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Issue #526

June 19th - 25th 2014

Published and distributed by Alimon Publishing, LLC - www.tidbitswyoming.com - tidbits@tidbitswyoming.com - 307-473-8661

TIDBITS® TAKES

FLIGHT

by Janet Spencer On June 25, 1953, Horace C. Boren became the first passenger to fly around the world on commercial airlines in less than 100 hours. Come along with Tidbits as we take flight! EARLY PIONEERS • The Wright brothers were not the first people to fly a plane. Seven years prior to their 1903 flight, Samuel Pierpont Langley’s 16-foot (4.8 m) plane travelled three quarters of a mile (1.2 km) and stayed aloft for a minute and a half. The Wright’s claim to fame was that they made the first flight that carried a human. Langley’s plane was unmanned. • The world’s first fatal airplane crash occurred in 1908 when a propeller broke, sending the aircraft plunging 150 feet (45 m) to earth. The pilot escaped with a broken leg, but the single passenger, Lt. Thomas Selfridge of the U.S. ignal Corps, was killed on impact. The pilot was Orville Wright. • Many people mistakenly think Charles Lindbergh made the first transatlantic flight. Actually, he made the first solo transatlantic flight, but many other transatlantic flights were made prior to his May 20-21, 1927 solo flight. For instance, there was Capt. John Alcock and Lt. Arthur Whitten Brown who flew a converted Vimy night bomber from Canada to Ireland on June 14 & 15, 1919. • When Capt. Alcock and Lt. Brown flew from Canada to Ireland, they took with them Lucky Jim and Twinkletoes— two stuffed black cats, for luck. However, these “lucky” charms didn’t do much good. First, a super-heated exhaust pipe disintegrated. Then a blinding fog moved in and the plane would have taken a nose dive into the Atlantic if the fog hadn’t cleared 100 feet above the

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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

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CNFR Schedule 2014 Friday, June 6th

2:00 p.m. Position Draw Location: NIRA National Office

Friday, June 13th

7:30 a.m. Work timed event cattle & goats (7:30-9 Goat Tying; 9-10:30 Steer Wrestling; 10:3011:30 Breakaway; 11:30-12:30 Tie Down; 12:30-Finish Team Roping) Location: Events Center 2:00 p.m. Draw Stock for 1st and 2nd Go-Round Location: Events Center 5:00 p.m. Jackpot Rodeo Location: Events Center Continued on the next page

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Welcome to Douglas, Wyoming Saturday, June 14th

8:00 a.am. -10:00 a.m. Pancake Breakfast Location: City Park Noon - 3:00 p.m. Mandatory Contestant Check-in Location: Events Center - Summit Room 3:00 p.m. Coaches Meeting Location: Events Center - Summit Room 3:15 p.m. Mandatory Contestant Orientation Meeting Location: Events Center - Arena seating 4:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. Arena Time Location: Events Center - Arena (4-4:30 Barrel Racers, 4:30-5 Goat Tyers, 5-6 Open)

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Thought for the Day: “In science one tries to tell people, in such a way as to be understood by everyone, something that no one ever knew before. But in poetry, it’s the exact opposite.” — Paul Dirac © 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. • It was novelist Tom Clancy who made the following sage observation: “The difference between fiction and reality? Fiction has to make sense.” • Charlie Chan, the fictional Honolulu detecte, was created in 1919 by novelist Earl Derr Biggers. The books featuring Chan became so popular that the character made 19-year-old aspiring drummer, jumped at the leap to radio, movies and television. the chance. He played three numbers with Over the years, 13 actors have portrayed the band, and lead singer Roger Daltry the detective, but not one of them has been later told Rolling Stone magazine, “That of Chinese ancestry. drummer was really good.” • Rattlesnakes can live up to 20 years. • When the TV sitcom “The Addams Fam- • Milk produced by a hippopotamus mother is pink. ily” was being cast in the early 1960s, actor *** John Astin came in to audition for the role of Lurch, the cadaverous butler. He was immediately rejected for the part. As he was leaving the room, hough, the producer spotted him, pulled him aside, and immediately offered him the role of Gomez — the lead. All he had to do was grow a mustache. • The nation of France was still executing people with he guillotine until 1977. • In 1973, The Who began a major U.S. tour with a show in San Francisco. As the show was starting, though, drummer Keith Moon collapsed. He was revived, but then collapsed once more. At that point, in an unprecedented move, Pete Townsend asked for volunteers from the audience. Scott Halprin, a

