone can take advantage of the building. perspective |entrance to water museum

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CONFRONTING INFRASTRUCTURE

Pumping Station I New Orleans, LA I Design Studio I Fall 2013 The building’s design encourages a comprehensive circulation throughout the entire building, offering public access to the pumping station. The main form of the building houses the program while another bar-like mass, a wooden sun-shading system, is shifted off of the main building. The interstitial space remaining dictates the buildings circulation.

main building mass wooden sun-shade circulation

diagram |circulation in plan

diagram |circulation in section

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section |through pumping station and levee


plan |roof level

plan |ground level

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CONFRONTING INFRASTRUCTURE

Pumping Station I New Orleans, LA I Design Studio I Fall 2013 The building’s circulation guides the visitor and encourages exploration of the entire building. The public is able to access the entire building. The public entrance leads visitors to the rooftop where they are let out onto an exterior balcony with views of the river on one side and the restaurant on the other. They can walk down a set of stairs onto the mezzanine of the water museum and pumping station. A catwalk through the pumping station draws visitors through the station where they can experience the massiveness of the pumps while walking along side the water-wall.

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perspective |pumping station public mezzanine


They can then choose to take the elevated path to the levee and river or loop back up to the roof along a ramp. The ramp is suspended between the pumping station and the wooden sunshading.

perspective |ramp to rooftop

perspective |rooftop balcony

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ENTRY STREET_PUBLIC LIBRARY Vieux Carre, New Orleans, LA I Design Studio I Fall 2011

A recent shift towards the importance of technology makes libraries a place of social encounter and signifies a gain in their recreational value. The french quarter library provides books, resources, and media centers for public use as well as public social areas. A public “street� leads the visitor in and through the building, passing all amenities and flowing out into a public courtyard. This project was developed and rendered with Revit.

PUBLIC COURTYARD


ENTRY “STREET” CHARTRES STREET

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ENTRY STREET_PUBLIC LIBRARY Vieux Carre, New Orleans, LA I Design Studio I Fall 2011


The main library-stacks area can be entered directly through the Toulouse Street entrance or through the public interior street leading from Chartres street to the courtyard. This main area’s circulation is in its center, connecting to the public portion’s “entry street.” This space acts as the spine for the library as it holds all vertical circulation and offers views between each level. It leads visitors to stacks, study spaces, and computer kiosks.

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ENTRY STREET_PUBLIC LIBRARY Vieux Carre, New Orleans, LA I Design Studio I Fall 2011

gravel roof membrane roof insulation concrete slab sheet rock insulated glass window mullion perforated metal screen

insulated glass flooring concrete slab metal decking brackets

flooring concrete slab metal decking steel column steel beam steel girder foam insulation suspended ceiling

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Providing privacy as well as light control, a perforated aluminum sheet is folded and hung in front of the glazing. Windowsized openings in the panel mimics the patterns of the surrounding buildings's elevations. The library is constructed of steel in order to provide large, open spaces within.

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THEHORIZON_YOGA HORIZON THE RETREAT Acadia National Park, Maine I Design Studio I Spring 2011

The facility was developed for a group of yoga devotees who have a special concern for the natural environment. The program of activities done at the retreat is very simple and focused to allow for contemplation and relaxation within the context of nature. The architectural program calls for sleeping accommodation for 20, a main house for social activities as well as a yoga studio. This project was developed in AutoCad and Rhino.

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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precedents



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double negative_michael heizer

THE HORIZON_YOGA RETREAT Acadia National Park, Maine I Design Studio I Spring 2011

precedents samios house_daffonchio architects

yoga studio_carter burton

double negative_michael heizer

samios house_daffonchio architects

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

The main circulation on the site is a north to south vertical stair/ramp that connects all parts of the program. At points, the path is cut deep into the earth which expresses the topography of the site to the user. At certain moments, the path leads to vast open views.


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CREATING CAMPUS_CULINARY INSTITUTE New Orleans, LA I Design Studio I Spring 2012

O.C. Hayle Boulevard, the school’s site, is a neglected street in New Orleans, once thriving with life and commerce. The long narrow site is programmed for a Culinary School focused on the French Art of Cooking. In order to create a campuslike feel on the small site, the program is physically divided into two bars pulled apart that face each other and create a courtyard-like plaza below, which becomes the center for social interaction between classes. This project was developed and rendered with Revit.

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This void between the two bars of program become an exterior plaza. Both bars are oriented towards this void so that, while they are two separate buildings, there is a strong visual connection from wherever you are standing. This central area acts as the one-building-school’s campus and is a place of social gathering. The materiality in this space is tactile. It is treated with wood railings and louvers while the exterior facade is treated with copper louvers. This plaza is connected to the street to embrace the community as a whole as well as serve the school.

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CREATING CAMPUS_CULINARY INSTITUTE New Orleans, LA I Design Studio I Spring 2012

The rear of the building houses the library and auditorium. This rendering shows the triple height space that serves as a connection between the two bars as well as a multi-purpose space for gatherings.

