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OVER 4 MILLION

Reader’s Nationwide! Issue #653

December 1st - 7th 2016

Published and distributed by Alimon Publishing, LLC - www.tidbitswyoming.com - tidbits@tidbitswyoming.com - 307-473-8661

A joke from the 1960’s: Q: How do you kill a blue elephant? A: With a blue elephant gun.

In This Issue: • Glenrock, WY – Page 2 • Wheatland, WY – Page 4 • Dining & Spirits – Page 5 • Douglas Holiday Section – Page 6 • Classifieds – Page 9 • Home and Garden – Page 10 • TIDBITS REMEMBERS ®

THE 60’S

by Kathy Wolfe Most folks alive in the 1960s remember the “big” events – the assassination of John F. Kennedy, Neil Armstrong walking on the moon, and the Cuban missile crisis. But how about those lesser-known events that occurred during this fascinating decade? This week, Tidbits focuses on occasions you might not know about that happened during the ‘60s. • An item purchased in 1960 for $100 would be equivalent to about $800 today. So consider that the average income in 1960 was $5,315. This would translate into today’s dollars at $42,520. A new house averaged $12,700, equivalent to $101,600 these days. By 1969, the income was $8,540 and the house cost was $15,500. A new car could be purchased for $2,600, a price that increased to $3,270 by 1969. • Chemist Leo Sternbach was responsible for calming the anxieties of millions of Americans with his invention of Valium in 1961, just one of his 241 drug patents. Valium decreases the rate of brain activity, tranquilizing those areas of the brain responsible for sensing fear. Although it was the biggest-selling drug in the nation from 1969 to 1980, it was found to be addictive, with some users dependent on it in just two weeks. Many users were found to depend on Valium for life’s everyday troubles, as well as difficulty experiencing joy.

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GLENROCK, WYOMING

Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

December 1st - 7th 2016

I-25, Exit 160 & 165

Glenrock I-25, Exit 160 or 165

Big Enough to Enjoy- Small Enough to Care.”

• It was noted American playwright and essayist Arthur Miller who gave the following sage advice: “Don’t be seduced into thinking that that which does not make a profit is without value.” the first bullet, some do an “anti-rain” dance • In the early 20th century, celebrated -- the variations are endless. racehorse Man o’ War won 20 of his 21 • Getting married soon, but working with a career races. Interestingly, his one loss tight budget? If you’re considering cutbacks, (often attributed to a terrible start and the you might not want to put the honeymoon extra weight he was carrying) was to a horse on the chopping block. Researchers have named Upset. found that couples who go on a honeymoon • Statistically speaking, you probably live tend to have within 320 miles of the place you were born. • Have you ever experienced a social situation in which you have to introduce someone, but you can’t quite remember their name? In Scotland, there’s a word to describe the hesitation caused by that moment of panic: a tartle. • According to a poll conducted by outdoor recreation retailer Gander Mountain, almost half of all hunters have some kind of ritual they observe to increase their chances for a lucky hunt. Some hunters go the entire season without shaving, some start each hunt at a particular time, some kiss

THE 60’S— (continued): •

The first James Bond movie “Dr. No” was released in 1962, starring Sean Connery in the first of his seven appearances as the British secret agent. Bond creator Ian Fleming didn’t want Connery in the role, and after viewing the film declared it was, “Dreadful. Simply dreadful.” The film’s budget was $1,000,000, and when costs exceeded that by $100,000, the producers wanted to halt production, fearing they would never make their money back. “Dr. No” went on to gross $59.6 • million worldwide. In July of 1963, the U.S. Post Office introduced the Zone Improvement Plan, or ZIP for short, establishing five-digit codes to improve its mail sorting and delivery systems. The code’s first digit designated the geographical area of the U.S., with zero assigned to the Northeast, increasing up to nine in the far West. The next two digits narrowed the area down to sectional centers, with the final two digits specifying the post offices. This was also the time that the Post Office instituted twoletter state abbreviations. Some locations ended up with noteworthy ZIP codes, including General Electric’s world headquarters in Schenectady, • New York, with ZIP 12345. Newton Falls, Ohio, has 44444 and Young America, Minnesota’s mail is addressed to ZIP 55555. In 1964, the U.S.

