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WORK SAMPLES

URBAN PLANNING AND DESIGN

ALISON M. SHEPPARD


CONTENTS

PLANNING AND DESIGN SAMPLES

ALISON SHEPPARD SB/MCP CANDIDATE 2013 DEPARTMENT OF URBAN STUDIES AND PLANNING MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY


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04 06

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05 01 MAPPING THE UNMAPPED 02 CURBSIDE EATING 03 PARAMETRIC URBANISM 04 COMMUNITY PLAN 05 CHARLES RIVER COMMONS 06 ITERATIVE CANOPY 07 DONGLI EXPERIENCITY


01 MAPPING THE UNMAPPED MIT SLAB: SIDEWALK LABORATORY


MIT SLAB, or the Sidewalk Lab, is a multidisciplinary research group at MIT. The group focuses on “mapping the unmapped” by using nontraditional cartography techniques to study overlooked and ubiquitous aspects of urban life. The approach is a fusion of art process and urban planning. Thus far, SLAB has focused on the mapping of sidewalks and street vendors in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and is currently expanding to a project exploring the underground housing phenomenon in Beijing, China. As a research assistant in this group, my role over the past two years has been to develop new maps and graphics for book and exhibit production. These maps have included a range of media, including photography, video, hand-drawing, and installation pieces. The piece to the left is a narrative map entitled “Negotiating the Sidewalk” and combines photographs of an alleyway in Ho Chi Minh City over the course of 10 years to describe how vendors, patrons, and owners negotiate and share the space of the sidewalk over time. An animated version of this map is also currently in progress.

WORK TYPE RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP

PRODUCED FOR MIT SLAB

HO CHI MINH CITY ONGOING


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01 MAPPING THE UNMAPPED

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The piece to the left is a narrative map entitled “Negotiating the Sidewalk” and combines photographs of an alleyway in Ho Chi Minh City over the course of 10 years to describe how vendors, patrons, and owners negotiate and share the space of the sidewalk over time.

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Also generated as a part of MIT SLAB, this map is a representation of the manner in which legal code and bureaucracy “construct” the city, often in an arbitrary manner. The white lines represent the only streets in the city on which street vending is technically “allowed” but the red net map reveals the vast extent of the street network, many of which are in actuality home to vendors.

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02 CURBSIDE EATING

MASTERS THESIS (WORK IN PROGRESS)


A work in progress, this thesis project examines the role of food trucks, a form of temporary urbanism, in activating the public space of the city. Through the case study of Los Angeles, the finished project will propose a series of design and planning interventions that allow food trucks to have the largest possible impact. Ultimately, the goal is to determine new ways in which food truck owners and operators can shape their urban environments.

WORK TYPE THESIS PROJECT

INDEPENDENT WORK

LOS ANGELES, CA SPRING 2013


03 PARAMETRIC URBANISM URBAN DESIGN IDEALS WORKSHOP


Over the course of 8 days in Singapore, this workshop explored the role of parameters in creating the existing urban fabric of various neighborhoods in Singapore. The site of this investigation, Punggol, is a new residential development in the north of the country. In future years, the town is planned to grow exponentially in size. This workshop is ongoing throughout the current semester, and will eventually culminate in comprehensive, parametric proposals for improvements and future adaptations in the neighborhood’s urban design and planning.

WORK TYPE DESIGN WORKSHOP

COLLABORATORS BERNARD HARKLESS, ANDRES BERNAL

SINGAPORE JANUARY 2013


03 PARAMETRIC URBANISM URBAN DESIGN IDEALS WORKSHOP

The focus chosen for this project was the ways in which individuals alter and take ownership of their environments in such a rigidly designed setting. In order to analyze this, the team set out to survey different types of “customization” observed in the site at the 3 scales: building, cluster, and neighborhood. To do this, an extensive surveying process was carried out to assess the existing customization within the area. This data was analyzed and sorted in a variety of ways. Analysis revealed that residents have a need and desire to customize their spaces, and that small permutations in the planning process could vastly improve the quality and ease of this.

TYPE OF USE

4%

LOUNGE

12% NONE

13%

RELIGIOUS

29%

DECORATIVE

39%

GARDENING

66% STORAGE


Finally, proposals were generated to not only allow for, but also to encourage future customization. These proposals included adaptations to the architecture of the buildings themselves, the design of the housing clusters, and planning interventions at the community scale. As this project progresses throughout the spring semester, a comprehensive planning proposal will be generated.

WORK TYPE DESIGN WORKSHOP

COLLABORATORS BERNARD HARKLESS, ANDRES BERNAL

SINGAPORE JANUARY 2013


04 COMMUNITY PLAN MAGOUN SQUARE & WINTER HILL

The Magoun Square and Winter Hill Community Plan is a document prepared in collaboration with 12 other classmates at MIT DUSP for the City of Somerville. Winter Hill is a neighborhood on the verge of drastic change and gentrification, and the plan proposes strategies for welcoming this inevitable change while preserving the best of the neighborhood that currently exists.

Personal roles in this project included graphic production and layout, as well as extensive work on the urban design and streetscape portion of the plan. The plan also includes economic, transportation, and environmental analysis and proposals, largely conducted by classmates. The full plan will be forthcoming in Spring 2013.