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Sunday, June 15th

10:00 a.m. Cowboy Church Service Location: Fairgrounds 1:00 p.m. “Bulls, Broncs & Breakaway” - Matinee Location: Events Center 4:00 p.m. “Bulls, Broncs & Breakaway” - Evening Location: Events Center

Monday, June 16th

7:00 a.m. Slack Location: Events Center

Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

June 19th - 25th 2014

7 p.m. KSC Freight Scholarship Awards Banquet Location: Parkway Plaza Hotel

7:00 p.m. 4th Performance Location: Events Center

Tuesday, June 17th

Saturday, June 21st

7:00 a.m. Slack Location: Events Center 7:00 p.m. 1st Performance Location: Events Center

1st Go-Round Ring Presentation after Steer Wrestling

Wednesday, June 18th 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. Softball Tourney Location: Softball Field 7:00 p.m. 2nd Performance Location: Events Center

2nd Go-Round Ring Presentation after Steer Wrestling

Thursday, June 19th

9:00 a.m. Golf Tournament Location: Paradise Valley 7:00 p.m. 3rd Performance

8:00 a.m. Short-go leaders TV head shots Location: Events Center 9:00-10:30 a.m. Special Olympics Location: Events Center 11:30 a.m. Foundation Style Show Location: Parkway Plaza 2:00 p.m. Cowboy Church Service Location: Fairgrounds 7:00 p.m. Championship Round Location: Events Center 3rd Go-Round Ring Presentation after Steer Wrestling Championship awards immediately following rodeo

(Tough Enough to Wear Pink)

Location: Events Center

Friday, June 20th

8:00 a.m. NIRA Coaches Breakfast Location: Parkway Plaza

were white convertibles with red interiors and black canvas tops. The 1953 Corvette was outfitted with a six-cylinder engine and a twospeed automatic transmission. • On July 5, 1975, Arthur Ashe defeats the fa- • vored Jimmy Connors to become the first black man ever to win Wimbledon. While the confident Connors strutted around the tennis court, she rested between sets. Finally, with the shocked crowd cheering him on, Ashe finished On July 4, 1776, in Philadelphia, the ContinenConnors off in the fourth set, 6-4. tal Congress adopts the Declaration of Inde- • On July 3, 1985, the blockbuster “Back to pendence, which proclaims the independence the Future,” starring Michael J. Fox, opens in of a new United States of America from Great theaters. The timetravel device in the film was Britain. The declaration came 442 days after the first shots of the American Revolution. On July 1, 1916, 25-year-old Army Lt. Dwight D. Eisenhower marries 19-year-old Mamie Geneva Doud. He would go on to lead the Allies to victory in Europe in World War II and later become the nation’s 34th president. The couple lived in 33 homes during Eisenhower’s 37-year military career. On July 6, 1933, Major League Baseball’s first AllStar Game takes place at Comiskey Park in Chicago. The event was designed to bolster the sport during the darkest years of the Great Depression. Fans who could still afford tickets migrated from the more expensive box seats to the bleachers, which cost 50 cents. On June 30, 1953, the first production Corvette is built at the General Motors facility in Flint, Mich. All 300 Corvettes

a DeLorean DMC-12 sports car outfitted with a nuclear reactor that would achieve the 1.21 gigawatts of power necessary to travel through time. On July 2, 1990, a stampede of religious pilgrims in a pedestrian tunnel in Mecca leaves more than 1,400 people dead. This was the most deadly of a series of incidents over 20 years affecting Muslims making the trip to Mecca. Hundreds die each year in this pilgrimage, in stonings, stampedes or fires. © 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.