Forest Service’s m a s c o t Smokey Bear was so popular and received so much fan mail that he was given his own ZIP code, 20252. What were folks watching on TV during the 1960s? One of the most popular series was the prime-time soap opera “Peyton Place,” which aired from 1964 to 1969. Other dramas included “The Fugitive,” “77 Sunset Strip,” “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.,” “Perry Mason,” and “Route 66.” On the lighter side, viewers enjoyed the 98 episodes of “Gilligan’s Island,” along with “Hogan’s Heroes,” and “The Monkees.” The space adventures of the starship Enterprise on • the NBC series “Star Trek” began on September 8, 1966 and continued for 79 episodes, with the last airing on June 3, 1969. Despite a fans’ letter-

longer-lasting marriages than those who skip the trip -- no matter how much or how little you spend. *** Thought for the Day: “If I seem to take part in politics, it is only because politics encircles us today like the coil of a snake from which one cannot get out, no matter how much one tries. I wish therefore to wrestle with the snake.” -Mahatma Gandhi (c) 2016 King Features Synd., Inc.

writing campaign, NBC cancelled the series, which achieved a much larger viewer audience afterward, when it entered syndication. Fans who became known as “Trekkies” organized conventions to honor the cult classic, which eventually became the most popular syndicated series. A popular 1994 movie tried to convince us that Forrest Gump was responsible for the invention

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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

Page 3

I-25, Exit 160 & 165

December 1st - 7th 2016

GLENROCK, WYOMING

Glenrock I-25, Exit 160 or 165

Big Enough to Enjoy- Small Enough to Care.�

4. Which hour mentioned in the Bible means the last possible moment that something can be done? First, Second, Eleventh, Twelfth 5. From Revelation, the lion of the tribe of Judah will open which book? Life, Everlasting torment, Death, Seven Seals 1. Is the book of Titus in the 6. What Philistine city was Old or New Testament or home to Goliath? Jericho, neither? Bethel, Gaza, Gath 2. What does Hebrews 9 say it will do when Christ appears ANSWERS: 1) New; 2) Save for a second time? Awake those who look for Him; 3) the Heavens, Start anew, Save British Museum; 4) Eleventh; those who look for Him, 5) Seven Seals; 6) Gath Cease all evil 3. Where is the Codex Now available by Wilson Sinaiticus, the oldest 2017 Bible Trivia box complete Bible in existence? Casey! calendar, Smithsonian, Hall of teasers. loaded with daily Jerusalem, British Museum, (c) 2016 King Features Synd., Inc. Vatican

PRICE REDUCED


Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

Page 4

December 1st - 7th 2016

WHEATLAND, WYOMING

I-25 Exit 78 & 80

12 Gifts

of Christmas

Platte County Happenings Guernsey Senior Center Chili & Pie Supper Hartville Harvest Blessing Service & Dance Glendo Veterans Day Breakfast Guernsey Veterans Day Luncheon Wheatland Veterans Day Dinner Town & Country Garden Club Bazaar Guernsey Holiday Bazaar Pheasant’s Forever Banquet Annual 4-H Carnival

For Detailed Information contact the Platte County Chamber of Commerce

Wheatland Chamber: 307-322-2322

Send an e-mail to: info@plattechamber.com

THE 60’S— (continued):

of the “smiley face” when he wiped his mudsplattered face on a yellow T-shirt. In reality, the image was the creation of American graphic artist Harvey Ross Ball. Ball was hired in 1963 to create an illustration to raise morale among the employees of an insurance company that had undergone several arduous mergers and acquisitions. He designed the image in less than 10 minutes, receiving $45 for his labors. The State Mutual Life Assurance Company issued posters, buttons, and signs embellished with the smiley face, trying to get their workers to smile more. On January 15, 1967, the Green Bay Packers teamed up against the Kansas City Chiefs at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum for the very first Super Bowl. Forty million viewers crowded around their television to watch the inaugural sporting event. (Contrast this with the nearly 115 million viewers who watched Super Bowl XLIX in 2015, the most-viewed television broadcast of any kind in American history.) Halftime entertainment was provided by the marching bands from the University of Arizona and Grambling State University, trumpeter Al Hirt, and 300 pigeons, along with a release of 10,000 balloons. The Packers defeated the Chiefs by a

