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Reader’s Nationwide! Issue #659

January 12th- 18th 2017

Published and distributed by Alimon Publishing, LLC - www.tidbitswyoming.com - tidbits@tidbitswyoming.com - 307-473-8661

“If the person you are talking to does not appear to be listening, be patient. It may simply be that he has a small piece of fluff in this ear.” - Winnie the Pooh

In This Issue: • Douglas, WY – Page 2 • Wheatland, WY- Page 5 • Glenrock, WY – Page 6 • Home and Garden – Page 8 • Classifieds – Page 11 • Dining & Spirits – Page 12 TIDBITS CELEBRATES ®

Winnie the Pooh by Kathy Wolfe

This week, in honor of Winnie the Pooh Day on January 18, Tidbits cuddles up with that silly old bear. • A.A. Milne, the author who created Winnie the Pooh, was born in London on January 18, 1882, hence the date of this commemoration. Alan Alexander Milne was already a successful playwright, author of mysteries, and writer for Punch magazine before Pooh was published, but the success of the stories about his son’s bear overshadowed his other work. • Milne had already served in the British Army in World War I before Pooh, and was a captain of the British Home Guard in World War II after the stories were published. • Milne’s son Christopher Robin was born in 1920, and became the model for the character in the Pooh books. For his first birthday, Christopher, who was mostly called Billy, received a stuffed bear from Harrod’s Department Store in London from his mother. The bear was given the name of Edward, and sometimes Big Bear, or Teddy Bear. A.A. Milne first wrote of Edward in a poem Continued on Page 2


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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

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while Eeyore had been a Christmas gift POOH— (continued): in 1921, the boy’s second Christmas. published in a 1924 edition of Punch, and Kanga and Roo were added to the later in a collection of children’s poetry called nursery in 1925. Milne invented two When We Were Very Young. more characters, Owl and Rabbit, to • During World War I, in faraway Winnipeg, round out the band of friends. Milne Manitoba, Canada, a young lieutenant created a setting of the Hundred Acre named Harry Colebourn boarded a train Wood, based on the Five Hundred along with other troops being transported Acre Wood located in East Sussex, to eastern Canada for their deployment to England’s Ashdown Forest. The Milne Europe. When the train stopped in Ontario, family lived at Cotchford Farm, on the Colebourn bought a small female black bear northern edge of the forest. cub from a hunter who had killed its mother. • Because Owl and Rabbit are “real” He paid $20 for little cub that he named animals that Milne created, the two Winnipeg, nicknaming her Winnie. The let it be known that they are smarter bear cub traveled to London with the troops and wiser. In the Pooh stories, Rabbit and became the mascot of the 2nd Canadian remarks to Owl, “You and I have brains. Infantry Brigade. The others have fluff.” • Milne chose an illustrator named E.H. Shepard for his books. Shepard drew inspiration from Ashdown Forest for his illustrations, and used his own son’s teddy bear “Growler” for the model of Winnie the Pooh. The first chapter of the first book was released on Christmas Eve, 1925, with the entire book published the following October. • Pooh lived in a tree “under the name of Sanders,” not because that was his name, but rather that of the previous resident. In Milne’s words, “…he had the name Sanders over the door in gold letters and Pooh lived under it.” Pooh’s first words each morning are “What’s for breakfast?” and his first activity is to look for “hunny to fill the rumblie in his tumblie.” • The gloomy, pessimistic gray donkey in the Pooh tales is named Eeyore, who lives in an area marked as “Eeyore’s Gloomy Place: Rather Boggy and Sad” on the map in the book. His name comes from the braying sound made by a donkey, “Hee-haw.” Eeyore always • When the Canadians shipped out for France, which went undetected for almost 50 years. seems to be losing his tail, and at one Winnie was loaned to the London Zoo. point, it was being used by Owl as a bell- • Christopher Milne resented the books his She quickly became the favorite animal of father wrote about him, saying, “It seemed to pull beside his door after he found it on the Christopher Milne, and the bear was so me ground. tame, that the boy was allowed to spend time • The favorite food of the springy-tailed, • almost that my father had got to where he was in Winnie’s cage feeding her. The stuffed by climbing upon my infant shoulders, that bouncing Tigger is extract of malt. Edward Bear’s name was soon changed to • Although Milne’s books suggest he had a he had filched from me my good name and Winnie. “Pooh” was the name of a swan the had left me with the empty fame of being his close, affectionate relationship with his only Milnes had encountered while on a holiday son.” Yet he followed in his father’s footsteps son, in fact, Christopher was brought up by vacation. And Winnie the Pooh was born. later in his life, penning five books of his own. a nanny, and was taken downstairs three • A.A. Milne began a series of stories about the times a day to visit his parents. He was sent to • Christopher Milne’s original toys are now “bear of very little brain,” centered around the displayed under glass in the Children’s Room boarding school for his education. only human character named Christopher • While serving in World War II, Christopher at the main New York City public library. It’s Robin for his own son. He incorporated his estimated that upwards of 750,000 people received injuries during an enemy son’s other toys, Piglet, Eeyore, Kanga, Roo, view them every year. bombardment and Tigger, into his stories. Piglet had been • of a bridge he had helped design and build. a gift to Christopher from their neighbors, Continued on Page 3 Flying shrapnel embedded in his brain,