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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

5 pm to 7 pm June 19th - Commerce Building July 17th - Sidewalk Sales - Downtown Area Aug 14th - End of Summer Blast - Town Park

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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland - For Advertising Call 307-473-8661

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Welcome to GLENROCK, Wyoming Here are 10 reasons you’ll want to make repairs before you put your house on the market: 1. Buyers are going to do an inspection, and the inspector will be able to identify all the issues and suggest needed repairs. So, really, there’s no avoiding it. You WILL have to fix any problems, credit money back to the buyer, or drop your price to compensate. 2. So many of the most common repairs are easy to solve, usually inexpensive, and can be done – by you – in a weekend. They’re likely to be the things that were already on your own list of weekend projects for the past year, and if they bother you, they’ll also bother a buyer. Leaky faucets, ripped window screens, ceiling stains, cracks in the

plaster: they may seem like minor issues, and each one by itself is, but when you’ve got a whole house full of problems like this, they add up to one big seller headache. 3. Eliminating distracting drawbacks will allow buyers to have a positive experience as they tour your home. That

TODAY’S REAL ESTATE TIP

Whether home buyers and home sellers work with real estate agents as clients or customers they are still owed the duty of “disclosure.” Disclosure as defined by real estate law means that all pertinent information that would affect a home buyer’s or home seller’s decision to buy or sell real estate must be disclosed by agents.

means open house visitors will be able to focus on your home’s positive, not negative, features. 4. Getting your home completely prepped and ready will increase its perceived value because you’re showing buyers that your property is wellmaintained. 5. You won’t have to do a price reduction to reflect the estimated (and often over-inflated) cost of repairs! 6. Last minute repairs done on a tight timeline are almost always more costly since you don’t have time to shop around for a less expensive estimate. Plus, your time crunch begs for tradesman to charge higher rush fees for squeezing the work into their schedule. 7. Your actual cost to fix items will Continued on Page 8


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10 Reasons— (continued):

always be less than a buyer’s estimate after their inspection. 8. You’ll avoid credits back to the buyer for problems identified during the inspection and haggling that drags on and on over minor issues, possibly costing you the deal. (You’d be surprised how ugly things can get when you’re down to the wire negotiating the added cost of repairs the cracks in the chimney.) 9. Your real estate agent will love showing off an impeccable home and buyer’s agents will be dying to get their clients in the front door. That brings in more potential buyers – which equates to more chances of finding the right one willing to pay your sale price. 10. You’ll sell faster. And for a higher price. Cha-ching. FLIGHT— (continued):

sea. Next, ice formed over the instruments on the wing after a snowstorm and Lt. Brown had to climb out on the wing to chip it off. But in spite of it all, the two men landed safely. Unfortunately, Alcock was killed six months later while flying in a fog in a Paris air show. Brown subsequently swore off flying forever, but his pilot son was killed in World War II. President Wilson and other important officials gathered in May of 1918 to witness the take-off of the first airmail flight. The plane was to carry mail from Washington, D.C. to Philadelphia. After take-off, the plane somehow went off course and landed in Waldorf, Maryland— which is farther away from Philadelphia than Washington is. The mail was eventually delivered by train. In 1938 Howard Hughes filled his plane with ping-pong balls so it would float if it went down over the ocean. He then proceeded to set the speed record for flying around the world.

For Advertising Call 307-259-5010 or 307-473-8661

• On March 2, 1949, a U.S. Superfortress bomber completed the first nonstop flight around the world when it landed at Fort Worth, Texas. The plane traveled 23,452 miles (37,742 km) in 94 hours and 1 minute. It was refueled four times in flight. • In 1986, the Voyager accomplished the first round-theworld flight without refueling. Cruising at a speed between 65 and 120 mph (104 – 194 km/hr) at an altitude of 8,000 to 10,000 feet (2,500 – 3,000 m) it took pilots Rattan & Yeager 216 hours, 3 minutes and 44 seconds to travel 25,012 miles (40,252 km). FAST FACTS ABOUT AIR TRAVEL • Number of people who traveled by air worldwide in 2012 Over 3 billion • Number of passengers who died in crashes in 2012 414

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Number of people killed or injured by bathtubs each year About 182,000 Average number of times an airliner is hit by lightning each year 1 Number of plane crashes due to lightning strikes since 1963 0 Percent of Americans who had flown in 1978, the beginning of airline deregulation 17% Percent who have flown today 84% Percent of Americans who hold a passport 11 Number of bags per minute that move through O’Hare Airport’s computerized baggage handling system 480 Number of bags lost or mishandled in the U.S. every day 7,000 Percent of all lost bags which are returned to their owners within 24 hours 97 Total number of lost bags which are never returned to their owners annually 435,000 Number of the world’s 20 busiest airports which are located in the U.S. 6 Number of flights handled by air traffic controllers at O’Hare Airport (the world’s 3rd busiest airport) per hour at peak periods 210 Number of people who work at O’Hare Airport in Chicago, Illinois 35,000 Amount of dirt moved during the construction of Denver International Airport, in millions of