score of 35 to 10. There have been health warnings on cigarette packages since 1965, when the U.S. Congress passed the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act, requiring “Caution: Cigarette Smoking May Be Hazardous to Your Health” to be printed on every package. The act also banned cigarette ads on broadcast media. Most likely, the name Douglas Engelbart is unfamiliar to you, yet you probably use his invention every single day. In 1967, Engelbart applied for a patent for an “X-Y position indicator for a display system,” which consisted of a wooden shell with two metal wheels. Its purpose was to link to a computer’s cursor, allowing the user to position the cursor on the screen. One of

the wheels was horizontal, the other vertical. So what was the invention? The computer mouse! Prior to Engelbart’s device, computer operators had to type codes and commands to make things happen. Engelbart never received any royalties for his invention. Musical artists have been pictured on the cover of the Rolling Stone since November 9, 1967, when the magazine first hit the newsstands. The inaugural issue featured John Lennon on the cover. Tina Turner graced the cover of the second issue. The magazine was founded in San Francisco by Jann Wenner, who is still the magazine’s publisher, along with a partner, music critic Ralph Gleason. Wenner borrowed $7,500 from his parents to establish the publication, and took the title from the 1950 blues song “Rollin’ Stone,” recorded by Muddy Waters, from the

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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

December 1st - 7th 2016

DINING & SPIRITS

well using a wire whisk. Blend in yogurt and Cool Whip Free. Add pecans and chocolate chips. Mix well to combine. 2. Evenly spoon mixture into 4 dessert dishes. Sprinkle graham cracker crumbs evenly over top of desserts. Refrigerate for at least 15 minutes. Serves 4. HINT: A self-seal sandwich bag works great for crushing graham crackers. * Each serving equals: 172 calories, 4g fat, 8g protein, 26g carb., 440mg sodium, 210mg calcium, 1g fiber; Diabetic Exchanges: 1 1/2 A holiday goodie! You needn’t feel deprived Starch/Carb., 1 Fat. this holiday season!

Triple Chocolate Desserts

1 (4-serving) package Jell-O sugar-free instant white chocolate pudding mix 2/3 cup Carnation nonfat dry milk powder 1 cup water 3/4 cup Dannon plain fat-free yogurt 1/2 cup Cool Whip Free 2 tablespoons chopped pecans 2 tablespoons mini chocolate chips 3 (2 1/2-inch) chocolate graham cracker squares, made into crumbs 1. In a large bowl, combine dry pudding mix, dry milk powder and water. Mix

(c) 2016 King Features Synd., Inc.


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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

DOULGAS, WYOMING

December 1st - 7th 2016

I-25 Exit 135 & 140

Douglas WY!!!!

Celebrating the Holidays Small Town Style

off its deadly stinger in a second, and swallow it. They have a unique immunity to the scorpion’s venom. • These animals have sharp claws that enable them to dig complex underground burrow systems, 6 to 8 feet (1.8 to 2.4 m) underground. A meerkat can dig through sand equal to its own weight in a matter of seconds. One burrow system might have as many as 70 different entrances and exits to keep them safe from predators, while providing a cool place out of the punishing heat of the desert sun. While digging, a membrane covers and protects the meerkat’s eyes, and the animal also has the ability to close its ears to keep the dirt out. • Meerkats have an elaborate “sentry”

THE 60’S— (continued): rock band The Rolling Stones, and from Bob Dylan’s hit “Like a Rolling Stone.” The first issue included stories about the Grateful Dead, David Crosby, The Who, Pink Floyd, and Donovan, and could be purchased for 25 cents. UNUSUAL ANIMALS: MEERKAT If you’ve ever seen the 1994 animated film The Lion King, you’ve seen a meerkat in the form of Timon, who sang “Hakuna matata,” the Swahili phrase that means “no worries.” This week, Tidbits has the real facts about this unusual creature, who really can’t sing at all! • Meerkats are members of the mongoose family with very long bodies and coats of gold, silver, orange, or brown. Unlike Timon, who walks on his hind legs, real meerkats can only stand on their hind legs, but walk on all fours. They use their tail for balancing when standing upright. • The omnivorous meerkats are small animals,