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DOUGLAS, WYOMING

POOH— (continued): • When A.A. Milne passed away in 1956, his widow sold the rights to the Pooh characters to Stephen Slesinger, a producer of radio, television, and films, as well as a comic strip creator. Slesinger also owned the rights to Edgar Rice Burroughs’ Tarzan character, and was author Zane Grey’s agent. When Slesinger died, his widow sold all the rights to the Walt Disney Company. • In Milne’s 1926 and 1928 stories, all the animals of the Hundred Acre Wood are said to fear the Heffalump, although they never actually encounter one, except in dreams. The Heffalump is depicted in the Disney movies as a friendly lavender creature much like an elephant. • Samuel J. Gopher was added as a character by Walt Disney, and was not a part of the original A.A. Milne stories. In fact, Gopher is frequently heard to say, “I’m not in the book, you know.” His occupation is “bricklayer, builder, excavation, and demolition expert.” UNUSUAL PLANTS: ROSES “A rose by any other name would smell as sweet,” wrote William Shakespeare in his famous play “Romeo and Juliet.” Here are

I-25 Exit 135 & 140

the facts on genus Rosa, which have come to symbolize love. • The rose has been the official National Floral Emblem of the United States since 1986, when the legislation was signed into law by President Reagan. Georgia, Iowa, New York, and North Dakota have also chosen the rose as their official state flower. • There are about 100 species of roses, and thousands of cultivars developed by crossbreeding, all varying in color and shape. They are the oldest species of plants grown as decoration. • Roses were cultivated in ancient Rome and used to decorate buildings, furniture, and even as a carpet of petals. Roman emperor Nero showered his guests with fresh petals, and it’s believed that Egyptian queen Cleopatra covered the floor of her palace with roses before Mark Antony paid a visit. • We associate roses with thorns, but technically, they are not thorns at all, but rather prickles. • Thorns have deep roots in a plant’s stem, while prickles attach at the surface and can be easily removed. The rose bush’s flowers tend to have their parts in multiples of five. • The majority of roses we grow are not species, but rather hybrids consisting of several different species. A hybrid can occur naturally when

• •

two species are grown in close proximity and cross-pollination occurs, or can be developed artificially by botanists. The fruit of the rose is known as the rose hip, a berry-like formation which can contain about 160 seeds. These edible hips are rich in Vitamin C and can be made into jams and jellies, soup, syrup, and brewed for hot tea. Rose hip seed oil is also used in makeup and skin products. Famous rose breeders include the wife of Napoleon, Empress Josephine, who developed 250 different varieties in her gardens in the early 1800s. George Washington also created many hybrids for his garden at Mt. Vernon, and named one of the varieties after his mother, Mary Washington, a hybrid that is still grown today. Victorian flower dictionaries tell us that a rose’s color determines its meaning. The red Continued on Page 5


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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland - For Advertising Call 307-473-8661