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cubic yards 110 Amount of dirt moved during the construction of the Panama Canal, in millions of cubic yards 330 • Miles of fiber optic cables running through Denver International Airport 5,300 • Highway miles from Miami to Seattle 3,362 • Total area of Denver International Airport, in square miles 53 • Total area of Manhattan Island, in square miles 22.4 • Number of miles of highways that could be built with the amount of asphalt that was used to build the runways and ramps at Denver International Airport 900 • Number of times airlines update fares in their computers daily 250,000 • Number of Americans who are members of a frequent flyer program 61 million • Percent of all frequent flyer miles which are earned on the ground 47 • Percent of all frequent flyer miles which are never redeemed 75 • Number of free tickets issued annually due to frequent flyer miles 12 million • Number of cubic feet of re-circulated air per minute given to economy-class passengers on some 737 flights 8 • Number of cubic feet of re-circulated air per minute given to first-class passengers on some 747 flights 60 • Amount of money saved per aircraft per year on fuel costs by re-circulating air instead of introducing fresh air $60,000 • Number of airsickness bags used by U.S. airlines each year 20 million • Number of collisions between birds and planes every year in the U.S. 1,400 • Percent of those collisions involving seagulls: 80 to 90 • Percent of students at the air traffic controller school at the Oklahoma City training center who do not get passing grades 40% • Percent of flights in America that either leave or arrive late 25 Famous Canadians DOUGLAS McCURDY • Douglas McCurdy, one of Canada’s premier aviators, was born in Nova Scotia in 1886, and graduated from the University of Toronto in 1906 with a degree in mechanical engineering.

Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

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It didn’t take long for his career to ‘take off.’ In 1907, he joined Alexander Graham Bell’s Aerial Experiment Association. In 1908, he helped Glenn Curtiss set up the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company. In 1909, he became the first person in the British empire to fly an aircraft, becoming only the 9th person

only 15 minutes to reach the downed aircraft. McCurdy joked that his feet never even got wet, but the plane was a complete loss. Still, he had managed to set two records: it was the longest flight ever, and it was also the first flight ever taken that left the sight of land. • McCurdy had taken the precaution of shipping a second plane to Havana, and without even changing his clothes, he treated onlookers to a flying exhibition. City officials pledged to give McCurdy the prize money even though he hadn’t completed the original flight. At a gala ceremony in his honor, he was handed a fancy envelope. However, when he opened the envelope later, he found it empty. After making discreet inquiries as to how he could get his prize money, he was advised that it would be a touchy and difficult matter. He dropped the issue. • Douglas McCurdy went on to achieve much more. In 1915, he established the first aviation school in Canada, and was the first manager of Canada’s first airport. He was also instrumental in setting up an aircraft manufacturing company located in Toronto. In 1947, McCurdy was appointed lieutenant-governor of Nova Scotia, a post he continued until 1952. • Douglas McCurdy died in 1961, just a few years short of seeing man land on the moon. A LONG LEAP • Goyathlay (meaning ‘one who yawns’) was an Apache born in 1829. He married and had three kids. In 1851, Mexican soldiers attacked his encampment, killing many, including Goyathlay’s family. Bent on revenge, the survivors went after the Mexicans. • Goyathlay battled fearlessly and without mercy. The Catholic Mexicans appealed to St. Jerome for help. Afterwards, the remaining Mexicans remarked on the bravery of the Apache warrior. They didn’t know his name, so they gave him a nickname, after the Mexican word for St. Jerome. It stuck. • Goyathlay, now known by his new nickname, became a military leader of his tribe who led many successful skirmishes. In 1886, tired of constant pursuit, he surrendered. He became a celebrity in his old age, and died in 1909. • In 1940, a platoon of paratroopers was nervous about the military’s first mass parachute jump scheduled for the following day. To bolster their courage, they went to a theater to watch a new movie about Goyathlay. Paratrooper Aubrey Eberhardt told his buddies he was going to yell the Apache warrior’s nickname as he bailed out, for inspiration. His buddies decided they would, too. It caught on, and throughout the war, the name was shouted as a battle cry whenever anyone bailed out of a plane. • Today this war whoop can be heard whenever people jump from high places, such as into the local swimming hole. What was Goyathlay’s Mexican nickname? Geronimo. EMERGENCY BAIL-OUTS • Lt. I. M. Chisov of Russia bailed out of his damaged plane in 1942. With no parachute, he fell 21,980 feet (6.7 km) landing on a steep, snowy mountainside and sliding down. He broke his pelvis and injured his spine but survived and recovered. • In 1959, a military pilot name Col. Rankin bailed out of his single engine plane when the engines failed at 46,000 feet (14 km). A storm was in progress over the Carolina coast at the time, and he went right through the middle of it. It normally would take a man 13 minutes to fall that far, but Rankin got caught in the updrafts and came to earth 45 minutes later. Fortunately, his parachute opened at 10,000 feet (3 km) and he landed intact. A passing motorist took him to the hospital, where he was treated for frostbite and shock. • In 1955, Pilot George Smith ejected from his disabled plane. That wouldn’t have been so bad, except that he was in a F100A Super