WORK TYPE CLIENT-BASED PRACTICUM

COLLABORATORS 11.360 CLASS

SOMERVILLE, MA FALL 2012


05 CHARLES RIVER COMMONS MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT

Charles River Commons is a proposal for a mixed use redevelopment of a site in Cambridge, MA. The site is currently home to big box retail, a Marriot Hotel, and large swaths of surface parking. The task was to create a proposal for a higher density, mixed-use development to occupy the site, while not displacing the current businesses located there. This proposal incorporates single- and multi-family residential development, large- and small-scale retail, redesigned open space, and community facilities to create a mixed-use destination that takes advantage of and builds off of its surroundings.

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multi-use parking garage

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mixed use tower

WORK TYPE INTRO URBAN DESIGN STUDIO

trader joe’s

playable sculpture

COLLABORATORS KARI MILCHMAN, NOAH KORETZ, CAROLINE BIRD

renovated walking path

single-family row houses

30 15 0

big box” ground retail floor retail

CAMBRIDGE, MA FALL 2011


05 CHARLES RIVER COMMONS MIXED USE DEVELOPMENT

Renderings of two components of the site: the town square open-space and retail area (left) and a street of singlefamily housing (right).


WORK TYPE INTRO URBAN DESIGN STUDIO

COLLABORATORS KARI MILCHMAN, NOAH KORETZ, CAROLINE BIRD

CAMBRIDGE, MA FALL 2012


06 ITERATIVE CANOPY

FUNDAMENTALS OF ARCHITECTURE STUDIO This project was a progression of exercises meant to explore the ways in which prescriptive rules can eventually be converted to a 3D architectural form. The final product is an example of an installation canopy to be installed in Boston’s City Hall Plaza.

A set of written rules was used to produce a 2D diagram. In the style of Sol LeWitt, this diagram was produced in a participatory manner: the instructions were given to a sample of peers, who followed the guidance to create the generative diagram shown at right. This diagram was then converted to a plan that would fill the polygonal area outlined below.

The 2D diagram was converted to a plan for a 3 dimensional object, which would eventually become a “canopy” for a public space in Boston’s City Hall Plaza. Typical requirements for an outdoor canopy had to be met: sufficient shade an sunshine should be provided, it should provide shelter from weather, and key structural elements should exist. To the right is a 3 dimensional model of the canopy.

Roof Plan


WORK TYPE ARCHITECTURE STUDIO

INDEPENDENT WORK

BOSTON, MA FALL 2010


07 DONGLI EXPERIENCITY

SUSTAINABLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING

The China Planning Studio at MIT focuses on sustainable neighborhood planning in the context of rapidly urbanizing cities in China. In Spring 2012, the site of focus was Dongli New Town, in Tianjin China. The goal of this project was to analyze and propose changes to the existing plan as laid out by the client, Vanke China. Teams of students worked to develop proposals focusing on a variety of major “themes.” The task of this group was to propose a plan for a sustainable neighborhood development around the theme of a major entertainment destination that is currently proposed for the study area.

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INTANGIBLE

MEMORABLE

K E Y AT T R I B U T E S

NATURAL

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CUSTOMIZED

PERSONAL

PRODUCT

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As China shifts from industrial to an experience-based economy, sustainable neighborhood planning will become even more important. This project capitalizes on the shift to an experience economy, and uses the following three goals to guide sustainable and quality development. I. Create a high quality living environment that supports the economic, physical, and social health of the community.

II. Create a year-round entertainment destination and dynamic interactive experience that celebrates innovative technology.

III. Create a highly connected residential and entertainment district with ample opportunities to live, work, and play.

The proposal operates at two scales: a conceptual plan for the entire Dongli District (here branded as Dongli ExperienCity) and a more comprehensive plan for one residential neighborhood within the district.


DISTRICT: Diagrammatic representations of principles applied at the district scale.

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Entertainment Zones

SITE: Diagrammatic representations of translation of these principles onto the study area.

Entertainment Zones

WORK TYPE PLANNING STUDIO

Activity Routes

COLLABORATORS RICO SUAREZ, RACHEL BLATT, NSE UMOH

Entertainment Anchors

TIANJIN, CHINA SPRING 2012

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07 DONGLI EXPERIENCITY SUSTAINABLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING

COMMUNITY FACILITIES CLUSTER

ANCHOR

ENHANCING USES

BUS ROUTE - SITE

OPEN SPACE

BUS ROUTE - DISTRICT

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The task was to analyze existing development, and propose alterations that could be made in future developments created by the client, Vanke China. The following broad topic areas were used to create a comprehensive plan for the neighborhood study area. WATER & LAND FORMATION OPEN SPACE ROAD NETWORK COMMUNITY FACILITIES HOUSING

Full details of the proposal, as well as additional drawings, renderings, and the compilation of work of all three teams can be found at: http://issuu.com/andreacheng/docs/tianjin_studio_2012_ web

500m WORK TYPE PLANNING STUDIO

COLLABORATORS RICO SUAREZ, RACHEL BLATT, NSE UMOH

TIANJIN, CHINA SPRING 2012


Work Samples - Alison Sheppard