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

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The circulation is almost entirely exterior, though covered, and runs around the plaza. Each room connects to this main ring of circulation, subtly implying that each room is a different ‘building’ on a campus. 3 6 9 12

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A SUSTAINABLE HOME

New Orleans, LA I BIM Class I Spring 2012

This was a group project designed with two other classmates for a BIM class. We were to design a sustainable shot-gun inspired house using Revit. Using simple design moves, steps towards stainability are achieved. Strategically placed windows and transoms increase air circulation and ventilation. The southern facade is largely solid to decrease heat gain while the northern facade has a lot of windows for daylight. The angled roof allows for rainwater collection and fountains lining the porch can use this water as a cooling system along with the vines protecting 34 residents from the sun.


The design was inspired by a traditional New Orleans shot-gun house. It has three bedrooms and two bathrooms. Designed with cost in mind, its materials are kept simple, consisting of wood and siding. Part of the assignment was to design, render, and prepare the presentation all using Revit.

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URBAN COLLECTOR_COMMUNITY CENTER San Lorenzo, Rome, IT I Design Studio Abroad I Fall 2012

SAN LORENZO AGRICULTURAL CENTER

ALISON CARROLL

Located on the edge of Rome, San Lorenzo is a lively neighborhood that caters to TULANE UNIVERSITY many::different of people: students from La::Sapienza University, young-adults URBAN types COLLECTOR : Cohabiting Dynamics School of Architecture, Rome Program 2012 DSGN410 - Del Signore / Klingman STUDIO with young families seeking lower-cost housing, and artists. The community center has a lot of various things to offer as a multi-purpose space. Outdoor markets, an urban garden with learning facilities, a child-care center, and housing make up the program of this building. This project was developed in Revit.

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URBAN COLLECTOR_COMMUNITY CENTER San Lorenzo, Rome, IT I Design Studio Abroad I Fall 2012 DESIGN CONCEPT: CONTINUATION OF PEDESTRIAN PATH

PATH ON SLOPED SITE

FLOOR SLABS - UPPER AND LOWER PATH

PERSEPECTIVE: PEDESTRIAN “STREET”

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VERTICAL CIRCULATION

The design concept for the “Urban Collector” was a scheme to extend the existing piazza located one block away. Visitors of this piazza spill out onto the street connecting the site because of its large sidewalk with city trees. The design continues this extension to the site and through it. The 12’ drop in the site’s topography is accounted for by leading this new “street” down through the site, past market stalls onto the adjacent soccer field’s level where there are more opportunities for market stalls as well as a new pedestrian street connecting the blocks on either side.


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PERSEPECTIVE: URBAN GARDEN PRODUCED PRODUCEDBY BYAN ANAUTODESK AUTODESKSTUDENT STUDENTPRODUCT PRODUCT

The childcare facility is separated from the other program for privacy and has a separate outdoor play area and entrance.

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

The urban garden is located in the building’s courtyard. When visitors enter the site through the pedestrian “street,” they experience a strong visual connection into the garden. The first level is open air and you can easily pass through into the public garden.

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PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

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PROGRAM & ORGANIZATION APARTMENTS

GREEN HOUSE

ROOF GARDEN

URBAN GARDEN MARKETS RESTAURANT TEACHING KITCHEN CLASS ROOM PREP STATION

CHILDCARE PUBLIC GROUP ROOMS

CAFE

PLAY GARDEN

LOUNGE

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RESTAURANT


URBAN COLLECTOR_COMMUNITY CENTER San Lorenzo, Rome, IT I Design Studio Abroad I Fall 2012

SECOND FLOORPLAN 60’

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TEACHING KITCHEN PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

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PRODUCEDBY BYAN ANAUTODESK AUTODESKSTUDENT STUDENTPRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCED

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

PRODUCEDBY BYAN ANAUTODESK AUTODESKSTUDENT STUDENTPRODUCT PRODUCT PRODUCED

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PRODUCED PRODUCED BY BY AN AN AUTODESK AUTODESK STUDENT STUDENT PRODUCT PRODUCT

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The height of the building comes from the apartment units. The facade is designed with the resident’s privacy in mind. Perforated ceramic screens can slide to provide privacy or be stacked for more light. Each unit has a balcony with a green wall.


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A typical housing unit is a two bedroom, two story apartment. You enter on the second level looking below into the double height living space. On the entry level is the unit’s bathroom, master bedroom, and small balcony. The lower level houses the living area, dining room, kitchen, second bedroom, as well as balcony. UP

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This layout allows each unit to have windows on both ends of the apartment which is ideal for ventilation.