in history to fly a plane. In 1910, he was the first Canadian to be issued a pilot’s license. And in 1911, he made the first flight from Florida to Cuba, one of his most remarkable achievements. From 1909 to 1911 McCurdy participated in flying exhibitions all over North America. Hoping to give the people of Cuba their first glimpse of mechanized flight, officials in Havana offered him $8,000 (worth $100,000 today) if he would be the first to fly from Key West to Havana. Although the 94-mile (151 km) journey doesn’t seem like a big deal today, McCurdy knew that if the flight succeeded, he would set a new world record for distance travelled over open water. • McCurdy paid a tinsmith to make pontoons to attach to the wings in case he was forced to land at sea. The U.S. navy offered to string six torpedo boats along the line of flight, each puffing out smoke to aid in navigation. They would also be able rescue him if he crashed. • On a calm day in January of 1911, McCurdy took off from Key West on a short test flight, intending to circle around and land again. But the crowds surged forward, clogging the landing strip. He had no choice but to head out to sea. • Reaching an altitude of 1,000 feet (304 m) and a speed of 48 mph (77 km/h), he could see the smoke from the funnels of the closest torpedo boat. He could hear their whistles blowing. After two hours, he spied the waterfront of Havana. Crowds thronged the beaches and a cheer went up. • Suddenly, just a few miles short of his goal, his engine quit as one cylinder after another gave out. He was forced to ditch in the ocean while Cuban citizens gasped in horror. Fortunately, the water was calm and the pontoons worked. The U.S.S. Pauling took

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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

• Add a cinnamon stick or softener sheet to your vacuum bag when you change it. As you clean, you will distribute the good smell throughout your home. To ripen a green tomato, wrap it in a sheet of newspaper or place it in a paper bag. It can then be left on the counter for several days to ripen. “Need to remove fruit or food coloring stains on your hands or your countertop? White vinegar will clean it off. It’s good for so many things.” — R.N. in Washington • “Instead of baking soda, I use three or four

FLIGHT— (continued):

Sabre jet fighter flying at supersonic speed at 35,000 feet (10.5 km). He became the first person to ever bail-out while traveling faster than the speed of sound. He was flying at 777 mph (1,250 km/hr). On the way down, his clothing was shredded, and his socks, helmet, and •

Why Train Dog to “Stay”? DEAR PAW’S CORNER: I understand why I should train a dog to “sit” or “come,” but why do training books always want you to teach them to “stay”? Doesn’t telling them to sit mean the dog should stay there? — Peter L., via email DEAR PETER: “Stay” is a reinforcing command used after you order a dog to either sit or lie down. I can see your point in that it seems unnecessary, but it’s really an important training command. During basic obedience training — which you should do with your dog daily — command the dog to “sit” in a firm voice. As soon as it follows the command and sits, use the command “stay.” Walk a few