only measuring up less than a foot (30 cm) from head to rump. Their tail does add another 9.5 inches (24 cm) to their length. They weigh about the same as a squirrel, around 2 lbs. (820 grams). When a meerkat is standing on all four feet, its height is only 6 inches (15 cm). Meerkats are found in the deserts and grasslands of Africa, specifically in Angola, Namibia, Botswana, and Lesotho. Dark patches of fur around their eyes effectively reduce the glare of the desert sun, similar to the result achieved by baseball players who paint dark lines under their eyes. In the mornings, they enjoy basking in the sun or grooming themselves. The diet of a meerkat is quite varied, as they dine on lizards, birds, bugs, snakes, rodents, eggs, and fruit. Poisonous scorpions are a staple of the meerkat’s diet, and it can catch the scorpion, pull

procedure that protects the clan and their domain. All the adults have a turn at guard duty in an hour-long shift, watching for predators while the others forage for food throughout the day. When all is well, the sentry makes peeping sounds. If there is danger, the meerkat has six different alarm calls that indicate the level of urgency. There are more than 20 different calls with different meanings made by the meerkat, including lost calls, feeding calls, and a call to forage. . Although they might seem friendly, even sharing their burrows with the yellow mongoose and ground squirrels, these animals can be quite aggressive, vicious fighters, sometimes killing the young members of their clan in order to improve their position in the hierarchy. Thinking of a meerkat as a pet? In the United States, you need a special permit to keep one. They are aggressive toward anyone unfamiliar, are prone to bovine tuberculosis, and have been known to get rabies.

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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

DOULGAS, WYOMING

THE 60’S— (continued):

THE BERLIN WALL As Berliners slept on the night of August 12, 1961, soldiers and construction workers labored in East Berlin, tearing up streets that led into West Berlin, erecting concrete posts, and stringing barbed wire, creating a barrier between the two parts of the city. Phone wires between East and West were cut, severing communications out of East Berlin. • At the end of World War II, Germany had been divided between the Allied Powers and the Soviet Union. The Allied powers fostered democracy and a capitalist society in West Germany, with freedom to travel. The result was a rapid post-war economic recovery. The Soviet Union, however, viewing East Germany as a “spoil of war,” quickly moved factory equipment and valuable assets to their own country. East Germany was established as a communist society with few freedoms. • As East Germany’s living conditions became more and more oppressive and the economy deterioraed, by the late 1950s, many had packed up and moved to West Berlin. By 1961, 2.5 million people had fled to the west, depleting the east’s labor force and population.

December 1st - 7th 2016

I-25 Exit 135 & 140

On the morning of August 13, East Berliners found themselves trapped. The 60,000 laborers who lived in the East but worked in the West could not get to work. Family and friends could no longer cross the border to meet. East Berliners were no longer allowed to attend any type of artistic entertainment, such as the theater or concerts. The Wall extended through the center of Berlin, then wrapped around West Berlin, for over 100 miles, completely restricting travel between the two areas

• W ithin a very few days, the original concrete post and barbed-wire fence was replaced with a permanent edifice of concrete blocks, topped with barbed wire. In 1965, steel girders and a concrete wall separated the two halves of the country. • A five-year-long upgrade began in 1975, made up of 12-ft x 4-ft. (3.6 m x 1.2 m) concrete slabs, and a large, slippery pipe around the top to deter any climbing. On the other side a 300-ft. (91.4-m) “No Man’s Land” was guarded by soldiers with dogs, electric fencing, watchtowers with giant spotlights, and minefields. • Thousands attempted escape from East Berlin. Some brave individuals tried jumping from upper-story windows of apartment buildings bordering the Wall. As the Wall became taller and stronger, elaborate tunnel systems from East German basements were dug. One resourceful group saved scraps of cloth and constructed a hot air balloon that sailed into West Germany. East German

soldiers shot anyone who even came close to the Wall. An estimated 200 died in their escape attempts, while about 5,000 are believed to have crossed successfully. • In the late 1980s, political changes came about, as the Eastern Block’s authoritarian power began to weaken. In late 1989, several border checkpoints were opened to East Germans who wanted to escape to the West. The Wall was quickly flooded with people, with some wielding hammers and chisels at the barricade. • The official demolition of the Berlin Wall began on June 13, 1990, and was not completed until 1992. East and West Germany were reunified into a single German state in October of 1990.