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Context

A SENTIMENTAL TYPOLOGY_WINERY Peconic, NY I Thesis Design Studio I Spring 2014 N Long Island Sound--Connecticut

New York City

Peconic Bay--South Fork


Most wineries on the North Fork took over old potato barns and various farm buildings, over the years being renovated to provide more amenities for the visitor. Starting from scratch on a forested site situated 70 feet above the Long Island Sound, this design includes the planting of a vineyard as well as a comprehensive strategy for the site. Based on the farm typology, a collection of structures create various sheltered spaces. Both the winery’s public components as well as the retreat’s program work together to enclose a communal outdoor garden. Free circulation of the site is encouraged through the close development of various circulation paths with careful attention paid to the visitors holistic experience of the space, accentuated by various ‘architectural moments.’ The final solution seeks to provide the visitor with an authentic understanding of the Genius Loci, providing both an architectural landscape that solidifies a strong sense of place as well as seek to provide a contemplative space that evokes the intangible, emotional dimensions of our built environment within each visitor.

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A SENTIMENTAL TYPOLOGY_WINERY Peconic, NY I Thesis Design Studio I Spring 2014 Farm Typology The main impact of the buildings on the site happens beyond this ‘wall.’ A group of barn-form buildings create a semi-enclosed courtyard—similar to those of a traditional farm typology—sheltering a private, special space to be utilized by the visitors. The barn typology presents a dichotomy: it is both an object in a landscape as well as part of the overall architectural ‘field.’ Though an impressive form within a, usually, flat landscape, a barn’s image gives us a sense of familiarity and pleasure. This juxtaposition is only one that is used throughout the project in terms of organization, landscaping, and materiality.

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A SENTIMENTAL TYPOLOGY_WINERY Peconic, NY I Thesis Design Studio I Spring 2014

Organization The site provides an unimposing setting with a subtle presence and wonderful outlook. Its situation on the top of a bluff overlooking the sound is exploited by the building’s placement and arrangement. Set back from the road almost 1000 feet, Objects in a field the building does not overwhelm the subtle, agrarian landscape. Two service buildings are placed closer to the road, flanking either side of the driveway, providing signage for the property as well as a gateway toward the main buildings. At this point, the buildings’ are seen: a long simple wall, accentuated by a tall tower, projecting confidence without arrogance. The buildings’ complexities remain concealed, only with hints of the 46 varied activities within. Circulation


Interior vs. Exterior Covered Space

Vistas

Enclosed Space

Circulation

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A SENTIMENTAL TYPOLOGY_WINERY Peconic, NY I Thesis Design Studio I Spring 2014

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Ground Floorplan nts.


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A SENTIMENTAL TYPOLOGY_WINERY Peconic, NY I Thesis Design Studio I Spring 2014 Landscape The duality between the indigenous, wooded landscape and the formal geometricized vineyard planting is expressed in the project in various ways. The contrast is accentuated by either side of the buildings as well: one side looks out over the flat Long Island landscape, dotted with houses and barns, while the other looks over a 75-foot bluff overlooking the spectacular Long Island sound. The footprint for the complex of buildings is carved out of existing woods and brush, leaving a landscape buffer between the buildings and their neighboring properties. A patch of natural brush was preserved within the courtyard in for both enhanced privacy as well as sun shading for the vineyard-side rooms.

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Formal vs. Indigenous Landscape

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A SENTIMENTAL TYPOLOGY_WINERY Peconic, NY I Thesis Design Studio I Spring 2014 Materiality The material presence within the building was used to create an emotive architecture. Juxtaposing solid concrete with a lighter, tactile wood constructing heightens the awareness of each. The winery’s entirety underground was done in wood-formed concrete, creating a dark, cavernous space. A catwalk connecting the tectonic wood tower to the concrete slab outlook through the bluff circulates Board-Formed Concrete the visitor through the barrel room, tank room, production area, case goods and wine cellar. The visitor can travel from the top of the tower, over looking the entirety of the area down into the earth, through the mysterious space of the winery, and jut back out over the sound. This procession accentuates the building’s presence within the world and provides an almost overwhelming experience for the visitor. Wood Floors

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Cedar-Shingle Roofing

The above-ground portion of the project was done in mostly wood, with exception of a few features. The fireplaces are all cast concrete as well as a few of the walls which accentuate various circulation paths. The fireplaces were done in concrete in order to heighten their presence an importance within the project as the hearth provides an emotional comfort, relating to memory. Similarly the concrete walls act in two ways: to juxtapose the wood construction as well as to create an illusion of protection.


Restaurant

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A SENTIMENTAL TYPOLOGY_WINERY Peconic, NY I Thesis Design Studio I Spring 2014

Entrance to hotel

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Entrance from public road, through service barns

Vine-covered trellis circulation through courtyard

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A SENTIMENTAL TYPOLOGY_WINERY Peconic, NY I Thesis Design Studio I Spring 2014

Barrel Room

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Section B (nts) through winery, courtyard, and ‘living room’


‘Living Room’

Tank Room

Circulation to rooms

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A SENTIMENTAL TYPOLOGY_WINERY Peconic, NY I Thesis Design Studio I Spring 2014

Tasting Room

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Courtyard

Pool

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A SENTIMENTAL TYPOLOGY_WINERY Peconic, NY I Thesis Design Studio I Spring 2014

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