charcoal briquettes in a bowl to control odor and moisture in my refrigerator. I place the briquettes in a shallow dish, then cover the top of the bowl with a small piece of cheesecloth and secure it with a fat rubber band. The best thing is that I can still use these briquettes on the grill. In the summer, hey get changed very regularly.” — M.L. n Virginia When it comes to fruits and vegetables, live a day is nice, but more matters. Try setting aside time after you come home from the grocery store for prepping fruits and vegetables. Pre-bag snack sizes of carrots, celery, strawberries, grapes, cantaloupe and apples. Pre-cut veggies for meals to make later in the week. Slice tomatoes and onions for sandwiches, and tear and separate lettuce for salads. They all make great, healthy treats, and it makes it easier to get your recommended servings! Have a stained coffee pot, but don’t want

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to use a harsh chemical cleanser to scrub that stain off? For gritty cleaning power, try using a tablespoon of milk and a tablespoon of salt. The salt gives you scrubbing power, and the milk’s acids help gently dissolve the stains. Send your tips to Now Here’s a Tip, c/o King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475 or e-mail JoAnn at heresatip@yahoo.com. © 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.

oxygen mask ripped off. He experienced a deceleration force of 40 G’s, meaning that he weighed an equivalent of 40 times his weight. He was unconscious when he landed in the ocean off the coast of California. By some miracle, there was a boat less than 100 yards away. He was in a coma for a week and spent the next six months in the hospital. During World War II, Captain J. H. Hedley was in a plane over Germany when the aircraft took a hit. Hedley was sucked out of the plane at 10,000 feet (3 km). The pilot took evasive action by plummeting in a vertical dive. When the plane pulled out of the dive, Hedley landed unhurt on the tail. He hung on till the plane was brought safely to a landing. During the invasion of Normandy in WWII, thousands of dummies were dropped from planes with parachutes along with the real paratroopers in order to mislead the Germans concerning the size of the fighting force.

steps back, wait a moment and command the dog to “come.” The power of this command is that it reinforces, particularly in early training stages, that the dog should stay right there. It doesn’t get a reward until the entire training sequence is done correctly: the dog sits, stays and then comes to the owner on command. This can take awhile for the dog to get right, so many owners break up the command training into three levels: first, teaching the dog to “sit” on command, rewarding that success with a pat or a tiny treat. Second, getting the dog to stay seated for more than a couple of seconds. This takes a great deal of patience and repetition. Again, a reward is given when the dog “stays” for a specific amount of time, like 3 seconds, and then 10 seconds and upward. The third stage is getting the dog to

stay while you’re walking away, gradually increasing the time and distance. As the dog’s training progresses, some owners stop using the “stay” command. But it’s a word that makes obedience training much easier for both owner and dog. Send your questions or comments to ask@ pawscorner.com. © 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.


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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland - For Advertising Call 307-473-8661

June 19th - 25th 2014


Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

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The best treatment for dandruff is to shampoo daily with a mild shampoo, i.e. baby shampoo. If that fails to work, use an antidandruff shampoo which lists 2.5% selenium sulfide or 2% zinc pyrithione in the formula. Also, remember to lather twice when you shampoo.

Careful Diet Vital for All Diabetics

DEAR DR. ROACH: Can you tell me why there is so much emphasis on small portions for diabetics or prediabetics? If you are watching carbs and are extremely underweight, is there still a reason to limit portion sizes? — C. ANSWER: The majority of people in North America with diabetes and prediabetes are overweight or obese, so limiting portion size makes sense for most people. However, for the minority of people with diabetes or prediabetes with normal or belownormal weight, portion size no longer has the importance it does in overweight people. A careful diet is important for everyone with diabetes. I would be cautious about the term “carbs,” since there are several different types of carbohydrates. Simple sugars and starches are the problem for diabetics, since they are rapidly converted to blood sugar. However, fruits, vegetables and whole grains are much more slowly turned into blood sugar, and along with high-quality protein and healthy fat, form the basis of a healthy diet for everybody — diabetics and non-diabetics alike. Being underweight with diabetes should raise the possibility of Type 1 diabetes, which is caused by autoimmune destruction of the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. Type 1 diabetics have no or almost no insulin, and absolutely need insulin by injection. Most people with Type 1 are children or adolescents, but it can happen in adults. Type 2 diabetes is caused by resistance to insulin. Most Type 2 diabetics have normal or even high levels of insulin. Insulin helps bring sugar from the blood into cells, but it also acts as a growth hormone. That’s one of the reasons Type 2 diabetics have trouble losing weight, since the high insulin levels promote fat deposition. Type 2 diabetes is more common in adults, but as North Americans continue to have increasing rates of obesity, Type 2 diabetes is showing up at younger and younger ages.