• On Jan. 28, 1777, British general John Burgoyne proposes an ill-fated plan to isolate New England from the other colonies by invading from Canada with 8,000 British troops. The plan failed, and Burgoyne surrendered his remaining 6,000 British forces to the Patriots at Saratoga. • On Jan. 26, 1838, the first Prohibition law in U.S. history is passed in Tennessee, making it a misdemeanor to sell alcoholic beverages in taverns and stores. • On Jan. 23, 1849, Elizabeth Blackwell is granted a medical degree from Geneva College in New York (now known as Hobart College), becoming the first female in the U.S. to be officially recognized as a physician.

• On Jan. 27, 1888, the National Geographic Society is founded in Washington, D.C. The 33 men who originally met and formed the National Geographic Society were a diverse group of geographers, explorers, teachers, lawyers, cartographers, military officers and financiers. • On Jan. 24, 1908, the Boy Scouts movement begins in England with the publication of the first installment of Robert Baden-Powell’s “Scouting for Boys.” By the end of April, the serialization of Scouting for Boys was completed, and scores of impromptu Boy Scout troops had sprung up across Britain. • On Jan. 29, 1922, as a blizzard dumps more than 2 feet of snow on Washington, D.C., snow buildup on the flat roof of the Knickerbocker Theatre collapses the building, and tons of steel and concrete crash down on 300 theatergoers attending a Saturday night movie. One hundred and eight people were killed. • On Jan. 25, 1968, the Israeli submarine Dakar, carrying 69 sailors, disappears. The exact fate of the boat remains a mystery. The Dakar last radioed its position as it passed the island of Crete. It was never heard from again. (c) 2017 King Features Synd., Inc.

January 12th- 18th 2017


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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

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WHEATLAND, WYOMING

POOH— (continued): rose has always been a universal symbol of passionate love, while yellow roses indicate friendship, joy, and caring. Pink roses symbolize grace, while peach represent modesty, and orange suggest fascination. • The world’s tallest rose bush on record can be found in Morristown, New Jersey, a plant that exceeds 18 feet (5.5 m) in height. The largest rose bush can be found in Tombstone, Arizona, just blocks from the OK Corral. The original root of this Lady Bank’s thornless rose bush came over from Scotland in 1885. Its trunk diameter is nearly 6 feet (1.8 m), and the bush covers 9,000 square feet (836 sq. m), large enough to shelter a crowd of 150. The world’s oldest living rose can be found growing on the wall of Germany’s Cathedral of Hildesheim. The plant has been documented since 815 A.D. • Rated as the nation’s most popular flower, there are 900 acres of greenhouse area devoted to the production of fresh-cut roses in the U.S. About 60% of these are produced in California, with one acre valued at about one million dollars. About 100 million roses are grown to handle Valentine’s Day gifts each year.

I-25 Exit 78 & 80

Platte County Happenings For Detailed Information contact the Platte County Chamber of Commerce

Wheatland Chamber: 307-322-2322

Send an e-mail to: info@plattechamber.com Guernsey Senior Center Chili & Pie Supper Hartville Harvest Blessing Service & Dance Glendo Veterans Day Breakfast Guernsey Veterans Day Luncheon

Wheatland Veterans Day Dinner Town & Country Garden Club Bazaar Guernsey Holiday Bazaar Pheasant’s Forever Banquet Annual 4-H Carnival