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DOULGAS, WYOMING

Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

December 1st - 7th 2016

I-25 Exit 135 & 140


Page 9

CLASSIFIEDS

Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland - For Advertising Call 307-473-8661

December 1st - 7th 2016

SHOP LOCAL


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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

DONNA’S DAY: CREATIVE FAMILY FUN By Donna Erickson

Make Salt-Dough Holiday Ornaments What do wire out of the toolbox, salt in the cupboard and twigs from the yard have in common? They’re some of the makings of a family holiday craft you can enjoy this weekend. The holidays are busy, so discover how nice it is to pause and do something fun together. When you stir up a simple dough of flour, salt and water, creativity is endless as you shape eye-catching ornaments for your tree, or build a mini indoor snowman. This traditional salt-dough recipe, which is easy to mix and roll out or sculpt, is a keeper. Once the creations are slow baked in an oven, grab paints, glue and glitter from your craft drawer, buttons and beads from a jar, and get crafting. Here’s the basic stuff you need: 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1 cup salt 1 cup water Medium-size mixing bowl, rolling pin, cookie sheet Toothpick or straw Acrylic paints White household glue, optional Ribbon or wire Cookie cutters (see “Extra Idea”) Mix the flour, salt and water together in a medium-size bowl. Knead several times on a floured board or countertop. If the dough is too dry, just add a bit more water. It it’s too

sticky, add flour. Now you are ready to shape and bake the dough. Here are two ideas to get your started: MAKE HOLIDAY ORNAMENTS Roll out the dough with a rolling pin to 1/2-inch thickness. Dip cookie cutters in flour and cut out your favorite shapes. Poke a hole near the top with a toothpick or straw for hanging on a tree, garland or through ribbons on the top of presents. MAKE WHIMSICAL SCULPTURES Continued on Page 12

December 1st - 7th 2016


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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland

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Tidbits of Glenrock, Douglas and Wheatland - For Advertising Call 307-473-8661

December 1st - 7th 2016

DONNA’S DAY— (continued): Play with some of the clay in your hands and shape into a snowman, house, bird or reindeer. Bake the cutouts or small sculptures on a tray in an oven heated to 250 F for about 1 1/2 hours, or until dough is hard to the touch. Cool completely on a rack. Paint with acrylic paints and let dry. For extra shine, coat with white household glue. Thread ribbon or wire through ornaments, twist or tie. Extra Idea: Make your own cookie cutter shapes for small hands to grab onto by bending and shaping with pliers the open end of small tomato sauce cans. Shape into a symbol of the season, such as a star. *** Donna Erickson’s award-winning series “Donna’s Day” is airing on public television nationwide. To find more of her creative family recipes and activities, visit www.donnasday. com and link to the NEW Donna’s Day Facebook fan page. Her latest book is “Donna Erickson’s Fabulous Funstuff for Families.” (c) 2016 Donna Erickson Distributed by King Features Synd.

• When crumbs gather in the cracks of your keyboard, turn it upside down and give it a good shake to remove most. Then, use the sticky side of a Post-it note dragged between the keys to clean out the rest. • “Save large platters that come with holiday trays to use when bringing cookies or baked goods to other parties. That way you don’t have to bring home a platter, you can just leave it and pass it on.” -- E.G. in Kansas • “Schedule haircuts and nail appointments to coincide with holiday parties. Then you wonÕt have to worry about doing your hair. It will still look nice from your beautician appointment.” -A.I. in Indiana • “I find that the best conversation starter when

visiting a large group of family or friends is a box or basket of photos. It is inexpensive to print copies, and I have all my old photos scanned anyway. Bringing them in a basket rather than in an album works because we pass them around, and people can take photos home with them. Sometimes, a picture will inspire a story, and I might write it down on the back of the photo to remember it and tuck it away. ItÕs more than worth the $10$15 it costs to print pictures.” -- L.W. in Virginia • Try substituting cream cheese for sour cream in your mashed potatoes for a dreamy, creamy alternative. Whip in with a mixer and enjoy. • Write return addresses on the back of holiday cards before disposing of the envelope. They can be tucked away for next yearÕs holiday cards list. Send your tips to Now Here’s a Tip, 628 Virginia Drive, Orlando, FL 32803. (c) 2016 King Features Synd., Inc.


Tidbits of Eastern WY - Dec 1, 2016