The situation is even more complex than I have made it here. There are people with elements of both Type 1 and 2 diabetes, and even rarer types. I believe Type 1 diabetics should be managed by an endocrinologist. Sophisticated blood tests, including insulin, C-peptide and insulin antibodies, occasionally are necessary to sort out what kind of diabetes is present. Diabetes is a serious, lifelong condition that can affect almost every part of the body. The booklet on diabetes explains the illness and its treatment in detail. To obtain a copy, write: Dr. Roach — No. 402W, Box 536475, Orlando, FL 328536475. Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Canada with the recipient’s printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery. *** DEAR DR. ROACH: Would someone who has a gluten intolerance be able to use psyllium products (Metamucil) without any problems? What I really want to know is, does psyllium have gluten, since it comes from wheat husks? Thank you for your answer. — S.S. ANSWER: Psyllium is gluten-free. It is made from the husks of the Plantago plant, not wheat. Psyllium is an excellent source of fiber, but should be started at a low dose and gradually increased to avoid bloating. *** Dr. Roach regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them

in the column whenever possible. Readers may email questions to ToYourGoodHealth@med.cornell.edu. To view and order health pamphlets, visit www.rbmamall. com, or write to P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. © 2014 North America Synd.,


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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

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• On June 30, 1953, the first production Cor1,400 people dead. This was the most deadly vette is built at the General Motors facility in of a series of incidents over 20 years affecting Flint, Mich. All 300 Corvettes were white conMuslims making the trip to Mecca. Hundreds vertibles with red interiors and black canvas die each year in this pilgrimage, in stonings, tops. The 1953 Corvette was outfitted with a stampedes or fires. six-cylinder engine and a twospeed automatic © 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. transmission. • On July 5, 1975, Arthur Ashe defeats the favored Jimmy Connors to become the first On July 4, 1776, in Philadelphia, the Continenblack man ever to win Wimbledon. While the tal Congress adopts the Declaration of Indeconfident Connors strutted around the tennis pendence, which proclaims the independence court, Ashe rested between sets. Finally, with of a new United States of America from Great the shocked crowd cheering him on, Ashe finBritain. The declaration came 442 days after ished Connors off in the fourth set, 6-4. the first shots of the American Revolution. • On July 3, 1985, the blockbuster “Back to On July 1, 1916, 25-year-old Army Lt. Dwight the Future,” starring Michael J. Fox, opens in D. Eisenhower marries 19-year-old Mamie theaters. The timetravel device in the Geneva Doud. He would go on to lead the Alfilm was a DeLorean DMC-12 sports lies to victory in Europe in World War II and car outfitted with a nuclear reactor later become the nation’s 34th president. The that would achieve the 1.21 gigawatts couple lived in 33 homes during Eisenhower’s of power necessary to travel through Senior Center Menu 37-year military career. time. On July 6, 1933, Major League Baseball’s first • On July 2, 1990, a stampede of reAll-Star Game takes place at Comiskey Park ligious pilgrims in a pedestrian Thursday June 19th in Chicago. The event was designed to bolster tunnel in Mecca leaves more than the sport during the darkest years of the Great Chicken Enchiladas, Spanish Rice, Depression. Fans who could still afford tickMixed Vegtables, Salad, Fruited Jell-O ets migrated from the more expensive box seats to the bleachers, which cost 50 cents.

Glenrock & Douglas

Friday June 20th Tuna Noodle Bake, Mixed Vegtables, Salad, Roll, Peaches Monday June 23rd Swiss Steak, Mashed Potatoes, Spinich, Salad, Roll, Pears

Tuesday June 21st Baked Ham, Sweet Potatoes, Green Beans, Salad, Roll, Peach Crisp Wednesday June 25th Chili, Crackers, Salad, Cinnamon Roll, Fruited Jello

Tbe june 19 25 web  
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