of a great gourd and a neck, thereunto was BANJOS fastened strings.” A 1678 document from the This week, Tidbits is “strummin’ on the ole banjo,” Caribbean island of Martinique references as we look at the facts surrounding this slave gatherings where the “banza” is played. stringed instrument. Because of many different countries engaged • There are differing theories as to the origin in the slave trade, the instrument spread of the word “banjo.” It may have its roots in throughout the world. An English physician the Nigerian Yoruba language, from the term visiting Jamaica in 1687 referred to it as a “Bami jo,” translating “dance for me.” Others “strum strump.” claim it came from the Kimbundu language in Angola, from their word “mbanza,” or • There were 19 different spellings in the 1700s for the banjo, including “banjar,” “banjil,” from a West African term for a bamboo stick “bangoe,” “bangie,” and “banshaw.” that was used for the instrument’s neck. But • The banjo is classified as a chordophone, meaning it makes sound through vibrating there’s no argument as strings stretched between two points. The to the African origin of banjo’s round-shaped body has animal skin the banjo. or parchment stretched over it, and usually • The journals has four or five strings, a fretted fingerboard, of English explorer and an elongated neck. Richard Jobson during his 1620 voyage down • The first American commercial manufacturer of banjos was a drum maker and musical the Gambia River in instrument dealer from Baltimore named Africa mentioned an William Boucher, who began production instrument “made in the early 1840’s. Three of his banjos are housed in the Smithsonian Museum of American History. • In the 1860s, the banjo became popular as a “parlor” instrument for amateur music performances in the home, and was frequently used to accompany classical music. • The Sears & Roebuck catalog featured banjos for the first time during the 1890s. • A four-stringed banjo is a plectrum banjo, meaning it is played with a pick. It’s primarily used in jazz music, such as Dixieland. The five-string is used for bluegrass music, a genre related to country music. Bluegrass has its roots in Irish reels, and Scottish, Welsh, and English ballads. It was also influenced by the early music of the African-Americans. The early five-string banjos were referred to as “clawhammer” banjos, meaning that picks weren’t used, rather rhythmic right hand techniques were employed. • In 1945, a young 21-year-old named Earl Scruggs joined Bill Monroe’s Blue Grass Boys Band, and created the distinctive sound we now call bluegrass. Earl popularized a three-finger banjo-picking style now known as “Scruggs style. “ Earl, who had started playing at age four, was introduced in 1945 at the Grand Ole Opry as “the boy who made the banjo talk.” Three years later, Scruggs had his own group, The Foggy Mountain Boys. • Although we think of John Lennon as a gifted guitarist, the first instrument he learned to play was the banjo, taught to him by his mother. • Actor/comedian Steve Martin is an accomplished banjo player, having first learned to play around age 16. In his words, “The banjo is such a happy instrument – you can’t play a sad song on the banjo – it always comes out so cheerful.”


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GLENROCK, WYOMING

Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

January 12th- 18th 2017

I-25, Exit 160 & 165

Glenrock I-25, Exit 160 or 165

Big Enough to Enjoy- Small Enough to Care.”

• It was American linguist, philosopher, historian and social critic Noam Chomsky who made the following sage observation: “Students who acquire large debts putting themselves through school are unlikely to think about changing society. When you trap people in a system of debt, they can’t afford the time to think.” • If you were to choose a perfectly average snowflake and count up the number of water molecules that make it up, you’d find 180 billion of them. • Some researchers estimate that, if left to their own devices, a single breeding pair of cats could produce a whopping 354,294 offspring within five years. • It’s been reported that saloons once offered free lunches -- and made sure those lunches were heavily salted in order to encourage patrons to buy more beverages. • The word “dandelion” comes from the French phrase “dent de lion” -- supposedly so named because the jagged edges of the plant’s leaf resemble a lion’s teeth. • You’ve probably never heard of Roman emperor Elagabalus; he served for only four years -- from 218 to 222. Among his contemporaries he was known for his decadence and eccentricity. For example, he was notorious for hosting elaborate banquets, then putting the ancient Roman equivalent • If you had a billion dollars, you could spend of whoopee cushions on guests’ seats. $1,000 every day for nearly 3,000 years be• Those who study such things say that a fore you ran out of cash. woman’s sense of smell is enhanced just *** before and during ovulation. Thought for the Day: “As any honest magician

knows, true magic inheres in the ordinary, the commonplace, the everyday, the mystery of the obvious. Only petty minds and trivial souls yearn for supernatural events, incapable of perceiving that everything -- everything! -- within and around them is pure miracle.” -- Edward Abbey (c) 2017 King Features Synd., Inc.

• Want to make your own dryer softener sheets? Here’s an easy tip: Soak a washcloth in regular liquid softener. Wring out the excess softener and lay flat or hang to dry. This makes a reusable softener sheet. You can get 15 or so uses out of your cloth before it needs to be resoaked. • “When adding flour to your stand mixer, try adding the flour in one batch and covering the top with a towel. Hold in place loosely while the mixer incorporates the flour. You will not get a big dust cloud!” -- M.H. in Indiana • Speaking of stand-mixer tips, here’s a good one: Use the dough hook on your stand mixer to shred chicken or pork from the slow cooker. Simply remove fat, add meat in hunks to bowl and mix. It’s so easy!

• If you’ve changed your prescription for eyeglasses, why not donate your old pair? Look for collection boxes from your local Lion’s Club, or search the organization’s website, lionsclub.org. It collects all prescription eyewear and redistributes the glasses to those in need. • Make your own double boiler by resting an ovenproof glass bowl on top of a pot. Fill the pot 1/4 full with water and boil. Place the glass bowl on top of the boiling water and melt away! • “To loosen the seal on a pickle jar (or other sealed jar with a metal lid) simply tap the Send your tips to Now Here’s a edge of the lid with a butter- Tip, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, knife handle. Light taps are all FL 32803. you need. You also can gently (c) 2017 King Features Synd., Inc. tap the edge of the lid directly on the countertop.” -- P.P. in Mississippi


Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

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I-25, Exit 160 & 165

Glenrock I-25, Exit 160 or 165

January 12th- 18th 2017

GLENROCK, WYOMING

Big Enough to Enjoy- Small Enough to Care.�


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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

DONNA’S DAY: CREATIVE FAMILY FUN By Donna Erickson

Reading Bookworm Grows With Books Reading is an important part of growing, and wintertime is the perfect season to snuggle indoors with kids and a book. Picture books, chapter books, there are so many waiting for all ages at the public library. The best part is that checking them out with your child’s own library card is free! Keep turning pages and talk about exciting stories with an activity that’s an incentive to keep family life full of reading. Make this

growing bookworm ... or call it a reading caterpillar. It will motivate your young child to pick up a book, finish it and even give it some analytical thought. What a classic combination! Plus, it’s a creative bookish idea to sharpen minds and reading skills. Find a lightweight plastic ball with holes in

it, such as a whiffle ball. This will be the bookworm’s head. Decorate one half of it to create the face by gluing on felt and buttons; twist pipe cleaners through holes for whimsical features. Now, tie a 38-inch length of string to the opposite half through one of the holes in the ball. The bookworm’s body will grow along the string. After you and your child read a book, cover the outside of a bathroom tissue tube or paper-towel tube cut in half with colored paper or paint, then add pictures cut from magazines or make original drawings that represent the characters and theme of the book. Was it about dinosaurs? Take a crayon and draw a Tyrannosaurus rex. Was it about a little boy who couldn’t fall asleep? Draw a teddy bear or pillow and press on sticker stars in the night. Write the title and author by the decor. Slide the string through the first decorated tube so that the tube touches the ball. As books are read, add more tubes, one after the other, and watch the bookworm grow. You’ll be feeding it books. How healthy! Display on a shelf or table. Extra tip: If you have an avid reader in the family, suggest that for every two or three tubes he adds to the bookworm, he might read a book to his younger sister and help her create a new collection

January 12th- 18th 2017

of tubes of her own. This will be a reminder to him that growing the bookworm is a joint family effort. *** Donna Erickson’s award-winning series “Donna’s Day” is airing on public television nationwide. To find more of her creative family recipes and activities, visit www.donnasday. com and link to the NEW Donna’s Day Facebook fan page. Her latest book is “Donna Erickson’s Fabulous Funstuff for Families.” (c) 2017 Donna Erickson Distributed by King Features Synd.


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1. 2. 3. 4.

Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

5. What’s the Decalogue another name for? Ark of Covenant, Holy Grail, Ten Commandments, Last Supper 6. In Romans 5:6, Paul noted that Christ died for the ... ? Believers, Unbelievers, Righteous, Ungodly Is the book of Lamentations in the Old or New Testament ANSWERS: 1) Old; 2) Benjamin; or neither? From Romans 11, which tribe 3) Eden; 4) Earth’s dust; 5) Ten did Paul describe himself Commandments; 6) Ungodly as a member of? Benjamin, Rome, Barnabus, Tarsus Comments? More Trivia? Visit In which “Garden of ” did www.TriviaGuy.com Adam and Eve live? Everest, Eden, Heaven, Paradise From the Bible, what was (c) 2017 King Features Synd., Inc. Adam made of or from? Eve’s rib, Earth’s dust, Ray of light, Fig leaf

January 12th- 18th 2017


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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

about walking him in the snow this winter. Last year, his legs and paws were too sensitive for boots, so I used to put little socks on his paws and cover them with plastic sandwich bags tied with rubber bands. That worked well, but last winter I DEAR PAW’S CORNER: My dog “Hank” couldn’t get them on is 14 years old and has arthritis. I’m worried

January 12th- 18th 2017

a doggie vest around him to keep his core temperature up, if he’ll tolerate it. Immediately after his walk, after he sits or lies down in a warm spot, check his paws for cuts or cold spots, and keep an eye on him to make sure he’s warm enough and relatively comfortable.

Cold, Ice No Problem for Determined Dog

Send your questions or pet care tips to ask@pawscorner.com. him because his legs and paws, especially the front ones, hurt too much. I’ve tried to train him to go on training pads inside the house, and he does so occasionally. However, he is adamant about going outside in the morning! -- Lauren G., via e-mail DEAR LAUREN: I know you’ve heard me and others recommend booties for dogs going out in freezing, icy conditions, but in this case I think you should defer to your dog’s judgment. Hank really wants to go outside, and he really does not want to wear booties. I have a feeling that he is shifting his weight around and adjusting his paws when he’s in the unfamiliar little booties, and that shifting and extra movement can exacerbate his arthritis. If it is not super-cold outside (like, below zero), and Hank has clear stretches of sidewalk, he should be just fine with a short walk each morning to do his business. Try putting

(c) 2017 King Features Synd., Inc.


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CLASSIFIEDS

Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland - For Advertising Call 307-473-8661

January 12th- 18th 2017

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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

January 12th- 18th 2017

DINING & SPIRITS

2. In a covered jar, combine evaporated milk and flour. Shake well to blend. Pour milk mixture into meat mixture. Add Cheddar cheese, half & half, parsley flakes, green onion and ranch dressing. Mix well to combine. 3. Lower heat. Simmer 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in uncooked rice. 4. Remove from heat, cover and let sit for 5 minutes. Gently stir just before serving. Makes 6 (1 cup) servings.

Wild Rice and Beef Soup

* Each serving: 234 calories, 6g fat, 17g protein, 28g carb., 580mg sodium, 373mg calcium, 1g Nothing says January (National Soup Month) fiber; Diabetic Exchanges: 2 Starch/Carbs, 1 better than a steaming bowl of hot soup! 1/2 Meat; Carb Choices: 2. 8 ounces extra-lean ground sirloin beef or turkey breast 1 (14-ounce) can Swanson Lower Sodium Fat Free Chicken Broth 1 (10 3/4-ounce) can Campbell’s Healthy Request Cream of Mushroom Soup 1/2 cup shredded carrots 1 (12-fluid-ounce) can evaporated fatfree milk 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour 3/4 cup shredded reduced-fat Cheddar cheese 1/2 cup fat-free half & half 1 teaspoon dried parsley flakes 2 tablespoons chopped green onion 2 tablespoons fat-free ranch dressing 2/3 cup uncooked quick wild rice

(c) 2017 King Features Synd., Inc.

1. In a large saucepan sprayed with butter-flavored cooking spray, brown meat. Stir in chicken broth, mushroom soup and carrots.

What is Wild Rice? Contrary to what many people believe, wild rice is not rice at all but a grass. Much of it sold in the world today is not even wild but rather cultivated varieties that do not occur naturally. Wild rice is really an annual aquatic seed Zizania aquatica found mostly in the upper freshwater lakes of Canada.


Tidbits of Eastern WY - Dec 12, 2016